CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 81 to 100 of 508

_id ba50
authors Achten, Henri and Jessurun, Joran
year 2002
title An Agent Framework for Recognition of Graphic Units in Drawings
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 246-253
summary Architects use graphic conventions in their drawings that have meaningful content to the design task. In previous work, such well-defined sets of graphic entities have been identified and defined. These sets are called graphic units. In this paper, we discuss how graphic unit recognition in drawings can take place using a multi-agent systems approach. This approach seems promising as singular agents may specialize in graphic unit-recognition, and multi-agent systems can address problems of ambiguity through negotiation mechanisms. We present an agent framework for this purpose, how it connects to the theory of graphic units, and how agents for recognizing graphic units are defined. The paper ends with a discussion of current findings and future work.
series eCAADe
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 730e
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1997
title Implementation of IT and CAD - what can Architect schools do?
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 83-92
summary In Sweden representatives from the Construction industry have put forward a research and development program called: "IT-Bygg 2002 -Implementation". It aims at making IT the vehicle for decreasing the building costs and at the same time getting better quality and efficiency out of the industry. A seminar was held with some of the most experienced researchers, developers and practitioners of CAD in construction in Sweden. The activities were recorded and annotated, analysed and put together afterwards; then presented to the participants to agree on. Co-operation is the key to get to the goals - IT and CAD are just the means to improve it. Co-operation in a phase of implementation is enough problematic without the technical difficulties in using computer programs created by the computer industry primarily for commercial reasons. The suggestion is that cooperation between software companies within Sweden will make a greater market to share than the sum of all individual efforts. In the short term, 2 - 5 years, implementation of CAD and IT will demand a large amount of educational efforts from all actors in the construction process. In the process of today the architect is looked upon as a natural coordinator of the design phase. In the integrated process the architect's methods and knowledge are central and must be spread to other categories of actors - what a challenge! At least in Sweden the number of researchers and educators in CAAD is easily counted. How do we make the most of it?
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ddssar0202
id ddssar0202
authors Akin, Ömer and Özkaya, Ipek
year 2002
title Models of Design Requirement
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Case studies show that significant proportions of design errors and failures are linked to poor requirement specification during both early stages of design and as changes occur. Computational requirements engineering as a front-end to design iterations is a promising area addressing theseproblems. In other design disciplines, such as in software engineering, requirement engineering has given significant product improvements. In this paper, we present a state-space representation of requirement models for architectural design. The purpose of requirement modeling in design is tocreate a process by which requirements can be converted into working design solutions through frontend validation. We suggest three models of requirement specification, co-evolutionary [CoM], multiple domain [MDM] and single domain [SDM] models, that can facilitate this effort. Taken together all three models provide a full set of logical permutations of requirement-solution “worlds” and “operations.” We compare each model against the others in terms of facilitating change management and computability.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddssup0201
id ddssup0201
authors Alexiou, K. and Zamenopoulos, T.
year 2002
title Artificial Design and Planning Support: Interactive Plan Generation andCoordination in Distributed Decision-Making
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In this paper we discuss some basic issues pertaining to artificial plan design as a paradigm for architectural design and urban planning support. We present a model for artificial design generation based on learning control methodologies. Plan design is seen as a search for "coordinated" solutions (changes) that satisfy distributed domain requirements and views expressed by human or artificial agents. Learning control is used as a method to search for solutions that direct partial descriptionsproduced by agents, to follow their dynamically defined targets -despite conflicting requirements. The model is simulated for land use and layout plan design, involving decisions for the location and physical configuration of a hypothetical housing and retail development.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 1636
authors Aly, Safwan and Krishnamurti, Ramesh
year 2002
title Can Doors and Windows Become Design Team Players?
source Gero JS and Brazier FMT (eds) (2002) Agents in Design 2002. Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, pp. 3-22
summary In an architectural design session, suppose design objects such as doors, windows and rooms can look after themselves, what kind of recommendations would a designer get? What is the nature of a design environment that facilitates such interactions? Where would a design object acquire the knowledge that allows it to interact intelligently? How would such localized recommendations be aggregated to support global design decisions made by the designer? This paper investigates these questions through the notion of objects as agents in design.
series other
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ga0230
id ga0230
authors Annunziato, Mauro and Pierucci, Piero
year 2002
title Human-Artificial Ecosystems: Searching for a Language
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The most recent advances of artificial life scientific research are opening up a new frontier: the creation of simulated life environments populated by autonomous agents. In these environments artificial beings can interact, reproduce and evolve [4, 6, 15], and can be seen as laboratories toexplore the emergence of social behaviors like competition, cooperation, relationships and communication [3, 5, 7] . It is still not possible to approach a reasonable simulation of the incredible complexity of human or animal societies, but these environments can be used as a scientific orartistic tools to explore some basic aspects of the evolution [1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16].
series other
email plancton@plancton.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id fce1
authors Anumba, C.J. and Ruikar, K.
year 2002
title Electronic commerce in construction-trends and prospects
source Automation in Construction 11 (3) (2002) pp. 265-275
summary There is growing interest in the conduct of business transactions by electronic means through the Internet and/or dedicated networks; this is often referred to as electronic commerce. This paper reviews developments in electronic commerce, with a particular focus on its applicability and uptake within the construction industry. Electronic commerce business models are reviewed and the enablers and barriers to their uptake in the construction sector presented. The paper concludes with future trends in electronic commerce and the need for construction organisations to make the necessary investments that will enable them to take advantage of these.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 1d66
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 2002
title Hybrid Design Environment
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 572-576
summary This paper discusses some preliminary ideas concerning new design environment or environment of designing. Main thesis of this paper is that process of creation and perception of architecture proceed between Real and Virtual. Architecture is created by analog and/or digital media. A the result we have the multitude and diversity of spaces and tools. Defining these terms is important for understanding a new process of design and a new space of designing. It gives us possibilities to create the new design environment, in which creation of architectural form may be considered as an integrated process connecting the analog, the digital, the real and the virtual. Architectural space, as we know it from physical environments, is supplemented by a virtual space. Physical, architectural and virtual spaces share very similar features in simulation. In virtual models, the boundary between the representation of physical sites and imaginary, virtual sites is vanishing rapidly, resulting in a new reality.
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 7798
authors Barrow, Larry
year 2002
title Elitism, IT and the Modern Architect Opportunity or Dilemma
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 97-109
summary Information Technology (IT) is impacting architecture dramatically in process and form. Often thecurrent transformation of architecture is difficult to analyze and frequently we see confusion and anxietyregarding uncertainties for the future of the architect as designer and project leader. The currentpotentiality for new exotic form (i.e. product) is mesmerizing; however, in the current context, lessobvious issues and pertinent questions are emerging for the profession. What is the mission of theprofession? What will keep us relevant in the mist of the new global society?In this paper, we will take an evolutionary perspective of technology in architecture and draw parallelsbetween the Renaissance, which is the genesis of the modern architect, and the contemporary state ofarchitecture. The modern architect was birthed during the Renaissance where we see the retraction ofthe architect from the building site and separation from direct involvement in the building process.Communications technology (i.e. representation in the form of free-hand drawings, mechanical 2Dorthographic drawings and 3D perspectives) enabled the decomposition of the master builder into threecomponents (i.e. artist-designer, practicing_architect, and builder). Thus, we see technology enable thedenigration and ultimate dissolution of the centuries old craftsman guilds and the master builder. Thetechnology evolution of “drawings” enabled monumental change in the process of architecture over thepast five hundred years. The fission of the master builder, enabled by “drawings”, resulted in disparatefactions which are the forerunners of the modern day litigious design-bid-build project delivery. We nowincreasingly see a return to the fusion of design and building where often the architect is not the projectmanager or leader. Thus, the question looms, will the 21st century architect lead or be led, and whatare the ramifications for the profession?The historical Master Builder is re-emerging as a dynamically networked team of design andconstruction knowledge specialists. Bi-lateral knowledge exchange, enhanced with emerging IT, isoccurring between owners, managers, architects, design specialists, engineers, builders and machines.Technology is disrupting architecture, resulting in increasing specialization and compressed timeframes, and may require reevaluation of the role of the architect as project-leader "integrativegeneralist"or "design-specialist".Conclusively, the concept of ‘cybernetic architecture’ is proposed as an IT reference framework. Failureto appropriately respond to societal evolution, driven by technology, could result in the loss ofprofessional status for the modern architect. Herein lies our dilemma, or opportunity, depending on therole choice of the modern architect.
series ACADIA
email lbarrow@msstate.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 6d22
authors Bermudez, J., Agutter, J., Syroid, N., Lilly, B., Sharir, Y., Lopez, T., Westenskow, D. and Foresti, S.
year 2002
title Interfacing Virtual & Physical Spaces through the Body: The cyberPRINT Project
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 395-400
summary The cyberPRINT is a fully immersive, interactive virtual environment that is being generated in rea-timebased on physiological data readings of a human body. In other words, the cyberPRINT is based oncreating interfaces between physical and digital spaces and between biology and informationtechnologies. The cyberPRINT is also an event, wherein a performer is connected to the cyberPRINTgenerator to create a self-sustaining feedback mechanism. Although using the body to electronicallydrive music and media events is not new, most of these works have paid little or no attention to thepotential of interactive 3D virtual environments. Nor have they been so technologically advanced,interdisciplinary intensive (involving architecture, choreography, modern dance, music, bioengineering,medicine and computer science), or architecturally focused as the cyberPRINT.This project covers a wide and fertile territory that goes from the very technical and design oriented tothe very theoretical and interdisciplinary. This paper is intended to (1) expand what has been alreadypublished about this project (Bermudez et al 2000a) and (2) establish potential areas for discussionbefore and after the performance
series ACADIA
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id acadia03_015
id acadia03_015
authors Bernhardt, Matthew and Blostein, Beth
year 2003
title APPROPRIATE LEVELS OF ACCESS: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY ON THE AVAILABILITY OF COMPUTERS IN STUDIO
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 119-127
summary One of the most significant technological challenges facing architecture schools today is how to provide an appropriate level of access to computing resources. As the computer has become a significant tool in the study and practice of architecture, students need to have access to that tool in order to further their studies. But in facing this question of access, what is “appropriate”? Is there such a thing as too much access? Is 1:1 access—a computer for every student—the minimum level of access that schools and students should accept? Or is there a point beyond which more resources just means more waste; computers sitting idle and unused, or students using the computer for unproductive ends? These questions were the subject of an experimental series of studios in the spring of 2002, wherein three studios were given varying numbers of computers for a term. The use of these computers was then tracked, and compared with previous terms. In tandem, the quality of work produced by these three studios was compared. While additional experiments are most likely needed to draw firm conclusions, the results of this experiment seem to support defining “an appropriate level of access” at less than 1:1.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email bernhardt.7@osu.edu
last changed 2004/12/09 16:42

_id ga0206
id ga0206
authors Biles, John A.
year 2002
title GenJam in Transition: from Genetic Jammer to Generative Jammer
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary GenJam, short for Genetic Jammer, is an evolutionary computation (EC) based software agent that models a jazz improviser. Recently GenJam has evolved away from its roots as an interactive genetic algorithm toward its current state as an autonomous generative system. GenJam has retained its chromosome-based representations and mappings, its intelligent selection, crossover and mutation operators, and its real-time interactive performance capabilities. However, it no longer needs any explicit representation of fitness, which arguably makes it no longer an EC system. This paper considers GenJam as a generative art system. Generative art produces “unique and non-repeatable events” that express a designer’s generating idea. The designer’s generating idea defines a species of events, represented in a genetic code. In music, these events could be individual notes, melodic phrases, even entire pieces. In GenJam the events are four-measure phrases, or “licks” in the jazz vernacular. The format for the genetic code, then, defines a species space from which unique individual events can be generated. Uniqueness is important in jazz because improvisation must be spontaneous and “new.” Hence, improvisation is tailor-made for the generative art paradigm, and in fact, one could argue that improvisation is, by definition, the purest example of generative art applied to music. In other words, generative music is improvisation, and GenJam is the Generative Jammer.
series other
email jab@it.rit.edu
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id acadia07_174
id acadia07_174
authors Bontemps, Arnaud; Potvin, André; Demers, Claude
year 2007
title The Dynamics of Physical Ambiences
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 174-181
summary This research proposes to support the reading of physical ambiences by the development of a representational technique which compiles, in a numerical interface, two types of data: sensory and filmic. These data are recorded through the use of a portable array equipped with sensors (Potvin 1997, 2002, 2004) as well as the acquisition of Video information of the moving environment. The compilation of information is carried out through a multi-media approach, by means of a program converting the environmental data into dynamic diagrams, as well as the creation of an interactive interface allowing a possible diffusion on the Web. This technique, named APMAP/Video, makes it possible to read out simultaneously spatial and environmental diversity. It is demonstrated through surveys taken at various seasons and time of the day at the new Caisse de dépôt et de placement headquarters in Montreal which is also the corpus for a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) research grant on Environmental Adaptability in Architecture (Potvin et al. 2003-2007). This case study shows that the technique can prove of great relevance for POEs (Post Occupancy Evaluation) as well as for assistance in a new design project.
series ACADIA
email arnaudbontemps@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id 63c3
authors Burdi, Luciana
year 2002
title Evaluating the Use of a Web-Based Collaborative Interactive Digital Model (CollABITA) in Supporting the Urban Design Approval Process1
source UMDS '02 Proceedings, Prague (Czech Republic) 2-4 October 2002, III.1-III.15
summary This research, after analyzing the Urban Development Approval Process in its functionalities and methodologies, is showing the key points at which the process might be supported by new computer technologies, and it establishes a web-based Collaborative Interactive Digital Model (CollABITA Model) that relates and facilitates the graphical representation of the urban design process with some elements of the methodological approach. The CollABITA Model will dramatically facilitate the idea of broadening public participation, and indirectly by this, also collaboration. This new web-based support tool, is focusing on how new Informative Computer Technologies can be used in order to have a more co-operative design process. By utilizing the enormous potential of Internet for informing the process, and software for visualizing its products, the Model will provide an effective support, which will be able to deliver information in various forms to the Designers, Developers, Decision Makers, Agencies and the final user (the Citizens). The Model is concerned with the big challenge of supporting the urban design approval process itself, by exploring different kind of visualizations and communication tools, rather than producing a guide for carrying out the design. CollABITA Model is based on the existent framework structure of the extranet tool already available. Then, more then those, CollABITA Model will try to solve, by adding technical and collaborative functionalities, those issues that are characteristics in the urban design process and that are not jet solved by using one of the software .
keywords 3D City modeling
series other
email lburdi@gsd.harvard.edu
more www.udms.net
last changed 2003/03/29 09:43

_id 046e
authors Burry, Mark
year 2002
title Rapid prototyping, CAD/CAM and human factors
source Automation in Construction 11 (3) (2002) pp. 313-333
summary CAD/CAM techniques for rapid prototyping, profile cutting, and form sculpting/routing/moulding are well-advanced for the vehicle and manufacturing industries. Although their migration to the building sector is readily achievable as a substitution for much of traditional construction, there are factors that work against this. Apart from the singular `one-off' nature of most architectural projects that limits ready exploitation of techniques derived in the main for mass-manufacture, there remains the problem of apprenticeship, and how to maintain a healthy lineage of skills for work otherwise less readily taken-up using automated manufacturing procedures. Continuing construction for Gaudí's Sagrada Família Church in Barcelona has provided a fertile test-bed for integrating rapid prototyping and CAD/CAM production where appropriate. Nevertheless, human factors such as maintaining the status quo with regard to apprenticeship and maintaining the skill lineage have provided some healthy insights into both the risks as well as the opportunities for greater involvement with CAD/CAM, and in particular, rapid prototyping in the building construction sector. This paper reports on and discusses the findings of case studies from the Sagrada Família Church project.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 82ac
authors Caldas, Luisa Gama and Norford, Leslie K.
year 2002
title A design optimization tool based on a genetic algorithm
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 173-184
summary Much interest has been recently devoted to generative processes in design. Advances in computational tools for design applications, coupled with techniques from the field of artificial intelligence, have lead to new possibilities in the way computers can inform and actively interact with the design process. In this paper, we use the concepts of generative and goal-oriented design to propose a computer tool that can help the designer to generate and evaluate certain aspects of a solution towards an optimized behavior of the final configuration. This work focuses mostly on those aspects related to the environmental performance of buildings. Genetic Algorithms (GAs) are applied as a generative and search procedure to look for optimized design solutions in terms of thermal and lighting performance in a building. The GA is first used to generate possible design solutions, which are then evaluated in terms of lighting and thermal behavior using a detailed thermal analysis program (DOE2.1E). The results from the simulations are subsequently used to further guide the GA search towards finding low-energy solutions to the problem under study. Solutions can be visualized using an AutoLisp routine. The specific problem addressed in this study is the placing and sizing of windows in an office building. The same method is applicable to a wide range of design problems like the choice of construction materials, design of shading elements, or sizing of lighting and mechanical systems for buildings.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ad19
id ad19
authors Calderon, C., and Noble, R
year 2005
title BEYOND MODELLING: AVANT-GARDE COMPUTER TECHNIQUES IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS.
source I Jornadas de Investigacion en Construccion, Madrid, 2-4 June, 2005.
summary If the result of computer innovations can be interpreted as an emerging “difference” in the quality of constructed space, then in order to truly understand what future applications may be regarding architecture at present, we should look at what advanced functions are available in the process of designing forms and space (DeLuca and Nardini, 2002). Recently the so called parametric approach, a technique for describing a large class of designs with a small description in programming code, has become a focus of attention in architectural computing. In this paper, we reflect on the current use of parametric tools using real case studies as well as our own proof of concept parametric programmes and report on how the avant-garde computer techniques may help to increase the quality of residential building.
keywords Building Quality, Parametric Design
series other
type normal paper
email carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/12/02 10:42

_id 7a20
id 7a20
authors Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title SHARED SPACE’ AND ‘PUBLIC SPACE’ DIALECTICS IN COLLABORATIVE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN.
source Proceedings of Collaborative Decision-Support Systems Focus Symposium, 30th July, 2002; under the auspices of InterSymp-2002, 14° International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics, 2002, Baden-Baden, pg. 27-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2005/03/30 14:25

_id 6279
id 6279
authors Carrara, G.; Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title Private Space' and ‘Shared Space’ Dialectics in Collaborative Architectural Design
source InterSymp 2002 - 14th International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics (July 29 - August 3, 2002), pp 28-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2012/12/04 06:53

_id 0ee9
authors Chase, Scott C.
year 2002
title (Re)design of construction assemblies with function/behaviour/structure grammars
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 356-359
summary A formal framework for redesign based upon Function/Behaviour/Structure models and design grammars is described. A proposed application domain is for the design and redesign of construction assemblies. GDL object technology is proposed as a candidate tool for implementation.
series eCAADe
email s.c.chase@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3this is page 4show page 5show page 6show page 7show page 8show page 9... show page 25HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_730338 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002