CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 509

_id 7e02
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2002
title The Virtual Campus: A new place for (lifelong) learning?
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 472-477
summary 472 eCAADe 20 [design e-ducation] Modeling Real and Virtual Worlds Session 13 In the early spring of 2001 a collection of German universities founded a virtual faculty of architecture, which was named „Liquid Campus“. Current thinking about future forms of education in the field of architecture combined with over 4 years of experience with net-based design studios, led to questions about the future of existing universities, their buildings and their use. This problem was put to 43 students in the form of a design exercise to create a place for a virtual university. In the current situation, in which the administration of knowledge is more and more located on the internet, and even the so-called meeting places themselves can be virtualised through the help of video-conference-software, the exercise was to design a virtual campus in the framework and to carry out this design work in a simulation of distributed practice. Initial criticism of the project came from the students in that exemplary working methods were not described, but left for the students to discover on their own. The creation of a concept for the Liquid Campus meant that the participants had to imagine working in a world without the face to face contacts that form the basis (at present) of personal interaction. Additionally, the assignment to create or design possible links between the real and the virtual was not an easy task for students who normally design and plan real physical buildings. Even the tutors had difficulties in producing focused constructive criticism about a virtual campus; in effect the virtualisation of the university leads to a distinctive blurring of its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosophical approach to the design problem. The paper explores the implications of the student’s conclusions on the nature of the university in general and draws conclusions specific to architectural education and the role of architecture in this process.
series eCAADe
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 3a28
authors Laiserin, Jerry
year 2002
title From atelier to e-telier: virtual design studios
source Architectural Record
summary The design studio, as physical place and pedagogical method, is the core of architectural education. Ateliers clustered around rue Napoleon in Paris defined the École des Beaux Arts. The Carnegie Endowment report on architectural education, published in 1996, identified a comparably central role for studios in schools today. From programs, schemes, and parti to desk crits, pin-ups, and charrettes-language and behavior learned in the studio establish the profession's cultural framework. Advances in CAD and visualization, combined with technologies to communicate images, data, and "live" action, now enable virtual dimensions of studio experience. Students no longer need gather at the same time and place to tackle the same design problem. Critics can comment over the network or by e-mail, and distinguished jurors can make virtual visits without being in the same room as the pin-up-if there is a pin-up (or a room). Virtual design studios (VDS) have the potential to favor collaboration over competition, diversify student experiences, and redistribute the intellectual resources of architectural education across geographic and socioeconomic divisions. The catch is predicting whether VDS will isolate students from a sense of place and materiality, or if it will provide future architects the tools to reconcile communication environments and physical space.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 255e
authors Sarawgi, Tina and Paranandi, Murali
year 2002
title Daylight Simulation: Examining its place during Conceptual Stages in a CAAD Studio
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 263-270
summary This paper reports on our experiences using computer graphic visual simulations to encouragearchitecture students to examine daylighting aspects of their design solutions during conceptual stagesin undergraduate design studios. Using computers for conceptual design was the major thrust of theinvestigation of these studios where daylight was one of the issues students examined for a four-weekperiod. We present our experiences and student work with traditional CGI-based and physics-basedradiosity rendering techniques. Our experiences show that although radiosity based visual simulation iscapable of producing more realistic images, in the design process its success was limited to studyingclearly defined interior spaces. CGI-based visualization, particularly when used in conjunction withtraditional physical models, was more useful and effective in the design process, being closer to thefluid nature of the design process. Further work needs to be done to make the currently availableradiosity-based software suitable for use in the design decision-making process.
series ACADIA
email t_sarawg@uncg.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id ba50
authors Achten, Henri and Jessurun, Joran
year 2002
title An Agent Framework for Recognition of Graphic Units in Drawings
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 246-253
summary Architects use graphic conventions in their drawings that have meaningful content to the design task. In previous work, such well-defined sets of graphic entities have been identified and defined. These sets are called graphic units. In this paper, we discuss how graphic unit recognition in drawings can take place using a multi-agent systems approach. This approach seems promising as singular agents may specialize in graphic unit-recognition, and multi-agent systems can address problems of ambiguity through negotiation mechanisms. We present an agent framework for this purpose, how it connects to the theory of graphic units, and how agents for recognizing graphic units are defined. The paper ends with a discussion of current findings and future work.
series eCAADe
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 705f
authors Champion, Erik and Dave, Bharat
year 2002
title Where is this place?
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 85-95
summary ‘Place’ is arguably an essential component of most successful virtual environments, yet the concept ofwhat is ‘place’, and what sort of ‘placeness’ is required for digital environments, are seldom discussed.A reflexive argument such as here is a place because it was designed to be a place does not stimulatedesign guidelines for virtual places, and it certainly does not help us create and evaluate virtual placessuitable for audiences who vary in intention or in available technology. To articulate useful distinctionsbetween virtual places, this paper extends design guidelines proposed by Kalay and Marx, reshapesthem with the help of Relph’s definitions, into spatial visualisation and activity-based environments, andadds a further category, the hermeneutic. The paper also proposes a graduated matrix for selection ofplacemaking elements and for selecting a mode of representation appropriate to the design objective ofthe virtual environment, be it spatial, activity-based, or hermeneutic.
series ACADIA
email b.dave@unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 2d54
authors Clayton, M.J., Warden, R.B. and Parker, Th.W.
year 2002
title Virtual construction of architecture using 3D CAD and simulation
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 227-235
summary 3D modeling and computer simulations provide new ways for architecture students to study the relationship between the design and construction of buildings. Digital media help to integrate and expand the content of courses in drafting, construction and design. This paper describes computer-based exercises that intensify the student's experience of construction in several courses from sophomore to senior level. The courses integrate content from drafting and design communication, construction, CAD, and design. Several techniques are used to strengthen students' awareness and ability in construction. These include: Virtual design–build projects in which students construct 3D CAD models that include all elements that are used in construction. Virtual office in which several students must collaborate under the supervision of a student acting as project architect to create a 3D CAD model and design development documents. Virtual sub-contracting in which each student builds a trade specific 3D CAD model of a building and all of the trade specific models must be combined into a single model. Construction simulations (4D CAD) in which students build 3D CAD models showing all components and then animate them to illustrate the assembly process. Cost estimating using spreadsheets. These techniques are applied and reapplied at several points in the curriculum in both technical laboratory courses and design studios. This paper compares virtual construction methods to physical design–build projects and provides our pedagogical arguments for the use of digital media for understanding construction.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id fe60
authors Cumming, Michael
year 2002
title Flexible and distributed coordination models for collaborative design
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 268-275
summary Designers working in collaborative design situations, attempt to plan or anticipate their activities, such that their work progresses in an orderly manner, according to technical demands of their domain. Designers, and the organizations that employ them, often attempt to formally represent such plans using process representations, such critical path diagrams, or Petri nets. Such process articulation and formalization can have benefits for designers and organizations, such as standardization and improvement of work practices, and improved collaboration and coordination between design parties. In addition to plan making, designers also try to coordinate their actions with the actions of others on the design team. This coordination, which often takes place in real time, is a process that is necessarily social, interactive, and iterative. Here the formulation of suitable process representations is more difficult, due to the dynamic and complex nature of social interactions. How to represent and design such coordination processes, is a continuing research question in the process modeling community. It is possible there exists general coordination mechanisms that could be useful in a variety of domains. Possibilities for distributed methods of design process coordination are examined. A coordination method is proposed that involves the exchange of design process models, represented as Petri nets. Rather than concentrating on the specific content of these models - which is assumed to vary considerably between design domains - general coordinating mechanisms are proposed. One such mechanism involves the communication of social commitments to process models, in addition to communication of the content and authorship of these models.
series eCAADe
email m.cumming@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 10eaea2001
id 10eaea2001
authors Gorczyca, Adam and Wrona, Stefan
year 2002
title Evaluation in 3D Endoscopic Simulation – Application in Architectural Studios
source Environmental Simulation - New Impulses in Planning Processes [Proceedings of the 5th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-922602-85-1]
summary Simulation techniques are nowadays commonly spread in CAAD applications. They are so popular, that even notion of SAAD (Simulation Aided Architectural Design) is used. Practical implementation of simulation techniques is present almost everywhere in our lives. All of us had a possibility of watching on TV, how Russians are going to pick up their atomic submarine “Kursk” from a sea-bottom. It is very tragic but significant example. People convinced themselves, that it is much cheaper to analyze any “virtual environment”, than to experiment with reality. Especially, when cost this “tampering” is extremely expensive. That is why some light and scenography simulation are prepared by computers. From the same reasons filmic special effects are produced (sink of Titanic…). There are also obvious medical applications, where endoscopic surgery replaced invading methods, while simulation of human body help students to learn anatomy. Forensic medicine try to identify faces of murders or body remains.
series EAEA
email skwrona@astercity.net
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 1627
authors Gorczyca, Adam
year 2002
title Changes in Group Communication in the Context of “virtual/real Ratio”
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 378-381
summary It is generally perceived that within the everyday work, there is a growing level of both the abstract and the virtual, especially for the teamwork participants dispersed within the global network. Purpose of this paper is to “translate” this feeling into a systematic scientific apparatus. The paper examines following factors: the time and place of mediation between participants, as well as personal and modal dimension. These factors are specified for communication tools used by architects.
series eCAADe
email adamgor@arch.pw.edu.pl
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 29b8
authors Hanzl, Malgorzata
year 2002
title The Role of Virtual City Models in Urban Tissue Evaluation
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 396-399
summary The shape of town is the main issue which planners deal with. The function of some buildings and urban facilities is flexible, it changes in time. The appearance of city public areas and, what follows, the life conditions of its inhabitants, depends on elements of the town structure - the surrounding buildings, their density, state and form. All lasting elements of the city form its shape which reflects urban processes which have been taking place over ages. The aim of this paper is to define how latest computer technology can be used as an aid in the evaluation of the town landscape.
series eCAADe
email mhanzl@p.lodz.pl
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 5b79
authors Johnson, Brian R.
year 2002
title Virtuality and Place
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 77-83
summary This paper explores the relationship between place, computation, and experience. In particular, it seeksto understand the zone that exists between the digital world on the one hand, and the physical world onthe other. It is suggested that the ideal of "immersive virtual reality", by focusing on technology systemsto replace the sensory world, misses the opportunity to explore a broader range of connections. Suchconnections involve combining physical and digital components to create blended environments. Anumber of examples of such environments are examined. The term "blended reality" is proposed todescribe such digitally augmented physical environments and to distinguish between them and virtualenvironments or cybrids. A design studio series formed around the exploration, design and experienceof blended physical and digital spaces is described and selected results presented.
series ACADIA
email brj@u.washington.edu
more http://faculty.washington.edu/brj/Publications/ACADIA02.PDF
last changed 2002/11/22 21:21

_id da49
authors Maher, Mary Lou and Gero, John S.
year 2002
title Agent Models of 3D Virtual Worlds
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 125-135
summary Architectural design has relevance to the design of virtual worlds that create a sense of place throughthe metaphor of buildings, rooms, and inhabitable spaces. The design and implementation of virtualworlds has focused on the design of 3D form for fast rendering to allow real time exploration of theworld. Using platforms that were originally designed for computer games, some virtual worlds nowcontain preprogrammed interactive behaviors. We present an agent model of virtual worlds in which theobjects in the world have agency, that is, the objects can sense their environment, reason about theirgoals, and make changes to the environment. This agent model is presented and illustrated using a wallagent. Following from the wall agent, we generalize how agency can be attached to any 3D model in avirtual world.
series ACADIA
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 256b
authors Martens, Bob and Herbert, Peter
year 2002
title Virtual Reconstruction of Synagogues Systematic Maintenance of Modeling Data
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 512-517
summary Computer-assisted reconstruction of no-longer existent (architectural) objects and their surroundings practically amounts to a “virtual comeback”. Irreversible destruction having removed identity-establishing buildings from the urban surface for all times is the principal cause for the attempt of renewed imaginating. Following the destruction of the so-called “Reichskristall-Night” of November 1938 the synagogues of the Jewish community in Vienna surely are to be considered for a virtual reconstruction. 60 years later, in the commemorative year of 1998 the first synagogue reconstruction was initiated. The medium-range goal, however, aims at the reconstruction of at least ten further synagogues within a project to be carried out in stages to be pursued over a period of several years. Fluctuations concerning the people involved in handling also call for a structure to be tracked down later on. This contribution deals with handling of modeling in a systematic manner aiming at a traceable data structure being of utmost importance for subsequent use and following-up work.
series eCAADe
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id f299
authors Martens, Bob and Peter, Herbert
year 2002
title Developing Systematics Regarding Virtual Reconstruction of Synagogues
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 349-356
summary Computer-assisted reconstruction of no-longer existent (architectural) objects and their surroundingsamounts to a “virtual comeback”. Irreversible destruction having removed identity-establishing buildingsfrom the urban surface forever is the principal reason for re-creating them by imagination. Following thedestruction during the so-called “Reichskristall-Night” of November 1938, the synagogues of the Jewishcommunity in Vienna will only survive by means of virtual reconstruction. Sixty years later, in the commemorativeyear of 1998, the first synagogue reconstruction was initiated. The medium-range goal,however, aims at the reconstruction of at least ten additional synagogues as a project to be carried outin stages over a period of several years. Changes in personnel also call for a structure to be trackeddown later on. This paper deals with handling of modeling in a systematic manner, taking intoconsideration personnel changes,aiming at a traceable data structure for subsequent use and follow-upwork.
series ACADIA
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id d5a0
authors Maze, John
year 2002
title Virtual Tactility: Working to Overcome Perceptual and Conceptual Barriers in the Digital Design Studio
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 325-331
summary In the digital age, what is the role of tactility in the digital design process as it is taught in schools ofarchitecture today? Often, students are never taught to appeal to any sense other than sight,particularly now as digital media is embraced as a valuable design tool. Yet, are there some essentialcharacteristics of architecture and the phenomenology of place making that is being cast aside due tothe nature of the tools being used? However true or enigmatic this may be, there is a way of workingand teaching that exists somewhere between the digital and the tactile.This paper postulates a hybrid working environment in the design studio that not only takes advantageof the strengths of various design media, but also focuses on reinterpreting its limits and drawbacks.The ultimate outcome will be a new digital media (intermedia) pedagogy that can revolutionize the waythat we teach architecture and, moreover, computer “aided” design.
series ACADIA
email maze@ufl.edu
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id dd8e
authors Moloney, Jules
year 2002
title String CVE Collaborative Virtual Environment software developed from a game engine
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 522-525
summary The University of Auckland has been experimenting with the adaptation of computer game engines for architectural education during a series of projects undertaken in specialized summer design studios 99 - 02. This paper reports on the early stages of software development of a collaborative virtual environment utilizing the ‘Torque’ game engine. The current software version (Beta 1.27) will be demonstrated and the studio outcomes discussed. The rationale for further application development is outlined with a focus on communication tools to enable experimentation with international virtual design studios.
series eCAADe
email j.moloney@auckland.ac.nz
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id e721
authors Nitsche, Michael and Roudavski, Stanislav
year 2002
title Building Cuthbert Hall Virtual College as a Dramatically Engaging Environment
source PDC 02 - Proceedings of Participatory Design conference, T. Binder, J. Gregory, I. Wagner (eds.), Malmö. Sweden, 23-25 June 2002 [ISBN 0-9667818-2-1]
summary This paper outlines the interdisciplinary nature, collaborative work patterns and role of aesthetics in the Cuthbert Hall Virtual College research project at the Cambridge University Moving Image Studio (CUMIS) and the Centre for Applied Research in Education Technology (CARET). The project identifies key properties of dramatically engaging real-time three-dimensional virtual environments (RT 3D VE) and how the holistic experiential phenomenon of place is organised and mediated through spatial narrative patterns. Interdisciplinary by nature, the project requires a collaborative approach between science, engineering, media and architecture, and the results are revealing for all these areas. The Cuthbert Hall project invites discussion of the importance in the creation and use of RT 3D VE's - under single and multi-user conditions - of articulate aesthetics (the quality of architectural, visual and audio design; the production and incorporation of dramatic properties) and of the conditions required for collaborative, communicative use of the environment. The full theoretical and technical discussions as well as the evaluation results are outside the scope of this submission.
keywords Real-time virtual environment, Computer Game, Place, Mediation, Expressive space
series other
email stanislav.roudavski@cumis.cam.ac.uk
last changed 2003/02/09 15:03

_id 623d
authors Oxman, Rivka
year 2002
title On E-Learning in Cyberspace - A Collaborative Construction of Knowledge of Places in Cyberspace
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 122-125
summary The paper describes an experimental program whose objective was to identify generic design concepts of “virtual place”. The design of virtual space constitutes a special and new class of design in which the visual constituents of place and their symbolic construction should be pre-defined and specified in order to enable design. A goal of this work has been to make a conceptual mapping of Cyberspace. The experiment was carried on in an e-learning environment in which a design class collaboratively constructed a generic knowledge base for the design of “virtual place”. We present the basis for the conceptual mapping employing the ICF formalism as an e-learning environment in making the survey, analysis and the categorization of relevant sites.
series eCAADe
email arrro01@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id bff9
authors Proctor, George (Ed.)
year 2002
title ACADIA 2002 [Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X / Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, 446 p.
summary The 2002 ACADIA conference finds digital tec_nology ubiquitous as the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture moves into its third decade. The organization of ACADIA is on the threshold of restating its mission. After 20 years, many of the organization’s initial objectives have been achieved. ACADIA members have been instrumental in the development of design software, and in bringing computers and digital technology into architectural practice and design school curriculum. At first, ACADIAns faced the debate over the appropriateness and utility of digital technology in the disciplines of architecture, planning and building science. Today the use of computers and information technology is widely accepted by architects and CAAD and digital technology have brought profound change to design practice. The debate in ACADIA has long since moved from "should we use this technology" to "how", "for what" and "why". Now that many practitioners, learning institutions and professional organizations have taken up the call, ACADIA must restate its mission, if it wishes to remain “distinct”. This does not mean that the work of ACADIA is complete. Much remains to be done and much more needs to be improved. ACADIA’s Mission Statement places particular focus on “education and the software, hardware and pedagogy involved in education.” And “(t)he organization is also committed to the research and development of computer aides that enhance design creativity, and that aim at contributing to the construction of humane physical environments.” These are the areas that continue to evolve, grow and provide for ACADIA’s continued relevance. The ACADIA 2002 conference theme reflects the state of digital technology’s application to the discipline, as much as it refers to ACADIA’s future. With the general acceptance of digital technology and CAAD, we have arrived at a place where the work of great interest and relevance lies in the space between what is digital and what is analog. The environments of real space and cyberspace have in a very short time become so intertwined that the space between real and virtual (not to be confused with reality and fantasy) is becoming indistinguishable. You cannot eat, travel, use public utilities, bank, shop, vacation or recreate without at the very least coming into contact with or passing through information space. The landscape between these two environments has become a cultural phenomenon for those societies with access to the Internet and information networks. And while the computer and World Wide Web have empowered individuals, the collective impact of the technology holds all the potential and problems that similarly emerged in other technology induced landscapes. Consider this last point in the context of ACADIA’s stated mission to “enhance design creativity while contributing to the construction of humane physical environments.” And you can see why many of the 260 initial submissions to this conference were in the area of design artifacts and design methodology, providing evidence that ACADIA’s mission remains relevant and in accord with the trends of research and professional creative activity.
series ACADIA
email georger@cybertects.com
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id 1fda
authors Rashid, Hani and Couture, Lise Anne
year 2002
title Virtual Architecture – Real Space
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 005-8
summary We are in the very early stages of a digital revolution whose direction we will not be certain of for sometime, much in the same way that Enlightenment-era architects, theologians, and thinkers did not quite comprehend the profound changes taking place in their own time. Today’s digital technologies are having profound effects on many different aspects of our contemporary understanding from the human genome to the mapping of the cosmos. Digital manipulations that use virtual-reality technologies form a major part of this revolution. As architects we are responding in a number of ways, by conceiving of entirely new geometric principles, new methodologies, and entirely novel approaches to representation beyond perspectival geometry.
series CAADRIA
email info@asymptote.net
more http://www.asymptote.net
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

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