CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 509

_id 6d22
authors Bermudez, J., Agutter, J., Syroid, N., Lilly, B., Sharir, Y., Lopez, T., Westenskow, D. and Foresti, S.
year 2002
title Interfacing Virtual & Physical Spaces through the Body: The cyberPRINT Project
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 395-400
summary The cyberPRINT is a fully immersive, interactive virtual environment that is being generated in rea-timebased on physiological data readings of a human body. In other words, the cyberPRINT is based oncreating interfaces between physical and digital spaces and between biology and informationtechnologies. The cyberPRINT is also an event, wherein a performer is connected to the cyberPRINTgenerator to create a self-sustaining feedback mechanism. Although using the body to electronicallydrive music and media events is not new, most of these works have paid little or no attention to thepotential of interactive 3D virtual environments. Nor have they been so technologically advanced,interdisciplinary intensive (involving architecture, choreography, modern dance, music, bioengineering,medicine and computer science), or architecturally focused as the cyberPRINT.This project covers a wide and fertile territory that goes from the very technical and design oriented tothe very theoretical and interdisciplinary. This paper is intended to (1) expand what has been alreadypublished about this project (Bermudez et al 2000a) and (2) establish potential areas for discussionbefore and after the performance
series ACADIA
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id b74f
authors Dijkstra, Jan and Timmermans, Harry
year 2002
title Towards a multi-agent model for visualizing simulated user behavior to support the assessment of design performance
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 135-145
summary We introduce the outline of a multi-agent model that can be used for visualizing simulated user behavior to support the assessment of design performance. We will consider various performance indicators of building environments, which are related to user reaction to design decisions. This system may serve as a media tool in the design process for a better understanding of what the design will look like, especially for those cases where design or planning decisions will affect the behavior of individuals. The system is based on cellular automata and multi-agent simulation technology. The system simulates how agents move around in a particular 3D (or 2D) environment, in which space is represented as a lattice of cells. Agents represent objects or people with their own behavior, moving over the network. Each agent will be located in a simulated space, based on the cellular automata grid. Each iteration of the simulation is based on a parallel update of the agents conforming local rules. Agents positioned within an environment will need sensors to perceive their local neighborhood and some means with which to affect the environment. In this way, autonomous individuals and the interaction between them can be simulated by the system. As a result, designers can use the system to assess the likely consequences of their design decisions on user behavior. We think that the system provides a potentially valuable tool to support design and decision-making processes, related to user behavior in architecture and urban planning.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id c7e9
authors Maver, T.W.
year 2002
title Predicting the Past, Remembering the Future
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 2-3
summary Charlas Magistrales 2There never has been such an exciting moment in time in the extraordinary 30 year history of our subject area, as NOW,when the philosophical theoretical and practical issues of virtuality are taking centre stage.The PastThere have, of course, been other defining moments during these exciting 30 years:• the first algorithms for generating building layouts (circa 1965).• the first use of Computer graphics for building appraisal (circa 1966).• the first integrated package for building performance appraisal (circa 1972).• the first computer generated perspective drawings (circa 1973).• the first robust drafting systems (circa 1975).• the first dynamic energy models (circa 1982).• the first photorealistic colour imaging (circa 1986).• the first animations (circa 1988)• the first multimedia systems (circa 1995), and• the first convincing demonstrations of virtual reality (circa 1996).Whereas the CAAD community has been hugely inventive in the development of ICT applications to building design, it hasbeen woefully remiss in its attempts to evaluate the contribution of those developments to the quality of the built environmentor to the efficiency of the design process. In the absence of any real evidence, one can only conjecture regarding the realbenefits which fall, it is suggested, under the following headings:• Verisimilitude: The extraordinary quality of still and animated images of the formal qualities of the interiors and exteriorsof individual buildings and of whole neighborhoods must surely give great comfort to practitioners and their clients thatwhat is intended, formally, is what will be delivered, i.e. WYSIWYG - what you see is what you get.• Sustainability: The power of «first-principle» models of the dynamic energetic behaviour of buildings in response tochanging diurnal and seasonal conditions has the potential to save millions of dollars and dramatically to reduce thedamaging environmental pollution created by badly designed and managed buildings.• Productivity: CAD is now a multi-billion dollar business which offers design decision support systems which operate,effectively, across continents, time-zones, professions and companies.• Communication: Multi-media technology - cheap to deliver but high in value - is changing the way in which we canexplain and understand the past and, envisage and anticipate the future; virtual past and virtual future!MacromyopiaThe late John Lansdown offered the view, in his wonderfully prophetic way, that ...”the future will be just like the past, onlymore so...”So what can we expect the extraordinary trajectory of our subject area to be?To have any chance of being accurate we have to have an understanding of the phenomenon of macromyopia: thephenomenon exhibitted by society of greatly exaggerating the immediate short-term impact of new technologies (particularlythe information technologies) but, more importantly, seriously underestimating their sustained long-term impacts - socially,economically and intellectually . Examples of flawed predictions regarding the the future application of information technologiesinclude:• The British Government in 1880 declined to support the idea of a national telephonic system, backed by the argumentthat there were sufficient small boys in the countryside to run with messages.• Alexander Bell was modest enough to say that: «I am not boasting or exaggerating but I believe, one day, there will bea telephone in every American city».• Tom Watson, in 1943 said: «I think there is a world market for about 5 computers».• In 1977, Ken Olssop of Digital said: «There is no reason for any individuals to have a computer in their home».The FutureJust as the ascent of woman/man-kind can be attributed to her/his capacity to discover amplifiers of the modest humancapability, so we shall discover how best to exploit our most important amplifier - that of the intellect. The more we know themore we can figure; the more we can figure the more we understand; the more we understand the more we can appraise;the more we can appraise the more we can decide; the more we can decide the more we can act; the more we can act themore we can shape; and the more we can shape, the better the chance that we can leave for future generations a trulysustainable built environment which is fit-for-purpose, cost-beneficial, environmentally friendly and culturally significactCentral to this aspiration will be our understanding of the relationship between real and virtual worlds and how to moveeffortlessly between them. We need to be able to design, from within the virtual world, environments which may be real ormay remain virtual or, perhaps, be part real and part virtual.What is certain is that the next 30 years will be every bit as exciting and challenging as the first 30 years.
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id e721
authors Nitsche, Michael and Roudavski, Stanislav
year 2002
title Building Cuthbert Hall Virtual College as a Dramatically Engaging Environment
source PDC 02 - Proceedings of Participatory Design conference, T. Binder, J. Gregory, I. Wagner (eds.), Malmö. Sweden, 23-25 June 2002 [ISBN 0-9667818-2-1]
summary This paper outlines the interdisciplinary nature, collaborative work patterns and role of aesthetics in the Cuthbert Hall Virtual College research project at the Cambridge University Moving Image Studio (CUMIS) and the Centre for Applied Research in Education Technology (CARET). The project identifies key properties of dramatically engaging real-time three-dimensional virtual environments (RT 3D VE) and how the holistic experiential phenomenon of place is organised and mediated through spatial narrative patterns. Interdisciplinary by nature, the project requires a collaborative approach between science, engineering, media and architecture, and the results are revealing for all these areas. The Cuthbert Hall project invites discussion of the importance in the creation and use of RT 3D VE's - under single and multi-user conditions - of articulate aesthetics (the quality of architectural, visual and audio design; the production and incorporation of dramatic properties) and of the conditions required for collaborative, communicative use of the environment. The full theoretical and technical discussions as well as the evaluation results are outside the scope of this submission.
keywords Real-time virtual environment, Computer Game, Place, Mediation, Expressive space
series other
email stanislav.roudavski@cumis.cam.ac.uk
last changed 2003/02/09 15:03

_id bff9
authors Proctor, George (Ed.)
year 2002
title ACADIA 2002 [Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X / Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, 446 p.
summary The 2002 ACADIA conference finds digital tec_nology ubiquitous as the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture moves into its third decade. The organization of ACADIA is on the threshold of restating its mission. After 20 years, many of the organization’s initial objectives have been achieved. ACADIA members have been instrumental in the development of design software, and in bringing computers and digital technology into architectural practice and design school curriculum. At first, ACADIAns faced the debate over the appropriateness and utility of digital technology in the disciplines of architecture, planning and building science. Today the use of computers and information technology is widely accepted by architects and CAAD and digital technology have brought profound change to design practice. The debate in ACADIA has long since moved from "should we use this technology" to "how", "for what" and "why". Now that many practitioners, learning institutions and professional organizations have taken up the call, ACADIA must restate its mission, if it wishes to remain “distinct”. This does not mean that the work of ACADIA is complete. Much remains to be done and much more needs to be improved. ACADIA’s Mission Statement places particular focus on “education and the software, hardware and pedagogy involved in education.” And “(t)he organization is also committed to the research and development of computer aides that enhance design creativity, and that aim at contributing to the construction of humane physical environments.” These are the areas that continue to evolve, grow and provide for ACADIA’s continued relevance. The ACADIA 2002 conference theme reflects the state of digital technology’s application to the discipline, as much as it refers to ACADIA’s future. With the general acceptance of digital technology and CAAD, we have arrived at a place where the work of great interest and relevance lies in the space between what is digital and what is analog. The environments of real space and cyberspace have in a very short time become so intertwined that the space between real and virtual (not to be confused with reality and fantasy) is becoming indistinguishable. You cannot eat, travel, use public utilities, bank, shop, vacation or recreate without at the very least coming into contact with or passing through information space. The landscape between these two environments has become a cultural phenomenon for those societies with access to the Internet and information networks. And while the computer and World Wide Web have empowered individuals, the collective impact of the technology holds all the potential and problems that similarly emerged in other technology induced landscapes. Consider this last point in the context of ACADIA’s stated mission to “enhance design creativity while contributing to the construction of humane physical environments.” And you can see why many of the 260 initial submissions to this conference were in the area of design artifacts and design methodology, providing evidence that ACADIA’s mission remains relevant and in accord with the trends of research and professional creative activity.
series ACADIA
email georger@cybertects.com
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 6348
authors Schnabel, Marc Aurel and Kvan, Thomas
year 2002
title Interaction in virtual building space, Distributing Knowledge in Building
source CIB W78 Conference 2002, Proceedings, Vol. 2, pp91-98, Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark, 12 –14 June
summary This paper presents the results from two experiments in working on descriptions of form in immersive virtual environments (IVE). Recently; Virtual Environments (VE) are increasingly used as environments for design and research. Using VE to visualize ideas from the initial steps of design; the architect is challenged to deal with perception of space; solid and void; without translations to and from a two dimensional media. From this new ability; we might expect new forms of design interaction and expression. The goal of our studies was to identify how designers use and communicate early design ideas by using immersive three-dimensional (3D) VEs and how they describe 3D volumes using different media. We set up a series of experiments including navigation- and perception-tasks; designing in IVE; transcription of design; remote communication between design partners and controlled observations. We explored initial intentions of 3D-immersive design schemes; textual descriptions and collaborations within IVE. This paper describes the outcome of creation; interpretation and communication of architectural design; by using an Immersive Joint Design Studio; as well as the description and translation of a 3D cubic structure. We discuss frameworks and factors influencing how architectural students communicate their proposals in an immersive Virtual Environment Design Studio (VeDS) and how this approach of design studio enables to understand volumes and spatial relationships.
keywords Virtual Environment; Remote Collaboration; Design Evaluation; Spatial Understanding
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 18dd
authors Sjöström, Calle
year 2002
title Non-Visual Haptic Interaction Design - Guidelines and Applications
source Lund Institute of Technology, School of Architecture
summary This dissertation has three cornerstones: * Haptics * Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) * Blind Users Haptics deals with controlling human movements and getting feedback through the sense of touch. A haptic interface transmits forces to a person’s hand or fingers in a way that mimics the sensation of touching real objects. Virtual haptic touch can be particularly useful for people with visual impairments. It makes it possible for a blind person to touch virtual objects, corresponding to the way a sighted person can see objects on a computer screen. The goal of this research was to carry out an unbiased investigation of the potential of this technology for blind people. The more specific aims were to: * Investigate if and how blind people’s computer usage can be improved by virtual haptics. * Investigate the problems that arise with graphical user interfaces for blind people and how these problems can be managed with haptics. * Develop new applications and find new areas in which virtual haptics can be applied for blind people. The design process has been primarily influenced by theories of usability engineering and reflection in action/reflection on action, focusing on the role of the engineer-designer. A concerted effort is made to use technology as a language to communicate with the users. Several haptic interface devices have been involved. The Phantom from SensAble Technologies has been used the most. It is a small robot with a thimble or stylus attached to the tip which supplies force feedback to the user. The others are the FEELit Mouse from Immersion and the force feedback joysticks from Logitech and Microsoft. Eighteen test applications were developed over five years’ time. They included games, curves, textures, drawings, menus, floor plans, and geometrical objects. Formal and informal user tests were performed on blind, blind-deaf and sighted people. One of the key results presented are five guidelines for non-visual haptic interaction design for researchers, designers, testers, developers and users of such applications. The guidelines are: 1. Elaborate a virtual object design of its own 2. Facilitate navigation and overview 3. Provide contextual information 4. Utilize all available modalities 5. Support the user in learning the interaction method and the specific environments and programs These guidelines represent the filtered and condensed knowledge and experience that the Haptics Group at Certec has gained during the testing and development process. They are further delineated and are a complement to existing HCI guidelines. This work shows that there is great potential in using haptic technology in applications for blind people. It is viable to translate both 2D and 3D graphical information and make it comprehensible via haptics. It has been demonstrated that a blind person can orientate and navigate in a virtual haptic environment and that these tasks can be further supported by using complementary information such as sound and Braille. It is also possible for a blind person to use knowledge gained in the virtual world for real life orientation.
keywords Haptics; Human-Computer Interaction; Blind People; Design Guidelines; Computer Access
series thesis:PhD
email Calle@ruff.certec.lth.se
more http://www.certec.lth.se/doc/hapticinteraction/
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id caadria2006_589
id caadria2006_589
authors YU-NAN YEH
year 2006
title FREEDOM OF FORM: THE ORIENTAL CALLIGRAPHY AND AESTHETICS IN DIGITAL FABRICATION
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 589-591
summary Computer-Aided Design (CAD) / Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) related research has been discussed since the 1960's (Ryder, G. et al, 2002, Mark Burry, 2002). Indeed, both Frank O. Gehry and Toyo Ito utilized CAD/CAM to create rich architectural form and in so doing gave birth to a new type of aesthetics. The visualization and liberalization of form space is the single most important characteristic attributable to the use of computers as a design tool. By the 1980's, Laser cutting and Rapid Prototyping techniques developed from CAM, became important new digital tools when researchers and designers discussed the development of form in architecture.
series CAADRIA
email nanstudio@yahoo.com.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id ga0230
id ga0230
authors Annunziato, Mauro and Pierucci, Piero
year 2002
title Human-Artificial Ecosystems: Searching for a Language
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The most recent advances of artificial life scientific research are opening up a new frontier: the creation of simulated life environments populated by autonomous agents. In these environments artificial beings can interact, reproduce and evolve [4, 6, 15], and can be seen as laboratories toexplore the emergence of social behaviors like competition, cooperation, relationships and communication [3, 5, 7] . It is still not possible to approach a reasonable simulation of the incredible complexity of human or animal societies, but these environments can be used as a scientific orartistic tools to explore some basic aspects of the evolution [1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16].
series other
email plancton@plancton.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id bcf7
authors Arvin, Scott A. and House, Donald H.
year 2002
title Modeling architectural design objectives in physically based space planning
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 213-225
summary Physically based space planning is a means for automating the conceptual design process by applying the physics of motion to space plan elements. This methodology provides for a responsive design process, which allows a designer to easily make decisions whose consequences immediately propagate throughout the design. It combines the speed of automated design methods with the flexibility of manual design methods, while adding a highly interactive quality and a sense of collaboration with the design itself. In our approach, the designer creates a space plan by specifying and modifying graphic design objectives rather than by directly manipulating primitive geometry. The plan adapts to the changing state of objectives by applying the physics of motion to its elements. For design objectives to affect a physically based space plan, they need to apply appropriate forces to space plan elements. Space planning can be separated into two problems, determining topological properties and determining geometric properties. Design objectives can then be categorized as topological or geometric objectives. Topological objectives influence the location of individual spaces, affecting how one space relates to another. Geometric objectives influence the size and shape of space boundaries, affecting the dimensions of individual walls. This paper focuses on how to model a variety of design objectives for use in a physically based space planning system. We describe how topological objectives, such as adjacency and orientation can be modeled to apply forces to space locations, and how geometric objectives, such as area, proportion, and alignment, can be modeled to apply forces to boundary edges.
series journal paper
email arvin@viz.tamu.edu
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 1d66
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 2002
title Hybrid Design Environment
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 572-576
summary This paper discusses some preliminary ideas concerning new design environment or environment of designing. Main thesis of this paper is that process of creation and perception of architecture proceed between Real and Virtual. Architecture is created by analog and/or digital media. A the result we have the multitude and diversity of spaces and tools. Defining these terms is important for understanding a new process of design and a new space of designing. It gives us possibilities to create the new design environment, in which creation of architectural form may be considered as an integrated process connecting the analog, the digital, the real and the virtual. Architectural space, as we know it from physical environments, is supplemented by a virtual space. Physical, architectural and virtual spaces share very similar features in simulation. In virtual models, the boundary between the representation of physical sites and imaginary, virtual sites is vanishing rapidly, resulting in a new reality.
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id f321
authors Ataman, Osman and Bermudez, Julio
year 2002
title ACADIA'99: media effect on architectural design
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 131-134
summary The idea of this conference arose from various discussions between us in various different places. We decided to put a proposal together for both positions—Technical Chairs and Site Organizers. This was unprecedented and we were anxious. We really wanted to run this conference and run it in Salt Lake City. Our theme AMedia and Design ProcessB was a timely topic and both of us were working on and around it. We thought it was interesting and challenging to define the terms and to establish the relationships between architecture, representation and media. In fact, all throughout the history of architecture, representation, media and design have been recognized to have a close relationship. Interpretations as to what exactly this relationship is or means have been subject to debate, disagreement and change along the ages. Whereas much has been said about the dialectics between representation and design, little has been elaborated on the relationship between media and design. Perhaps, it is not until now, surrounded by all kinds of media at the turn of the millennium, as Johnson argues, that we have enough context to be able to see and address the relationship between media and human activities with some degree of perspective.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 7798
authors Barrow, Larry
year 2002
title Elitism, IT and the Modern Architect Opportunity or Dilemma
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 97-109
summary Information Technology (IT) is impacting architecture dramatically in process and form. Often thecurrent transformation of architecture is difficult to analyze and frequently we see confusion and anxietyregarding uncertainties for the future of the architect as designer and project leader. The currentpotentiality for new exotic form (i.e. product) is mesmerizing; however, in the current context, lessobvious issues and pertinent questions are emerging for the profession. What is the mission of theprofession? What will keep us relevant in the mist of the new global society?In this paper, we will take an evolutionary perspective of technology in architecture and draw parallelsbetween the Renaissance, which is the genesis of the modern architect, and the contemporary state ofarchitecture. The modern architect was birthed during the Renaissance where we see the retraction ofthe architect from the building site and separation from direct involvement in the building process.Communications technology (i.e. representation in the form of free-hand drawings, mechanical 2Dorthographic drawings and 3D perspectives) enabled the decomposition of the master builder into threecomponents (i.e. artist-designer, practicing_architect, and builder). Thus, we see technology enable thedenigration and ultimate dissolution of the centuries old craftsman guilds and the master builder. Thetechnology evolution of “drawings” enabled monumental change in the process of architecture over thepast five hundred years. The fission of the master builder, enabled by “drawings”, resulted in disparatefactions which are the forerunners of the modern day litigious design-bid-build project delivery. We nowincreasingly see a return to the fusion of design and building where often the architect is not the projectmanager or leader. Thus, the question looms, will the 21st century architect lead or be led, and whatare the ramifications for the profession?The historical Master Builder is re-emerging as a dynamically networked team of design andconstruction knowledge specialists. Bi-lateral knowledge exchange, enhanced with emerging IT, isoccurring between owners, managers, architects, design specialists, engineers, builders and machines.Technology is disrupting architecture, resulting in increasing specialization and compressed timeframes, and may require reevaluation of the role of the architect as project-leader "integrativegeneralist"or "design-specialist".Conclusively, the concept of ‘cybernetic architecture’ is proposed as an IT reference framework. Failureto appropriately respond to societal evolution, driven by technology, could result in the loss ofprofessional status for the modern architect. Herein lies our dilemma, or opportunity, depending on therole choice of the modern architect.
series ACADIA
email lbarrow@msstate.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 5422
authors Barría, H., Lagos, R. and Munoz, Chr.
year 2002
title The Inter-Media Space
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 584-587
summary This paper explores the juxtaposition between architectonic space and virtual environments. It establishes the hypothesis that the intersection of virtual environments with our common life causes a break-up of time and space. Virtual environments are the last and most integral part of the technological revolution, becoming a parallel world, an unlimited extension of our limited world. The spatial and temporal juxtaposition of these two realities creates a new reality of being “inbetween”, it reveals the “inter-media”. This “inter-media” reality is an issue for architecture of our time, and it still lacks of responses.
series eCAADe
email hbarria@ubiobio.cl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 263a
authors Bermúdez, Julio
year 2002
title Implicaciones Arquitectónicas de La Naturaleza del Hacer en Ambientes Digitales [Architectonic Implications of the Nature of the Digital Atmosphere ]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 142-145
summary Architectural Implications of the Nature of Making in Digital Environments There exists an a-priori relationship between the basic structural constrains of an environment and the types of construction that may evolve there. For instance, the inexorable laws of nature have caused architecture to develop as a physical, stable, containing and inert object. Hence there are good reasons to study how cyberspace with its different ontological foundations may define the architecture to be built there. This examination may be best accomplished by concentrating in how what is structurally unique to the cyber impacts architectural design This paper investigates the ontology of construction in cyberspace by analyzing ordinary digital laws that defy reality. The findings both challenge our traditional conceptions of architecture and guide us toward totally unprecedented design potentials. The goal is to begin building a fundamental theory of architectural space, design and construction applicable to cyberspace.
series SIGRADI
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ee65
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis and Charitos, Dimitris
year 2002
title Teaching Virtual Environment Design
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 42-49
summary In a previous paper, the authors considered the design and development of virtual environments (VEs) pointing out the need for a new direction within architectural education, leading towards a generation of VE architects. It was suggested that there is an urgent need for educating practitioners who will contribute to the design of 3D content for multimedia and virtual reality applications. This paper focuses on the application of these principles and ideas into the structure and methodology of three VE design courses, taught by the authors. These courses are by no means suggested as exhaustive examples of teaching this subject. They are seen as preliminary approaches, adapting to the educational context they are integrated within. Bearing in mind the problems relating to teaching large numbers of students with a design studio approach, difficult concepts, resources availability, fighting misconceptions, techno-phobia the following areas are discussed in the hope that they will contribute to VE design curricula in the near future.
series eCAADe
email V.Bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 138eaea2001
id 138eaea2001
authors Breen, Jack
year 2002
title A Room with a Different View
source Environmental Simulation - New Impulses in Planning Processes [Proceedings of the 5th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-922602-85-1]
summary This contribution documents the developments, results and findings of an experimental design visualisation and presentation exercise entitled ‘A Different View of Delft’. The primary aim of this project was to make students aware of the potentials of the active utilisation of physical models for the sake of designerly enquiry. Furthermore the ambition was to explore new ways of using such model ‘environments’ for the benefit of design communication and presentation. For this exercise a ‘game’ situation with clear constraints and rules was developed beforehand. The students were to work out a proposal for a new exhibition space, as an annex to a – hypothetical – existing museum. The new space was to create a fitting ‘setting’ for a single work of art: Johannes Vermeer’s famous View of Delft. The maximum contours of the new exhibition space were given, along with clear guidelines concerning which walls and roof segments might be (partly) opened. The emphasis lay on the viewer’s ‘approach’ to the painting, its positioning and ‘framing’ in an architectural context. A designerly search involving form and space, the choice of colours and materials and particularly the strategic use of (natural) lighting.
series EAEA
email J.L.H.Breen@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id ad19
id ad19
authors Calderon, C., and Noble, R
year 2005
title BEYOND MODELLING: AVANT-GARDE COMPUTER TECHNIQUES IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS.
source I Jornadas de Investigacion en Construccion, Madrid, 2-4 June, 2005.
summary If the result of computer innovations can be interpreted as an emerging “difference” in the quality of constructed space, then in order to truly understand what future applications may be regarding architecture at present, we should look at what advanced functions are available in the process of designing forms and space (DeLuca and Nardini, 2002). Recently the so called parametric approach, a technique for describing a large class of designs with a small description in programming code, has become a focus of attention in architectural computing. In this paper, we reflect on the current use of parametric tools using real case studies as well as our own proof of concept parametric programmes and report on how the avant-garde computer techniques may help to increase the quality of residential building.
keywords Building Quality, Parametric Design
series other
type normal paper
email carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/12/02 10:42

_id 7a20
id 7a20
authors Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title SHARED SPACE’ AND ‘PUBLIC SPACE’ DIALECTICS IN COLLABORATIVE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN.
source Proceedings of Collaborative Decision-Support Systems Focus Symposium, 30th July, 2002; under the auspices of InterSymp-2002, 14° International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics, 2002, Baden-Baden, pg. 27-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2005/03/30 14:25

_id 6279
id 6279
authors Carrara, G.; Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title Private Space' and ‘Shared Space’ Dialectics in Collaborative Architectural Design
source InterSymp 2002 - 14th International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics (July 29 - August 3, 2002), pp 28-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2012/12/04 06:53

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