CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 507

_id 5c95
authors Lou, C.W., Kaga, A. and Sasada, T.
year 2002
title Environmental Design with Huge Landscape in Real-Time Simulation System: Real-time Simulation System to Real Project
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 265-272
summary This paper is the culmination of a period of studying and participating in certain real project on environmental design with realtime simulation system application. The focus of this paper is on understanding that a generally real-time simulation system, can render a complex scene that consisted by a huge landscape model with millions polygons and building models with thousands details. It is also more than just a collection of unorganized techniques. This paper must dual with issues of scene elements management as a front end that efficiently provide the ability to process complex and moving objects in a physically realistic way. We establish a platform providing good support for the environmental designers.
series CAADRIA
email sasada@env.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id ddssar0229
id ddssar0229
authors De Vries, B., Jessurun, A.J. and J. Dijkstra, J.
year 2002
title Conformance Checking by Capturing and Simulating Human Behaviour in the Built Environment
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In order to model natural human behaviour, it is necessary to capture this behaviour. First, we will start out by modelling behaviour for specific situations, such as taking a seat in a theatre. To capture humanbehaviour, the following experiment is performed: Given a virtual environment, a sufficient number of subjects (real humans) are asked to execute a human task in this virtual environment (e.g. take a seat inthe theatre). Whenever the subject deviates from the shortest path, the system will ask for a clue why this is done. The hypothesis is that the combination of the motion paths and the clues for making/changing decisions will provide decision rules to make reliable predictions about human behaviour under the same conditions when using virtual persons. To test the hypothesis, we propose to use the university’s main conference and presentation hall as a test case. A 3D model and a motion pathgraph are constructed that enables a virtual person to find its way to a selected chair. The clues from the experiment are implemented as decision rules that determine a virtual person’s behaviour. Running thesimulation will result in the following data: Time per person to find a chair, Deviation from the shortest path, Distance covered per person to find a chair, Distribution of seated persons over time and Relocation of persons. To validate the test case, the process of people entering the hall and finding a chair is recorded on videotape. The walking behaviour of the people observed on the video is analysed and compared with the data from the simulation.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 4f57
authors Nikiforiadis, Faidon and Pitts, Adrian
year 2002
title A Study of the Accuracy of Daylighting Simulation of Heavily Obstructed Buildings in the Urban Canyons of Athens
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 456-463
summary This paper deals with the use and evaluation of daylighting simulation tools in relation to a complex urban environment. The environment concerned is one commonly found in city centre areas where the proximity of buildings leads to the creation of ‘urban canyons’; the result of this is that assessment and simulation of daylight requires a more sophisticated approach than for other situations. In urban areas building layout is the most important factor effecting daylight, sunlight and solar heat gain reaching a building. It also affects sunlight in open spaces, ventilation, shelter and the dispersal of pollutants. In order to produce a more realistic understanding of the dynamic effects of daylight, there is a need not only for the research and development of advanced CAD and lighting simulation tools, but also of the study of possible alternative methods in their application. In the work reported in this paper, an attempt has been made to move the focus of lighting and daylighting simulation from the scale of a room to that of a whole building; the building itself being surrounded by its specific urban environment (including its microclimate). The study evaluates if there is sufficient evidence that it is possible with such complexity to reach reliable computation results after executing the simulation. The case study presented uses a 4D model of an urban canyon to investigate the sensitivity of such a complex simulation system. It can also be used to find ways to analyse and predict how daylight is reflected, refracted, scattered, diffused, polarised, diffracted and absorbed as it traverses an urban environment.
series eCAADe
email arp99fn@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 24eaea2001
id 24eaea2001
authors Ohno, R., Katayama, M., Komatsuzaki, T. and Soeda, M.
year 2002
title Development of a Visual Simulation System Synchronized with Walking Motion - An application for a study of distance perception
source Environmental Simulation - New Impulses in Planning Processes [Proceedings of the 5th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-922602-85-1]
summary Conventional visual simulators allow observers to move in the simulated space by using a mouse or a joy-stick without the kinesthetic feeling of motion. However, the link between visual image and body motion is important to perceive the environment, especially when people are walking. In this paper, a visual simulation system was designed to synchronize the subject's walking motion on a treadmill with the video image shown on a HMD. In order to detect the walking motion, sensors were attached to both subject’s ankles. According to the detected motion, the treadmill rotates and a CCD camera moves in a model space. Because of the sensors’ low sensitivity and the time lag between the detected motion and treadmill rotation, the subjects couldn’t walk smoothly. Therefore, the walking speed which synchronizes with the video image was kept constant for each subject and the experimenter started up and stopped the simulator. The validity of this simulation system was examined by comparing the accuracy of distance estimation using the new simulator with that using the conventional system without walking motion. The “distance reproduction” method was applied to measure the perceived distance: subjects walked 25 meter in a real setting without being told the distance, and were asked to move the same distance in different conditions. Since the distance estimation became accurate in the condition with the walking motion, the validity of this simulator was secured. The following experiment was intended to investigate the influence of physical environmental features on perceived distance by using the simulation system. We operated some features using a scale model of a route and examined their influences. Subjects were asked to "walk" through a path consisted of two spaces with different physical features, and to respond by showing the proportion of the length of those two spaces. The result revealed that the distance of a narrower and lower ceiling path where people perceive clearer line perspective and faster optical flow tends to be perceived longer.
series EAEA
email rohno@n.cc.titech.ac.jp
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 2d44
authors Tsou, Jin-Yeu and Chow, Benny
year 2002
title Integrating Scientific Simulation with Rapid-Prototyping Modeling for Design Curriculum Development
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 548-551
summary Although Computer-Aided Architectural Design tools have been introduced to studios for design visualization and communication, tangible models constructed by cardboard or other modeling materials still play an important role in assisting students on developing their conceptual framework related to spatial organization. A Rapid Prototyping (RP) system could provide a paradigm shift from the existing workflow of hand-made architectural model into an automated computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) environment. The introduction of computer controlled manufacturing technology will not limit the use of current conventional model making, and it will provide new capabilities for precise scaled model making and the possibility to generate free-form surface models for design representation. Because the technical capabilities of RP system could dramatically change the design workflow, the computer-aided manufacturing approach for architectural design has been adopted by overseas and local academic institutions. In this paper, we report the findings of a pilot study that applied rapid prototyping technology in architectural design education for helping students exploring an automated computer-aided manufacturing environment during early stage of design development.
series eCAADe
email jinyeutsou@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 0e4c
authors Uddin, M. Saleh and Yoon, So-Yeon
year 2002
title Peter Eisenman’s House X, Scheme G: 3D Game Engine for Portable Virtual Representation of Architecture
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 526-531
summary Recently introduced 3D games, game editors, along with gaming software offer great potential for delivering three-dimensional, collaborative virtual environments for online audiences. These capabilities have significant potential in architectural visualization. The University of Missouri-Columbia’s Emerging Technology Group developed the Virtual Campus Project introducing the university campus to prospective students through the Internet. Fascinating quality, seamless real time rendering, and smooth navigation are enough to impress visitors. However, the developers had to use eye measures and guesses based on photos rather than architectural drawings for initial 3D computer models. The absence of a precise scaling system as well as not being able to recognize a standard 3D architectural drawing format in a virtual environment were the prime generators of this paper. One important goal for this paper is to suggest architects the potentials of using universal or exchangeable formats of 3D models with accurate structure data to build virtual models. A second goal is to provide better understanding of potentials in 3D game engines for virtual representation of architecture.
series eCAADe
email UddinSaleh@aol.com
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 2cd9
authors Ceccato, C. Fischer, Th., Li Chun-Man, G. and Frazer, J.
year 2002
title A Large-Scale Computing Infrastructure for Design Education
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 282-289
summary Most departmental computing infrastructure reflects the state of networking technology and available funds at the time of construction, which converge in a preconceived notion of homogeneity of network architecture and usage patterns. The DMAN (Digital Media Access Network) project, a large-scale server and network foundation for The Hong Kong Polytechnic University’s School of Design, was created as a platform that would support a highly complex academic environment while giving maximum freedom to students, faculty and researchers through simplicity and ease of use. As a centralized multi-user computation backbone, DMAN faces an extremely heterogeneous user and application profile, exceeding implementation and maintenance challenges of typical enterprise, and even most academic server set-ups. This paper summarizes the specification, implementation and application of the system while describing its significance for design education in a computational context.
series eCAADe
email sdtom@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id ddssar0207
id ddssar0207
authors Conti, G. and Ucelli, G.
year 2002
title A Java3D Tool for Real-Time Collaboration in a Virtual Reality CAADEnvironment
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Today the development of network-based virtual communities and the use of avatars have brought a new level of complexity to the meaning of virtuality, providing the technology for remote presence and collaborative experiences. In this project the intention was to pursue this articulated vision of VR in order to assist the design profession during the early stages of the design process. The objective was to provide a tool that is capable of creating 3D shapes in a shared VR environment, thus allowing thedesign and its evolution to be shared. The use of the Java programming language was a natural choice for this project. Because of Java’s performance scalability and hardware independence the concept ofCAAD has been extended, making it possible to create a VR environment that can co-exist between high-end supercomputers and standard PCs. The project is currently being tested using PCs and an SGI system running a Reality Centre. The research reported in this paper describes the architecture and application of software that aims to increase the opportunity for collaboration within virtual worlds and enable effective and transparent information exchange.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 7e02
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2002
title The Virtual Campus: A new place for (lifelong) learning?
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 472-477
summary 472 eCAADe 20 [design e-ducation] Modeling Real and Virtual Worlds Session 13 In the early spring of 2001 a collection of German universities founded a virtual faculty of architecture, which was named „Liquid Campus“. Current thinking about future forms of education in the field of architecture combined with over 4 years of experience with net-based design studios, led to questions about the future of existing universities, their buildings and their use. This problem was put to 43 students in the form of a design exercise to create a place for a virtual university. In the current situation, in which the administration of knowledge is more and more located on the internet, and even the so-called meeting places themselves can be virtualised through the help of video-conference-software, the exercise was to design a virtual campus in the framework and to carry out this design work in a simulation of distributed practice. Initial criticism of the project came from the students in that exemplary working methods were not described, but left for the students to discover on their own. The creation of a concept for the Liquid Campus meant that the participants had to imagine working in a world without the face to face contacts that form the basis (at present) of personal interaction. Additionally, the assignment to create or design possible links between the real and the virtual was not an easy task for students who normally design and plan real physical buildings. Even the tutors had difficulties in producing focused constructive criticism about a virtual campus; in effect the virtualisation of the university leads to a distinctive blurring of its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosophical approach to the design problem. The paper explores the implications of the student’s conclusions on the nature of the university in general and draws conclusions specific to architectural education and the role of architecture in this process.
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id d5ac
authors Kalisperis, L.N., Otto, G., Muramoto, K., Gundrum, J.S., Masters, R. and Orland, B.
year 2002
title Virtual Reality/Space Visualization in Design Education: The VR-Desktop Initiative
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 64-71
summary Although virtual reality (VR) is a fast-growing field, utilization of its potential within an affordable environment in the early years of architectural education has been limited. Currently, we are in the process of exploring the educational potential of virtual reality in the creation and understanding of space as a set of dynamic volumes that can be experienced. The VR-Desktop initiative is an effort to bring the salient features of projection-based VR to second-year architecture students in a way that is more generally accessible than the many canonical, first-generation, projection-based VR systems. The VR-Desktop has been implemented in the teaching of the architectural design studio in the second year of a fiveyear curriculum, as part of the physical architectural studio. Through the VR-Desktop system in the studio, students immediately start working in an immersive environment. They create space by manipulating solids and voids while evaluating the anthropometric relations of the proposed solution. The students are able to study and test conceptual details in a virtual environment from the very beginning of their architectural design project. In order to assess student perception of the usefulness of various system attributes for diverse tasks, we have begun a usability study. Thirty-five surveys were collected from the students who had used the lab during the two semesters for which the two-screen system was available. Preliminary observations indicate that within the architectural context, virtual reality techniques involving depth perception can convey relevant information to students more efficiently and with less misrepresentation than traditional techniques. This paper suggests that full field of view, motion, stereoscopic vision, and interactivity are possible components of the 3D visualization techniques that are necessary to enhance architectural education
series eCAADe
email lnk@psu.edu
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 192eaea2001
id 192eaea2001
authors Kardos, Peter
year 2002
title Perceptual Evaluation of the Spatial Manifestations of Urban Structures
source Environmental Simulation - New Impulses in Planning Processes [Proceedings of the 5th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-922602-85-1]
summary The objective of this contribution is to bring to the attention of the community of experts in the field of architectural simulation the interdependence of the spatial manifestations of material components of urban environments and the phenomena of visual perception and imagination which we practically employ in education, professional design and which we also try to use in our contact with the clients. The way towards finding new qualities of urban environments should be dominated by our efforts to understand and perceive the urban structure as a real space-time manifestation, which is being mediated to the user also as a sensually experienced image (scene). Its atmosphere and informative content give impulses for an individualized reaction from various aspects. The content of the experience is multileveled and the sensorial effects of its iconic components can be precisely verified by means of simulation processes in temporal sequences. Taking these aspects as basis, we are developing methods, which would by taking determined conditions into consideration, broaden the spectrum of research, verification, or evaluation of the real spatial manifestations and interactive actions in situ as well as their possible anticipation and performance in laboratory conditions. Perceptual simulation is, together with the significance of experiencing and evaluating the urban environment in the eye-level horizon, a starting point of spatial model simulation methods as a supportive experimental creative and verification tool. The new information technologies and the creative technical cooperation of analog and digital iconic simulation systems create unconventional possibilities for exact recording of information and impulses for the complicated transformational process engaging more actively the community in their participation. Practice in teaching architectural design has verified
series EAEA
email kardos@fa.stuba.sk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 79b4
authors Kuenstle, Michael W.
year 2002
title Flow Structure Environment Simulation - A Comparative Analysis of Wind Flow Phenomena and Building Structure Interaction
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 564-568
summary This paper documents the progress of research to investigate the integration of computational modeling techniques into wind mitigation analysis and design for building structures located in high wind prone areas. Some of the basic mechanics and theoretical concepts of fluid flow and wind pressure as well as their translation into design criteria for structural analysis and design are reviewed, followed by a discussion of a detailed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) application case study for a simulated “3-second gust” wind flow over a low rectangular building located in a coastal region. The case study project models the wind flow behavior and pressure distribution over the building structure when situated in three varying conditions within a single terrain exposure category. The simulations include three-dimensional modeling of the building type constructed (1) on-grade in a flat coastal area, (2) above grade with the building elevated on structural columns, and (3) on-grade downwind of an escarpment. The techniques and parameters for development of the simulations are discussed and some preliminary interpretations of the results are evaluated by comparing their predictions to existing experimental and analytical data.
series eCAADe
email kuenstle@ufl.edu
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 998d
authors Lee, Alpha Wai Keung
year 2002
title Design Computing Education Software Development Integration of Scaffolding Strategies and Multiple Representations
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 140-143
summary Design Computing is an interdisciplinary field that centres on the intersection of design, computer science and linguistics. This multidimensional face of the new paradigm of design computing necessitates a mutual understanding of computing and designs as a whole, which are usually, conceived as separated stages of computed-mediated design. Based on cognitive and computational approach, with the integration of scaffolding strategies and multiple representations, an interactive and real-time design computing learning system is constructed. By interactively manipulating the various attributes, codes, parameters and digital media contents in a distributed system, learners are gradually exposed to the mutual relationship of representational digital multimedia and the underlining programming syntax in a collaborative environment. The author attempted the use of game programming technology in the development of the above system to support design learning and research in understanding design activities. The aim is to identify the design process that if taught well would address the core goals of design education.
series eCAADe
email alpha@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id c7e9
authors Maver, T.W.
year 2002
title Predicting the Past, Remembering the Future
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 2-3
summary Charlas Magistrales 2There never has been such an exciting moment in time in the extraordinary 30 year history of our subject area, as NOW,when the philosophical theoretical and practical issues of virtuality are taking centre stage.The PastThere have, of course, been other defining moments during these exciting 30 years:• the first algorithms for generating building layouts (circa 1965).• the first use of Computer graphics for building appraisal (circa 1966).• the first integrated package for building performance appraisal (circa 1972).• the first computer generated perspective drawings (circa 1973).• the first robust drafting systems (circa 1975).• the first dynamic energy models (circa 1982).• the first photorealistic colour imaging (circa 1986).• the first animations (circa 1988)• the first multimedia systems (circa 1995), and• the first convincing demonstrations of virtual reality (circa 1996).Whereas the CAAD community has been hugely inventive in the development of ICT applications to building design, it hasbeen woefully remiss in its attempts to evaluate the contribution of those developments to the quality of the built environmentor to the efficiency of the design process. In the absence of any real evidence, one can only conjecture regarding the realbenefits which fall, it is suggested, under the following headings:• Verisimilitude: The extraordinary quality of still and animated images of the formal qualities of the interiors and exteriorsof individual buildings and of whole neighborhoods must surely give great comfort to practitioners and their clients thatwhat is intended, formally, is what will be delivered, i.e. WYSIWYG - what you see is what you get.• Sustainability: The power of «first-principle» models of the dynamic energetic behaviour of buildings in response tochanging diurnal and seasonal conditions has the potential to save millions of dollars and dramatically to reduce thedamaging environmental pollution created by badly designed and managed buildings.• Productivity: CAD is now a multi-billion dollar business which offers design decision support systems which operate,effectively, across continents, time-zones, professions and companies.• Communication: Multi-media technology - cheap to deliver but high in value - is changing the way in which we canexplain and understand the past and, envisage and anticipate the future; virtual past and virtual future!MacromyopiaThe late John Lansdown offered the view, in his wonderfully prophetic way, that ...”the future will be just like the past, onlymore so...”So what can we expect the extraordinary trajectory of our subject area to be?To have any chance of being accurate we have to have an understanding of the phenomenon of macromyopia: thephenomenon exhibitted by society of greatly exaggerating the immediate short-term impact of new technologies (particularlythe information technologies) but, more importantly, seriously underestimating their sustained long-term impacts - socially,economically and intellectually . Examples of flawed predictions regarding the the future application of information technologiesinclude:• The British Government in 1880 declined to support the idea of a national telephonic system, backed by the argumentthat there were sufficient small boys in the countryside to run with messages.• Alexander Bell was modest enough to say that: «I am not boasting or exaggerating but I believe, one day, there will bea telephone in every American city».• Tom Watson, in 1943 said: «I think there is a world market for about 5 computers».• In 1977, Ken Olssop of Digital said: «There is no reason for any individuals to have a computer in their home».The FutureJust as the ascent of woman/man-kind can be attributed to her/his capacity to discover amplifiers of the modest humancapability, so we shall discover how best to exploit our most important amplifier - that of the intellect. The more we know themore we can figure; the more we can figure the more we understand; the more we understand the more we can appraise;the more we can appraise the more we can decide; the more we can decide the more we can act; the more we can act themore we can shape; and the more we can shape, the better the chance that we can leave for future generations a trulysustainable built environment which is fit-for-purpose, cost-beneficial, environmentally friendly and culturally significactCentral to this aspiration will be our understanding of the relationship between real and virtual worlds and how to moveeffortlessly between them. We need to be able to design, from within the virtual world, environments which may be real ormay remain virtual or, perhaps, be part real and part virtual.What is certain is that the next 30 years will be every bit as exciting and challenging as the first 30 years.
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 3439
authors Paranandi, M. and Sarawgi, T.
year 2002
title Virtual Reality on Architecture: Enabling Possibilities
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 309-316
summary This paper examines the potential of Virtual Reality (VR) technologies for architectural applications. There has been a great deal of anticipation for its implications for architecture since Ivan Sutherland's first VR system in the 60's. The term VR was formalized and became popular in the main stream in the late 80's and became an industry by the late 90's. Although it has found good applications in Medicine, Flight Simulation, and Video Game Industry, its effect on architecture remains imperceptible. In the work that we review, we found that the success of VR in architecture has primarily been in the passive and exploratory applications. We also note that at the present time, the cost of VR systems is directly proportionate to the level of photorealism and immersion. We contend that photorealistic visualization and total immersion are not absolute prerequisites for making most design decisions. Hence, through this paper we bring to light the inherent promise of VR technology and the potential impact it could have with its current limitations, on the way we conventionally think and design our built environment pushing it beyond space and time constraints.
series CAADRIA
email paranam@muohio.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id b74f
authors Dijkstra, Jan and Timmermans, Harry
year 2002
title Towards a multi-agent model for visualizing simulated user behavior to support the assessment of design performance
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 135-145
summary We introduce the outline of a multi-agent model that can be used for visualizing simulated user behavior to support the assessment of design performance. We will consider various performance indicators of building environments, which are related to user reaction to design decisions. This system may serve as a media tool in the design process for a better understanding of what the design will look like, especially for those cases where design or planning decisions will affect the behavior of individuals. The system is based on cellular automata and multi-agent simulation technology. The system simulates how agents move around in a particular 3D (or 2D) environment, in which space is represented as a lattice of cells. Agents represent objects or people with their own behavior, moving over the network. Each agent will be located in a simulated space, based on the cellular automata grid. Each iteration of the simulation is based on a parallel update of the agents conforming local rules. Agents positioned within an environment will need sensors to perceive their local neighborhood and some means with which to affect the environment. In this way, autonomous individuals and the interaction between them can be simulated by the system. As a result, designers can use the system to assess the likely consequences of their design decisions on user behavior. We think that the system provides a potentially valuable tool to support design and decision-making processes, related to user behavior in architecture and urban planning.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ec93
authors Lee, Alpha W.K.
year 2002
title From Simulation to Stimulation - Stimulative Design Computing Learning and Teaching Environment Based on Multiple Representations
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 207-212
summary Design computing is an interdisciplinary field that centers on the intersection of design, computer science, and cognitive science. These multi-dimensional faces of this new paradigm necessitate a mutual understanding of computing and design as a whole, which are usually conceived as separate stages of computer-mediated design. This paper explores the use of multiple representations in stimulative design computing learning and teaching environment. This paper starts with an overview of computer-mediated collaborative learning, multiple representations and learner-centered design. Then issues related to the methodology in implementing the system are discussed. Agent models and prototype of the above computer-mediated collaborative learning system are constructed. The research is under progress.
series CAADRIA
email alpha@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 757b
authors Lee, Jaemin and Akleman, Ergun
year 2002
title Practical Image Based Lighting
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 279-288
summary In this paper, we present a user-friendly and practical method for seamless integration of computergeneratedimages (CG) with real photographs and video. In general, such seamless integration isextremely difficult and requires recovery of real-world information to simulate the same environment forboth CG and real objects. This real-world information includes camera positions and parameters,shapes, material properties, and motion of real objects. Among these, one of the most important islighting.Image-based lighting that is developed to recover illumination information of the real world fromphotographs has recently become popular in computer graphics. In this paper we present a practicalimage-based lighting method that is based on a simple and easily constructable device: a square platewith a cylindrical stick. We have developed a user-guided system to approximately recover illuminationinformation (i.e. orientations, colors, and intensities of light sources) from a photograph of this device.Our approach also helps to recover surface colors of real objects based on reconstructed lightinginformation.
series ACADIA
email softviz@yahoo.com
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id ddssup0215
id ddssup0215
authors Ruiz, M., Fornés, A., Ramon, J., Alorda, J. Goula, M. and Pié, R.
year 2002
title GIS Tools for Landscape Impact Assessment
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary This paper present the main results obtained by the development of the Artemis Project ”Design and Evaluation of Residential Patterns in the Mediterranan Region appropiate to sustainable development of environmentally deteriorated rural areas” 4th European Framework Program. Call ENVIRONMENT AND CLIMATE . ENV4-CT97-0656.) As results of the project an Integrated Landscape Assessment Model (AIAM) was created. AIAM is a resource modelling system focusing on the generation of a decision support system application oriented to provide criteria in order to evaluate effects and to optimise location of low density residential settlements. The Model includes a Landscape multicriteria analysis merged with spatial analysis tools set in a GIS Environment. The A.I.A.M. provides data structures, user interface components, and output mechanism witch allows the user to apply the knowledge acquired for Artemis Project. One of the main goals of the A.I.A.M is to give a landscape view of the territory including variables that are usually not considered in planning and environmental impact assessment processes. Also the models gives a sustainable support both to planner and designers projects. A.I.A.M. gives the data structure to define a residential patterns, the parameters through which a pattern is adequately described. This pattern definition allows comparison between the one’s of the reference area and so, extract conclusions about divergence between them.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 1992
authors Russell, Peter
year 2002
title Using Higher Level Programming in Interdisciplinary teams as a means of training for Concurrent Engineering
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 14-19
summary The paper explains a didactical method for training students that has been run three times to date. The premise of the course is to combine students from different faculties into interdisciplinary teams. These teams then have a complex problem to resolve within an extremely short time span. In light of recent works from Joy and Kurzweil, the theme Robotics was chosen as an exercise that is timely, interesting and related, but not central to the studies of the various faculties. In groups of 3 to 5, students from faculties of architecture, computer science and mechanical engineering are entrusted to design, build and program a robot which must successfully execute a prescribed set of actions in a competitive atmosphere. The entire course lasts ten days and culminates with the competitive evaluation. The robots must navigate a labyrinth, communicate with on another and be able to cover longer distances with some speed. In order to simplify the resources available to the students, the Lego Mindstorms Robotic syshed backgrounds instaed of synthetic ones. The combination of digitally produced (scanned) sperical images together with the use of HDR open a wide range of new implementation in the field of architecture, especially in combining synthetic elements in existing buildings, e.g. new interior elements in an existing historical museum).ural presentations in the medium of computer animation. These new forms of expression of design thoughts and ideas go beyond mere model making, and move more towards scenemaking and storytelling. The latter represents new methods of expression within computational environments for architects and designers.its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosg and programming a winning robot. These differences became apparent early in the sessions and each group had to find ways to communicate their ideas and to collectively develop them by building on the strengths of each team member.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2013/02/04 06:17

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