CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 509

_id 204eaea2001
id 204eaea2001
authors Niemann, T., Schmidt, A. and Reiss, S.
year 2002
title The Use of New Media Tools in Environmental Simulation
source Environmental Simulation - New Impulses in Planning Processes [Proceedings of the 5th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-922602-85-1]
summary Urban design model simulations serve to let us envision the future environment. These models are important tools in planning processes and serve to democratize improve the comprehension of decision processes. Those affected and (often) laypeople help in the formulation of opinions. Not lastly, model simulations facilitate the evaluation of the quality of the future urban design spaces and allow for corrections in the optimization of designs. Model simulations can be created by the help of endoscopic techniques already well known to medicine. Nowadays, virtual simulations can, on the other hand, be entirely created on a computer through the use of suitable programs. At the present time a comparative investigation into the performance capabilities of analog and digital technologies is still pending. In a two-group comparative study, static analog and digital simulations were compared by using categorical scales to answer questions on urban design layout and living space quality. The results demonstrated that analog and digital simulations lead to similar value judgments. However, layout and living space quality in the analog simulations were given somewhat higher rankings, on average. A conclusive statement about the performance capabilities of analog or digital simulations in urban design processes is still premature. Future studies should take this context into consideration. Aside from the performance capabilities of a simulation, other aspects are also to be considered, such as the resource requirements for practical urban planning processes. At this time the use of analog simulations is often recommended. This is because the use of analog simulations brings similar results using fewer resources than digital simulations. To the observer, analog simulations retain a more natural quality. Now as before, models are often constructed during the performance of urban design projects, reducing even further the resource demands of an analog model, which in the end is reflected in the costs.
series EAEA
email alexander.schmidt@uni-essen.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 3439
authors Paranandi, M. and Sarawgi, T.
year 2002
title Virtual Reality on Architecture: Enabling Possibilities
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 309-316
summary This paper examines the potential of Virtual Reality (VR) technologies for architectural applications. There has been a great deal of anticipation for its implications for architecture since Ivan Sutherland's first VR system in the 60's. The term VR was formalized and became popular in the main stream in the late 80's and became an industry by the late 90's. Although it has found good applications in Medicine, Flight Simulation, and Video Game Industry, its effect on architecture remains imperceptible. In the work that we review, we found that the success of VR in architecture has primarily been in the passive and exploratory applications. We also note that at the present time, the cost of VR systems is directly proportionate to the level of photorealism and immersion. We contend that photorealistic visualization and total immersion are not absolute prerequisites for making most design decisions. Hence, through this paper we bring to light the inherent promise of VR technology and the potential impact it could have with its current limitations, on the way we conventionally think and design our built environment pushing it beyond space and time constraints.
series CAADRIA
email paranam@muohio.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 730e
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1997
title Implementation of IT and CAD - what can Architect schools do?
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 83-92
summary In Sweden representatives from the Construction industry have put forward a research and development program called: "IT-Bygg 2002 -Implementation". It aims at making IT the vehicle for decreasing the building costs and at the same time getting better quality and efficiency out of the industry. A seminar was held with some of the most experienced researchers, developers and practitioners of CAD in construction in Sweden. The activities were recorded and annotated, analysed and put together afterwards; then presented to the participants to agree on. Co-operation is the key to get to the goals - IT and CAD are just the means to improve it. Co-operation in a phase of implementation is enough problematic without the technical difficulties in using computer programs created by the computer industry primarily for commercial reasons. The suggestion is that cooperation between software companies within Sweden will make a greater market to share than the sum of all individual efforts. In the short term, 2 - 5 years, implementation of CAD and IT will demand a large amount of educational efforts from all actors in the construction process. In the process of today the architect is looked upon as a natural coordinator of the design phase. In the integrated process the architect's methods and knowledge are central and must be spread to other categories of actors - what a challenge! At least in Sweden the number of researchers and educators in CAAD is easily counted. How do we make the most of it?
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 2d03
authors Head, J., Hoag, R. and Brooks, K.
year 2002
title An Evaluation of Urban Simulation Processes for the Elumens Vision Dome
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 55-63
summary This paper reports an evaluation of the potential use and value of three digital urban simulationstechniques presented on a hemispheric display system made by Elumens®. The utility of this system toengage students and decision-makers in a process of envisioning alternative futures for a communitycollege campus in a Midwestern U.S. city is discussed. Visualization of alternative environments is acritical part of planning and design. The ability of designers, planners and their students to use media toengage and communicate proposals is essential to effective participatory design processes.
series ACADIA
email jeffhead@ksu.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id caadria2006_613
id caadria2006_613
authors JAEHO RYU, NAOKI HASHIMOTO, MAKOTO SATO, MASASHI SOEDA, RYUZO OHNO
year 2006
title A GAME ENGINE BASED ARCHITECTURAL SIMULATOR ON MULTI-PROJECTOR DISPLAYS
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 613-615
summary To make whole one image on screens that is generated by many computers and synchronization among computers, there is a need for a network software environment for multi-projector display system. Although the development costs increase for parallel programming for multi-projector display system, there is a possibility that the program cannot be executed at an enough speed since the network bandwidth might become a bottleneck. There are some software environments for that kind of multi-projector display system like Chromium that is latest version of WireGL (Humphreys, 2001&2002). WireGL is a kind of Client-Server Model, which one rendering server sends the data of rendering to many computers. While it can use the application without modification of source, it requires heavy network traffics. The other type of operating software is VR Juggler (Cruz-Neira, 2002), and CAVE Library that is a kind of Master-Slave Model. In the Master-Slave Model, every computer has same application programs to render the image that only keep the synchronization of rendering and events. But, these programs require a specialized skill and knowledge to modify the source of program for the certain rendering PC-Cluster system.
series CAADRIA
email jaehoryu@hi.pi.titech.ac.jp, naoki@hi.pi.titech.ac.jp, msato@pi.titech.ac.jp, rohno@n.cc.titech.ac.jp, msoeda@n.cc.titech.ac.jp
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id b6f7
authors Morozumi, M., Sueshige, Y., Uchiyama, T. and Inoue, S.
year 2002
title Linked QTVR System for SimulatingCitizens’ Strolling Around Activities
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 217-227
summary This paper discusses a city model using the linked QTVR (cylinder-VR) technique to study relationshipsbetween people’s behavior while strolling around downtown shopping districts, and visual stimuli in eachpart of the district. At the beginning of the study, because a large city model was required, a majorobstacle was the necessity of taking a large number of photographic images of the area, especiallyimages with wide vertical view angles. The objectives of this paper are to: (a) discuss the major featuresof the simulation system and its uses for the study, (b) discuss a refined method of producing acylindrical image of QTVR allowing the operator to look up almost 56 degrees, and (c) evaluate theperformance of the developed system through experiment by 30 university students who know thedistrict well.
series ACADIA
email moro@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 1fda
authors Rashid, Hani and Couture, Lise Anne
year 2002
title Virtual Architecture – Real Space
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 005-8
summary We are in the very early stages of a digital revolution whose direction we will not be certain of for sometime, much in the same way that Enlightenment-era architects, theologians, and thinkers did not quite comprehend the profound changes taking place in their own time. Today’s digital technologies are having profound effects on many different aspects of our contemporary understanding from the human genome to the mapping of the cosmos. Digital manipulations that use virtual-reality technologies form a major part of this revolution. As architects we are responding in a number of ways, by conceiving of entirely new geometric principles, new methodologies, and entirely novel approaches to representation beyond perspectival geometry.
series CAADRIA
email info@asymptote.net
more http://www.asymptote.net
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id cf2011_p060
id cf2011_p060
authors Sheward, Hugo; Eastman Charles
year 2011
title Preliminary Concept Design (PCD) Tools for Laboratory Buildings, Automated Design Optimization and Assessment Embedded in Building Information Modeling (BIM) Tools.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 451-476.
summary The design of laboratory buildings entails the implementation of a variety of design constraints such as building codes; design guidelines and technical requirements. The application of these requires from designers the derivation of data not explicitly available at early stages of design, at the same time there is no precise methodology to control the consistency, and accuracy of their application. Many of these constraints deal with providing secure environmental conditions for the activities inside laboratories and their repercussions both for the building occupants and population in general, these constraints mandate a strict control over the building’s Mechanical Equipment (MEP), in particular the Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system. Due to the importance of these laboratory designers are expected to assess their designs not only according spatial relationships, but also design variables such as HVAC efficiency, air pressure hierarchies, operational costs, and the possible implications of their design decisions in the biological safety of the facility. At this point in time, there are no practical methods for making these assessments, without having constant interaction with HVAC specialists. The assessment of laboratory design variables, particularly those technical in nature, such as dimensioning of ducts or energy consumption are usually performed at late stages of design. They are performed by domain experts using data manually extracted from design information, with the addition of domain specific knowledge, the evaluation is done mostly through manual calculations or building simulations. In traditional practices most expert evaluations are performed once the architectural design have been completed, the turn around of the evaluation might take hours or days depending on the methods used by the engineer, therefore reducing the possibility for design alternatives evaluation. The results of these evaluations will give clues about sizing of the HVAC equipment, and might generate the need for design reformulations, causing higher development costs and time delays. Several efforts in the development of computational tools for automated design evaluation such as wheel chair accessibility (Han, Law, Latombe, Kunz, 2002) security and circulation (Eastman, 2009), and construction codes (ww.Corenet.gov.sg) have demonstrated the capabilities of rule or parameter based building assessment; several computer applications capable of supporting HVAC engineers in system designing for late concept or design development exist, but little has been done to assess the capabilities of computer applications to support laboratory design during architectural Preliminary Concept Design(PCD) (Trcka, Hensen, 2010). Developments in CAD technologies such as Building Information Modeling (BIM) have opened doors to formal explorations in generative design using rule based or parametric modeling [7]. BIM represents buildings as a collection of objects with their own geometry, attributes, and relations. BIM also allows for the definition of objects parametrically including their relation to other model objects. BIM has enabled the development of automated rule based building evaluation (Eastman, 2009). Most of contemporary BIM applications contemplate in their default user interfaces access to design constraints and object attribute manipulations. Some even allow for the application of rules over these. Such capabilities make BIM viable platforms for automation of design data derivation and for the implementation of generative based design assessment. In this paper we analyze the possibilities provided by contemporary BIM for implementing generative based design assessment in laboratory buildings. In this schema, domain specific knowledge is embedded in to the BIM system as to make explicit design metrics that can help designers and engineers to assess the performance of design alternatives. The implementation of generative design assessments during PCD can help designers and engineers to identify design issues early in the process, reducing the number of revisions and reconfigurations in later stages of design. And generally improving design performance.
keywords Heating ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Building Information Models (BIM), Generative Design Assessment
series CAAD Futures
email hshewardga3@gatech.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 11fc
authors Tang, S.K., Liu, Y.T., Fan, Y.C., Wu, Y.L., Lu, H.Y., Lim, C.K., Hung, L.Y. and Chen, Y.J.
year 2002
title How to Simulate and Realise a Disappeared City and City Life? - A VR Cave Simulation
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 301-308
summary Computer simulation is used well in historical architecture restoration and research in a small scale for a long time, and should be used in a larger scale to represent a city, especially a disappeared city. Therefore how to utilize computers to coordinate both architectural and cultural data of a city becomes an important issue. This study takes Chang-an City that existed 1400 years ago but disappeared now as example and tries to develop a computerized and visualized method to simulate and realize a disappeared city and it’s life. Finally, we represent simulations in a virtual reality cave (VR Cave) to make navigators evolving in and interacting with the virtual Chang-An City.
series CAADRIA
email tsk@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 156e
authors Tsou, J.-Y., Chow, B. and Lam, S.
year 2002
title Performance-Based Simulation for the Planning and Design of Hyper Dense Urban Habitation
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 249-256
summary The rapid development of the economy and urbanization create great pressure on population of Hong Kong, China and other developing countries. This not only brings great changes on the form and style of the urban sphere, but also, challenges to the natural environment and resources to support urban habitation. Regarding the process of urbanization, the development of the housing industry becomes the focus to resolve the need of materialization for urban living. For this reason, from time to time, technical and economical considerations are always prior to the significance of human settlement environment, humanity, and sustainable development. Considering the deficiency in urban human settlements environment, especially in responsiveness to the natural environment. Information technology (IT) undoubtedly can help to promote and assess the design and planning quality in both environmental and regional microenvironment aspects. A research project-Environmental Responsible Architecture and Urban Design (ERAU)-is established to support urban scale planning, information processing, and computer-aided performance evaluation on both micro and macro building design and planning efficiency.
series CAADRIA
email jinyeutsou@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 12e3
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E., Che Zulkhairi, A. and Karboulonis, P.
year 2002
title Interactive Storytelling and Its Role in the Design Process
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 151-158
summary Projects of ever increasing complexity and size have incited the need for new and robust design methodologies and tools in an effort to manage complexity, lower costs, ascertain quality and reduce risk. Technology convergence through the growing availability of networked computers, rapid progress in Computer Aided Design (CAD) and information management have encouraged the undertaking of even more complex designs that demand high degrees of interaction, collaboration and the efficient sharing and dissemination of information. It is suggested that interactive storytelling and interactive design (Rafi and Karboulonis, 2001) techniques that use non-linear information mapping systems can be deployed to assist users as they navigate information that is structured to address localized needs as they arise. The design process is a collaborative effort that encompasses diverse knowledge disciplines and demands the management and utilization of available resources to satisfy the needs of a single or set of goals. It is thought that building industry specialists should work close together in an organised manner to solve design problems as they emerge and find alternatives when designs fall short. The design process involves the processing of dynamic and complex information, that can be anything from the amount of soil required to level lands - to the needs of specific lightings systems in operation theatres. Other important factors that affect the design process are related to costs and deadlines. This paper will demonstrate some of our early findings in several experiments to establish nonlinear storytelling. It will conclude with a recommendation for a plausible design of such a system based on experimental work that is currently being conducted and is reaching its final stages. The paper will lay the foundations of a possible path to implementation based on the concept of multi-path animation that is appropriate for structuring the design process as used in the building industry.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ecaade03_587_34_asanowicz
id ecaade03_587_34_asanowicz
authors Asanowicz, Alexander
year 2003
title Architectural Composition in Digital Space
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 587-590
summary In this paper the possibilities of using the computers at course of architectural compositions are considered. As the start point of the new teaching method of architectural composition we used the course of tradition architectural composition, elaborated at our Faculty. The course of Digital Architectural Composition was finished in 2002. The main goal of using the new digital media for modelling architectural forms was checking the new possibilities of form creation. Traditionally, searching of forms at the conceptual design stage is performed by using sketches, drawings and physical models. Our new method showed that is possible to do the same thing using the computerbased 3D modelling, experiencing no physical limitations of the 'real' substance. At the same time, at the early design stages, when formal value is sought, computer modelling can be done almost intuitively. In ours work we try to find a creative way of using computer - transforming the tool into medium. The attention was paid on exploring the possibilities characteristic for computers and not available with traditional methods of modelling. Architect’s tradition tools are effectively replaced by a computer, which create a new way of doing things.
keywords Architectural composition, computer modelling, method of teaching
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/22 08:51

_id 7798
authors Barrow, Larry
year 2002
title Elitism, IT and the Modern Architect Opportunity or Dilemma
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 97-109
summary Information Technology (IT) is impacting architecture dramatically in process and form. Often thecurrent transformation of architecture is difficult to analyze and frequently we see confusion and anxietyregarding uncertainties for the future of the architect as designer and project leader. The currentpotentiality for new exotic form (i.e. product) is mesmerizing; however, in the current context, lessobvious issues and pertinent questions are emerging for the profession. What is the mission of theprofession? What will keep us relevant in the mist of the new global society?In this paper, we will take an evolutionary perspective of technology in architecture and draw parallelsbetween the Renaissance, which is the genesis of the modern architect, and the contemporary state ofarchitecture. The modern architect was birthed during the Renaissance where we see the retraction ofthe architect from the building site and separation from direct involvement in the building process.Communications technology (i.e. representation in the form of free-hand drawings, mechanical 2Dorthographic drawings and 3D perspectives) enabled the decomposition of the master builder into threecomponents (i.e. artist-designer, practicing_architect, and builder). Thus, we see technology enable thedenigration and ultimate dissolution of the centuries old craftsman guilds and the master builder. Thetechnology evolution of “drawings” enabled monumental change in the process of architecture over thepast five hundred years. The fission of the master builder, enabled by “drawings”, resulted in disparatefactions which are the forerunners of the modern day litigious design-bid-build project delivery. We nowincreasingly see a return to the fusion of design and building where often the architect is not the projectmanager or leader. Thus, the question looms, will the 21st century architect lead or be led, and whatare the ramifications for the profession?The historical Master Builder is re-emerging as a dynamically networked team of design andconstruction knowledge specialists. Bi-lateral knowledge exchange, enhanced with emerging IT, isoccurring between owners, managers, architects, design specialists, engineers, builders and machines.Technology is disrupting architecture, resulting in increasing specialization and compressed timeframes, and may require reevaluation of the role of the architect as project-leader "integrativegeneralist"or "design-specialist".Conclusively, the concept of ‘cybernetic architecture’ is proposed as an IT reference framework. Failureto appropriately respond to societal evolution, driven by technology, could result in the loss ofprofessional status for the modern architect. Herein lies our dilemma, or opportunity, depending on therole choice of the modern architect.
series ACADIA
email lbarrow@msstate.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 6d22
authors Bermudez, J., Agutter, J., Syroid, N., Lilly, B., Sharir, Y., Lopez, T., Westenskow, D. and Foresti, S.
year 2002
title Interfacing Virtual & Physical Spaces through the Body: The cyberPRINT Project
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 395-400
summary The cyberPRINT is a fully immersive, interactive virtual environment that is being generated in rea-timebased on physiological data readings of a human body. In other words, the cyberPRINT is based oncreating interfaces between physical and digital spaces and between biology and informationtechnologies. The cyberPRINT is also an event, wherein a performer is connected to the cyberPRINTgenerator to create a self-sustaining feedback mechanism. Although using the body to electronicallydrive music and media events is not new, most of these works have paid little or no attention to thepotential of interactive 3D virtual environments. Nor have they been so technologically advanced,interdisciplinary intensive (involving architecture, choreography, modern dance, music, bioengineering,medicine and computer science), or architecturally focused as the cyberPRINT.This project covers a wide and fertile territory that goes from the very technical and design oriented tothe very theoretical and interdisciplinary. This paper is intended to (1) expand what has been alreadypublished about this project (Bermudez et al 2000a) and (2) establish potential areas for discussionbefore and after the performance
series ACADIA
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 077a
authors Boucard, D., Huot, S., Colin, Ch., Hégron, G. and Siret, D.
year 2002
title An Image-based and Knowledge-based System for Efficient Architectural and Urban Modeling
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 229-238
summary In this paper, we present two user-centered systems aiming at making easier the modeling ofarchitectural and urban scenes by using two different but complementary approaches. The first oneMArINa, an image-based modeler, allows the user to reconstruct urban scenes from one or moregraphical documents. This method focuses more on reconstructing models and is more dedicated tothe production of 3D sketches. The second modeler, MArCo is a knowledge-based modelercontaining the know-from and know-how on classical architecture. It allows the user to modelclassical architectural scenes verifying automatically all the domain rules. Finally, we show howMArINa and MArCo can cooperate providing the user a tool combining efficiently their respectivecapabilities.
series ACADIA
email Didier.Boucard@emn.fr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 3d67
authors Breen, J., Nottrot, R. and Stellingwerff, M.
year 2002
title Relating to the ‘real’ Perceptions of Computer Aided and Physical Modelling
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 134-138
summary Designing - giving form to new objects or environments - is largely a question of anticipating the workings of spatial and material environments, which can become ‘reality’ only by being built. Until ‘realized’ a design is essentially a figment of the designer’s imagination, although his or her ideas may be laid down and conveyed to others via specialized design media. In this way impressions of the design may be shared with clients, colleagues or other ‘actors’ in the design process. Such products of the designer’s imaging process can be relatively abstract or begin to approach - future - reality. Form & Media research can be ‘revealing’, stimulating insights concerning preferences, working processes and the effects of products of the designer’s imagination. In the past ten years we have gained considerable practical experience with both virtual and tangible (scale) models. We have compared different techniques in conference workshops, within educational settings and in our Form & Media research laboratory. The research projects ranged from the development of practical techniques and working methods to protocol analyses of designing architects. This contribution draws comparisons between different computer aided modelling techniques, with an indication of their perspectives, making use of the experience gained from various experiments in an educational context, and will highlight the potentials for different combinations of digital and physical modelling techniques.
series eCAADe
email j.l.h.breen@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id caadria2010_042
id caadria2010_042
authors Celento, David
year 2010
title Open-source, parametric architecture to propagate hyper-dense, sustainable urban communities: parametric urban dwellings for the experience economy
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 443-452
summary Rapid developments in societal, technological, and natural systems suggest profound changes ahead if research in panarchical systems (Holling, 2001) is to be believed. Panarchy suggests that systems, both natural and man-made, rise to the point of vulnerability then fail due to disruptive forces in a process of ‘creative destruction.’ This sequence allows for radical, and often unpredictable, renewal. Pressing sustainability concerns, burgeoning urban growth, and emergent ‘green manufacturing’ laws, suggest that future urban dwellings are headed toward Gladwell’s ‘tipping point’ (2002). Hyper-dense, sustainable, urban communities that employ open-source standards, parametric software, and web-based configurators are the new frontier for venerable visions. Open-source standards will permit the design, manufacture, and sale of highly diverse, inter-operable components to create compact urban living environments that are technologically sophisticated, sustainable, and mobile. These mass-customised dwellings, akin to branded consumer goods, will address previous shortcomings for prefabricated, mobile dwellings by stimulating consumer desire in ways that extend the arguments of both Joseph Pine (1992) and Anna Klingman (2007). Arguments presented by authors Makimoto and Manners (1997) – which assert that the adoption of digital and mobile technologies will create large-scale societal shifts – will be extended with several solutions proposed.
keywords Mass customisation; urban dwellings; open source standards; parametric design; sustainability
series CAADRIA
email dcelento@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id 705f
authors Champion, Erik and Dave, Bharat
year 2002
title Where is this place?
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 85-95
summary ‘Place’ is arguably an essential component of most successful virtual environments, yet the concept ofwhat is ‘place’, and what sort of ‘placeness’ is required for digital environments, are seldom discussed.A reflexive argument such as here is a place because it was designed to be a place does not stimulatedesign guidelines for virtual places, and it certainly does not help us create and evaluate virtual placessuitable for audiences who vary in intention or in available technology. To articulate useful distinctionsbetween virtual places, this paper extends design guidelines proposed by Kalay and Marx, reshapesthem with the help of Relph’s definitions, into spatial visualisation and activity-based environments, andadds a further category, the hermeneutic. The paper also proposes a graduated matrix for selection ofplacemaking elements and for selecting a mode of representation appropriate to the design objective ofthe virtual environment, be it spatial, activity-based, or hermeneutic.
series ACADIA
email b.dave@unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 6440
authors Chang, Y.L., Lee, Y.Z. and Liu, Y.T.
year 2002
title Construction of Digital City in Physical City: Cyberspatial Cognition Approach to the Project of Hsin-Chu Digital City in Taiwan
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 109-116
summary The cyberspace upon physical space forms a new spatial structure to increase the influence on the urban fabric and the concept of space in architecture. Today, digital cities are being developed all over the world. By using a city metaphor, digital cities integrate urban information and create public spaces. How do digital cities directly connect to physical cities and become an imaginable city? Therefore, we argue that a new spatial analysis theory must be established for digital city, comparing with theories of disciplines, to find the explicitly spatial structures and relations in digital city upon physical city.
series CAADRIA
email jecho@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 25HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_661185 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002