CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 508

_id ddssar0201
id ddssar0201
authors Achten, H.H.
year 2002
title Requirements for Collaborative Design in Architecture
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary The concept of collaborative design has recently come under renewed attention in the field of computer aided architectural design support. Although collaborative design deals with the same aspects of cooperation by various participants in the design process as previously studiedin, for example, concurrent engineering and multi-disciplinary design, it nevertheless puts a different research emphasis. Collaborative design looks at how the process can be improved in such a way that collaboration –working together in a manner to enhance each participants contribution to the design– emerges from the process. In engineering design practice, thismeans a shift forward in the design process where engineers are asked earlier for their input in the design solution. For CAAD research, the phenomenon of collaborative design poses the question how design tools and environments can be made in such a way that collaboration will occur. In this paper, the aims is to describe the concept of collaborative design in architecture, and to give an outline of the perceived requirements in the organisation of design and Computer Aided Design Support to achieve collaborative design.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 060b
authors Af Klercker, J.
year 1997
title A National Strategy for CAAD and IT-Implementation in the Construction Industry the Construction Industry
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary The objective of this paper is to present a strategy for implementation of CAD and IT in the construction and building management#1 industry in Sweden. The interest is in how to make the best use of the limited resources in a small country or region, cooperating internationally and at the same time avoiding to be totally dominated by the great international actors in the market of information technology.

In Sweden representatives from the construction and building management industry have put forward a research and development program called: "IT-Bygg#2 2002 - Implementation". It aims at making IT the vehicle for decreasing the building costs and at the same time getting better quality and efficiency out of the industry.

The presented strategy is based on a seminar with some of the most experienced researchers, developers and practitioners of CAD in Sweden. The activities were recorded and annotated, analyzed and put together afterwards.

The proposal in brief is that object oriented distributed CAD is to be used in the long perspective. It will need to be based on international standards such as STEP and it will take at least another 5 years to get established.

Meanwhile something temporary has to be used. Pragmatically a "de facto standard" on formats has to be accepted and implemented. To support new users of IT all software in use in the country will be analyzed, described and published for a national platform for IT-communication within the construction industry.

Finally the question is discussed "How can architect schools then contribute to IT being implemented within the housing sector at a regional or national level?" Some ideas are presented: Creating the good example, better support for the customer, sharing the holistic concept of the project with all actors, taking part in an integrated education process and international collaboration like AVOCAAD and ECAADE.

 

keywords CAAD, IT, Implementation, Education, Collaboration
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/afklerck/afklerck.htm
last changed 2007/01/21 13:05

_id 12d9
authors Anumba, C.J., Ugwu, O.O., Newnham, L. and Thorpe, A.
year 2002
title Collaborative design of structures using intelligent agents
source Automation in Construction 11 (1) (2002) pp. 89-103
summary The construction industry has a long tradition of collaborative working between the members of a construction project team. At the design stage, this has traditionally been based on physical meetings between representatives of the principal design disciplines. To aid these meetings, the information and communications technologies that are currently available have been utilised. These have yielded some success but are hampered by the problems posed by the use of heterogeneous software tools and the lack of effective collaboration tools that are necessary to collapse the time and distance constraints, within which increasingly global design teams work. In particular, there are very few tools available to support distributed asynchronous collaboration. Distributed artificial intelligence, which is commonly implemented in the form of intelligent agents, offers considerable potential for the development of such tools. This paper examines some of the issues associated with the use of distributed artificial intelligence systems within the construction industry. It describes the potential for the use of agent technology in collaborative design and then goes on to present the key features of an agent-based system for the collaborative design of portal frame structures. An example is presented to demonstrate the working and benefits of the prototype system, which makes a significant contribution by allowing for peer to peer negotiation between the design agents.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 7f0a
authors Chen, K.-Z.,Feng, X.-A. and Ding, L.
year 2002
title Intelligent approaches for generating assembly drawings from 3-D computer models of mechanical products
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 34 (5) (2002) pp. 347-355
summary In order to reduce the time of mechanical product design and ensure the high quality of their assembly drawings, this paper develops an intelligent approach for generatingassembly drawings automatically from three-dimensional (3-D) computer assembly models of mechanical products by simulating the experienced human designer's thinkingmode with the aid of computer graphics and knowledge-based expert system. The key issues include the strategies and methods for selecting the necessary views in anassembly drawing, determining necessary sectional views in each view, eliminating the unreasonable projective overlap of the components in each view, and minimizing thenumbers of both the views in an assembly drawing and the sectional views in each view. Based on the approach, corresponding software prototype was developed. Finally, itis demonstrated, from an example of the fixture in a modularized drilling machine, that its assembly drawing was generated successfully using this intelligent softwareprototype.
keywords CAD, Intelligent CAD, Expert System, Artificial Intelligence, Assembly, Drawing
series journal paper
email kzchen@hkucc.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id 9a97
authors Chen, Zhuo F. and Brown, David C.
year 2002
title Explorations of a Two-Layer A-Design System - The Influence of New Agents on a Design System
source Gero JS and Brazier FMT (eds) (2002) Agents in Design 2002. Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, pp. 249-256
summary This paper presents the architecture of a two-layer A-design system. It then goes on to use that system in an example configuration design problem. Two-layer A-Design limits the bias of selecting the most commonly used components by having the ability to introduce new components.
series other
email dcb@cs.wpi.edu
last changed 2003/05/10 08:16

_id c840
authors Cheung, S.-O., Tong, T.K.-L. and Tam, C.-M.
year 2001
title Site pre-cast yard layout arrangement through genetic algorithms
source Automation in Construction 11 (1) (2002) pp. 35-46
summary The use of modular construction has gained wide acceptance in the housing sector. Standardized modular units are often pre-cast on site. The establishment of site pre-cast yard, in particular arranging the pre-cast facilities within the compound, presents real challenge to site management. This complex task is further aggregated with the involvement of several resources with different transport cost. A GA-model is developed for the search for a near optimal layout solution. The fitness function is to minimize the total transport cost for a pre-determined daily output. The use of the model is illustrated by an example. When compared with the best solution within the initial population, 18.45% reduction in cost for resources flow was achieved by the near optimal layout arrangement arrived at the 673rd trial. It is also suggested that the model can be extended to other layout problems such as warehouse and production line.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 154d
authors Colajanni, B., Pellitteri, G. and Concialdi, S.
year 2002
title Intelligent Structures for Collaborating with the Architect
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 360-364
summary The number of different designers with different competencies collaborating in a building project is today conspicuous. An undesired consequence is the possible rise of conflicts between decisions taken independently by more than one specialist on the same building object. The early detection of such conflicts is then one of the most important features in collaborative design. Moreover, of great interest would be the possibility not only of automatic detection but also of solution proposal of at least the most manageable of those conflicts. In this perspective smart models of building components could be very useful. This is possible giving the building elements, represented as objects, the specific intelligence. A simple example of this possibility is given in this paper. In a precedent work we proposed a way of managing elementary spatial conflicts between building components tending to occupy the same spaces. The automatic detection derived from the previous declaration of two levels of constraints (soft constraint and hard constraints) in such way that a violation of them could be immediately signaled to the actor wanting to take the decision triggering the conflict. In this paper the topic is the consequences of the rise of a spatial conflict (occupation of the same space) between a column of a spatial frame of columns and beams, and another building object of any sort subject to a soft or hard constraint. The procedure identifies the minimum displacement of the two objects, propagates the column displacement to the other structural elements connected to it and checks the feasibility of the new configuration of the structural schema both with regard to the possible rise of new conflicts and with the compliance to previous structural criteria.
series eCAADe
email pellitt@unipa.it
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id ddssup0206
id ddssup0206
authors Dickey, J.W. and Jones, Dennis B.
year 2002
title CyberQuest Prospector (CQP):A Guide for the Evolutionary Discovery Process
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary CyberQuest Prospector (CQP) is a tool to guide an individual or team through the evolutionary process of finding better approaches to a particular problem, project, program, plan, or design. This prospectingprocess can involve, for example, new definitions, different data, altered evaluation techniques and new ideas and actions on many other topics. CQP involves a five step process. At step zero all the requisite historical background knowledge is entered. This knowledge is divided into topical areas or statements. In step one the team updates the various knowledge statements in the system and then assigns a "maturity" to them. The team then adds any new statements (step two). Next, (step three) the team makes decisions on actions to be undertaken and also on the external factors likely to be "in play" in the upcoming time period. After that period (step four) the team records the results and rates the "success" achieved. CQP subsequently changes the associated knowledge statement confidences. In the last step the clock is advanced. The ultimate result is a set of definitions, data, relationships, experimental techniques, issues,implications, and even personality traits in which some degree of confidence has evolved. The CQP process is demonstrated here with an urban transportation planning example involving such diverse topics asplanning/analysis techniques, data collection methods, and procedures for working with advocacy coalition networks.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 349e
authors Durmisevic, Sanja
year 2002
title Perception Aspects in Underground Spaces using Intelligent Knowledge Modeling
source Delft University of Technology
summary The intensification, combination and transformation are main strategies for future spatial development of the Netherlands, which are stated in the Fifth Bill regarding Spatial Planning. These strategies indicate that in the future, space should be utilized in a more compact and more efficient way requiring, at the same time, re-evaluation of the existing built environment and finding ways to improve it. In this context, the concept of multiple space usage is accentuated, which would focus on intensive 4-dimensional spatial exploration. The underground space is acknowledged as an important part of multiple space usage. In the document 'Spatial Exploration 2000', the underground space is recognized by policy makers as an important new 'frontier' that could provide significant contribution to future spatial requirements.In a relatively short period, the underground space became an important research area. Although among specialists there is appreciation of what underground space could provide for densely populated urban areas, there are still reserved feelings by the public, which mostly relate to the poor quality of these spaces. Many realized underground projects, namely subways, resulted in poor user satisfaction. Today, there is still a significant knowledge gap related to perception of underground space. There is also a lack of detailed documentation on actual applications of the theories, followed by research results and applied techniques. This is the case in different areas of architectural design, but for underground spaces perhaps most evident due to their infancv role in general architectural practice. In order to create better designs, diverse aspects, which are very often of qualitative nature, should be considered in perspective with the final goal to improve quality and image of underground space. In the architectural design process, one has to establish certain relations among design information in advance, to make design backed by sound rationale. The main difficulty at this point is that such relationships may not be determined due to various reasons. One example may be the vagueness of the architectural design data due to linguistic qualities in them. Another, may be vaguely defined design qualities. In this work, the problem was not only the initial fuzziness of the information but also the desired relevancy determination among all pieces of information given. Presently, to determine the existence of such relevancy is more or less a matter of architectural subjective judgement rather than systematic, non-subjective decision-making based on an existing design. This implies that the invocation of certain tools dealing with fuzzy information is essential for enhanced design decisions. Efficient methods and tools to deal with qualitative, soft data are scarce, especially in the architectural domain. Traditionally well established methods, such as statistical analysis, have been used mainly for data analysis focused on similar types to the present research. These methods mainly fall into a category of pattern recognition. Statistical regression methods are the most common approaches towards this goal. One essential drawback of this method is the inability of dealing efficiently with non-linear data. With statistical analysis, the linear relationships are established by regression analysis where dealing with non-linearity is mostly evaded. Concerning the presence of multi-dimensional data sets, it is evident that the assumption of linear relationships among all pieces of information would be a gross approximation, which one has no basis to assume. A starting point in this research was that there maybe both linearity and non-linearity present in the data and therefore the appropriate methods should be used in order to deal with that non-linearity. Therefore, some other commensurate methods were adopted for knowledge modeling. In that respect, soft computing techniques proved to match the quality of the multi-dimensional data-set subject to analysis, which is deemed to be 'soft'. There is yet another reason why soft-computing techniques were applied, which is related to the automation of knowledge modeling. In this respect, traditional models such as Decision Support Systems and Expert Systems have drawbacks. One important drawback is that the development of these systems is a time-consuming process. The programming part, in which various deliberations are required to form a consistent if-then rule knowledge based system, is also a time-consuming activity. For these reasons, the methods and tools from other disciplines, which also deal with soft data, should be integrated into architectural design. With fuzzy logic, the imprecision of data can be dealt with in a similar way to how humans do it. Artificial neural networks are deemed to some extent to model the human brain, and simulate its functions in the form of parallel information processing. They are considered important components of Artificial Intelligence (Al). With neural networks, it is possible to learn from examples, or more precisely to learn from input-output data samples. The combination of the neural and fuzzy approach proved to be a powerful combination for dealing with qualitative data. The problem of automated knowledge modeling is efficiently solved by employment of machine learning techniques. Here, the expertise of prof. dr. Ozer Ciftcioglu in the field of soft computing was crucial for tool development. By combining knowledge from two different disciplines a unique tool could be developed that would enable intelligent modeling of soft data needed for support of the building design process. In this respect, this research is a starting point in that direction. It is multidisciplinary and on the cutting edge between the field of Architecture and the field of Artificial Intelligence. From the architectural viewpoint, the perception of space is considered through relationship between a human being and a built environment. Techniques from the field of Artificial Intelligence are employed to model that relationship. Such an efficient combination of two disciplines makes it possible to extend our knowledge boundaries in the field of architecture and improve design quality. With additional techniques, meta know/edge, or in other words "knowledge about knowledge", can be created. Such techniques involve sensitivity analysis, which determines the amount of dependency of the output of a model (comfort and public safety) on the information fed into the model (input). Another technique is functional relationship modeling between aspects, which is derivation of dependency of a design parameter as a function of user's perceptions. With this technique, it is possible to determine functional relationships between dependent and independent variables. This thesis is a contribution to better understanding of users' perception of underground space, through the prism of public safety and comfort, which was achieved by means of intelligent knowledge modeling. In this respect, this thesis demonstrated an application of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) as a partner in the building design process by employing advanced modeling techniques. The method explained throughout this work is very generic and is possible to apply to not only different areas of architectural design, but also to other domains that involve qualitative data.
keywords Underground Space; Perception; Soft Computing
series thesis:PhD
email s.durmisevic@wannadoo.nl
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ga0207
id ga0207
authors Fischer, T.
year 2002
title Computation-Universal Voxel Automata as Material for Generative Design Education
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper is a report on the educational application of a voxel automata system for massively parallel execution of computation-universal cellular units in the generative design field. The software, designed and co-developed by the author to enable developmental strategies in generative design - for example with respect to 3D design generation, semantic self-evaluation and self-replication - was applied in teaching at the School of Design at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University to achieve two goals: to teach programming as part of the School’s Interactive Systems Design stream and to teach generative concepts at a theoretical, yet hands-on and highly intensive level. An introduction to the software, its development and its functions as well as a discussion of the teaching/learning experience is given, highlighting design educational aspects and student design work. The paper concludes with an analysis of how student approaches to generative concepts have been affected by the tool and how ideas and feedback from students have supported the ongoing development of the voxel automata system and its documentation.
series other
email sdtom@polyu.edu.hk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ga0204
id ga0204
authors García-Salgado, Tomás
year 2002
title Modular Perspective as a Method for Generative Design
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Apparently there are many methods for perspective but if we categorize them there are just a few. Some criterions of classification relate perspective to the so-called 1-point, 2-point and 3-point methods, others —more formally— to projective geometry, descriptive geometry or vectorial algebra. Of course we cannot forget to mention the early treatises on perspective such as Alberti’s Della Pittura or Piero’s De Prospectiva Pingendi, which escapes any classification. Our aim on this article is not precisely to solve the classification problem rather we propose a new comprehensive method for perspective, capable of 3D representation without using vanishing points.The modular perspective method allows us to work in true three-dimensionality on the perspective plane (PPl). We will explain how to measure directly on the PPl the triad coordinates (x, y, p) of a given point into the visual space, and how to play with the symmetrical planes X and Y (SPl X/Y) in order to generate or recover data. Finally we will explain how to employ modular perspective in generative design formal-process through an example of application.
series other
email tgsalgado@perspectivegeometry.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id c839
authors Hwang, Jie-Eun
year 2002
title SpaceScope: Developing a Spatial Information Retrieval System - Focused on Apartment Unit Floor Plans -
source Yonsei University, Dept. of Housing & Interior Design
summary This research investigates the spatial information retrieval (IR) in architecture focused on constructing efficient metadata that is crucial for data retrieval. Generally speaking, metadata is ‘structured data about data’ to describe resources especially in a digital format. In this research, metadata is a sort of data object to be useful in searching spatial information. Metadata is also used to describe raw spatial data object as not only attribute data but also content structurally and semantic ally. There are two issues that motivate this research; 1) what is the spatial information – that materializes the intangible space as a data object, and 2) how we can search the information efficiently – the content-based information retrieval. Although knowledge of a building’s spatial content is most important in architecture, there has been no logical method to manage it.

From the viewpoint of content-based retrieval, the researcher analyzes spatial information of a floor plan, with a focus on the apartment unit floor plan common in Korea. Then the metadata items are extracted in a structured manner. To manage the items efficiently, the researcher develops a data model for spatial information according to the concept of the “Structured Floor Plan”. The main object of content to retrieve is a spatial network that consists of nodes of spaces and their linkages. There are two ways to organize the metadata: the traditional index files and the RDF (Resource Description Framework). While the index files are still efficient with computability, the RDF applies greater options to retrieve, such as fuzzy predicates, semantic predicates, and so on. To exploit the metadata, this research shows several possibilities of query operations that present a set of sample queries about L-DK(Living room – Dining room – Kitchen). Implementation of the prototype system is divided into three parts: 1) a modeling module using Vitruvius; 2) an indexing module using MS SQL Server? 2000 in conjunction XML; and 3) a browsing module using the SpaceScope browser.

The future works may consider XML-based databases and a knowledge based query language, such as RQL/XQL, working on such databases. The more specific domain knowledge is involved, the more practical systems would be. Even in architecture, there may be a diverse range of domain knowledge, such as design, building performance, facility management, energy management, post occupied evaluation, historical research, and so on. Also the issue of interface should be investigated in depth, so that it will be adequate to the needs of the architectural field.

keywords Content-based Information Retrieval; Metadata; RDF; XML; Spatial Information; Apartment Floor Plan; Semantics
series thesis:MSc
email curiozen@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2003/04/25 05:27

_id ddssar0217
id ddssar0217
authors Kacher, S., Bignon, J.C., Halin, G. and Duffing, G.
year 2002
title The Content-Based Image Retrieval as an Assistance Tool to the Architectural Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary The architectural design requires a research of ideas and a documentation to help the designer in its creation work. It is a domain where the use of pictures (drawing, photography,…) is essential, because the information transmitted by photographic images are often more easily to understand than the one transmitted by texts. The goal of this work is to show the help that can bring the research of pictures indexed by visuals criteria, as colour, texture and shape, in the architectural design domain. If weaccept the principle that " an image is better than 10000 words ", we can make the hypothesis that an image research indexed by visual criteria can bring a supplementary help to the designer when he tries to resolve design problems. We tested a research tool resting on image indexation with graphic attributes. Two types of corpora have been used. The first one contains images illustrating building products and the second one shows buildings or parts of buildings, which illustrate the wood architecture domain. The objective of this experiment is to evaluate the relevance of this type of image indexing according to identified users needs. We try to determine which type of visual criteria is the most appropriate to help the designer in the various phases of the design process.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssup0208
id ddssup0208
authors Kawakami, Mitsuhiko and Zhenjiang, Shen
year 2002
title Formulation of an Urban and Regional Planning System Basedon a Geographical Information System and its Application- A Case Study of the Ishikawa Prefecture Area of Japan -
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary An Urban and Regional Planning System based on a geographical information system was developed using four sub-systems consisting of a digital map system, a database system, an analysis and forecast system and a planning system. In this case ARCVIEW GIS software was used as a development tool. The digital map system is formulated by the planar orthogonal coordinate system. The data is converted from digital maps issued by the Geographical Survey Institute of Japan (GSI). The database system has layers of data sets, which consist of statistical data, attribute data of geographical points and characteristics of natural features and the built environment. Several sets of principal census data havebeen converted to mesh data. These kinds of data sets are also utilized to this system. LANDSAT TM data is converted into vector data and linked to the same coordinate system. The analysis and forecast system consists of statistical or mathematical analysis, forecasts and visual presentations of the results. The planning system consists of some planning models and reviewing techniques to evaluate alternatives. As an example, this paper examines the relationship between land use and the temperatureon the ground level in built-up areas.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id sigradi2006_e149b
id sigradi2006_e149b
authors Kendir, Elif
year 2006
title Prêt-à-Construire – An Educational Inquiry into Computer Aided Fabrication
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 162-165
summary This paper aims to show and discuss the relevance of developing necessary strategies for reintegrating the concept of fabrication into the architectural design process. The discussion will be partly based on the outcome of a graduate architectural design studio conducted in Spring semester 2002-2003. The graduate studio was part of a series of exploratory studies conducted on the nature of architectural design process transformed by information technologies. Preceded by studios investigating cognition and representation, this last studio focused on the concept of fabrication. The overarching aim of the studio series was to put CAD and CAM in context both within the actual architectural design process and within architectural education. The last of this series, which will be discussed within the frame of this paper, has specifically focused on CAM and the concept of fabrication in architecture. In accordance with the nature of a design studio, the research was more methodological than technical. The studio derived its main inspiration from the constructional templates used in dressmaking, which can be considered as an initial model for mass customization. In this context, the recladding of Le Corbusier’s Maison Domino was given as the main design problem, along with several methodological constraints. The main constraint was to develop the design idea through constructional drawings instead of representational ones. The students were asked to develop their volumetric ideas through digital 3D CAD models while working out structural solutions on a physical 1/50 model of Maison Domino. There was also a material constraint for the model, where only specified types of non-structural paper could be used. At this stage, origami provided the working model for adding structural strength to sheet materials. The final outcome included the explanation of different surface generation strategies and preliminary design proposals for their subcomponents. The paper will discuss both the utilized methodology and the final outcome along the lines of the issues raised during the studio sessions, some of which could be decisive in the putting into context of CAD – CAM in architectural design process. One such issue is mass customization, that is, the mass production of different specific elements with the help of CAM technologies. Another issue is “open source” design, indicating the possibility of a do-it-yourself architecture, where architecture is coded as information, and its code can be subject to change by different designers. The final key issue is the direct utilization of constructional drawings in the preliminary design phase as opposed to representational ones, which aimed at reminding the designer the final phase of fabrication right from the beginning. Finally, the paper will also point at the problems faced during the conduct of the studio and discuss those in the context of promoting CAM for architectural design and production in countries where there is no actual utilization of these technologies for these purposes yet.
keywords Education; Fabrication; CAM
series SIGRADI
email s3131573@student.rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id a20e
authors Lin, H.T. and Chiu, Mao-Lin
year 2002
title From Urban Landscape to Information Landscape: Digital Tainan as an Example
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 101-108
summary Urban landscape is an important visual form to reflect the characteristics of a city. This paper attempts to transform the urban landscape into information landscape to reveal the city characters, build a web-based system to navigate the 3D city model, and better understand the urban life by scene-based scenarios and role-play. The Digital Tainan project is presented for demonstration and discussion.
series CAADRIA
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2002/09/05 07:25

_id 9d2e
authors Liu, H., Tang, M. and Frazer, J. H.
year 2002
title A Knowledge Based Collaborative Design Environment
source Gero JS and Brazier FMT (eds) (2002) Agents in Design 2002. Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, pp. 233-246
summary In this paper, we propose an agent based collaborative design environment in which human designers and software agents interact with each other, exchange design information and keep track of state information to assist with collaborative design. First of all, it presents a hierarchical multi-agent system architecture for integrating design and engineering tools, software agents and human specialists in an open environment. The hierarchical multi-agent system architecture offers a promising framework with their novel approaches for dynamically creating and managing design tasks in widely distributed and ever-changing design environments. Secondly, it introduces a collaborative design process model and the dynamic management approach for collaborative design process. Then, the structure of a design agent, its static knowledge and dynamic knowledge are introduced respectively. The knowledge based design approach provides a foundation for supporting reusable design activities. Finally, the cooperative design process is illustrated by a bicycle design example.
series other
email sdhliu@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2003/05/10 08:16

_id ddssar0224
id ddssar0224
authors Mardjono, F., Trum, H.M.G.J. and Janssen, J.
year 2002
title Development of a Decision Support Tool for Bamboo Building Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary The design process of a bamboo building is sometimes very complex for building designers, since there is no accepted design methodology for it. This process may be caused by a lack of relevant information provided to the designer. Based on this issue, this paper proposes a decision support system for application in bamboo building design that might be helpful for the designer in his/her design process. For this purpose, a decision support tool for bamboo building design process is being developed. Thedevelopment of the tool uses approaches, i.e. a taxonomy of bamboo building to identify the design problems, IDEFÆ to model the decision support tool, and develops a dedicated tool for Bamboo building design process. This tool has been tested in an international bamboo-housing workshop, hence results, suggestions, and recommendations from the workshop will be analysed. With this tool, the bamboo-building designer can make a bamboo building design in a systematic way. This tool also helpsthe designer to be as best informed, explicit, correct, and complete as possible during the design process.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c7e9
authors Maver, T.W.
year 2002
title Predicting the Past, Remembering the Future
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 2-3
summary Charlas Magistrales 2There never has been such an exciting moment in time in the extraordinary 30 year history of our subject area, as NOW,when the philosophical theoretical and practical issues of virtuality are taking centre stage.The PastThere have, of course, been other defining moments during these exciting 30 years:• the first algorithms for generating building layouts (circa 1965).• the first use of Computer graphics for building appraisal (circa 1966).• the first integrated package for building performance appraisal (circa 1972).• the first computer generated perspective drawings (circa 1973).• the first robust drafting systems (circa 1975).• the first dynamic energy models (circa 1982).• the first photorealistic colour imaging (circa 1986).• the first animations (circa 1988)• the first multimedia systems (circa 1995), and• the first convincing demonstrations of virtual reality (circa 1996).Whereas the CAAD community has been hugely inventive in the development of ICT applications to building design, it hasbeen woefully remiss in its attempts to evaluate the contribution of those developments to the quality of the built environmentor to the efficiency of the design process. In the absence of any real evidence, one can only conjecture regarding the realbenefits which fall, it is suggested, under the following headings:• Verisimilitude: The extraordinary quality of still and animated images of the formal qualities of the interiors and exteriorsof individual buildings and of whole neighborhoods must surely give great comfort to practitioners and their clients thatwhat is intended, formally, is what will be delivered, i.e. WYSIWYG - what you see is what you get.• Sustainability: The power of «first-principle» models of the dynamic energetic behaviour of buildings in response tochanging diurnal and seasonal conditions has the potential to save millions of dollars and dramatically to reduce thedamaging environmental pollution created by badly designed and managed buildings.• Productivity: CAD is now a multi-billion dollar business which offers design decision support systems which operate,effectively, across continents, time-zones, professions and companies.• Communication: Multi-media technology - cheap to deliver but high in value - is changing the way in which we canexplain and understand the past and, envisage and anticipate the future; virtual past and virtual future!MacromyopiaThe late John Lansdown offered the view, in his wonderfully prophetic way, that ...”the future will be just like the past, onlymore so...”So what can we expect the extraordinary trajectory of our subject area to be?To have any chance of being accurate we have to have an understanding of the phenomenon of macromyopia: thephenomenon exhibitted by society of greatly exaggerating the immediate short-term impact of new technologies (particularlythe information technologies) but, more importantly, seriously underestimating their sustained long-term impacts - socially,economically and intellectually . Examples of flawed predictions regarding the the future application of information technologiesinclude:• The British Government in 1880 declined to support the idea of a national telephonic system, backed by the argumentthat there were sufficient small boys in the countryside to run with messages.• Alexander Bell was modest enough to say that: «I am not boasting or exaggerating but I believe, one day, there will bea telephone in every American city».• Tom Watson, in 1943 said: «I think there is a world market for about 5 computers».• In 1977, Ken Olssop of Digital said: «There is no reason for any individuals to have a computer in their home».The FutureJust as the ascent of woman/man-kind can be attributed to her/his capacity to discover amplifiers of the modest humancapability, so we shall discover how best to exploit our most important amplifier - that of the intellect. The more we know themore we can figure; the more we can figure the more we understand; the more we understand the more we can appraise;the more we can appraise the more we can decide; the more we can decide the more we can act; the more we can act themore we can shape; and the more we can shape, the better the chance that we can leave for future generations a trulysustainable built environment which is fit-for-purpose, cost-beneficial, environmentally friendly and culturally significactCentral to this aspiration will be our understanding of the relationship between real and virtual worlds and how to moveeffortlessly between them. We need to be able to design, from within the virtual world, environments which may be real ormay remain virtual or, perhaps, be part real and part virtual.What is certain is that the next 30 years will be every bit as exciting and challenging as the first 30 years.
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 6862
authors Ozel, Filiz and Kohler, Niklaus
year 2002
title Data Modeling Issues in Simulating the Dynamic Processes in Life Cycle Analysis of Buildings
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 187-195
summary Typically, in simulating the dynamic processes in buildings, data modeling efforts require the modelingof the building geometry, its components and the relationship between these components, as well asthe modeling of the process that is under study. For example, in simulating the life cycle of a building,one must simulate the flow of materials as well as the flow of information as part of the processmodeling, while a component model is needed to represent the building as an artifact. A third aspect ofthis modeling effort constitutes the simulation of human intervention, i.e. the decision process that mightaffect the nature of the building itself as well as the process that acts upon it. For example, the decisionto remodel a certain component clearly affects both the component itself as well as the process ofaging, when life cycle of buildings is simulated. This paper looks at the data modeling requirements ofthe simulation of building life cycle within the context of the three parameters mentioned above: datamodel for buildings; process models and decision models. Temporal issues in data modeling, such asversioning for components, keeping track of data that are related to change and remodeling, andbuildings as temporal-spatial entities for life cycle analysis purposes are also addressed.
series ACADIA
email ozel@asu.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

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