CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 508

_id aef5
authors De Paoli, Giovanni and Léglise, Michel
year 2002
title Architectural Design Education and Digital Technologies: Toward a Multinational Research Observatory
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 56-63
summary New visions that do not confine the computer to strictly technical and representation functions have appeared in schools of architecture over the past few years. The use of new information and communication technologies (NICT), in the field of design education in particular, have allowed the creation of innovative teaching tools and teaching configurations that are operational in certain European and North American schools. Unfortunately, the comparison of experiences is rare, and it would be beneficial to facilitate educational exchanges on a scientific basis. It is clear, now, that the general use of NICT will have to promote educational programs that are evaluated scientifically, that are “efficient” and that are occasionally multinational, even if the cultural differences make the task difficult. These considerations have lead us to the proposal of recommendations for the creation of a multinational observatory for the teaching of design that could benefit from the presence of researchers from European countries and from North America already implicated in activities in our laboratories. This observatory is conceived as a depository of pedagogical works serving as observation material destined for scientific research. As such, it would act as an observation site for research in didactics of design. It would allow for a new understanding of the opportunities and limitations derived from the emerging globalisation of distributed design education and offer new challenges for architectural schools. This article describes the beginnings of this observation system and underscores its potential to produce results in the future.
series eCAADe
email michel.leglise@toulouse.archi.fr
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 7798
authors Barrow, Larry
year 2002
title Elitism, IT and the Modern Architect Opportunity or Dilemma
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 97-109
summary Information Technology (IT) is impacting architecture dramatically in process and form. Often thecurrent transformation of architecture is difficult to analyze and frequently we see confusion and anxietyregarding uncertainties for the future of the architect as designer and project leader. The currentpotentiality for new exotic form (i.e. product) is mesmerizing; however, in the current context, lessobvious issues and pertinent questions are emerging for the profession. What is the mission of theprofession? What will keep us relevant in the mist of the new global society?In this paper, we will take an evolutionary perspective of technology in architecture and draw parallelsbetween the Renaissance, which is the genesis of the modern architect, and the contemporary state ofarchitecture. The modern architect was birthed during the Renaissance where we see the retraction ofthe architect from the building site and separation from direct involvement in the building process.Communications technology (i.e. representation in the form of free-hand drawings, mechanical 2Dorthographic drawings and 3D perspectives) enabled the decomposition of the master builder into threecomponents (i.e. artist-designer, practicing_architect, and builder). Thus, we see technology enable thedenigration and ultimate dissolution of the centuries old craftsman guilds and the master builder. Thetechnology evolution of “drawings” enabled monumental change in the process of architecture over thepast five hundred years. The fission of the master builder, enabled by “drawings”, resulted in disparatefactions which are the forerunners of the modern day litigious design-bid-build project delivery. We nowincreasingly see a return to the fusion of design and building where often the architect is not the projectmanager or leader. Thus, the question looms, will the 21st century architect lead or be led, and whatare the ramifications for the profession?The historical Master Builder is re-emerging as a dynamically networked team of design andconstruction knowledge specialists. Bi-lateral knowledge exchange, enhanced with emerging IT, isoccurring between owners, managers, architects, design specialists, engineers, builders and machines.Technology is disrupting architecture, resulting in increasing specialization and compressed timeframes, and may require reevaluation of the role of the architect as project-leader "integrativegeneralist"or "design-specialist".Conclusively, the concept of ‘cybernetic architecture’ is proposed as an IT reference framework. Failureto appropriately respond to societal evolution, driven by technology, could result in the loss ofprofessional status for the modern architect. Herein lies our dilemma, or opportunity, depending on therole choice of the modern architect.
series ACADIA
email lbarrow@msstate.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id bff9
authors Proctor, George (Ed.)
year 2002
title ACADIA 2002 [Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X / Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, 446 p.
summary The 2002 ACADIA conference finds digital tec_nology ubiquitous as the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture moves into its third decade. The organization of ACADIA is on the threshold of restating its mission. After 20 years, many of the organization’s initial objectives have been achieved. ACADIA members have been instrumental in the development of design software, and in bringing computers and digital technology into architectural practice and design school curriculum. At first, ACADIAns faced the debate over the appropriateness and utility of digital technology in the disciplines of architecture, planning and building science. Today the use of computers and information technology is widely accepted by architects and CAAD and digital technology have brought profound change to design practice. The debate in ACADIA has long since moved from "should we use this technology" to "how", "for what" and "why". Now that many practitioners, learning institutions and professional organizations have taken up the call, ACADIA must restate its mission, if it wishes to remain “distinct”. This does not mean that the work of ACADIA is complete. Much remains to be done and much more needs to be improved. ACADIA’s Mission Statement places particular focus on “education and the software, hardware and pedagogy involved in education.” And “(t)he organization is also committed to the research and development of computer aides that enhance design creativity, and that aim at contributing to the construction of humane physical environments.” These are the areas that continue to evolve, grow and provide for ACADIA’s continued relevance. The ACADIA 2002 conference theme reflects the state of digital technology’s application to the discipline, as much as it refers to ACADIA’s future. With the general acceptance of digital technology and CAAD, we have arrived at a place where the work of great interest and relevance lies in the space between what is digital and what is analog. The environments of real space and cyberspace have in a very short time become so intertwined that the space between real and virtual (not to be confused with reality and fantasy) is becoming indistinguishable. You cannot eat, travel, use public utilities, bank, shop, vacation or recreate without at the very least coming into contact with or passing through information space. The landscape between these two environments has become a cultural phenomenon for those societies with access to the Internet and information networks. And while the computer and World Wide Web have empowered individuals, the collective impact of the technology holds all the potential and problems that similarly emerged in other technology induced landscapes. Consider this last point in the context of ACADIA’s stated mission to “enhance design creativity while contributing to the construction of humane physical environments.” And you can see why many of the 260 initial submissions to this conference were in the area of design artifacts and design methodology, providing evidence that ACADIA’s mission remains relevant and in accord with the trends of research and professional creative activity.
series ACADIA
email georger@cybertects.com
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id cc97
authors Zhou, Q., Krawczyk, R.J. and Schipporeit, G.
year 2002
title From CAD to iAD - A Web-based Steel Consulting of Steel Construction in Architecture
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 346-349
summary Information technology has become so powerful that what is conventionally called CAD might evolve to iAD (Internet Aided Design) (Zhou 2000). For Internet applications in the AEC industry, most of the efforts and success have been concentrated on project management and collaboration, while in the design and engineering consulting area, limited progress has been made. At the same time, contemporary development has not changed the nature of the fragmentation of the AEC industry. Based on previous research of surveys of development of Internet applications in the AEC industry (Zhou 2001), and the proposal of conceptual model of Internet-based engineering consulting in architecture (Zhou2002), we try to apply these theories and concepts into a specified area, steel construction consulting for architects. In previous research, first of all, we defined the contents and scope of steel construction consulting and their potential application. Second, we proposed a solid working model covering structure organization, audience, services provided and technology. In this research, a web-based application will be out by prototyped by conducting a conceptual design consulting in steel structure in order to show the whole process of how this Internet-based consulting model works.
series eCAADe
email qizhou77@yahoo.com
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id f899
authors Shih, Naai-Jung and Wang, Pin-Hung
year 2002
title The Application of Reverse Engineering for Building Construction Management
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 338-341
summary This research utilizes a 3D laser scanner to retrieve 3D digital information of a building construction site for the management purpose. The concept of reverse engineering is applied as a method in revealing potential problems in building construction process through the analysis of 3D data. This study presents construction images, scanned point-cloud sets, and output rapid prototyping (RP) models as exemplification.
series eCAADe
email njshih@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 49a6
authors He, J., Tsou, J.-Y. and Lam, S.
year 2002
title Potential of Using a GIS-based Natural Visual Landscape Evaluation Tool in Large-scale Urban Planning - A Comparative Study in Dongshan New Town
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 478-487
summary Natural visual landscape is under deterioration due to improper construction and planning in modern development of China. One of the main reasons is the feebleness in planning supporting methodology and technology in respect for natural visual landscape. In such supporting information, landscape evaluation always acts as a significant component. Especially in comprehensive planning, it is the only approach to access visual value distribution in large-scale region. In this paper, we present a GISbased natural visual landscape evaluation tool through a case study. By an integrated rating statistics function of this tool, visual quality of natural landscape is quantified through analysis in visibility, landuse, and visual resource quality. Then we make comprehensive planning strategies based on this scientific supporting tool. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of this tool by comparing these strategies with schemes of the same project conducted through traditional planning module. This comparative study reveals the efficiency and effectiveness of the tool as well as its implementation in large-scale comprehensive urban planning.
series eCAADe
email hejie@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 3439
authors Paranandi, M. and Sarawgi, T.
year 2002
title Virtual Reality on Architecture: Enabling Possibilities
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 309-316
summary This paper examines the potential of Virtual Reality (VR) technologies for architectural applications. There has been a great deal of anticipation for its implications for architecture since Ivan Sutherland's first VR system in the 60's. The term VR was formalized and became popular in the main stream in the late 80's and became an industry by the late 90's. Although it has found good applications in Medicine, Flight Simulation, and Video Game Industry, its effect on architecture remains imperceptible. In the work that we review, we found that the success of VR in architecture has primarily been in the passive and exploratory applications. We also note that at the present time, the cost of VR systems is directly proportionate to the level of photorealism and immersion. We contend that photorealistic visualization and total immersion are not absolute prerequisites for making most design decisions. Hence, through this paper we bring to light the inherent promise of VR technology and the potential impact it could have with its current limitations, on the way we conventionally think and design our built environment pushing it beyond space and time constraints.
series CAADRIA
email paranam@muohio.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id b2f6
authors Schira, Gretchen
year 2002
title Analysis of Digital Image Properties and Human Preference
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 413-422
summary The three studies summarized in this paper present evidence that aesthetic preference for visualsurface texture is closely correlated with spatial frequency and orientation. The stimuli used were digitalversions of real environments, in the sense that they originated in photographs of real surfaces.Correlations are significant, and robust, and they were not effected by identifiability of the images.Theoretically, this points to the possibility that aesthetic preferences for objects in the builtenvironment—‘virtual’ and ‘real’—are not exclusively devoted to culture, memory and association, aspost-modern discourse would dictate. Although more work needs to be done, it nevertheless points tothe potential that preference for digital/virtual as well as real architectural environments be consideredthe visual stimuli to which human beings are neurologically tuned. Digital technology provides themeans to implement such research, and computer simulations of ‘real’ environments will be the firstapplication. With an ability to adapt aesthetically to the changing human condition, the importantquestions are how should one adapt such surfaces and under what criteria or under what influence arethe adaptations made?
series ACADIA
email g.schira@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 18dd
authors Sjöström, Calle
year 2002
title Non-Visual Haptic Interaction Design - Guidelines and Applications
source Lund Institute of Technology, School of Architecture
summary This dissertation has three cornerstones: * Haptics * Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) * Blind Users Haptics deals with controlling human movements and getting feedback through the sense of touch. A haptic interface transmits forces to a person’s hand or fingers in a way that mimics the sensation of touching real objects. Virtual haptic touch can be particularly useful for people with visual impairments. It makes it possible for a blind person to touch virtual objects, corresponding to the way a sighted person can see objects on a computer screen. The goal of this research was to carry out an unbiased investigation of the potential of this technology for blind people. The more specific aims were to: * Investigate if and how blind people’s computer usage can be improved by virtual haptics. * Investigate the problems that arise with graphical user interfaces for blind people and how these problems can be managed with haptics. * Develop new applications and find new areas in which virtual haptics can be applied for blind people. The design process has been primarily influenced by theories of usability engineering and reflection in action/reflection on action, focusing on the role of the engineer-designer. A concerted effort is made to use technology as a language to communicate with the users. Several haptic interface devices have been involved. The Phantom from SensAble Technologies has been used the most. It is a small robot with a thimble or stylus attached to the tip which supplies force feedback to the user. The others are the FEELit Mouse from Immersion and the force feedback joysticks from Logitech and Microsoft. Eighteen test applications were developed over five years’ time. They included games, curves, textures, drawings, menus, floor plans, and geometrical objects. Formal and informal user tests were performed on blind, blind-deaf and sighted people. One of the key results presented are five guidelines for non-visual haptic interaction design for researchers, designers, testers, developers and users of such applications. The guidelines are: 1. Elaborate a virtual object design of its own 2. Facilitate navigation and overview 3. Provide contextual information 4. Utilize all available modalities 5. Support the user in learning the interaction method and the specific environments and programs These guidelines represent the filtered and condensed knowledge and experience that the Haptics Group at Certec has gained during the testing and development process. They are further delineated and are a complement to existing HCI guidelines. This work shows that there is great potential in using haptic technology in applications for blind people. It is viable to translate both 2D and 3D graphical information and make it comprehensible via haptics. It has been demonstrated that a blind person can orientate and navigate in a virtual haptic environment and that these tasks can be further supported by using complementary information such as sound and Braille. It is also possible for a blind person to use knowledge gained in the virtual world for real life orientation.
keywords Haptics; Human-Computer Interaction; Blind People; Design Guidelines; Computer Access
series thesis:PhD
email Calle@ruff.certec.lth.se
more http://www.certec.lth.se/doc/hapticinteraction/
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 166c
authors Song, Y., Clayton, M.J. and Johnson, R.E.
year 2002
title Anticipating reuse: documenting buildings for operations using web technology
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 185-197
summary This research explores the feasibility of web technology as a means for delivering building information to better support facility operations. Our research proposes just-in-time (JIT) facility documentation as a pragmatic solution to the limitations of current as-built documents, allowing more effective reuse of building information. Our investigation addresses four issues: (1) what building information is needed for facility operations; (2) how the design and construction team can improve the format for delivering the building information to facility operators; (3) how current web technology can store and deliver facility information in support of operations; and (4) what is the mechanism of documenting building information using the web technology. We surveyed literature, interviewed members of design and operations teams and reviewed current initiatives of industry and software vendors to identify problems with current practices. We also surveyed promising web technologies and conducted experiments to determine how these technologies could help to solve the problems. We constructed a conceptual framework of JIT facility documentation as a solution to current information fragmentation problems. We developed a prototype of the JIT document system to demonstrate a "proof of concept" by using current web technologies such as Autodesk's DWF, Microsoft's Active Server Pages, VB and Java script, and Access database to develop the prototype system. By dynamically composing HTML pages in response to task-specific requests, our prototype enables easy access and integration of a variety of building information to support facility operations.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 0e4c
authors Uddin, M. Saleh and Yoon, So-Yeon
year 2002
title Peter Eisenman’s House X, Scheme G: 3D Game Engine for Portable Virtual Representation of Architecture
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 526-531
summary Recently introduced 3D games, game editors, along with gaming software offer great potential for delivering three-dimensional, collaborative virtual environments for online audiences. These capabilities have significant potential in architectural visualization. The University of Missouri-Columbia’s Emerging Technology Group developed the Virtual Campus Project introducing the university campus to prospective students through the Internet. Fascinating quality, seamless real time rendering, and smooth navigation are enough to impress visitors. However, the developers had to use eye measures and guesses based on photos rather than architectural drawings for initial 3D computer models. The absence of a precise scaling system as well as not being able to recognize a standard 3D architectural drawing format in a virtual environment were the prime generators of this paper. One important goal for this paper is to suggest architects the potentials of using universal or exchangeable formats of 3D models with accurate structure data to build virtual models. A second goal is to provide better understanding of potentials in 3D game engines for virtual representation of architecture.
series eCAADe
email UddinSaleh@aol.com
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 5781
authors Woo, J., Clayton, M., Johnson, R., Flores, B. and Ellis, Ch.
year 2002
title Dynamic Knowledge Map: Reusing Experts’ Tacit Knowledge in the AEC Industry
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 407-411
summary Much knowledge in the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry is experience-basedand tacit. Nevertheless, the typical strategy for knowledge management is focused on computer-basedapproaches for capturing and disseminating explicit knowledge. AEC firms have been successful atcollecting and storing explicit information in enterprise databases, but they are poor at knowledgeretrieval and exchange. Consequently, AEC professionals find it difficult to reuse core experts’knowledge for highly knowledge-intensive AEC activities. This situation calls for a method fordisseminating tacit knowledge from experts’ brains to achieve higher quality AEC projects.The primary purpose of this paper is to set a theoretical foundation for clarifying the contribution ofexperts’ tacit knowledge in the AEC industry. The secondary purpose is to describe the concept forprototype software, Dynamic Knowledge Map, that can assist in the reuse of experts’ tacit knowledge.Dynamic Knowledge Map is a Web-based knowledge navigator that searches for experts and facilitatescommunication with those experts by using internet technology. Higher performance levels theoreticallycan be achieved while accelerating the knowledge transfer processes. Future research will test thesuitability of Dynamic Knowledge Map for tacit knowledge utilization in AEC organizations.
series ACADIA
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 1083
authors Wu, Rui
year 2002
title Computer Aided Dimensional Control in Building Construction
source Eindhoven University of Technology
summary Dimensional control in the building industry can be defined as the operational techniques and activities that are necessary, during the construction process of a building, for the assurance of the defined dimension quality of a building (Hoof, 1986). Efficient and precise dimensional control of buildings under construction is becoming ever more important because of changes in the construction industry. More prefabricated components are used; more regulations appear; newly designed buildings have more complex shapes, and building construction is speeding up. To ensure the predefined dimensional quality, a plan of dimensional control must be designed, on the basis of building drawings and specifications delivered by architects, before the building is constructed. The dimensional control plan must provide site personnel with adequate information on, among others, setting out and assembling building components, which can often be done by means of Total Stations. The essence of designing a dimensional control plan is to find out which points should be used as positioning points, which points should be set out in advance or controlled afterwards, and not to forget why. In an effort to contribute to the improvement of the dimensional control of on-site construction projects, this research tries to capture the knowledge required to design an adequate dimensional control plan and make that knowledge more generally available, and build a digital connection between CAD systems and Total Stations, focusing on prefabricated concrete building structural elements. The instrument developed in this research for capturing of essential dimensional control information and knowledge makes use of Product Data Technology (PDT) and Knowledge Technology (KT). The chosen solution supports the stochastic analysis of optimal positioning points taking account of various sorts of deviations and their mutual relationships. The resulting information model has been written in a standardized information modelling language called UML (Unified Modelling Language). The model has been implemented in a Dimensional Control System (DCS) and applied in the “La Tour” construction project in Apeldoorn, the Netherlands. The DCS provides a digital way to bridge the floor plan design with dimensional control, predict dimensional deviation limits and output the data needed for a Total Station. The case study of “La Tour” tests the UML model and prototype of the DCS. The results prove that direct positioning of objects (by putting reflectors on the objects and using a Total Station and by inputting coordinates extracted and calculated from the AutoCAD drawings) provides higher speed, accuracy and reliability. It also shows a way to (pre)position free form objects in 3D where traditional methods cannot. In conclusion: (1) it seems to be justified to expect that the application of the DCS will contribute to increased confidence in dimensional control and the reduction of costs of failure, which potentially could support the increased use of cheaper construction methods, and will also contribute to the improvement of building design and construction process. (2) the scientific contribution of this research is a first step towards providing dimensional quality in a construction process covered by stochastic dimensional uncertainty, even for positioning of free form objects.
keywords Construction Management; Constructional Engineering; Computer Applications
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id d455
authors Porada, Sabine
year 2002
title Pedagogical Laboratory of Potential Architecture
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 578-583
summary The increasing instrumentation of the design process can transform it into a site of virtual: architectural, structural, psychological, sociological, …, experimentation. Thanks to that, architecture that was never thought as a scientific discipline seems at last to enjoy a virtual laboratory of pure research. This visionary space of experimentation of potential architecture must assure the return of performances obtained in the constructed environment. But, to make such a future certain, one has to start with pedagogy, where the laboratory of potential architecture must constitute a real construction site of the imaginary.
series eCAADe
email msporada@wanadoo.fr
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 060b
authors Af Klercker, J.
year 1997
title A National Strategy for CAAD and IT-Implementation in the Construction Industry the Construction Industry
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary The objective of this paper is to present a strategy for implementation of CAD and IT in the construction and building management#1 industry in Sweden. The interest is in how to make the best use of the limited resources in a small country or region, cooperating internationally and at the same time avoiding to be totally dominated by the great international actors in the market of information technology.

In Sweden representatives from the construction and building management industry have put forward a research and development program called: "IT-Bygg#2 2002 - Implementation". It aims at making IT the vehicle for decreasing the building costs and at the same time getting better quality and efficiency out of the industry.

The presented strategy is based on a seminar with some of the most experienced researchers, developers and practitioners of CAD in Sweden. The activities were recorded and annotated, analyzed and put together afterwards.

The proposal in brief is that object oriented distributed CAD is to be used in the long perspective. It will need to be based on international standards such as STEP and it will take at least another 5 years to get established.

Meanwhile something temporary has to be used. Pragmatically a "de facto standard" on formats has to be accepted and implemented. To support new users of IT all software in use in the country will be analyzed, described and published for a national platform for IT-communication within the construction industry.

Finally the question is discussed "How can architect schools then contribute to IT being implemented within the housing sector at a regional or national level?" Some ideas are presented: Creating the good example, better support for the customer, sharing the holistic concept of the project with all actors, taking part in an integrated education process and international collaboration like AVOCAAD and ECAADE.

 

keywords CAAD, IT, Implementation, Education, Collaboration
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/afklerck/afklerck.htm
last changed 2007/01/21 13:05

_id 9c41
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E., Chee W.K., Mai, N., Ken, T.-K. N. and Sharifah Nur, A.S.A. (Eds.)
year 2002
title CAADRIA 2002 [Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X / Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, 370 p.
summary Evolution of trends in the realm of computer aided architectural design (CAAD) has seen the convergence of technologies – complementing traditional tools with emerging sciences like Information Technology (IT) and multimedia applications. This appliqué of technologies has not just expanded the scope and enhanced the realm of CAAD research and practice, but is also breaking new frontiers. This creative nexus will be realised at the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research In Asia (CAADRIA 2002) to be held at the Faculty of Creative Multimedia, Multimedia University, Malaysia, between 18th-20th April, 2002. CAADRIA 2002’s theme, "Redefining Content", seeks to recognise and infuse these emerging components in the field of architecture and design with a holistic approach towards online, digital and interactive systems. The 41 papers compiled were selected through a blind review process conducted by an international review panel. To reflect the multi-disciplinary nature of this year's conference, the chapters are arranged topically to facilitate the in-depth study of key components. The component sessions include: // Web Design, Database and Networks // CAD, Modelling and Tools // Collaborative Design, Creative Design and Case Reasoning // Simulation and Prototyping // Virtual Environment and Knowledge Management // Design Education, Teaching and Learning /// We believe that this specialised approach will provide a deeper and more illuminating feel of the various components and their critical convergence in the field of architecture and design.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
more www.caadria.org
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 12d9
authors Anumba, C.J., Ugwu, O.O., Newnham, L. and Thorpe, A.
year 2002
title Collaborative design of structures using intelligent agents
source Automation in Construction 11 (1) (2002) pp. 89-103
summary The construction industry has a long tradition of collaborative working between the members of a construction project team. At the design stage, this has traditionally been based on physical meetings between representatives of the principal design disciplines. To aid these meetings, the information and communications technologies that are currently available have been utilised. These have yielded some success but are hampered by the problems posed by the use of heterogeneous software tools and the lack of effective collaboration tools that are necessary to collapse the time and distance constraints, within which increasingly global design teams work. In particular, there are very few tools available to support distributed asynchronous collaboration. Distributed artificial intelligence, which is commonly implemented in the form of intelligent agents, offers considerable potential for the development of such tools. This paper examines some of the issues associated with the use of distributed artificial intelligence systems within the construction industry. It describes the potential for the use of agent technology in collaborative design and then goes on to present the key features of an agent-based system for the collaborative design of portal frame structures. An example is presented to demonstrate the working and benefits of the prototype system, which makes a significant contribution by allowing for peer to peer negotiation between the design agents.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id c1f5
authors Blaszczyszyn, Maciej
year 2002
title Day-to-day Reality of Web-based Collaboration - Tools among European Architect Professionals
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 110-113
summary On behalf of phenomenal advantages of project extranet technology You can believe in improving communication among professionals in design and construction industry. But until now, the reality appears not as good. It is technological irony, as evidenced in below presented survey, that advanced solutions for a better collaboration may set up unbreakable barriers. Therefore knowledge of everyday reality in the field of webbased collaboration tools use is critical to all participants of this process, commercial as well academic ones. It is especially important to all European professionals, who are aware of consequences of extending in nearest future borders of European Union, the second biggest market in the world.
series eCAADe
email maciejb@arch.pw.edu.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 2cd9
authors Ceccato, C. Fischer, Th., Li Chun-Man, G. and Frazer, J.
year 2002
title A Large-Scale Computing Infrastructure for Design Education
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 282-289
summary Most departmental computing infrastructure reflects the state of networking technology and available funds at the time of construction, which converge in a preconceived notion of homogeneity of network architecture and usage patterns. The DMAN (Digital Media Access Network) project, a large-scale server and network foundation for The Hong Kong Polytechnic University’s School of Design, was created as a platform that would support a highly complex academic environment while giving maximum freedom to students, faculty and researchers through simplicity and ease of use. As a centralized multi-user computation backbone, DMAN faces an extremely heterogeneous user and application profile, exceeding implementation and maintenance challenges of typical enterprise, and even most academic server set-ups. This paper summarizes the specification, implementation and application of the system while describing its significance for design education in a computational context.
series eCAADe
email sdtom@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 705f
authors Champion, Erik and Dave, Bharat
year 2002
title Where is this place?
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 85-95
summary ‘Place’ is arguably an essential component of most successful virtual environments, yet the concept ofwhat is ‘place’, and what sort of ‘placeness’ is required for digital environments, are seldom discussed.A reflexive argument such as here is a place because it was designed to be a place does not stimulatedesign guidelines for virtual places, and it certainly does not help us create and evaluate virtual placessuitable for audiences who vary in intention or in available technology. To articulate useful distinctionsbetween virtual places, this paper extends design guidelines proposed by Kalay and Marx, reshapesthem with the help of Relph’s definitions, into spatial visualisation and activity-based environments, andadds a further category, the hermeneutic. The paper also proposes a graduated matrix for selection ofplacemaking elements and for selecting a mode of representation appropriate to the design objective ofthe virtual environment, be it spatial, activity-based, or hermeneutic.
series ACADIA
email b.dave@unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

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