CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 508

_id ga0219
id ga0219
authors Schadewitz, Nicole and Jachna, Timothy
year 2002
title Using Social Interaction in Generative Design of Shared Virtual Spaces
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The proposed paper outlines research findings in the field of generative design of visual virtual chat spaces. It discusses social interaction as a central determining factor in the generation of virtual spaces through and for chat communication on the World Wide Web. Social interaction in a chat room is based on communication using written text. The research and design results of this project involve the translation of chat statements into three-dimensional virtual objects according to - criteria derived from theories of virtual and social space, - the production of space through action and interaction of the users of the interface and - the translation of the components of written text (words and characters) into three-dimensional virtual forms. The generation of a dynamic, virtual, social structure is based on criteria deduced from systems of interaction within social space. The visual social structure, reflected in the shape and spatial relation of the three-dimensional objects, evolves as source for feedback processes and therefore as “re-generation” of social interaction. This paper documents the design, implementation and evaluation of the described system. It represents an outset and a first manifestation of a new project in cultural-differentiated user-interaction-centred generative approaches in interface design of chat room applications.
series other
email sd.nic@polyu.edu.hk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ga0230
id ga0230
authors Annunziato, Mauro and Pierucci, Piero
year 2002
title Human-Artificial Ecosystems: Searching for a Language
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The most recent advances of artificial life scientific research are opening up a new frontier: the creation of simulated life environments populated by autonomous agents. In these environments artificial beings can interact, reproduce and evolve [4, 6, 15], and can be seen as laboratories toexplore the emergence of social behaviors like competition, cooperation, relationships and communication [3, 5, 7] . It is still not possible to approach a reasonable simulation of the incredible complexity of human or animal societies, but these environments can be used as a scientific orartistic tools to explore some basic aspects of the evolution [1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16].
series other
email plancton@plancton.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ecaade03_587_34_asanowicz
id ecaade03_587_34_asanowicz
authors Asanowicz, Alexander
year 2003
title Architectural Composition in Digital Space
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 587-590
summary In this paper the possibilities of using the computers at course of architectural compositions are considered. As the start point of the new teaching method of architectural composition we used the course of tradition architectural composition, elaborated at our Faculty. The course of Digital Architectural Composition was finished in 2002. The main goal of using the new digital media for modelling architectural forms was checking the new possibilities of form creation. Traditionally, searching of forms at the conceptual design stage is performed by using sketches, drawings and physical models. Our new method showed that is possible to do the same thing using the computerbased 3D modelling, experiencing no physical limitations of the 'real' substance. At the same time, at the early design stages, when formal value is sought, computer modelling can be done almost intuitively. In ours work we try to find a creative way of using computer - transforming the tool into medium. The attention was paid on exploring the possibilities characteristic for computers and not available with traditional methods of modelling. Architect’s tradition tools are effectively replaced by a computer, which create a new way of doing things.
keywords Architectural composition, computer modelling, method of teaching
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/22 08:51

_id 9dc7
authors Hwang, Jie-Eun and Choi, Jin-Won
year 2002
title SpaceCore: Metadata for Retrieving Spatial Information in Architecture
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 197-215
summary This research investigates the spatial information retrieval in architecture focused on constructingefficient metadata that is crucial for data retrieval. Generally speaking, metadata is ‘structured dataabout data’ to describe the resources especially in a digital method. In this research, metadata is a sortof data object to be used in searching spatial information, such as describing a raw spatial data objectnot only as attribute data but also as content, structurally and semantically. There are two issues thatmotivate this research; 1) the materialization of the intangible space as a data object, and 2) thecontent-based information retrieval. In the viewpoint of content-based retrieval, we analyze spatialinformation on the apartment unit floor plan common in Korea. Then we extract the metadata items in astructured manner. To manage the items efficiently, we develop a data model for spatial informationaccording to the concept of “Structured Floor Plan”. For exploiting the metadata, this research showsseveral possibilities of query operations to present a set of sample queries about L-D-K(Living room -Dining room – Kitchen). Implementation of the prototype system is divided into three parts: 1) amodeling module, Vitruvis; 2) an indexing module, SpaceCore; and 3) a browsing module.
series ACADIA
email curiozen@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id ga0215
id ga0215
authors Kabala, Joanna
year 2002
title The Side Effect of a Generative Experiment
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper discusses the issue expressed in the call for the Generative Art 2002 conference that says: "GA is identifiable as one of the most advanced approaches in creative and design world." In this paper the value of Generative Art for the art, science and design worlds is described in the reference to a generative experiment. The experiment has been conducted in industrial environment with the aim of defining possibilities for natural interaction of humans with machines. In specific, the experiment examined an option for visual adaptation in accordance to user feedback. In the context of the experiment's outcome the issue of recognizability of Generative Art values is discussed. Generative Art can be identified but is not widely recognized as "one of the most advanced approaches in creative and design world". What makes it difficult for designers to switch to generative thinking and accept immediately Generative Art as the possible way of advancing traditional design methods? And what makes it promising to keep searching for ways of application of Generative Art in contemporary design? Some possible answers, proposed in this paper, aim at contributing to the discussion about the changing role of artists and designers in the contemporary society.
series other
email joanna.kabala@planet.nl
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ba50
authors Achten, Henri and Jessurun, Joran
year 2002
title An Agent Framework for Recognition of Graphic Units in Drawings
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 246-253
summary Architects use graphic conventions in their drawings that have meaningful content to the design task. In previous work, such well-defined sets of graphic entities have been identified and defined. These sets are called graphic units. In this paper, we discuss how graphic unit recognition in drawings can take place using a multi-agent systems approach. This approach seems promising as singular agents may specialize in graphic unit-recognition, and multi-agent systems can address problems of ambiguity through negotiation mechanisms. We present an agent framework for this purpose, how it connects to the theory of graphic units, and how agents for recognizing graphic units are defined. The paper ends with a discussion of current findings and future work.
series eCAADe
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 6b70
authors Af Klercker, Jonas and Pittioni, Gernot
year 2002
title Architect and Structural Engineer in interactive design
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 386-389
summary We are convinced that an interactive design process involving engineers and architects will create values to a project. Looking back there have been some obstacles, like a week’s time for exchange of drawings with traditional postal services; manual calculation methods, which could not be spoiled on loose grounds like architect’s sketches; different media – architect’s drawings and engineer’s numbers in tables; attitudes and traditional roles, implemented already in education. Today most of these obstacles can be overcome and we have made a test. We have used ArchiCad by Graphisoft and FEM-design by SKANSKA IT Solutions to test to make an interactive design. Our conclusions are that exchange of information, drawings and other documents is more or less routine in praxis, and it works almost instantly. Computers make calculation faster and easier for the engineer. Though we would wish to have software which manages to do more rapid estimations. Even simulations such as of loads on a structure are practically possible. By using model based CAD the data can be used for transferring quantities for calculations as well as visualization of the design as a platform for collaborate analysis. The technique is developed and usable but to gain acceptance and make use of it is also a matter of attitudes and of application activities in education.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2013/02/04 05:50

_id 461b
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E. and Karboulonis, P.
year 2002
title The Role of Advanced VR Interfaces in Knowledge Management and Their Relevance to CAD
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 277-284
summary This paper introduces knowledge management and computer aided visualisation as a key in establishing both valuation and value creation capabilities in the enterprise where dissemination of knowledge and effective sharing of information through collaboration spur creativity and stimulate business practices. The paper draws an original approach for the design and development of a universal information/knowledge visualisation tool and outlines the mechanics that enable the working prototype that focuses on CAD.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddssar0214
id ddssar0214
authors Al Hassan, F., Trum, H.M.G.J. and Rutten, P.G.S.
year 2002
title Strategic Briefing A Conceptual Process Model for Building Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Nowadays building design problems are divided in partial discipline related sub-problems. Through targeted and focused attention to sub problems however the awareness of the whole is lost. Each designparticipant gives his sub-problem first priority. In contrast in the past the master builder saw the whole problem as his problem first. Thus the process of seeing the design problem as a whole, as a result ofprioritizing, considering constraints, or strategizing, is lost in today’s practice, basically because this process is a mental and implicit process, that occurred in the brain of the multi-disciplinary master builder.In most cases it is the task of no one in a design team today. The aim of this paper is modeling this conceptual mental implicit process design using System Theory and Cognitive Psychology, trying to determine the structure of the design problem as it occurs intuitively in the brain. The result will provide us with a mechanism that enables us each time to refine a unique common design problem representation. This leads to more effective use of design team capabilities, and forms an essential basis for organizing efforts toward collaborative solutions. Also some kind of clarity is provided as to how proposed solutions are to be judged.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddssup0202
id ddssup0202
authors Antoni, J.P.
year 2002
title Urban Sprawl Modelling: Combining Models to Make Decision
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Urban sprawl is frequently associated with the idea of an unsuitable development, leading to increasing economic, social and environmental problems. Moreover, its control is difficult because multiple patterns (concerning numerous traditional urban planning fields) overlap. In order to understand the sprawl process and to manage its consequences, it must be simplified. The construction of a decision making tool appears then interesting. The GIS-based tool presented here is being developed incollaboration between the urban planning agency of Belfort and the laboratory of geography of Strasbourg. It requires three steps: 1. quantification of the sprawl (how much areas are involved in theurban sprawl process?); 2. location of the sprawl (where are the areas defined in the first step?); 3. differentiation of the sprawl (what are the areas located in the second step?). Of course, the successionof the three stages makes the use of the complete model more complex. So, a global ergonomic user interface is being developed within the GIS, allowing to modify each parameter and to play easily numerous simulations.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 12d9
authors Anumba, C.J., Ugwu, O.O., Newnham, L. and Thorpe, A.
year 2002
title Collaborative design of structures using intelligent agents
source Automation in Construction 11 (1) (2002) pp. 89-103
summary The construction industry has a long tradition of collaborative working between the members of a construction project team. At the design stage, this has traditionally been based on physical meetings between representatives of the principal design disciplines. To aid these meetings, the information and communications technologies that are currently available have been utilised. These have yielded some success but are hampered by the problems posed by the use of heterogeneous software tools and the lack of effective collaboration tools that are necessary to collapse the time and distance constraints, within which increasingly global design teams work. In particular, there are very few tools available to support distributed asynchronous collaboration. Distributed artificial intelligence, which is commonly implemented in the form of intelligent agents, offers considerable potential for the development of such tools. This paper examines some of the issues associated with the use of distributed artificial intelligence systems within the construction industry. It describes the potential for the use of agent technology in collaborative design and then goes on to present the key features of an agent-based system for the collaborative design of portal frame structures. An example is presented to demonstrate the working and benefits of the prototype system, which makes a significant contribution by allowing for peer to peer negotiation between the design agents.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id a35a
authors Arponen, Matti
year 2002
title From 2D Base Map To 3D City Model
source UMDS '02 Proceedings, Prague (Czech Republic) 2-4 October 2002, I.17-I.28
summary Since 1997 Helsinki City Survey Division has proceeded in experimenting and in developing the methods for converting and supplementing current digital 2D base maps in the scale 1:500 to a 3D city model. Actually since 1986 project areas have been produced in 3D for city planning and construction projects, but working with the whole map database started in 1997 because of customer demands and competitive 3D projects. 3D map database needs new data modelling and structures, map update processes need new working orders and the draftsmen need to learn a new profession; the 3D modeller. Laser-scanning and digital photogrammetry have been used in collecting 3D information on the map objects. During the years 1999-2000 laser-scanning experiments covering 45 km2 have been carried out utilizing the Swedish TopEye system. Simultaneous digital photography produces material for orto photo mosaics. These have been applied in mapping out dated map features and in vectorizing 3D buildings manually, semi automatically and automatically. In modelling we use TerraScan, TerraPhoto and TerraModeler sw, which are developed in Finland. The 3D city model project is at the same time partially a software development project. An accuracy and feasibility study was also completed and will be shortly presented. The three scales of 3D models are also presented in this paper. Some new 3D products and some usage of 3D city models in practice will be demonstrated in the actual presentation.
keywords 3D City modeling
series other
email matti.arponen@hel.fi
more www.udms.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id bcf7
authors Arvin, Scott A. and House, Donald H.
year 2002
title Modeling architectural design objectives in physically based space planning
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 213-225
summary Physically based space planning is a means for automating the conceptual design process by applying the physics of motion to space plan elements. This methodology provides for a responsive design process, which allows a designer to easily make decisions whose consequences immediately propagate throughout the design. It combines the speed of automated design methods with the flexibility of manual design methods, while adding a highly interactive quality and a sense of collaboration with the design itself. In our approach, the designer creates a space plan by specifying and modifying graphic design objectives rather than by directly manipulating primitive geometry. The plan adapts to the changing state of objectives by applying the physics of motion to its elements. For design objectives to affect a physically based space plan, they need to apply appropriate forces to space plan elements. Space planning can be separated into two problems, determining topological properties and determining geometric properties. Design objectives can then be categorized as topological or geometric objectives. Topological objectives influence the location of individual spaces, affecting how one space relates to another. Geometric objectives influence the size and shape of space boundaries, affecting the dimensions of individual walls. This paper focuses on how to model a variety of design objectives for use in a physically based space planning system. We describe how topological objectives, such as adjacency and orientation can be modeled to apply forces to space locations, and how geometric objectives, such as area, proportion, and alignment, can be modeled to apply forces to boundary edges.
series journal paper
email arvin@viz.tamu.edu
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ac57
authors Bae, H.A., Kim, M.R., Shin, S.Y., Kim, H.A. and Yoon, C.S.
year 2002
title An Application of Photogrammetry Measuring Technology to Parametric Modeling of Korean Traditional Wooden Structure
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 139-146
summary To construct a 3D parametric model of Korean traditional wooden structure, the fundamental process is to obtain the dimensions of each building. An application of measuring high technology helps this process accomplished more efficiently. However PhotoModeler is a photogrammetric program to measure the dimension using photographs. The information derived from PhotoModeler is used to clarify the design rule inherent in a Korean traditional mansion type building - UnHyun Palace.
series CAADRIA
email bhanseon@hanmail.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddssar0206
id ddssar0206
authors Bax, M.F.Th. and Trum, H.M.G.J.
year 2002
title Faculties of Architecture
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In order to be inscribed in the European Architect’s register the study program leading to the diploma ‘Architect’ has to meet the criteria of the EC Architect’s Directive (1985). The criteria are enumerated in 11 principles of Article 3 of the Directive. The Advisory Committee, established by the European Council got the task to examine such diplomas in the case some doubts are raised by other Member States. To carry out this task a matrix was designed, as an independent interpreting framework that mediates between the principles of Article 3 and the actual study program of a faculty. Such a tool was needed because of inconsistencies in the list of principles, differences between linguistic versions ofthe Directive, and quantification problems with time, devoted to the principles in the study programs. The core of the matrix, its headings, is a categorisation of the principles on a higher level of abstractionin the form of a taxonomy of domains and corresponding concepts. Filling in the matrix means that each study element of the study programs is analysed according to their content in terms of domains; thesummation of study time devoted to the various domains results in a so-called ‘profile of a faculty’. Judgement of that profile takes place by committee of peers. The domains of the taxonomy are intrinsically the same as the concepts and categories, needed for the description of an architectural design object: the faculties of architecture. This correspondence relates the taxonomy to the field of design theory and philosophy. The taxonomy is an application of Domain theory. This theory,developed by the authors since 1977, takes as a view that the architectural object only can be described fully as an integration of all types of domains. The theory supports the idea of a participatory andinterdisciplinary approach to design, which proved to be awarding both from a scientific and a social point of view. All types of domains have in common that they are measured in three dimensions: form, function and process, connecting the material aspects of the object with its social and proceduralaspects. In the taxonomy the function dimension is emphasised. It will be argued in the paper that the taxonomy is a categorisation following the pragmatistic philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce. It will bedemonstrated as well that the taxonomy is easy to handle by giving examples of its application in various countries in the last 5 years. The taxonomy proved to be an adequate tool for judgement ofstudy programs and their subsequent improvement, as constituted by the faculties of a Faculty of Architecture. The matrix is described as the result of theoretical reflection and practical application of a matrix, already in use since 1995. The major improvement of the matrix is its direct connection with Peirce’s universal categories and the self-explanatory character of its structure. The connection with Peirce’s categories gave the matrix a more universal character, which enables application in other fieldswhere the term ‘architecture’ is used as a metaphor for artefacts.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 898a
authors Bay, J.H.
year 2002
title Cognitive Biases and Precedent Knowledge in Human and Computer-Aided Design Thinking
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 213-220
summary Cognitive biases (illusions) and potential errors can occur when using precedent knowledge for analogical, pre-parametric and qualitative design thinking. This paper refers largely to part of a completed research (Bay 2001) on how heuristic biases, discussed by Tversky and Kahneman (1982) in cognitive psychology, can affect judgement and learning of facts from precedents in architectural design, made explicit using a kernel of conceptual system (Tzonis et. al., 1978) and a framework of architectural representation (Tzonis 1992). These are used here to consider how such illusions and errors may be transferred to computer aided design thinking.
series CAADRIA
email akibayp@nus.edu.sg
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id acadia07_174
id acadia07_174
authors Bontemps, Arnaud; Potvin, André; Demers, Claude
year 2007
title The Dynamics of Physical Ambiences
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 174-181
summary This research proposes to support the reading of physical ambiences by the development of a representational technique which compiles, in a numerical interface, two types of data: sensory and filmic. These data are recorded through the use of a portable array equipped with sensors (Potvin 1997, 2002, 2004) as well as the acquisition of Video information of the moving environment. The compilation of information is carried out through a multi-media approach, by means of a program converting the environmental data into dynamic diagrams, as well as the creation of an interactive interface allowing a possible diffusion on the Web. This technique, named APMAP/Video, makes it possible to read out simultaneously spatial and environmental diversity. It is demonstrated through surveys taken at various seasons and time of the day at the new Caisse de dépôt et de placement headquarters in Montreal which is also the corpus for a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) research grant on Environmental Adaptability in Architecture (Potvin et al. 2003-2007). This case study shows that the technique can prove of great relevance for POEs (Post Occupancy Evaluation) as well as for assistance in a new design project.
series ACADIA
email arnaudbontemps@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id ee65
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis and Charitos, Dimitris
year 2002
title Teaching Virtual Environment Design
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 42-49
summary In a previous paper, the authors considered the design and development of virtual environments (VEs) pointing out the need for a new direction within architectural education, leading towards a generation of VE architects. It was suggested that there is an urgent need for educating practitioners who will contribute to the design of 3D content for multimedia and virtual reality applications. This paper focuses on the application of these principles and ideas into the structure and methodology of three VE design courses, taught by the authors. These courses are by no means suggested as exhaustive examples of teaching this subject. They are seen as preliminary approaches, adapting to the educational context they are integrated within. Bearing in mind the problems relating to teaching large numbers of students with a design studio approach, difficult concepts, resources availability, fighting misconceptions, techno-phobia the following areas are discussed in the hope that they will contribute to VE design curricula in the near future.
series eCAADe
email V.Bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 4b05
authors Brazier, Frances M. and Wijngaards, Niek
year 2002
title Role of Trust in Automated Distributed Design
source Gero JS and Brazier FMT (eds) (2002) Agents in Design 2002. Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, pp. 71-83
summary Distributed design involves many participants, each with their own expertise and goals. Information acquired from different participants may be valued differently in terms of accuracy and trustworthiness. Human participants in a distributed design setting often know whom they trust, and whose abilities they value. This knowledge is not often made explicit. It does, however, influence distributed design processes (i.e. the way in which members of a design team assess and incorporate each others' designs, objectives, evaluations). These trust relations need to be made explicit to be able to effectively support distributed design.
series other
email niek@cs.vu.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 3d67
authors Breen, J., Nottrot, R. and Stellingwerff, M.
year 2002
title Relating to the ‘real’ Perceptions of Computer Aided and Physical Modelling
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 134-138
summary Designing - giving form to new objects or environments - is largely a question of anticipating the workings of spatial and material environments, which can become ‘reality’ only by being built. Until ‘realized’ a design is essentially a figment of the designer’s imagination, although his or her ideas may be laid down and conveyed to others via specialized design media. In this way impressions of the design may be shared with clients, colleagues or other ‘actors’ in the design process. Such products of the designer’s imaging process can be relatively abstract or begin to approach - future - reality. Form & Media research can be ‘revealing’, stimulating insights concerning preferences, working processes and the effects of products of the designer’s imagination. In the past ten years we have gained considerable practical experience with both virtual and tangible (scale) models. We have compared different techniques in conference workshops, within educational settings and in our Form & Media research laboratory. The research projects ranged from the development of practical techniques and working methods to protocol analyses of designing architects. This contribution draws comparisons between different computer aided modelling techniques, with an indication of their perspectives, making use of the experience gained from various experiments in an educational context, and will highlight the potentials for different combinations of digital and physical modelling techniques.
series eCAADe
email j.l.h.breen@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

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