CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 61 to 80 of 508

_id ga0206
id ga0206
authors Biles, John A.
year 2002
title GenJam in Transition: from Genetic Jammer to Generative Jammer
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary GenJam, short for Genetic Jammer, is an evolutionary computation (EC) based software agent that models a jazz improviser. Recently GenJam has evolved away from its roots as an interactive genetic algorithm toward its current state as an autonomous generative system. GenJam has retained its chromosome-based representations and mappings, its intelligent selection, crossover and mutation operators, and its real-time interactive performance capabilities. However, it no longer needs any explicit representation of fitness, which arguably makes it no longer an EC system. This paper considers GenJam as a generative art system. Generative art produces “unique and non-repeatable events” that express a designer’s generating idea. The designer’s generating idea defines a species of events, represented in a genetic code. In music, these events could be individual notes, melodic phrases, even entire pieces. In GenJam the events are four-measure phrases, or “licks” in the jazz vernacular. The format for the genetic code, then, defines a species space from which unique individual events can be generated. Uniqueness is important in jazz because improvisation must be spontaneous and “new.” Hence, improvisation is tailor-made for the generative art paradigm, and in fact, one could argue that improvisation is, by definition, the purest example of generative art applied to music. In other words, generative music is improvisation, and GenJam is the Generative Jammer.
series other
email jab@it.rit.edu
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ga0237
id ga0237
authors Ciao, Quinsan
year 2002
title Generative Design: Rule-Based Reasoning in Design Process
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary As emphasized by Professor Soddu’s series of pioneer works on generative design, the fundamental theoretical base can be generallyconsidered as a design process that generates design by the initiation, developing and manipulation with designers’ objectives as well as theirassociated set of rules. This process is, in a broad sense, a reasoning process that follows the rules being set forth. In many cases, the rules arecommon logic that governs our reasoning, while in others they are more special rules that restrict the generating process to a confined space.Computer assisted generative design has made impressive progress over the past decade, along with the rapid growing capacity and speed ofcomputers as well as development and discovery of rules, rule setting and effective manipulating schemes and algorithms. After manyimpressive progress and remarkable results has demonstrated from time to time, however, theoretical foundation of such design approach, orthe significance of awareness of such approach has not been thoroughly treated, recognized and discussed, not to mention clearly understood.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ga0214
id ga0214
authors De Felice, F,Abbattista, F. and Scagliola, F.
year 2002
title GenOrchestra: An Interactive Evolutionary Agent for Musical Composition
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary GenOrchestra is a project involving the Dipartimento d’Informatica and Conservatorio di Musica “N. Piccinni” in Bari. This project concern a Creative Evolutionary System, based on Evolutionary Computation (EC) techniques, applied to the field of western tonal music. With GenOrchestra a novel way to evaluate the produced tunes is presented: indeed we adopt a hybrid solution composed for two kinds of fitness functions. The first, called technique fitness, evaluates the consonance degree between melodic, harmonic and rhythmic sections, moreover, it defines how well the rhythmic paths is organized into a coherent musical event. The second fitness function called human fitness, determine how well the tunes are perceived from a human audience, like in a concert. This task is accomplished by presenting the tunes on the Internet and then gathering the surfers evaluations in a database from which the system take the final population scoring. This, coupled with a no limited musical primordial soup, makes GenOrchestra a promising eclectic artificial composer. The ultimate goal of this project, currently in progress, is the development of a very human-like composer, which can produce music in any musical genre, and which is able to show a “personal style”. Samples will be soon available at http://valis.di.uniba.it/GenOrchestra/samples.html
series other
email febo74@libero.it
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 1a42
authors Fjeld, M., Lauche, K., Bichsel, M., Voorhorst, F., Krueger, H., Rauterberg, M.
year 2002
title Physical and Virtual Tools: Activity Theory Applied to the Design of Groupware
source Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Kluwer
summary Activity theory is based on the concept of tools mediating between subjects and objects. In this theory, an individual's creative interaction with his or her surroundings can result in the production of tools. When an individual's mental processes are exteriorized in the form of tools - termed objectification - they become more accessible to other people and are therefore useful for social interaction. This paper shows how our understanding of activity theory has shaped our design philosophy for groupware and how we have applied it. Our design philosophy and practice is exemplified by a description of the BUILD-IT system. This is an Augmented Reality system we developed to enhance group work; it is a kind of graspable groupware which supports cooperative planning. The system allows a group of people, co-located around a table, to interact, by means of physical bricks, with models in a virtual three-dimensional (3D) setting. Guided by task analysis, a set of specific tools for different 3D planning and configuration tasks was implemented as part of this system. We investigate both physical and virtual tools. These tools allow users to adjust model height, viewpoint, and scale of the virtual setting. Finally, our design practice is summarized in a set of design guidelines. Based on these guidelines, we reflect on our own design practice and the usefulness of activity theory for design.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ga0213
id ga0213
authors Herr, Christiane M.
year 2002
title Generative Architectural Design and Complexity Theory
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary During the past decades, complexity theory has evolved as a new discipline that provides a broad scientific perspective towards dynamic real-life phenomena, challenging the classical linear worldview as well as simple cause-and-effect-style Newtonian physics. For architects, the advent of this new science offers the challenge as well as the chance to reconsider common design approaches and to invent new strategies based on the new paradigms. The actual application of complexity theory to architectural design, however, results in a fundamental dilemma: How can a reflective, ultimately retrospective body of thought (complexity theory) be applied to prospective design challenges (architecture)? Being part of a current MArch thesis project, the proposed paper focuses on this general dilemma between architectural design and complexity theory and discusses actual as well as potential future generative architectural design approaches involving complexity theory. Generative design strategies commonly apply algorithmic methods and formalisms, which can conveniently produce and deal with high levels of complexity. Complexity describes general properties of a system and can be further dissected into several modes: epistemic, ontological and functional complexity. This taxonomy offers insights into generative design applications, which have mostly focused on a limited set of complexity modes. Besides complexity generated by sheer numbers, aspects like functional or hierarchical complexity offer further perspectives on generative systems, processes and output. Considering these aspects of complexity theory, future challenges to generative architectural design can be predicted.
series other
email candyhk@hkusua.hku.hk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ddssar0216
id ddssar0216
authors Jones, Dennis B.
year 2002
title The Quantum Matrix:A Three Dimensional Data Integration and Collaboration ToolFor Virtual Environments
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary If a picture is worth a thousand words, what if they could walk and talk? How would you like to bring a whole new dimension to your ideas; to use visualization to convey a sense of time and motion, to use imagery to give your ideas vividness; to use sound to give them voice and view them threedimensionally. The Matrix allows you to do all of this and much more. The Matrix resembles Rubik’s cube, but its purpose is to store, manage and access data of all types and to view them in three dimensions in virtual environments such as the CAVE and on your desktop. The current version can store, access and view almost anything that is in digital form, including:Text files Pictures Video Clips Sound Files Spreadsheets URL’s HTML pages Databases CAD drawings Gantt Charts Business Graphics VRML modelsExecutable Programs OLE (Object Link & Embedded) The Matrix is a three-dimensional multimedia and document management tool. The Matrix anticipates the convergence of electronic media into one consistent environment for analysis and representation. the Matrix uses VMRL and OpenGL technologies to allow the user to be immersed in their data as withCinerama, IMAX and Virtual Reality Environments. The Matrix allows the user to exercise their creativity by interactively placing and organizing their data three dimensionally and navigating through and viewingdata and documents in 3D (monocular and binocular – stereo). The Matrix user interface is simple to use. Employing the now familiar “drag and drop” method to manage data and documents. Items can be placed into the matrix grid at a user selected matrix cube location. Upon dropping a document on a cube it appears as a mapped image onto the surface. Navigating through the 3D Matrix-space is fun. All navigation uses real-time animation giving you instant feed back as to where you are. Data drilling is as simple as mouse click on a Matrix cube. Double clicking the on an object in the matrix activates that object. Data dreams was an image that preexisted the program by several years. The dream was to create a new way oforganizing and exploring data. The Qube image was created using Microstation by Bentley Systems, Inc. The figure was modeled using Poser by MetaCreations and composited using Adobe Photoshop.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ecaade03_601_68_penttila
id ecaade03_601_68_penttila
authors Penttilä, Hannu
year 2003
title Survey of Architectural-ICT in the Educational Curriculumns of Europe
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 601-606
summary The paper documents the findings of the post-graduate study carried out among the 180 European schools of architecture in more than 30 countries during 2002-2003. The objective has been to describe the role of ""modern digital information technology"" and to give an understandable and measurable overview the current architectural education and its relation with ICT and CAAD. The study material has been collected with a web-survey, with questionnaires to eCAADe-conference participants in Helsinki 2001 and Warsaw 2002, and with direct email-contacts to schools’ key-persons. Computer-aided design has developed into architectural information and communication technology (ICT), to become the main tool of the majority. The general image of new media use in the architectural schools seems to be slightly too positive. The invisible or ”normal” ICT-use - writing, surfing, emailing - has a lot more volume than documented. The major hardware platform in european architecture schools is PC/Windows (90-95 %), Linux and Unix are used also commonly (25-35 %). Macintoshes are also used much more widely within architecture (50-55 %) than within the common computing platforms. MS/Office (90-95 %) and PhotoShop (85-90 %) are obviously also used widely in the architecture schools. Graphic tools PageMaker, QuarkXpress, Illustrator, Freehand are common tools for architecture students (30-50 %). AutoCAD is ”the marketing leader"" in architectural platforms (80-90 %) followed by ArchiCAD (60-65 %). MicroStation/Bentley has also a remarkable volume in the schools (35-40 %). 3DStudio is the most common 3D-modelling tool (80-85 %), followed by formZ (35-40 %). Slightly less volume but still remarkable (15-25 %) have Rhino, Maya, Alias, Lightscape and Radiance.
keywords Architectural education; architectural curriculumns; information and communication technology; IT; ICT; questionnaires; statistics
series eCAADe
email penttila@mittaviiva.fi
more http://www.arkit.net
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ga0218
id ga0218
authors Schein, Markus
year 2002
title Applied Generative Procedures in Furniture Design
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary This paper discusses an approach which combines different generative procedures with design methods as they are common in daily design practice: Two generative tools together with paper models, prototypes and „classical“ Computer Aided Design span the design process. The subject of experimentation is a specific class of furniture: CNC - manufactured, foldable objects for different seating positions, based on a material composition of thin plywood laminated with fabric and / or felt. The generative tools described below have been developed with the macro programming facilities of the CAD-software I-DEAS. One tool can be used either for systematic exploration of the search space or as a source for inspiration, depending on the preference settings chosen by the user. The other tool is made for the elaboration of details of the generated designs and for preparing production. The prototypes of these tools are still in an experimental stage and just in use to be tested and evaluated. Therefore the charcacter of the following text is more descriptive than analysing.
series other
email mschein@student.uni-kassel.de
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 8780
authors Abdelhameed, W., Ozel, F., Addelatiff, M. and Daef, A.
year 2002
title Assessment of the Impact of Digital-Manual Media Types on the Basic Design Capabilities of Architects: A Proposed Framework and Directive Measures
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 275-276
summary The research attempts to defi ne and classify the design capabilities of architects into a basic framework. This defi nition will be useful in understanding and determining the types and nature of impact introduced by digital and manual media used during architecturaldesign process. The research consists of three parts. The First part reviews the main stages, tasks and activities of the architectural design process. The second part builds the proposed framework of design capabilities relating them to the specifi c tasks and activities conductedby the architect along the design process. The third part proposes some useful measures as to how to make use of the proposed framework in assessing the impact of media on the design capabilities of architects.
series SIGRADI
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ddssar0201
id ddssar0201
authors Achten, H.H.
year 2002
title Requirements for Collaborative Design in Architecture
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary The concept of collaborative design has recently come under renewed attention in the field of computer aided architectural design support. Although collaborative design deals with the same aspects of cooperation by various participants in the design process as previously studiedin, for example, concurrent engineering and multi-disciplinary design, it nevertheless puts a different research emphasis. Collaborative design looks at how the process can be improved in such a way that collaboration –working together in a manner to enhance each participants contribution to the design– emerges from the process. In engineering design practice, thismeans a shift forward in the design process where engineers are asked earlier for their input in the design solution. For CAAD research, the phenomenon of collaborative design poses the question how design tools and environments can be made in such a way that collaboration will occur. In this paper, the aims is to describe the concept of collaborative design in architecture, and to give an outline of the perceived requirements in the organisation of design and Computer Aided Design Support to achieve collaborative design.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 730e
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1997
title Implementation of IT and CAD - what can Architect schools do?
source AVOCAAD First International Conference [AVOCAAD Conference Proceedings / ISBN 90-76101-01-09] Brussels (Belgium) 10-12 April 1997, pp. 83-92
summary In Sweden representatives from the Construction industry have put forward a research and development program called: "IT-Bygg 2002 -Implementation". It aims at making IT the vehicle for decreasing the building costs and at the same time getting better quality and efficiency out of the industry. A seminar was held with some of the most experienced researchers, developers and practitioners of CAD in construction in Sweden. The activities were recorded and annotated, analysed and put together afterwards; then presented to the participants to agree on. Co-operation is the key to get to the goals - IT and CAD are just the means to improve it. Co-operation in a phase of implementation is enough problematic without the technical difficulties in using computer programs created by the computer industry primarily for commercial reasons. The suggestion is that cooperation between software companies within Sweden will make a greater market to share than the sum of all individual efforts. In the short term, 2 - 5 years, implementation of CAD and IT will demand a large amount of educational efforts from all actors in the construction process. In the process of today the architect is looked upon as a natural coordinator of the design phase. In the integrated process the architect's methods and knowledge are central and must be spread to other categories of actors - what a challenge! At least in Sweden the number of researchers and educators in CAAD is easily counted. How do we make the most of it?
series AVOCAAD
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 12e3
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E., Che Zulkhairi, A. and Karboulonis, P.
year 2002
title Interactive Storytelling and Its Role in the Design Process
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 151-158
summary Projects of ever increasing complexity and size have incited the need for new and robust design methodologies and tools in an effort to manage complexity, lower costs, ascertain quality and reduce risk. Technology convergence through the growing availability of networked computers, rapid progress in Computer Aided Design (CAD) and information management have encouraged the undertaking of even more complex designs that demand high degrees of interaction, collaboration and the efficient sharing and dissemination of information. It is suggested that interactive storytelling and interactive design (Rafi and Karboulonis, 2001) techniques that use non-linear information mapping systems can be deployed to assist users as they navigate information that is structured to address localized needs as they arise. The design process is a collaborative effort that encompasses diverse knowledge disciplines and demands the management and utilization of available resources to satisfy the needs of a single or set of goals. It is thought that building industry specialists should work close together in an organised manner to solve design problems as they emerge and find alternatives when designs fall short. The design process involves the processing of dynamic and complex information, that can be anything from the amount of soil required to level lands - to the needs of specific lightings systems in operation theatres. Other important factors that affect the design process are related to costs and deadlines. This paper will demonstrate some of our early findings in several experiments to establish nonlinear storytelling. It will conclude with a recommendation for a plausible design of such a system based on experimental work that is currently being conducted and is reaching its final stages. The paper will lay the foundations of a possible path to implementation based on the concept of multi-path animation that is appropriate for structuring the design process as used in the building industry.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ga0230
id ga0230
authors Annunziato, Mauro and Pierucci, Piero
year 2002
title Human-Artificial Ecosystems: Searching for a Language
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The most recent advances of artificial life scientific research are opening up a new frontier: the creation of simulated life environments populated by autonomous agents. In these environments artificial beings can interact, reproduce and evolve [4, 6, 15], and can be seen as laboratories toexplore the emergence of social behaviors like competition, cooperation, relationships and communication [3, 5, 7] . It is still not possible to approach a reasonable simulation of the incredible complexity of human or animal societies, but these environments can be used as a scientific orartistic tools to explore some basic aspects of the evolution [1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16].
series other
email plancton@plancton.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 7798
authors Barrow, Larry
year 2002
title Elitism, IT and the Modern Architect Opportunity or Dilemma
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 97-109
summary Information Technology (IT) is impacting architecture dramatically in process and form. Often thecurrent transformation of architecture is difficult to analyze and frequently we see confusion and anxietyregarding uncertainties for the future of the architect as designer and project leader. The currentpotentiality for new exotic form (i.e. product) is mesmerizing; however, in the current context, lessobvious issues and pertinent questions are emerging for the profession. What is the mission of theprofession? What will keep us relevant in the mist of the new global society?In this paper, we will take an evolutionary perspective of technology in architecture and draw parallelsbetween the Renaissance, which is the genesis of the modern architect, and the contemporary state ofarchitecture. The modern architect was birthed during the Renaissance where we see the retraction ofthe architect from the building site and separation from direct involvement in the building process.Communications technology (i.e. representation in the form of free-hand drawings, mechanical 2Dorthographic drawings and 3D perspectives) enabled the decomposition of the master builder into threecomponents (i.e. artist-designer, practicing_architect, and builder). Thus, we see technology enable thedenigration and ultimate dissolution of the centuries old craftsman guilds and the master builder. Thetechnology evolution of “drawings” enabled monumental change in the process of architecture over thepast five hundred years. The fission of the master builder, enabled by “drawings”, resulted in disparatefactions which are the forerunners of the modern day litigious design-bid-build project delivery. We nowincreasingly see a return to the fusion of design and building where often the architect is not the projectmanager or leader. Thus, the question looms, will the 21st century architect lead or be led, and whatare the ramifications for the profession?The historical Master Builder is re-emerging as a dynamically networked team of design andconstruction knowledge specialists. Bi-lateral knowledge exchange, enhanced with emerging IT, isoccurring between owners, managers, architects, design specialists, engineers, builders and machines.Technology is disrupting architecture, resulting in increasing specialization and compressed timeframes, and may require reevaluation of the role of the architect as project-leader "integrativegeneralist"or "design-specialist".Conclusively, the concept of ‘cybernetic architecture’ is proposed as an IT reference framework. Failureto appropriately respond to societal evolution, driven by technology, could result in the loss ofprofessional status for the modern architect. Herein lies our dilemma, or opportunity, depending on therole choice of the modern architect.
series ACADIA
email lbarrow@msstate.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 898a
authors Bay, J.H.
year 2002
title Cognitive Biases and Precedent Knowledge in Human and Computer-Aided Design Thinking
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 213-220
summary Cognitive biases (illusions) and potential errors can occur when using precedent knowledge for analogical, pre-parametric and qualitative design thinking. This paper refers largely to part of a completed research (Bay 2001) on how heuristic biases, discussed by Tversky and Kahneman (1982) in cognitive psychology, can affect judgement and learning of facts from precedents in architectural design, made explicit using a kernel of conceptual system (Tzonis et. al., 1978) and a framework of architectural representation (Tzonis 1992). These are used here to consider how such illusions and errors may be transferred to computer aided design thinking.
series CAADRIA
email akibayp@nus.edu.sg
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 6d22
authors Bermudez, J., Agutter, J., Syroid, N., Lilly, B., Sharir, Y., Lopez, T., Westenskow, D. and Foresti, S.
year 2002
title Interfacing Virtual & Physical Spaces through the Body: The cyberPRINT Project
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 395-400
summary The cyberPRINT is a fully immersive, interactive virtual environment that is being generated in rea-timebased on physiological data readings of a human body. In other words, the cyberPRINT is based oncreating interfaces between physical and digital spaces and between biology and informationtechnologies. The cyberPRINT is also an event, wherein a performer is connected to the cyberPRINTgenerator to create a self-sustaining feedback mechanism. Although using the body to electronicallydrive music and media events is not new, most of these works have paid little or no attention to thepotential of interactive 3D virtual environments. Nor have they been so technologically advanced,interdisciplinary intensive (involving architecture, choreography, modern dance, music, bioengineering,medicine and computer science), or architecturally focused as the cyberPRINT.This project covers a wide and fertile territory that goes from the very technical and design oriented tothe very theoretical and interdisciplinary. This paper is intended to (1) expand what has been alreadypublished about this project (Bermudez et al 2000a) and (2) establish potential areas for discussionbefore and after the performance
series ACADIA
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 817b
authors Bong, C.W. and Wang, Y.C.
year 2002
title A Shape Compactness Measurement Indexing with Fuzzy Multicriteria Decision Making Approach
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 093-100
summary Compactness of a district or zone is determined by considering its appearance and the area of dispersal of the district (Altman, 1998) and it is used as a characteristic to describe shape (Shiode, 1998; Knight, 1997). However, existing compactness measurement used to assess district plans in redistricting applications are vague and imprecision although there are more than thirty over Euclidean or non-Euclidean measurement methods. Therefore, this paper presents an integrated shape compactness measurement indexing with a fuzzy multicriteria decision making approach (FMCDM) to enhance the measurement of shape compactness. An experiment is conducted in order to verify the practically of the proposed model to improve existing compactness measurement method.
series CAADRIA
email cwbong@pd.jaring.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id acadia07_174
id acadia07_174
authors Bontemps, Arnaud; Potvin, André; Demers, Claude
year 2007
title The Dynamics of Physical Ambiences
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 174-181
summary This research proposes to support the reading of physical ambiences by the development of a representational technique which compiles, in a numerical interface, two types of data: sensory and filmic. These data are recorded through the use of a portable array equipped with sensors (Potvin 1997, 2002, 2004) as well as the acquisition of Video information of the moving environment. The compilation of information is carried out through a multi-media approach, by means of a program converting the environmental data into dynamic diagrams, as well as the creation of an interactive interface allowing a possible diffusion on the Web. This technique, named APMAP/Video, makes it possible to read out simultaneously spatial and environmental diversity. It is demonstrated through surveys taken at various seasons and time of the day at the new Caisse de dépôt et de placement headquarters in Montreal which is also the corpus for a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) research grant on Environmental Adaptability in Architecture (Potvin et al. 2003-2007). This case study shows that the technique can prove of great relevance for POEs (Post Occupancy Evaluation) as well as for assistance in a new design project.
series ACADIA
email arnaudbontemps@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id 132eaea2001
id 132eaea2001
authors Borg, Manuela and Walz, Manfred
year 2002
title Orientation Strategies within Public Spaces as the Rudiments of Space Usage and Layout” – A Workshop Contribution
source Environmental Simulation - New Impulses in Planning Processes [Proceedings of the 5th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-922602-85-1]
summary Our guiding questions in research are: - how does one orient oneself in an unknown urban space, - are there typical strategies in orientation, which become visible during the search process and finally:- do men and women orientate in the same unknown urban space in the same way or are there hints that they are following different strategies?Our long-term theme in research is to find out the regularity and the rules of the processes of moving and using public spaces. In the first step we are trying to find out in which way the individual perception of urban spaces in moving depends on the design of urban spaces. Therefore in our research design we try to explore the qualities of urban spaces which become visible in moving processes. It is one of the oldest questions of urban design and – by the way – nearly every architect or planner pretends to know everything on this subject. But nobody is yet able to predict real moving or using processes while designing. On the other side: the parameters of the material frame work are well known while moving and using processes are still nearly unknown.
series EAEA
email borg@fh-dortmund.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 3d67
authors Breen, J., Nottrot, R. and Stellingwerff, M.
year 2002
title Relating to the ‘real’ Perceptions of Computer Aided and Physical Modelling
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 134-138
summary Designing - giving form to new objects or environments - is largely a question of anticipating the workings of spatial and material environments, which can become ‘reality’ only by being built. Until ‘realized’ a design is essentially a figment of the designer’s imagination, although his or her ideas may be laid down and conveyed to others via specialized design media. In this way impressions of the design may be shared with clients, colleagues or other ‘actors’ in the design process. Such products of the designer’s imaging process can be relatively abstract or begin to approach - future - reality. Form & Media research can be ‘revealing’, stimulating insights concerning preferences, working processes and the effects of products of the designer’s imagination. In the past ten years we have gained considerable practical experience with both virtual and tangible (scale) models. We have compared different techniques in conference workshops, within educational settings and in our Form & Media research laboratory. The research projects ranged from the development of practical techniques and working methods to protocol analyses of designing architects. This contribution draws comparisons between different computer aided modelling techniques, with an indication of their perspectives, making use of the experience gained from various experiments in an educational context, and will highlight the potentials for different combinations of digital and physical modelling techniques.
series eCAADe
email j.l.h.breen@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

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