CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 61 to 80 of 238

_id 3850
authors Chitchian, D. and Bekkering, H.
year 2002
title Urban-CAD, A Tool for Urbanistic Design
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 404-407
summary The existing CAD, CAAD programs and design applications hardly support the urbanistic design activities. The conceptual difference between architecture and urbanism necessitates developing new CAD software based on the urbanistic design process. Our developed Urban-CAD system assists designers with urbanistic design activities.
series eCAADe
email d.chitchian@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 1804
authors Chitchian, D. and Bekkering, H.
year 2002
title An Urbanistic Design Tool
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 339-344
summary The existing CAD and CAAD programs and design applications hardly support the urbanistic designactivities. Although those applications are useful means to be utilized generally in design tasks, they arenot suitable tools as urbanism community needs. Most existing CAD programs are based on thearchitectural design process and therefore not suitable for urbanistic design. The conceptual differencebetween architecture and urbanism necessitates developing new CAD software based on the urbanisticdesign process. We believe that our developed Urban-CAD system assists designers with urbanisticdesign activities and overcomes the limitations of the already existing CAD applications.
series ACADIA
email d.chitchian@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id 1207
authors Cinelis, G., Januskevicius, E. and Kazakeviciute, G.
year 2002
title CAAD Program Development: Expectations and Results
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 118-121
summary This research and the paper is our attempt to study in what extent is it reasonable to fill the curriculum provided for architecture students educated as a contemporary architect with knowledge of algorithms, programming, integration of CAAD tools, etc. The experience of several years of the course “CAAD program development” was generalized and will be discussed taking into account the results of the analysis of the feedback from the students. The results of the work could be important for the definition of the guidelines for the future.
series eCAADe
email gc@mail.balt.net
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 2d54
authors Clayton, M.J., Warden, R.B. and Parker, Th.W.
year 2002
title Virtual construction of architecture using 3D CAD and simulation
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 227-235
summary 3D modeling and computer simulations provide new ways for architecture students to study the relationship between the design and construction of buildings. Digital media help to integrate and expand the content of courses in drafting, construction and design. This paper describes computer-based exercises that intensify the student's experience of construction in several courses from sophomore to senior level. The courses integrate content from drafting and design communication, construction, CAD, and design. Several techniques are used to strengthen students' awareness and ability in construction. These include: Virtual design–build projects in which students construct 3D CAD models that include all elements that are used in construction. Virtual office in which several students must collaborate under the supervision of a student acting as project architect to create a 3D CAD model and design development documents. Virtual sub-contracting in which each student builds a trade specific 3D CAD model of a building and all of the trade specific models must be combined into a single model. Construction simulations (4D CAD) in which students build 3D CAD models showing all components and then animate them to illustrate the assembly process. Cost estimating using spreadsheets. These techniques are applied and reapplied at several points in the curriculum in both technical laboratory courses and design studios. This paper compares virtual construction methods to physical design–build projects and provides our pedagogical arguments for the use of digital media for understanding construction.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 154d
authors Colajanni, B., Pellitteri, G. and Concialdi, S.
year 2002
title Intelligent Structures for Collaborating with the Architect
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 360-364
summary The number of different designers with different competencies collaborating in a building project is today conspicuous. An undesired consequence is the possible rise of conflicts between decisions taken independently by more than one specialist on the same building object. The early detection of such conflicts is then one of the most important features in collaborative design. Moreover, of great interest would be the possibility not only of automatic detection but also of solution proposal of at least the most manageable of those conflicts. In this perspective smart models of building components could be very useful. This is possible giving the building elements, represented as objects, the specific intelligence. A simple example of this possibility is given in this paper. In a precedent work we proposed a way of managing elementary spatial conflicts between building components tending to occupy the same spaces. The automatic detection derived from the previous declaration of two levels of constraints (soft constraint and hard constraints) in such way that a violation of them could be immediately signaled to the actor wanting to take the decision triggering the conflict. In this paper the topic is the consequences of the rise of a spatial conflict (occupation of the same space) between a column of a spatial frame of columns and beams, and another building object of any sort subject to a soft or hard constraint. The procedure identifies the minimum displacement of the two objects, propagates the column displacement to the other structural elements connected to it and checks the feasibility of the new configuration of the structural schema both with regard to the possible rise of new conflicts and with the compliance to previous structural criteria.
series eCAADe
email pellitt@unipa.it
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id ddssar0207
id ddssar0207
authors Conti, G. and Ucelli, G.
year 2002
title A Java3D Tool for Real-Time Collaboration in a Virtual Reality CAADEnvironment
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Today the development of network-based virtual communities and the use of avatars have brought a new level of complexity to the meaning of virtuality, providing the technology for remote presence and collaborative experiences. In this project the intention was to pursue this articulated vision of VR in order to assist the design profession during the early stages of the design process. The objective was to provide a tool that is capable of creating 3D shapes in a shared VR environment, thus allowing thedesign and its evolution to be shared. The use of the Java programming language was a natural choice for this project. Because of Java’s performance scalability and hardware independence the concept ofCAAD has been extended, making it possible to create a VR environment that can co-exist between high-end supercomputers and standard PCs. The project is currently being tested using PCs and an SGI system running a Reality Centre. The research reported in this paper describes the architecture and application of software that aims to increase the opportunity for collaboration within virtual worlds and enable effective and transparent information exchange.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 6e0a
authors Craig, David Latch and Zimring, Craig
year 2002
title Support for collaborative design reasoning in shared virtual spaces
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 249-259
summary This paper discusses collaborative design, emphasizing the elaboration and transformations of a problem space, and the role that unstructured verbal communication and graphic communication can play in these processes. An asynchronous collaborative system, called the Immersive Discussion Tool (IDT), is introduced as a means for supporting productive design exchanges. IDT allows collaborators to reason about 3-D models over the Internet using view-dependent and view-independent diagrammatic marks, dynamic simulations, geometric design surrogates and text annotations. IDT relies on VRML to view the models, with an extensive Java-based interface driving the interactive behavior, including the construction and playback of graphical annotations, the management of threaded discussions, and the management of file input/output. The development and initial implementation of IDT has revealed the difficulty of constructing complex marks in a virtual 3-D space. Possible strategies for dealing with these problems are suggested.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id f71b
authors Cuberos, Ricardo and Indriago, Jose
year 2002
title Hypermedia approaching to digital cities - 3D Maracaibo Project
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 417-421
summary This paper relates preliminary experiences creating a comprehensive digital model of a 2 million inhabitant’s city in Venezuela. Applying multiple computer strategies, professors and graduate students are working together in order to get a 22 thousand hectares 3D model of Maracaibo city, the second largest in the country.
series eCAADe
email rcuberos@luz.ve
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id fe60
authors Cumming, Michael
year 2002
title Flexible and distributed coordination models for collaborative design
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 268-275
summary Designers working in collaborative design situations, attempt to plan or anticipate their activities, such that their work progresses in an orderly manner, according to technical demands of their domain. Designers, and the organizations that employ them, often attempt to formally represent such plans using process representations, such critical path diagrams, or Petri nets. Such process articulation and formalization can have benefits for designers and organizations, such as standardization and improvement of work practices, and improved collaboration and coordination between design parties. In addition to plan making, designers also try to coordinate their actions with the actions of others on the design team. This coordination, which often takes place in real time, is a process that is necessarily social, interactive, and iterative. Here the formulation of suitable process representations is more difficult, due to the dynamic and complex nature of social interactions. How to represent and design such coordination processes, is a continuing research question in the process modeling community. It is possible there exists general coordination mechanisms that could be useful in a variety of domains. Possibilities for distributed methods of design process coordination are examined. A coordination method is proposed that involves the exchange of design process models, represented as Petri nets. Rather than concentrating on the specific content of these models - which is assumed to vary considerably between design domains - general coordinating mechanisms are proposed. One such mechanism involves the communication of social commitments to process models, in addition to communication of the content and authorship of these models.
series eCAADe
email m.cumming@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 0653
authors Czerner, Jürgen and Gatermann, Harald
year 2002
title Modeling and Rendering Virtual Architecture by Using Fisheye-Panorama-Based Images and Lightings in HDR-Quality
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 172-174
summary We use digitally made spherical panoramas as background for vr visualisation in architectural sceneries instead of stitched photographs (fisheye-based or serical-mirror-based). For this reason we had the idea to develop the first fisheye-based digitalscanning panorama-camera together with the manufacturer Spheron. The ultimate step in reaching optimal quality not only as a background but also as a source of lighting the background-image is taken as a HDR-image. The high-dynamic-range-technology was developed by the Californian scientist Paul Devebec. High dynamic photographs contain a broader range of information between the very bright zones down to the very dark zones - a lot more than “normal” photographs (digital and analogue), which are named LDR (low dynamic range in comparison to HDR). Some software-products in the field of cad-visualisation in virtual and augmented reality already enable the use of HDR-images and open a new field of controlling daylight and artificial light simulations with photographed backgrounds instaed of synthetic ones. The combination of digitally produced (scanned) spericalimages together with the use of HDR open a wide range of new implementation in the field of architecture, especially in combining synthetic elements in existing buildings, e.g. new interior elements in an existing historical museum).
series SIGRADI
email fb1@fh-bochum.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id a207
authors Czerner, Jürgen and Gatermann, Harald
year 2002
title Modeling and rendering virtual architecture by using fisheye-panorama-based images and lightings in HDR-quality
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 569-571
summary We use digitally made spherical panoramas as background for vr-visualisation in architectural sceneries instead of stitched photographs (fisheye-based or serical-mirrorbased). For this reason we had the idea to develop the first fisheye-based digital-scanning panorama-camera together with the manufacturer Spheron. The ultimate step in reaching optimal quality not only as a background but also as a source of lighting the background-image is taken as a HDR-image. The high-dynamic- range-technology was developed by the Californian scientist Paul Devebec. High dynamic photographs contain a broader range of information between the very bright zones down to the very dark zones - a lot more than “normal” photographs (digital and analogue), which are named LDR (low dynamic range in comparison to HDR). Some software-products in the field of cad-visualisation in virtual and augmented reality already enable the use of HDR-images and open a new field of controlling daylight and artificial light simulations with photographed backgrounds instaed of synthetic ones. The combination of digitally produced (scanned) sperical images together with the use of HDR open a wide range of new implementation in the field of architecture, especially in combining synthetic elements in existing buildings, e.g. new interior elements in an existing historical museum).
series eCAADe
email fb1@fh-bochum.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 012c
authors De Araujo, Tereza Cristina Malveira and Rossi, Angela Maria Gabriella
year 2002
title O real, o virtual e a Internet na era da Informação [The Real, the virtual and the Internet in the Information Age]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 28-30
summary Over the last decade, advances in computer graphics plus the growing popularity of the Internet have incorporated the words reality and virtuality into our vocabulary, at the same time, making the distance between the words shorter. In this article, we discuss the two concepts - reality and virtuality - and analyze how this question has affected human communication, specially in the Web environment. This analysis will be used as a basis for research on the impact of “non-presence” in working relationships in a virtual environment, more specifically in the architecture and engineering areas where we find the Web being used as a communication tool for the development of collaborative design between groups involved with the design process of the built environment.
series SIGRADI
email malveira@terra.com.br, gabriella.rossi@ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id aef5
authors De Paoli, Giovanni and Léglise, Michel
year 2002
title Architectural Design Education and Digital Technologies: Toward a Multinational Research Observatory
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 56-63
summary New visions that do not confine the computer to strictly technical and representation functions have appeared in schools of architecture over the past few years. The use of new information and communication technologies (NICT), in the field of design education in particular, have allowed the creation of innovative teaching tools and teaching configurations that are operational in certain European and North American schools. Unfortunately, the comparison of experiences is rare, and it would be beneficial to facilitate educational exchanges on a scientific basis. It is clear, now, that the general use of NICT will have to promote educational programs that are evaluated scientifically, that are “efficient” and that are occasionally multinational, even if the cultural differences make the task difficult. These considerations have lead us to the proposal of recommendations for the creation of a multinational observatory for the teaching of design that could benefit from the presence of researchers from European countries and from North America already implicated in activities in our laboratories. This observatory is conceived as a depository of pedagogical works serving as observation material destined for scientific research. As such, it would act as an observation site for research in didactics of design. It would allow for a new understanding of the opportunities and limitations derived from the emerging globalisation of distributed design education and offer new challenges for architectural schools. This article describes the beginnings of this observation system and underscores its potential to produce results in the future.
series eCAADe
email michel.leglise@toulouse.archi.fr
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id ddssar0229
id ddssar0229
authors De Vries, B., Jessurun, A.J. and J. Dijkstra, J.
year 2002
title Conformance Checking by Capturing and Simulating Human Behaviour in the Built Environment
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In order to model natural human behaviour, it is necessary to capture this behaviour. First, we will start out by modelling behaviour for specific situations, such as taking a seat in a theatre. To capture humanbehaviour, the following experiment is performed: Given a virtual environment, a sufficient number of subjects (real humans) are asked to execute a human task in this virtual environment (e.g. take a seat inthe theatre). Whenever the subject deviates from the shortest path, the system will ask for a clue why this is done. The hypothesis is that the combination of the motion paths and the clues for making/changing decisions will provide decision rules to make reliable predictions about human behaviour under the same conditions when using virtual persons. To test the hypothesis, we propose to use the university’s main conference and presentation hall as a test case. A 3D model and a motion pathgraph are constructed that enables a virtual person to find its way to a selected chair. The clues from the experiment are implemented as decision rules that determine a virtual person’s behaviour. Running thesimulation will result in the following data: Time per person to find a chair, Deviation from the shortest path, Distance covered per person to find a chair, Distribution of seated persons over time and Relocation of persons. To validate the test case, the process of people entering the hall and finding a chair is recorded on videotape. The walking behaviour of the people observed on the video is analysed and compared with the data from the simulation.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 3ad9
authors Dierckx, T., Stellingwerff, M. and Verbeke, J.
year 2002
title Relating to the ‘real’ Theories for and Experiences with Educational Database Systems
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 80-87
summary One of the most ubiquitous computer applications is the database. Common databases are capable of handling massive amounts of data, which allow users to instantly find the factual data they seek. In most cases the assistance of a database is straightforward and objective. However, when people work with databases with a rich and diverse content, this can lead to unexpected findings, surprises and possibly a revolution in their understanding of a design problem. Furthermore multimedia databases and the systems with a more enhanced set of interactive features provide more appealing results. Databases become most interesting when the creators and the users can rise the data to a level that touches knowledge, wisdom and creativity. This paper goes into questions about the application of databases in architectural education. What can be the role of databases in the education of next generation architects? What should educators offer the students through database content, or what should be left open for creative initiatives? We present a broad overview of possible database content, various modes of interaction with the databases and several ways of representation of the database content. The overview shows areas where educational database technology is still underdeveloped and areas where a lot of concurrent databases exist. The theoretical overview enabled us to set out a further strategy for database applications in our school of Architecture. Besides the theory, we present our recent experiences with a database for architectural realizations. The database of buildings can be used in different educational exercises.
series eCAADe
email dynamo@archb.sintlucas.wenk.be
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 2a84
authors Donath, D. Hansen, St. and Richter, K.
year 2002
title Architectural Window - Computer networks as planning and integration tools
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 302-305
summary As building projects become increasingly more complex, the number of project participants increases as does their spatial distribution. An effective decentralised work process and co-operation is of increasing importance. The global computer network, the internet, has great potential and recent times have seen the development of a variety of techniques in this field. The project proposal described here is based upon this approach and also takes it a step further. A specific analysis of the subject and the subsequent identification of potential approaches formed the basis for an architectural application that brings the architect in contact with other project participants using the internet as a powerful yet simple and easy to use medium. The project is currently (2002) undergoing practice tests and academic investigation and is installed on a freely-accessible server.
series eCAADe
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 28fe
authors Donath, Dirk, Lömker, Thorsten M. and Richter, Katharina
year 2002
title Plausibility in the Planning Process - Reason and Confidence in the Computer-Aided Design and Planning of Buildings
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 155-162
summary Architecture is more than form. It must be more than form. It can be spectacular, it can be revolutionary,but it should also be comprehensible, reasoned and plausible and this should be reflected in its form.This very nature of architecture makes it different from other design disciplines. However, it is thesecentral aspects that are not supported by current computer-aided planning systems. The developmentof digital models concentrates on the purely formal aspects.
series ACADIA
email loemker@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 54b0
authors Duarte, J.P., Heitor, M. and Mitchell, W.J.
year 2002
title The Glass Chair - Competence Building for Innovation
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 180-185
summary This paper tells the strange tale of a glass chair. Creating a glass chair might seem a perverse – maybe impossible – enterprise. After all, chairs are normally held together by moment connections, such as those joining the legs to the seat. Glass is a notoriously bad material for forming moment connections; it is brittle, and quickly snaps if you subject it to bending. But there are advantages to such startling formulations of design problems. They force you to challenge conventional wisdom, to ignore standard prototypes, and to ask interesting new questions. How might you design a chair without moment connections? How might you do so without making the result impossibly heavy? How would you built it? And what interesting qualities might such a chair have? These were questions investigated in the design project pursued jointly by students at an American and a Portuguese school, in collaboration with glass and molding fabricators. The students explored many possibilities, and in doing so learned a great deal about chairs and about the properties and potentials of glass. The final project is a particularly elegant outcome of their investigations. It is created from just two curved pieces of glass, which held together by metal tie-rods. In the end, the finished glass chair looked just like the initial computer visualizations.
series eCAADe
email jduarte@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 88ea
authors Dzieglewska, Maja
year 2002
title Cityscan - A digital urban experience
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 201-203
summary CITYSCAN is a series of interactive city documentations produced with contemporary multimedia techniques. It is offered as an elective course offered at the Department of Architecture by Prof. Dr. Ludger Hovestadt at ETH Zurich. Digital processing of information, multimedia programs, interactive presentations, teamwork and visualisation, are objects of investigation. A dense global CITYSCAN map elaborated together with students is our long-term goal.
series eCAADe
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1show page 2this is page 3show page 4show page 5show page 6show page 7show page 8... show page 11HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_292422 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002