CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 506

_id 31ca
authors Martens, B., Björk, B.-C. and Turk, Z.
year 2002
title Open, Self Organising Repository for Scientific Information Exchange - The SciX Project
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 222-229
summary In the paper-based world, CAAD-associations, such as eCAADe, and scientific publishers aim at getting the right people together and for making sure their work gets distributed to their peers. Electronic networks, such as the Internet, are providing scientists with the means to pursue those activities on their own. In this paper we present the goals of an EU project called SciX. The goal of SciX is to analyze the business processes of scientific publishing, to invent new publication models and through a series of pilots to demonstrate how this should work. In the envisioned scenarios, professional associations such as eCAADe play an important role. Their members are the potential users of SciX’s platforms, authors and readers of the papers. Associations could also become the publishers and archivists of the knowledge created within their respective community. The objectives of this contribution focus on involving the eCAADecommunity in the developments in SciX, on fine-shaping the goals as well as on defining the requirements and monitoring the usability of the pilots.
series eCAADe
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 6b05
authors Martens, B., Björk, B.-Chr. and Turk, Z.
year 2002
title Open, Self Organising Repository for Scientific Information Exchange
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 116-120
summary In the paper-based world, CAAD-associations, such as SIGRADI, and scientific publishers aim at getting the right people together and for making sure their work gets distributed to their peers. Electronic networks, such as the Internet, are providing scientists with the means to pursue those activities on their own. In this paper we present the goals of an EU project called SciX (Scientific information eXchange). The goal of is this project is to analyze the business processes of scientific publishing, to invent new publication models and through a series of pilots to demonstrate how this should work. In the envisioned scenarios, professional associations such as SIGRADI play an important role.
keywords Scientific Knowledge Management, Retrospective CAAD Research, CAADrelated Publications, Web-based Bibliographic Database, Machine Learning
series SIGRADI
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at; bo-christer.bjork@shh.fi; ziga.turk@itc.fgg.uni-lj.si
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 6b70
authors Af Klercker, Jonas and Pittioni, Gernot
year 2002
title Architect and Structural Engineer in interactive design
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 386-389
summary We are convinced that an interactive design process involving engineers and architects will create values to a project. Looking back there have been some obstacles, like a week’s time for exchange of drawings with traditional postal services; manual calculation methods, which could not be spoiled on loose grounds like architect’s sketches; different media – architect’s drawings and engineer’s numbers in tables; attitudes and traditional roles, implemented already in education. Today most of these obstacles can be overcome and we have made a test. We have used ArchiCad by Graphisoft and FEM-design by SKANSKA IT Solutions to test to make an interactive design. Our conclusions are that exchange of information, drawings and other documents is more or less routine in praxis, and it works almost instantly. Computers make calculation faster and easier for the engineer. Though we would wish to have software which manages to do more rapid estimations. Even simulations such as of loads on a structure are practically possible. By using model based CAD the data can be used for transferring quantities for calculations as well as visualization of the design as a platform for collaborate analysis. The technique is developed and usable but to gain acceptance and make use of it is also a matter of attitudes and of application activities in education.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2013/02/04 05:50

_id 7798
authors Barrow, Larry
year 2002
title Elitism, IT and the Modern Architect Opportunity or Dilemma
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 97-109
summary Information Technology (IT) is impacting architecture dramatically in process and form. Often thecurrent transformation of architecture is difficult to analyze and frequently we see confusion and anxietyregarding uncertainties for the future of the architect as designer and project leader. The currentpotentiality for new exotic form (i.e. product) is mesmerizing; however, in the current context, lessobvious issues and pertinent questions are emerging for the profession. What is the mission of theprofession? What will keep us relevant in the mist of the new global society?In this paper, we will take an evolutionary perspective of technology in architecture and draw parallelsbetween the Renaissance, which is the genesis of the modern architect, and the contemporary state ofarchitecture. The modern architect was birthed during the Renaissance where we see the retraction ofthe architect from the building site and separation from direct involvement in the building process.Communications technology (i.e. representation in the form of free-hand drawings, mechanical 2Dorthographic drawings and 3D perspectives) enabled the decomposition of the master builder into threecomponents (i.e. artist-designer, practicing_architect, and builder). Thus, we see technology enable thedenigration and ultimate dissolution of the centuries old craftsman guilds and the master builder. Thetechnology evolution of “drawings” enabled monumental change in the process of architecture over thepast five hundred years. The fission of the master builder, enabled by “drawings”, resulted in disparatefactions which are the forerunners of the modern day litigious design-bid-build project delivery. We nowincreasingly see a return to the fusion of design and building where often the architect is not the projectmanager or leader. Thus, the question looms, will the 21st century architect lead or be led, and whatare the ramifications for the profession?The historical Master Builder is re-emerging as a dynamically networked team of design andconstruction knowledge specialists. Bi-lateral knowledge exchange, enhanced with emerging IT, isoccurring between owners, managers, architects, design specialists, engineers, builders and machines.Technology is disrupting architecture, resulting in increasing specialization and compressed timeframes, and may require reevaluation of the role of the architect as project-leader "integrativegeneralist"or "design-specialist".Conclusively, the concept of ‘cybernetic architecture’ is proposed as an IT reference framework. Failureto appropriately respond to societal evolution, driven by technology, could result in the loss ofprofessional status for the modern architect. Herein lies our dilemma, or opportunity, depending on therole choice of the modern architect.
series ACADIA
email lbarrow@msstate.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddssar0207
id ddssar0207
authors Conti, G. and Ucelli, G.
year 2002
title A Java3D Tool for Real-Time Collaboration in a Virtual Reality CAADEnvironment
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Today the development of network-based virtual communities and the use of avatars have brought a new level of complexity to the meaning of virtuality, providing the technology for remote presence and collaborative experiences. In this project the intention was to pursue this articulated vision of VR in order to assist the design profession during the early stages of the design process. The objective was to provide a tool that is capable of creating 3D shapes in a shared VR environment, thus allowing thedesign and its evolution to be shared. The use of the Java programming language was a natural choice for this project. Because of Java’s performance scalability and hardware independence the concept ofCAAD has been extended, making it possible to create a VR environment that can co-exist between high-end supercomputers and standard PCs. The project is currently being tested using PCs and an SGI system running a Reality Centre. The research reported in this paper describes the architecture and application of software that aims to increase the opportunity for collaboration within virtual worlds and enable effective and transparent information exchange.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 8301
authors Garner, S. and Mann, P.
year 2002
title Interdisciplinarity: Perceptions of the Value of Computer Supported Collaborative Work in Design for the Built Environment
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 221-228
summary This paper presents the findings from a study into the current exploitation of CSCW in design for the built environment in the UK. The research is based on responses to a web-based questionnaire. Members of various professions including civil engineers, architects, building services engineers and quantity surveyors were invited to complete the questionnaire. The responses reveal important trends in the breadth and size of project teams at the same time as new pressures are emerging regarding team integration and efficiency. The findings suggest that while CSCW systems may improve project management (e.g. via project documentation) and the exchange of information between team members it has yet to significantly support those activities that characterize integrated collaborative working between disparate specialists. The authors conclude by combining the findings with a wider discussion of the application of CSCW to design activity – appealing for CSCW to go beyond multidisciplinary working to achieve interdisciplinary working.
series CAADRIA
email s.w.garner@open.ac.uk
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 49a6
authors He, J., Tsou, J.-Y. and Lam, S.
year 2002
title Potential of Using a GIS-based Natural Visual Landscape Evaluation Tool in Large-scale Urban Planning - A Comparative Study in Dongshan New Town
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 478-487
summary Natural visual landscape is under deterioration due to improper construction and planning in modern development of China. One of the main reasons is the feebleness in planning supporting methodology and technology in respect for natural visual landscape. In such supporting information, landscape evaluation always acts as a significant component. Especially in comprehensive planning, it is the only approach to access visual value distribution in large-scale region. In this paper, we present a GISbased natural visual landscape evaluation tool through a case study. By an integrated rating statistics function of this tool, visual quality of natural landscape is quantified through analysis in visibility, landuse, and visual resource quality. Then we make comprehensive planning strategies based on this scientific supporting tool. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of this tool by comparing these strategies with schemes of the same project conducted through traditional planning module. This comparative study reveals the efficiency and effectiveness of the tool as well as its implementation in large-scale comprehensive urban planning.
series eCAADe
email hejie@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id ddssar0223
id ddssar0223
authors Mahdavi, A, Suter G. and Ries, R.
year 2002
title A Representation Scheme for Integrated Building Performance Analysis
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary This paper presents a representational scheme for integrated building performance analysis. The underlying research work was motivated by the need for seamless exchange of structured design information.A comprehensive and widely accepted industry standard suitable for exchanging design information among the various AEC (Architecture/Engineering/Construction) applications has yet to emerge. As a contribution to this on-going discussion, we present a specific approach to the integration problem in building product modeling. This approach can be viewed as pragmatic or bottom-up in the sense that itwas driven by the informational needs of related individual domains (particularly in the early stages of design) rather than by a quest for a universally applicable solution. In this paper, we describe a schemawhich emerged from the SEMPER effort, a multi-year project aimed at supporting detailed performance analysis for early design in the energy, life-cycle analysis, lighting, and thermal comfort domains. Thisschema relies on a representational division of labor between a shared building model, and various disciplinary (domain) models. Specifically, we present a documentation of the shared object model together with disciplinary models for the energy, light, acoustics, and life-cyle assessment domain.
keywords building product models, building performance, integration
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id d0d1
authors Martens, B., Björk, B.-Ch. and Turk, Z.
year 2002
title The SciX Project: Re-Engineering from Paper-based to Free Electronic Publishing
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 179-185
summary In the paper-based world, CAAD-associations, such as ACADIA, and scientific publishers aim at gettingthe right people together and for making sure their work gets distributed to their peers. Electronicnetworks, such as the Internet, are providing scientists with the means to pursue those activities on theirown. In this paper we present the goals of an EU project called SciX. The goal of SciX is to analyze thebusiness processes of scientific publishing, to invent new publication models and through a series ofpilots to demonstrate how this should work. In the envisioned scenarios, professional associations suchas ACADIA play an important role. Their members are the potential users of SciX 's platforms, authorsand readers of the papers. Associations could also become the publishers and archivists of theknowledge created within their respective community. The objectives of this contribution focus oninvolving the ACADIA-community in the developments in SciX on fine-shaping the goals as well as ondefining the requirements and monitoring the usability of the pilots.
series ACADIA
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 1083
authors Wu, Rui
year 2002
title Computer Aided Dimensional Control in Building Construction
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary Dimensional control in the building industry can be defined as the operational techniques and activities that are necessary, during the construction process of a building, for the assurance of the defined dimension quality of a building (Hoof, 1986). Efficient and precise dimensional control of buildings under construction is becoming ever more important because of changes in the construction industry. More prefabricated components are used; more regulations appear; newly designed buildings have more complex shapes, and building construction is speeding up. To ensure the predefined dimensional quality, a plan of dimensional control must be designed, on the basis of building drawings and specifications delivered by architects, before the building is constructed. The dimensional control plan must provide site personnel with adequate information on, among others, setting out and assembling building components, which can often be done by means of Total Stations. The essence of designing a dimensional control plan is to find out which points should be used as positioning points, which points should be set out in advance or controlled afterwards, and not to forget why. In an effort to contribute to the improvement of the dimensional control of on-site construction projects, this research tries to capture the knowledge required to design an adequate dimensional control plan and make that knowledge more generally available, and build a digital connection between CAD systems and Total Stations, focusing on prefabricated concrete building structural elements. The instrument developed in this research for capturing of essential dimensional control information and knowledge makes use of Product Data Technology (PDT) and Knowledge Technology (KT). The chosen solution supports the stochastic analysis of optimal positioning points taking account of various sorts of deviations and their mutual relationships. The resulting information model has been written in a standardized information modelling language called UML (Unified Modelling Language). The model has been implemented in a Dimensional Control System (DCS) and applied in the “La Tour” construction project in Apeldoorn, the Netherlands. The DCS provides a digital way to bridge the floor plan design with dimensional control, predict dimensional deviation limits and output the data needed for a Total Station. The case study of “La Tour” tests the UML model and prototype of the DCS. The results prove that direct positioning of objects (by putting reflectors on the objects and using a Total Station and by inputting coordinates extracted and calculated from the AutoCAD drawings) provides higher speed, accuracy and reliability. It also shows a way to (pre)position free form objects in 3D where traditional methods cannot. In conclusion: (1) it seems to be justified to expect that the application of the DCS will contribute to increased confidence in dimensional control and the reduction of costs of failure, which potentially could support the increased use of cheaper construction methods, and will also contribute to the improvement of building design and construction process. (2) the scientific contribution of this research is a first step towards providing dimensional quality in a construction process covered by stochastic dimensional uncertainty, even for positioning of free form objects.
keywords Construction Management; Constructional Engineering; Computer Applications
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ddssar0206
id ddssar0206
authors Bax, M.F.Th. and Trum, H.M.G.J.
year 2002
title Faculties of Architecture
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In order to be inscribed in the European Architect’s register the study program leading to the diploma ‘Architect’ has to meet the criteria of the EC Architect’s Directive (1985). The criteria are enumerated in 11 principles of Article 3 of the Directive. The Advisory Committee, established by the European Council got the task to examine such diplomas in the case some doubts are raised by other Member States. To carry out this task a matrix was designed, as an independent interpreting framework that mediates between the principles of Article 3 and the actual study program of a faculty. Such a tool was needed because of inconsistencies in the list of principles, differences between linguistic versions ofthe Directive, and quantification problems with time, devoted to the principles in the study programs. The core of the matrix, its headings, is a categorisation of the principles on a higher level of abstractionin the form of a taxonomy of domains and corresponding concepts. Filling in the matrix means that each study element of the study programs is analysed according to their content in terms of domains; thesummation of study time devoted to the various domains results in a so-called ‘profile of a faculty’. Judgement of that profile takes place by committee of peers. The domains of the taxonomy are intrinsically the same as the concepts and categories, needed for the description of an architectural design object: the faculties of architecture. This correspondence relates the taxonomy to the field of design theory and philosophy. The taxonomy is an application of Domain theory. This theory,developed by the authors since 1977, takes as a view that the architectural object only can be described fully as an integration of all types of domains. The theory supports the idea of a participatory andinterdisciplinary approach to design, which proved to be awarding both from a scientific and a social point of view. All types of domains have in common that they are measured in three dimensions: form, function and process, connecting the material aspects of the object with its social and proceduralaspects. In the taxonomy the function dimension is emphasised. It will be argued in the paper that the taxonomy is a categorisation following the pragmatistic philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce. It will bedemonstrated as well that the taxonomy is easy to handle by giving examples of its application in various countries in the last 5 years. The taxonomy proved to be an adequate tool for judgement ofstudy programs and their subsequent improvement, as constituted by the faculties of a Faculty of Architecture. The matrix is described as the result of theoretical reflection and practical application of a matrix, already in use since 1995. The major improvement of the matrix is its direct connection with Peirce’s universal categories and the self-explanatory character of its structure. The connection with Peirce’s categories gave the matrix a more universal character, which enables application in other fieldswhere the term ‘architecture’ is used as a metaphor for artefacts.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 6d22
authors Bermudez, J., Agutter, J., Syroid, N., Lilly, B., Sharir, Y., Lopez, T., Westenskow, D. and Foresti, S.
year 2002
title Interfacing Virtual & Physical Spaces through the Body: The cyberPRINT Project
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 395-400
summary The cyberPRINT is a fully immersive, interactive virtual environment that is being generated in rea-timebased on physiological data readings of a human body. In other words, the cyberPRINT is based oncreating interfaces between physical and digital spaces and between biology and informationtechnologies. The cyberPRINT is also an event, wherein a performer is connected to the cyberPRINTgenerator to create a self-sustaining feedback mechanism. Although using the body to electronicallydrive music and media events is not new, most of these works have paid little or no attention to thepotential of interactive 3D virtual environments. Nor have they been so technologically advanced,interdisciplinary intensive (involving architecture, choreography, modern dance, music, bioengineering,medicine and computer science), or architecturally focused as the cyberPRINT.This project covers a wide and fertile territory that goes from the very technical and design oriented tothe very theoretical and interdisciplinary. This paper is intended to (1) expand what has been alreadypublished about this project (Bermudez et al 2000a) and (2) establish potential areas for discussionbefore and after the performance
series ACADIA
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 7e02
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2002
title The Virtual Campus: A new place for (lifelong) learning?
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 472-477
summary 472 eCAADe 20 [design e-ducation] Modeling Real and Virtual Worlds Session 13 In the early spring of 2001 a collection of German universities founded a virtual faculty of architecture, which was named „Liquid Campus“. Current thinking about future forms of education in the field of architecture combined with over 4 years of experience with net-based design studios, led to questions about the future of existing universities, their buildings and their use. This problem was put to 43 students in the form of a design exercise to create a place for a virtual university. In the current situation, in which the administration of knowledge is more and more located on the internet, and even the so-called meeting places themselves can be virtualised through the help of video-conference-software, the exercise was to design a virtual campus in the framework and to carry out this design work in a simulation of distributed practice. Initial criticism of the project came from the students in that exemplary working methods were not described, but left for the students to discover on their own. The creation of a concept for the Liquid Campus meant that the participants had to imagine working in a world without the face to face contacts that form the basis (at present) of personal interaction. Additionally, the assignment to create or design possible links between the real and the virtual was not an easy task for students who normally design and plan real physical buildings. Even the tutors had difficulties in producing focused constructive criticism about a virtual campus; in effect the virtualisation of the university leads to a distinctive blurring of its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosophical approach to the design problem. The paper explores the implications of the student’s conclusions on the nature of the university in general and draws conclusions specific to architectural education and the role of architecture in this process.
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 1992
authors Russell, Peter
year 2002
title Using Higher Level Programming in Interdisciplinary teams as a means of training for Concurrent Engineering
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 14-19
summary The paper explains a didactical method for training students that has been run three times to date. The premise of the course is to combine students from different faculties into interdisciplinary teams. These teams then have a complex problem to resolve within an extremely short time span. In light of recent works from Joy and Kurzweil, the theme Robotics was chosen as an exercise that is timely, interesting and related, but not central to the studies of the various faculties. In groups of 3 to 5, students from faculties of architecture, computer science and mechanical engineering are entrusted to design, build and program a robot which must successfully execute a prescribed set of actions in a competitive atmosphere. The entire course lasts ten days and culminates with the competitive evaluation. The robots must navigate a labyrinth, communicate with on another and be able to cover longer distances with some speed. In order to simplify the resources available to the students, the Lego Mindstorms Robotic syshed backgrounds instaed of synthetic ones. The combination of digitally produced (scanned) sperical images together with the use of HDR open a wide range of new implementation in the field of architecture, especially in combining synthetic elements in existing buildings, e.g. new interior elements in an existing historical museum).ural presentations in the medium of computer animation. These new forms of expression of design thoughts and ideas go beyond mere model making, and move more towards scenemaking and storytelling. The latter represents new methods of expression within computational environments for architects and designers.its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosg and programming a winning robot. These differences became apparent early in the sessions and each group had to find ways to communicate their ideas and to collectively develop them by building on the strengths of each team member.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2013/02/04 06:17

_id 6fbc
authors Tunçer, Bige, Stouffs, Rudi and Sariyildiz, Sevil
year 2002
title Cooperating on Architectural Analyses
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 20-27
summary As part of a fourth semester architectural design studio, students perform an analysis of selected precedents according to various criteria. For this purpose, they are provided with a web-based environment for the storage and management of their analyses. In this way, , and By integrating the analysis results into a common, extensible, library, the students are able to benefit from a collaboration with peers, and draw upon each others’ results for comparisons and relationships between different design aspects or buildings. In order to support this integration and strengthen the collaboration, we are developing organization and presentation tools that are integrated within the webbased environment. In this paper, we describe the context as provided by the design studio course, reflect on the advantages of a web-based repository for managing design and analysis information, describe the techniques we are developing to improve this process, and present the implementation of the resulting tools within the web-based environment.
series eCAADe
email b.tuncer@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 060b
authors Af Klercker, J.
year 1997
title A National Strategy for CAAD and IT-Implementation in the Construction Industry the Construction Industry
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary The objective of this paper is to present a strategy for implementation of CAD and IT in the construction and building management#1 industry in Sweden. The interest is in how to make the best use of the limited resources in a small country or region, cooperating internationally and at the same time avoiding to be totally dominated by the great international actors in the market of information technology.

In Sweden representatives from the construction and building management industry have put forward a research and development program called: "IT-Bygg#2 2002 - Implementation". It aims at making IT the vehicle for decreasing the building costs and at the same time getting better quality and efficiency out of the industry.

The presented strategy is based on a seminar with some of the most experienced researchers, developers and practitioners of CAD in Sweden. The activities were recorded and annotated, analyzed and put together afterwards.

The proposal in brief is that object oriented distributed CAD is to be used in the long perspective. It will need to be based on international standards such as STEP and it will take at least another 5 years to get established.

Meanwhile something temporary has to be used. Pragmatically a "de facto standard" on formats has to be accepted and implemented. To support new users of IT all software in use in the country will be analyzed, described and published for a national platform for IT-communication within the construction industry.

Finally the question is discussed "How can architect schools then contribute to IT being implemented within the housing sector at a regional or national level?" Some ideas are presented: Creating the good example, better support for the customer, sharing the holistic concept of the project with all actors, taking part in an integrated education process and international collaboration like AVOCAAD and ECAADE.

 

keywords CAAD, IT, Implementation, Education, Collaboration
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/afklerck/afklerck.htm
last changed 2007/01/21 13:05

_id 12d9
authors Anumba, C.J., Ugwu, O.O., Newnham, L. and Thorpe, A.
year 2002
title Collaborative design of structures using intelligent agents
source Automation in Construction 11 (1) (2002) pp. 89-103
summary The construction industry has a long tradition of collaborative working between the members of a construction project team. At the design stage, this has traditionally been based on physical meetings between representatives of the principal design disciplines. To aid these meetings, the information and communications technologies that are currently available have been utilised. These have yielded some success but are hampered by the problems posed by the use of heterogeneous software tools and the lack of effective collaboration tools that are necessary to collapse the time and distance constraints, within which increasingly global design teams work. In particular, there are very few tools available to support distributed asynchronous collaboration. Distributed artificial intelligence, which is commonly implemented in the form of intelligent agents, offers considerable potential for the development of such tools. This paper examines some of the issues associated with the use of distributed artificial intelligence systems within the construction industry. It describes the potential for the use of agent technology in collaborative design and then goes on to present the key features of an agent-based system for the collaborative design of portal frame structures. An example is presented to demonstrate the working and benefits of the prototype system, which makes a significant contribution by allowing for peer to peer negotiation between the design agents.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id a35a
authors Arponen, Matti
year 2002
title From 2D Base Map To 3D City Model
source UMDS '02 Proceedings, Prague (Czech Republic) 2-4 October 2002, I.17-I.28
summary Since 1997 Helsinki City Survey Division has proceeded in experimenting and in developing the methods for converting and supplementing current digital 2D base maps in the scale 1:500 to a 3D city model. Actually since 1986 project areas have been produced in 3D for city planning and construction projects, but working with the whole map database started in 1997 because of customer demands and competitive 3D projects. 3D map database needs new data modelling and structures, map update processes need new working orders and the draftsmen need to learn a new profession; the 3D modeller. Laser-scanning and digital photogrammetry have been used in collecting 3D information on the map objects. During the years 1999-2000 laser-scanning experiments covering 45 km2 have been carried out utilizing the Swedish TopEye system. Simultaneous digital photography produces material for orto photo mosaics. These have been applied in mapping out dated map features and in vectorizing 3D buildings manually, semi automatically and automatically. In modelling we use TerraScan, TerraPhoto and TerraModeler sw, which are developed in Finland. The 3D city model project is at the same time partially a software development project. An accuracy and feasibility study was also completed and will be shortly presented. The three scales of 3D models are also presented in this paper. Some new 3D products and some usage of 3D city models in practice will be demonstrated in the actual presentation.
keywords 3D City modeling
series other
email matti.arponen@hel.fi
more www.udms.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id acadia07_174
id acadia07_174
authors Bontemps, Arnaud; Potvin, André; Demers, Claude
year 2007
title The Dynamics of Physical Ambiences
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 174-181
summary This research proposes to support the reading of physical ambiences by the development of a representational technique which compiles, in a numerical interface, two types of data: sensory and filmic. These data are recorded through the use of a portable array equipped with sensors (Potvin 1997, 2002, 2004) as well as the acquisition of Video information of the moving environment. The compilation of information is carried out through a multi-media approach, by means of a program converting the environmental data into dynamic diagrams, as well as the creation of an interactive interface allowing a possible diffusion on the Web. This technique, named APMAP/Video, makes it possible to read out simultaneously spatial and environmental diversity. It is demonstrated through surveys taken at various seasons and time of the day at the new Caisse de dépôt et de placement headquarters in Montreal which is also the corpus for a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) research grant on Environmental Adaptability in Architecture (Potvin et al. 2003-2007). This case study shows that the technique can prove of great relevance for POEs (Post Occupancy Evaluation) as well as for assistance in a new design project.
series ACADIA
email arnaudbontemps@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id e601
authors Braga, Gisele Pinna
year 2002
title Uma Interface Multimídia para a Comunicação do Projeto Arquitetônico [A multimedia interface for the architectural design communication]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 193-197
summary The purpose of this work is the development of a Digital Learning Material that helps the process of understanding complex concepts, specifically architectural projects. In order to optimize the comprehension of architectural projects new materials can be developed based on multimedia technology. This technology mix different sorts of messages in one single interface, stimulating students in different ways. As an architectural project has many different information to be tansmittd and assimilated, multimedia technology is a good way to organize all of them to comunicate in an efficient way. All these concepts are applied in a proposal for a multimedia learning material: a prototype about an “Architectural Project”.
series SIGRADI
email giipinna@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

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