CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 155

_id ga0233
id ga0233
authors Sheridan, J.
year 2002
title The Evolving Role of the Artist
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary For more than a decade the author has designed and used algorithmic systems to produce artworks that incorporate generative and evolutionary concepts, forms and processes. This work has demonstrated that algorithmic aesthetic processes and products can be effectively created and modulated by both human beings and non-human systems. However, this work has also raised important questions such as: - What role can the individual human artist play in a cultural economy based upon industrialized generative processes and non-human systems? - How can artists integrate standardized scientific languages and algorithmic processes into personal visions and expressive languages? - How can artists capture their personal creative processes and encapsulate these processes in industry standard systems and software; and should they do so? - How might the generative systems and products created by human and non-human artists function and evolve in the larger social context? To address these questions, in this paper the author uses examples taken from his past and present artwork to illustrate the opportunities and pitfalls presented by computerized generative aesthetic processes and tools. In addition, the author offers a set of conjectures intended to help clarify issues such as: the evolving role of the artist as a producer of knowledge and form, and the value and appropriate structure of personalized computer languages for artists.
series other
email jamy@arthink.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 7992
id 7992
authors von Buelow, Peter
year 2002
title USING EVOLUTIONARY ALGORITHMS TO AID DESIGNERS OF ARCHITECTURAL STRUCTURES
source Creative evolutionary systems, eds Bentley, Peter & Corne, David, Morgan Kaufmann, pp 315-336
summary This paper describes the application of an Intelligent Genetic Design Tool (IGDT) in the design of architectural, structural elements. As a computer design aid an IGDT is innovative in its intelligent interaction with the designer. By always submitting multiple solutions for review by the designer, it is less likely to cause design fixation than other optimization techniques, and allows the user greater range in exploring hard-to-code design criteria such as aesthetics. As an example, the design of a cantilever truss is briefly explored. Using the coded optimization criterion of weight, and the designer's non-coded criteria of visual aesthetics and performance, a series of possible designs are explored. The ability of an IGDT to intelligently respond to the designer's preferences in a way that promotes creative thinking on the part of the designer is demonstrated. A final truss design is selected based on the use of the tool. It is concluded that an IGDT offers a significantly different approach to computer aided structural design which has the potential to enhance the user's own creativity in determining a good solution.
keywords evolutionary form exploration genetic algorithm design
series book
type normal paper
email pvbuelow@umich.edu
last changed 2006/04/07 19:55

_id 9c41
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E., Chee W.K., Mai, N., Ken, T.-K. N. and Sharifah Nur, A.S.A. (Eds.)
year 2002
title CAADRIA 2002 [Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X / Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, 370 p.
summary Evolution of trends in the realm of computer aided architectural design (CAAD) has seen the convergence of technologies – complementing traditional tools with emerging sciences like Information Technology (IT) and multimedia applications. This appliqué of technologies has not just expanded the scope and enhanced the realm of CAAD research and practice, but is also breaking new frontiers. This creative nexus will be realised at the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research In Asia (CAADRIA 2002) to be held at the Faculty of Creative Multimedia, Multimedia University, Malaysia, between 18th-20th April, 2002. CAADRIA 2002’s theme, "Redefining Content", seeks to recognise and infuse these emerging components in the field of architecture and design with a holistic approach towards online, digital and interactive systems. The 41 papers compiled were selected through a blind review process conducted by an international review panel. To reflect the multi-disciplinary nature of this year's conference, the chapters are arranged topically to facilitate the in-depth study of key components. The component sessions include: // Web Design, Database and Networks // CAD, Modelling and Tools // Collaborative Design, Creative Design and Case Reasoning // Simulation and Prototyping // Virtual Environment and Knowledge Management // Design Education, Teaching and Learning /// We believe that this specialised approach will provide a deeper and more illuminating feel of the various components and their critical convergence in the field of architecture and design.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
more www.caadria.org
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id ddssar0204
id ddssar0204
authors Asanowicz, A.
year 2002
title Evolution of Media for Early Design Stages
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In this paper the evolution of media used at early design stages will be considered. In traditional methods of searching and presenting the design idea, the basic tool used was the graphic representation. Implementation of new digital techniques in 60s - 70s focused on the mathematical way ofrepresentation. These methods were “not architect friendly” (lack of graphic representation traditionally used by architects). As a result, the development of methods for digital support of form searching was terminated. The computer was used as a tool for drafting. Creative usage of computers for form searching through sketching on the display was extremely difficult. The computer could be described as an “incompatible pencil”. Only in recent years can we see new efforts in this area ofdesign methodology. Thanks to new technical possibilities we have a new chance for changing the process of designing. New kinds of software and hardware let us use the computer not as a pen, but as a medium. In this paper different new ways of form searching will be considered (from very simple method as the scansketches to very complicated ones, such as the generic algorithms). At the end, the influence of new media on the process of design will be presented.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id sigradi2003_094
id sigradi2003_094
authors Bessone, M., Mantovani, G. and Schanz, J.
year 2003
title Multimedia y diseño arquitectónico diferente (Multimedia and different architectural design)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary Hearing and touch may be incorporated into visual representation systems that historically covered creative process, now helped by multimedia. During 2002-2003 we developed an experimental design studio that challenged participants to design architecture from words (using their spelling, pronunciation, location, etc.) and through an inquiry based on the "concept of inwardness". Evoking a word from the association of images and texts as well as seizing its potential tactile and hearing dimensions completed what was a very interactive design process. Such process was utilized to generate images and ideas geared to design/make an "installation" to be displayed at art events.
keywords Architecture, Design, Word, Image, Sound
series SIGRADI
email mbessone@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id caadria2010_042
id caadria2010_042
authors Celento, David
year 2010
title Open-source, parametric architecture to propagate hyper-dense, sustainable urban communities: parametric urban dwellings for the experience economy
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 443-452
summary Rapid developments in societal, technological, and natural systems suggest profound changes ahead if research in panarchical systems (Holling, 2001) is to be believed. Panarchy suggests that systems, both natural and man-made, rise to the point of vulnerability then fail due to disruptive forces in a process of ‘creative destruction.’ This sequence allows for radical, and often unpredictable, renewal. Pressing sustainability concerns, burgeoning urban growth, and emergent ‘green manufacturing’ laws, suggest that future urban dwellings are headed toward Gladwell’s ‘tipping point’ (2002). Hyper-dense, sustainable, urban communities that employ open-source standards, parametric software, and web-based configurators are the new frontier for venerable visions. Open-source standards will permit the design, manufacture, and sale of highly diverse, inter-operable components to create compact urban living environments that are technologically sophisticated, sustainable, and mobile. These mass-customised dwellings, akin to branded consumer goods, will address previous shortcomings for prefabricated, mobile dwellings by stimulating consumer desire in ways that extend the arguments of both Joseph Pine (1992) and Anna Klingman (2007). Arguments presented by authors Makimoto and Manners (1997) – which assert that the adoption of digital and mobile technologies will create large-scale societal shifts – will be extended with several solutions proposed.
keywords Mass customisation; urban dwellings; open source standards; parametric design; sustainability
series CAADRIA
email dcelento@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id ga0214
id ga0214
authors De Felice, F,Abbattista, F. and Scagliola, F.
year 2002
title GenOrchestra: An Interactive Evolutionary Agent for Musical Composition
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary GenOrchestra is a project involving the Dipartimento d’Informatica and Conservatorio di Musica “N. Piccinni” in Bari. This project concern a Creative Evolutionary System, based on Evolutionary Computation (EC) techniques, applied to the field of western tonal music. With GenOrchestra a novel way to evaluate the produced tunes is presented: indeed we adopt a hybrid solution composed for two kinds of fitness functions. The first, called technique fitness, evaluates the consonance degree between melodic, harmonic and rhythmic sections, moreover, it defines how well the rhythmic paths is organized into a coherent musical event. The second fitness function called human fitness, determine how well the tunes are perceived from a human audience, like in a concert. This task is accomplished by presenting the tunes on the Internet and then gathering the surfers evaluations in a database from which the system take the final population scoring. This, coupled with a no limited musical primordial soup, makes GenOrchestra a promising eclectic artificial composer. The ultimate goal of this project, currently in progress, is the development of a very human-like composer, which can produce music in any musical genre, and which is able to show a “personal style”. Samples will be soon available at http://valis.di.uniba.it/GenOrchestra/samples.html
series other
email febo74@libero.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 3ad9
authors Dierckx, T., Stellingwerff, M. and Verbeke, J.
year 2002
title Relating to the ‘real’ Theories for and Experiences with Educational Database Systems
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 80-87
summary One of the most ubiquitous computer applications is the database. Common databases are capable of handling massive amounts of data, which allow users to instantly find the factual data they seek. In most cases the assistance of a database is straightforward and objective. However, when people work with databases with a rich and diverse content, this can lead to unexpected findings, surprises and possibly a revolution in their understanding of a design problem. Furthermore multimedia databases and the systems with a more enhanced set of interactive features provide more appealing results. Databases become most interesting when the creators and the users can rise the data to a level that touches knowledge, wisdom and creativity. This paper goes into questions about the application of databases in architectural education. What can be the role of databases in the education of next generation architects? What should educators offer the students through database content, or what should be left open for creative initiatives? We present a broad overview of possible database content, various modes of interaction with the databases and several ways of representation of the database content. The overview shows areas where educational database technology is still underdeveloped and areas where a lot of concurrent databases exist. The theoretical overview enabled us to set out a further strategy for database applications in our school of Architecture. Besides the theory, we present our recent experiences with a database for architectural realizations. The database of buildings can be used in different educational exercises.
series eCAADe
email dynamo@archb.sintlucas.wenk.be
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 6a37
authors Fowler, Thomas and Muller, Brook
year 2002
title Physical and Digital Media Strategies For Exploring ‘Imagined’ Realities of Space, Skin and Light
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 13-23
summary This paper will discuss an unconventional methodology for using physical and digital media strategies ina tightly structured framework for the integration of Environmental Control Systems (ECS) principles intoa third year design studio. An interchangeable use of digital media and physical material enabledarchitectural explorations of rich tactile and luminous engagement.The principles that provide the foundation for integrative strategies between a design studio and buildingtechnology course spring from the Bauhaus tradition where a systematic approach to craftsmanship andvisual perception is emphasized. Focusing particularly on color, light, texture and materials, Josef Albersexplored the assemblage of found objects, transforming these materials into unexpected dynamiccompositions. Moholy-Nagy developed a technique called the photogram or camera-less photograph torecord the temporal movements of light. Wassily Kandinsky developed a method of analytical drawingthat breaks a still life composition into diagrammatic forces to express tension and geometry. Theseschematic diagrams provide a method for students to examine and analyze the implications of elementplacements in space (Bermudez, Neiman 1997). Gyorgy Kepes's Language of Vision provides a primerfor learning basic design principles. Kepes argued that the perception of a visual image needs aprocess of organization. According to Kepes, the experience of an image is "a creative act ofintegration". All of these principles provide the framework for the studio investigation.The quarter started with a series of intense short workshops that used an interchangeable use of digitaland physical media to focus on ECS topics such as day lighting, electric lighting, and skin vocabulary tolead students to consider these components as part of their form-making inspiration.In integrating ECS components with the design studio, an nine-step methodology was established toprovide students with a compelling and tangible framework for design:Examples of student work will be presented for the two times this course was offered (2001/02) to showhow exercises were linked to allow for a clear design progression.
series ACADIA
email tfowler@calpoly.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id ddssar0210
id ddssar0210
authors Friedl, G., Trum, H.M.G.J. and Rutten, P.G.S.
year 2002
title An Innovative Model of the Building Development ProcessDesign as a Process of Crystallisation
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In the past, models describing the development of artefacts, including buildings, usually were of a linear nature thereby suggesting a sequential path from conception of the artefact to its completion. This has consequences for the sequence of activities in the design and programming phase. However, designing is basically a thinking activity and is as such not bound to the same laws as e.g. the construction process. This must have repercussions for the way the design process is designed andmanaged. The proposed conceptual model of the artefact development process – in this case a building design process – is a kind of framework which is more in accordance with the nature of thinkingactivities. It should stimulate a non-sequential process. The development of a solution to a design problem thus should become a responsive search process driven by insights and creative leaps but guided by the framework the model provides. Furthermore, the model is meant to support the exploration and clarification of the problem as well as to extend the solution space by various means such as the development of scenarios and strategic values as a basis for the realisation of the building project’s goals. This model is an essential element in the development of an innovative approach towards the process design of the building design process. The creation of a building (conception, design and development) is not considered a sequential process but a process of crystallisation with the potential of developing in all directions, thus growing from a conceptual centre outwards.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ga0211
id ga0211
authors Gartland-Jones, Andrew
year 2002
title Can a Genetic Algorithm Think Like a Composer?
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary There has now been a substantial body of work utilising Genetic Algorithms (GA) for the purpose of musical composition. A common point of discussion is how far GA’s can simulate not just the musical output of human composers, but also the process of composing itself. This paper begins by discussing the suitability of using a GA for composition, and goes on to describe a generative music system (by the author), that utilises a domain specific, knowledge rich GA. The system acts on a supplied 2-bar musical phrase (up to 4 parts), and evolves musical fragments towards a supplied target. The aim is to provide interim points on the evolutionary path, which represents a ‘new’ musical ideas audibly based on the supplied fragments. The paper concludes that the system is able to model at least part of the creative process of composition, and is effective at producing musically successful results. (Audio download sources of its output are included to support this conclusion). The system was used to generate music included in an interactive installation work, exhibited at Brighton Arts Festival 2002, and other applications under developed that use the algorithm are discussed.
series other
email drew@atgj.org
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 192eaea2001
id 192eaea2001
authors Kardos, Peter
year 2002
title Perceptual Evaluation of the Spatial Manifestations of Urban Structures
source Environmental Simulation - New Impulses in Planning Processes [Proceedings of the 5th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-922602-85-1]
summary The objective of this contribution is to bring to the attention of the community of experts in the field of architectural simulation the interdependence of the spatial manifestations of material components of urban environments and the phenomena of visual perception and imagination which we practically employ in education, professional design and which we also try to use in our contact with the clients. The way towards finding new qualities of urban environments should be dominated by our efforts to understand and perceive the urban structure as a real space-time manifestation, which is being mediated to the user also as a sensually experienced image (scene). Its atmosphere and informative content give impulses for an individualized reaction from various aspects. The content of the experience is multileveled and the sensorial effects of its iconic components can be precisely verified by means of simulation processes in temporal sequences. Taking these aspects as basis, we are developing methods, which would by taking determined conditions into consideration, broaden the spectrum of research, verification, or evaluation of the real spatial manifestations and interactive actions in situ as well as their possible anticipation and performance in laboratory conditions. Perceptual simulation is, together with the significance of experiencing and evaluating the urban environment in the eye-level horizon, a starting point of spatial model simulation methods as a supportive experimental creative and verification tool. The new information technologies and the creative technical cooperation of analog and digital iconic simulation systems create unconventional possibilities for exact recording of information and impulses for the complicated transformational process engaging more actively the community in their participation. Practice in teaching architectural design has verified
series EAEA
email kardos@fa.stuba.sk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id ddssar0218
id ddssar0218
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2002
title Information Amount Measurement in Generative Systems:An Objective Approach to Termination
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Termination in computational generative systems is linked increasingly to user intervention: the generative system concludes when the user chooses it to do so. The similarities between this approach to termination and the creative artistic process suggest that the products of generative systems are amenable to analysis in terms of well-formedness leading to a formal measure that acts as an automatic termination trigger. The paper proposes that such a measure can be derived from structural information theory. By applying the compression of structural information theory to meaningful principles of a design world we derive a consistent, universal description of the design result at any given state. This description expresses the correlation of the design with its formal constraints, as well as the general perception of the design’s patterns.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 8461
authors Saunders, Rob
year 2002
title Curious Design Agents and Artificial Creativity - A Synthetic Approach to the Study of Creative Behaviour
source The University of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture
summary Creative products are generally recognised as satisfying two requirements: firstly they are useful, and secondly they are novel. Much effort in AI and design computing has been put into developing systems that can recognise the usefulness of the products that they generate. In contrast, the work presented in this thesis has concentrated on developing computational systems that are able to recognise the novelty of their work. The research has shown that when computational systems are given the ability to recognise both the novelty and the usefulness of their products they gain a level of autonomy that opens up new possibilities for the study of creative behaviour in single agents and the emergence of social creativity in multi-agent systems. The work presented in this thesis has developed a model of curiosity in design as the selection of design actions with the goal of generating novel artefacts. Agents that embody this model of curiosity are called “curious design agents”. The behaviour of curious design agents is demonstrated with a range of applications to visual and nonvisual design domains. Visual domains include rectilinear drawings, Spirograph patterns, and “genetic artworks” similar to the work of Karl Sims. Non-visual domains include an illustrative abstract design space useful for visualising the behaviour of curious agents and the design of doorways to accommodate the passage of large crowds. The design methods used in the different domains show that the model of curiosity is applicable to models of designing by direct manipulation, parametric configuration or by using a separate design tool that embodies the generative aspects of the design process. In addition, an approach to developing multi-agent systems with autonomous notions of creativity called artificial creativity is presented. The opportunities for studying social creativity in design are illustrated with an artificial creativity system used to study the emergence of social notions of whom and what are creative in a society of curious design agents. Developing similar artificial creativity systems promises to be a useful synthetic approach to the study of socially situated, creative design.
series thesis:PhD
email rob@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/06 09:33

_id ddssar0212
id ddssar0212
authors Scott Gowans and John Graham
year 2002
title Appropriate Collectives: A Contemporary Structure For Collaborative Working
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary This paper attempts to illustrate the importance of the conceptual initiative in the design process and how, through the development of a poetic narrative, it can inform the process of creative design andmanufacture. The argument outlined proposes the adoption of a poetic narrative as a mechanism for defining and clarifying the designers’ intention with the use of metaphorical associations advocated as ameans of exploiting our innate ability for intuitive extrapolation. Our approach gives emphasis to the conceptual corollary or intellectual process that underpins all considered design work and challenges the traditionally accepted methods of project development where this phase of the process is seen as having a pre-prescribed beginning and end. The paper is also intended as a statement of intent that celebrates the unique nature of our interdisciplinary working practices and, as a contextualisingdocument that posits a realistic and contemporary vision for the future of collaborative endeavours. We illustrate how, through the adherence to a philosophy of creative realism and by the establishment of legitimate, ephemeral collectives; we can effectively instigate and address opportunities in many areas at any given time. In the paper we actively promote an expansive and creative engagement with the dynamics of project inception, development and control as a means of realising our collective aspirations and of ensuring project ownership in the widest sense. The paper discusses creatively critical architectural and new media projects that attempt to subvert a number of modern orthodoxies bysupplanting them with an affective internal logic.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 2ed6
authors Serrentino, Roberto H. and Molina, Hernán
year 2002
title Arquitectura modular basada en la teoría de policubos [Modular Architecture Based on the Theory of Policubos]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 264-267
summary Modular Architecture refers to the design of any system composed of separated components that can be connected together preserving proportional and dimensional relationships. The beauty of modular architecture is that it is possible to replace or add any component (a module) without affecting the rest of the system. A polycube is a set of unit cubes joined in such a way that each face of the cube is either completely joined to another or completely free of any join. A polycube is a 3D generalization of polyominoes, which consist in a set of squared unit modules joined by their sides. This paper shows how, from the volumetric and modular character of polycubes, it is possible to set correspondences with 3D forms of architectural use, being a very powerful sustain in assisted design processes. The main purposes are:- to be used as creative triggers in the realization of architectural designs- to enlarge the possibilities of CAAD systems exploring modular complex groupings- to develop a simplified procedure of teaching-learning architectural forms.
series SIGRADI
email rserrentino@tucbbs.com.ar, labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 09:00

_id ddssar0202
id ddssar0202
authors Akin, Ömer and Özkaya, Ipek
year 2002
title Models of Design Requirement
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Case studies show that significant proportions of design errors and failures are linked to poor requirement specification during both early stages of design and as changes occur. Computational requirements engineering as a front-end to design iterations is a promising area addressing theseproblems. In other design disciplines, such as in software engineering, requirement engineering has given significant product improvements. In this paper, we present a state-space representation of requirement models for architectural design. The purpose of requirement modeling in design is tocreate a process by which requirements can be converted into working design solutions through frontend validation. We suggest three models of requirement specification, co-evolutionary [CoM], multiple domain [MDM] and single domain [SDM] models, that can facilitate this effort. Taken together all three models provide a full set of logical permutations of requirement-solution “worlds” and “operations.” We compare each model against the others in terms of facilitating change management and computability.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddssup0206
id ddssup0206
authors Dickey, J.W. and Jones, Dennis B.
year 2002
title CyberQuest Prospector (CQP):A Guide for the Evolutionary Discovery Process
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary CyberQuest Prospector (CQP) is a tool to guide an individual or team through the evolutionary process of finding better approaches to a particular problem, project, program, plan, or design. This prospectingprocess can involve, for example, new definitions, different data, altered evaluation techniques and new ideas and actions on many other topics. CQP involves a five step process. At step zero all the requisite historical background knowledge is entered. This knowledge is divided into topical areas or statements. In step one the team updates the various knowledge statements in the system and then assigns a "maturity" to them. The team then adds any new statements (step two). Next, (step three) the team makes decisions on actions to be undertaken and also on the external factors likely to be "in play" in the upcoming time period. After that period (step four) the team records the results and rates the "success" achieved. CQP subsequently changes the associated knowledge statement confidences. In the last step the clock is advanced. The ultimate result is a set of definitions, data, relationships, experimental techniques, issues,implications, and even personality traits in which some degree of confidence has evolved. The CQP process is demonstrated here with an urban transportation planning example involving such diverse topics asplanning/analysis techniques, data collection methods, and procedures for working with advocacy coalition networks.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id e5e7
authors Fischer, Th., Fischer, T. and Ceccato, C.
year 2002
title Distributed Agents for Morphologic and Behavioral Expression in Cellular Design Systems
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 111-121
summary After more than a century of domination by neo-Darwinian theory, biological thought is beginning to giveincreasing recognition to developmental theory. Amongst other reasons, this recent widening ofperspective is grounded on the incompleteness of the neo-Darwinian perspective in providing modelsfor the invention of novel forms or species and individual development. Evolutionary design theory hasdrawn much of its inspiration from evolutionary biology and consequently shows analogous flaws. Thispaper demonstrates an adoption of biological developmental theory to the field of design theory in orderto fill the corresponding gap. As natural developmental processes are based on the development ofcellular units, which form composite structures, this paper employs the cellular model as a means for thedevelopment of a corresponding design and construction theory. The discussion of this approachincludes possible linkages between morphologic and behavioral attributes of tissues with implicationsfor self-assembly, growth, healing and self-reproduction of man-made structures.
series ACADIA
email sdtom@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

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