CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 509

_id ddssar0214
id ddssar0214
authors Al Hassan, F., Trum, H.M.G.J. and Rutten, P.G.S.
year 2002
title Strategic Briefing A Conceptual Process Model for Building Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Nowadays building design problems are divided in partial discipline related sub-problems. Through targeted and focused attention to sub problems however the awareness of the whole is lost. Each designparticipant gives his sub-problem first priority. In contrast in the past the master builder saw the whole problem as his problem first. Thus the process of seeing the design problem as a whole, as a result ofprioritizing, considering constraints, or strategizing, is lost in today’s practice, basically because this process is a mental and implicit process, that occurred in the brain of the multi-disciplinary master builder.In most cases it is the task of no one in a design team today. The aim of this paper is modeling this conceptual mental implicit process design using System Theory and Cognitive Psychology, trying to determine the structure of the design problem as it occurs intuitively in the brain. The result will provide us with a mechanism that enables us each time to refine a unique common design problem representation. This leads to more effective use of design team capabilities, and forms an essential basis for organizing efforts toward collaborative solutions. Also some kind of clarity is provided as to how proposed solutions are to be judged.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddssar0206
id ddssar0206
authors Bax, M.F.Th. and Trum, H.M.G.J.
year 2002
title Faculties of Architecture
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In order to be inscribed in the European Architect’s register the study program leading to the diploma ‘Architect’ has to meet the criteria of the EC Architect’s Directive (1985). The criteria are enumerated in 11 principles of Article 3 of the Directive. The Advisory Committee, established by the European Council got the task to examine such diplomas in the case some doubts are raised by other Member States. To carry out this task a matrix was designed, as an independent interpreting framework that mediates between the principles of Article 3 and the actual study program of a faculty. Such a tool was needed because of inconsistencies in the list of principles, differences between linguistic versions ofthe Directive, and quantification problems with time, devoted to the principles in the study programs. The core of the matrix, its headings, is a categorisation of the principles on a higher level of abstractionin the form of a taxonomy of domains and corresponding concepts. Filling in the matrix means that each study element of the study programs is analysed according to their content in terms of domains; thesummation of study time devoted to the various domains results in a so-called ‘profile of a faculty’. Judgement of that profile takes place by committee of peers. The domains of the taxonomy are intrinsically the same as the concepts and categories, needed for the description of an architectural design object: the faculties of architecture. This correspondence relates the taxonomy to the field of design theory and philosophy. The taxonomy is an application of Domain theory. This theory,developed by the authors since 1977, takes as a view that the architectural object only can be described fully as an integration of all types of domains. The theory supports the idea of a participatory andinterdisciplinary approach to design, which proved to be awarding both from a scientific and a social point of view. All types of domains have in common that they are measured in three dimensions: form, function and process, connecting the material aspects of the object with its social and proceduralaspects. In the taxonomy the function dimension is emphasised. It will be argued in the paper that the taxonomy is a categorisation following the pragmatistic philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce. It will bedemonstrated as well that the taxonomy is easy to handle by giving examples of its application in various countries in the last 5 years. The taxonomy proved to be an adequate tool for judgement ofstudy programs and their subsequent improvement, as constituted by the faculties of a Faculty of Architecture. The matrix is described as the result of theoretical reflection and practical application of a matrix, already in use since 1995. The major improvement of the matrix is its direct connection with Peirce’s universal categories and the self-explanatory character of its structure. The connection with Peirce’s categories gave the matrix a more universal character, which enables application in other fieldswhere the term ‘architecture’ is used as a metaphor for artefacts.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 6440
authors Chang, Y.L., Lee, Y.Z. and Liu, Y.T.
year 2002
title Construction of Digital City in Physical City: Cyberspatial Cognition Approach to the Project of Hsin-Chu Digital City in Taiwan
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 109-116
summary The cyberspace upon physical space forms a new spatial structure to increase the influence on the urban fabric and the concept of space in architecture. Today, digital cities are being developed all over the world. By using a city metaphor, digital cities integrate urban information and create public spaces. How do digital cities directly connect to physical cities and become an imaginable city? Therefore, we argue that a new spatial analysis theory must be established for digital city, comparing with theories of disciplines, to find the explicitly spatial structures and relations in digital city upon physical city.
series CAADRIA
email jecho@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id e5e7
authors Fischer, Th., Fischer, T. and Ceccato, C.
year 2002
title Distributed Agents for Morphologic and Behavioral Expression in Cellular Design Systems
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 111-121
summary After more than a century of domination by neo-Darwinian theory, biological thought is beginning to giveincreasing recognition to developmental theory. Amongst other reasons, this recent widening ofperspective is grounded on the incompleteness of the neo-Darwinian perspective in providing modelsfor the invention of novel forms or species and individual development. Evolutionary design theory hasdrawn much of its inspiration from evolutionary biology and consequently shows analogous flaws. Thispaper demonstrates an adoption of biological developmental theory to the field of design theory in orderto fill the corresponding gap. As natural developmental processes are based on the development ofcellular units, which form composite structures, this paper employs the cellular model as a means for thedevelopment of a corresponding design and construction theory. The discussion of this approachincludes possible linkages between morphologic and behavioral attributes of tissues with implicationsfor self-assembly, growth, healing and self-reproduction of man-made structures.
series ACADIA
email sdtom@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id ga0202
id ga0202
authors Frazer, Jh., Frazer, J., Liu X., Tang M. and Janssen, P.
year 2002
title Generative and Evolutionary Techniques for Building Envelope Design
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The authors have been involved in the use of generative techniques for building envelope design since 1968 and the use of genetic algorithms since 1990. Recent work has focused on incorporating optimisation functions into form generating processes in order for new forms responding to varied design environments to be created and determined. This paper will summarise the authors’ previous work in this field and explain the theory behind this approach, and illustrate recent developments. While the initial implementation of a new building envelope design system is reported in more details in a related paper at this conference, this paper outlines its main features and points out the direction at which it is to be fully developed and further improved.
series other
email John.frazer@polyu.edu.hk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id 9e16
authors Neuckermans, H., Heylighen, A. and Morisse, P.
year 2002
title Visual Keys to Architectural Design
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 175-182
summary This paper presents a new mechanism to access and interact with DYNAMO, a collective case base for architectural design developed as a Web-based tool. The system is fully operational since a few years in the context of architectural design education as well as for seminars on architectural theory. We have now developed a set of visual keys structured at the one hand according to the Vitruvian tripartition of architecture: Firmitas (structure, materials,…), Utilitas (building programme,…), Venustas (formal qualities/articulation, spatial configuration,…) to which we added Context (topography, site, budget, climate,...) as a supplementary dimension, and at the other hand including three levels of detail: single spaces, building blocks or master plan entities. Visual keys match the architect’s designerly way of thinking. The visual keys are in fact nothing else than a graphical codification of architecture within the realm of architectural composition. The software, that has been developed so far, does not only allow users to access cases via the keys we have implemented, but it also provides a tool to sketch and submit their own keys.
series CAADRIA
email Herman.Neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2002/09/04 13:45

_id e5a6
authors Senagala, Mahesh
year 2002
title Time-like Architectures: The Emergence of Post-spatial Parametric Worlds
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 69-76
summary A new trend is emerging in architecture today: dynamic and time-like architectures (term derived fromthe language of Theory of Relativity) that are capable of moving, flexing and reconfiguring themselvesthrough globally networked control mechanisms are emerging. Such buildings maybe "pluggedinto" the information networks and can be manipulated through remote interaction. Architecture canbe published, literally. At this time there is no one theoretical framework available to address sucharchitectural efforts and the paper is aimed at providing a framework under the rubric of "TimelikeArchitectures". The paper addresses the unprecedented transformation of the spatial and temporalfoundations of architecture by a convergence of two technological developments: global real-timeinformation networks and kinetic, pneumatic tectonics. Envisioned and in some cases built by agroup of avant-garde architects, time-like architectures are poised to become a norm in a nottoo distant future. The paper will identify, define and outline few time-like works. The paper willalso outline the historical, theoretical and ethical relationships between post-spatial (authors term),post-modern and modern architectures using Charles Jencks’ structuralist classification,Evolutionary Tree.
series ACADIA
email mahesh@mahesh.org
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id d145
authors Senagala, Mahesh
year 2002
title Time-like Architectures - The Emergence of Post-spatial Parametric Worlds
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 254-261
summary A new trend is emerging in architecture today: dynamic and time-like architectures (term derived from the language of Theory of Relativity) that are capable of moving, flexing and reconfiguring themselves through globally networked control mechanisms are emerging. Such buildings maybe “plugged into” the information networks and can be manipulated through remote interaction. Architecture can be published, literally. At this time there is no one theoretical framework available to address such architectural efforts and the paper is aimed at providing a framework under the rubric of “Time-like Architectures”. The paper addresses the unprecedented transformation of the spatial and temporal foundations of architecture by a coming together of two technological developments: global real-time information networks and kinetic, pneumatic tectonics. Envisioned, and, in some cases built, by a group of avant-garde architects, time-like architectures are poised to become a norm in a not too distant future. The paper will identify, define and outline few time-like works. The paper will also outline the historical, theoretical and ethical relationships between post-spatial, post-modern and modern architectures using Charles Jencks’ structuralist classification, Evolutionary Tree.
series eCAADe
email msenagala@satx.rr.com
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id ga0233
id ga0233
authors Sheridan, J.
year 2002
title The Evolving Role of the Artist
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary For more than a decade the author has designed and used algorithmic systems to produce artworks that incorporate generative and evolutionary concepts, forms and processes. This work has demonstrated that algorithmic aesthetic processes and products can be effectively created and modulated by both human beings and non-human systems. However, this work has also raised important questions such as: - What role can the individual human artist play in a cultural economy based upon industrialized generative processes and non-human systems? - How can artists integrate standardized scientific languages and algorithmic processes into personal visions and expressive languages? - How can artists capture their personal creative processes and encapsulate these processes in industry standard systems and software; and should they do so? - How might the generative systems and products created by human and non-human artists function and evolve in the larger social context? To address these questions, in this paper the author uses examples taken from his past and present artwork to illustrate the opportunities and pitfalls presented by computerized generative aesthetic processes and tools. In addition, the author offers a set of conjectures intended to help clarify issues such as: the evolving role of the artist as a producer of knowledge and form, and the value and appropriate structure of personalized computer languages for artists.
series other
email jamy@arthink.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ba50
authors Achten, Henri and Jessurun, Joran
year 2002
title An Agent Framework for Recognition of Graphic Units in Drawings
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 246-253
summary Architects use graphic conventions in their drawings that have meaningful content to the design task. In previous work, such well-defined sets of graphic entities have been identified and defined. These sets are called graphic units. In this paper, we discuss how graphic unit recognition in drawings can take place using a multi-agent systems approach. This approach seems promising as singular agents may specialize in graphic unit-recognition, and multi-agent systems can address problems of ambiguity through negotiation mechanisms. We present an agent framework for this purpose, how it connects to the theory of graphic units, and how agents for recognizing graphic units are defined. The paper ends with a discussion of current findings and future work.
series eCAADe
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 6b70
authors Af Klercker, Jonas and Pittioni, Gernot
year 2002
title Architect and Structural Engineer in interactive design
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 386-389
summary We are convinced that an interactive design process involving engineers and architects will create values to a project. Looking back there have been some obstacles, like a week’s time for exchange of drawings with traditional postal services; manual calculation methods, which could not be spoiled on loose grounds like architect’s sketches; different media – architect’s drawings and engineer’s numbers in tables; attitudes and traditional roles, implemented already in education. Today most of these obstacles can be overcome and we have made a test. We have used ArchiCad by Graphisoft and FEM-design by SKANSKA IT Solutions to test to make an interactive design. Our conclusions are that exchange of information, drawings and other documents is more or less routine in praxis, and it works almost instantly. Computers make calculation faster and easier for the engineer. Though we would wish to have software which manages to do more rapid estimations. Even simulations such as of loads on a structure are practically possible. By using model based CAD the data can be used for transferring quantities for calculations as well as visualization of the design as a platform for collaborate analysis. The technique is developed and usable but to gain acceptance and make use of it is also a matter of attitudes and of application activities in education.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
last changed 2013/02/04 05:50

_id ddssar0202
id ddssar0202
authors Akin, Ömer and Özkaya, Ipek
year 2002
title Models of Design Requirement
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Case studies show that significant proportions of design errors and failures are linked to poor requirement specification during both early stages of design and as changes occur. Computational requirements engineering as a front-end to design iterations is a promising area addressing theseproblems. In other design disciplines, such as in software engineering, requirement engineering has given significant product improvements. In this paper, we present a state-space representation of requirement models for architectural design. The purpose of requirement modeling in design is tocreate a process by which requirements can be converted into working design solutions through frontend validation. We suggest three models of requirement specification, co-evolutionary [CoM], multiple domain [MDM] and single domain [SDM] models, that can facilitate this effort. Taken together all three models provide a full set of logical permutations of requirement-solution “worlds” and “operations.” We compare each model against the others in terms of facilitating change management and computability.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ac57
authors Bae, H.A., Kim, M.R., Shin, S.Y., Kim, H.A. and Yoon, C.S.
year 2002
title An Application of Photogrammetry Measuring Technology to Parametric Modeling of Korean Traditional Wooden Structure
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 139-146
summary To construct a 3D parametric model of Korean traditional wooden structure, the fundamental process is to obtain the dimensions of each building. An application of measuring high technology helps this process accomplished more efficiently. However PhotoModeler is a photogrammetric program to measure the dimension using photographs. The information derived from PhotoModeler is used to clarify the design rule inherent in a Korean traditional mansion type building - UnHyun Palace.
series CAADRIA
email bhanseon@hanmail.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0a71
authors Barros, Diana Rodríguez
year 2002
title Sistemas hipermediales, efectos del tamaño de los nodos y del número de vínculos [Hyper medial Systems; Size effects of the nodes and number of bonds]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 186-189
summary A Hypermedia system is, morphologically speaking, an information structure which organizes a set of elements of alphanumeric and graphic nature as a web. This enables a multidimensional access from specific interests. One of the most widespread hypermedia applications is within the field of education. There should be validation criteria which contribute to systematize and direct design processes for didactic hypermedia. This work aims at becoming a contribution by analyzing the relations and effects produced by the number of links and node sizes on some basic didactic uses; particularly, within information search, learning and attitude towards hypermedia. From the results obtained, we propose guidelines for the design of didactic Web Sites and CD Rom.
series SIGRADI
email dibarros@mdp.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2044
authors Barros, Diana Rodríguez and Mandagaran, María
year 2002
title Sistemas Hipermediales y descentramiento temático [Hyper medial Systems and thematic decentralized]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 190-192
summary Hipermedia lead to a non- linear organization of information, where the user decides the path to follow and the relations among the different information blocks. They constitute starting points for establishing both social and sin gu lar “sense genealogies”. Sense production by means of mutimedia access and the resignifying of information correspond, within the Theory of Science Didactics, to the concept of thematic decentering. This concept refers to fl exibility and transference modes, opposed toseg men ta tion and which enable to explore, approach and relate different topics and complexities. It is supposed to generate more cultivated individuals by broadly linking science, technology and art. Within this theoretic frame work, the work presents the de vel op ment of a hipermedium on the Villa Victoria Cultural Center, which aims at a didactic treat ment of cultural spaces as object of knowl edge.
series SIGRADI
email dibarros@mdp.edu.ar, mmandagaran@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 7798
authors Barrow, Larry
year 2002
title Elitism, IT and the Modern Architect Opportunity or Dilemma
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 97-109
summary Information Technology (IT) is impacting architecture dramatically in process and form. Often thecurrent transformation of architecture is difficult to analyze and frequently we see confusion and anxietyregarding uncertainties for the future of the architect as designer and project leader. The currentpotentiality for new exotic form (i.e. product) is mesmerizing; however, in the current context, lessobvious issues and pertinent questions are emerging for the profession. What is the mission of theprofession? What will keep us relevant in the mist of the new global society?In this paper, we will take an evolutionary perspective of technology in architecture and draw parallelsbetween the Renaissance, which is the genesis of the modern architect, and the contemporary state ofarchitecture. The modern architect was birthed during the Renaissance where we see the retraction ofthe architect from the building site and separation from direct involvement in the building process.Communications technology (i.e. representation in the form of free-hand drawings, mechanical 2Dorthographic drawings and 3D perspectives) enabled the decomposition of the master builder into threecomponents (i.e. artist-designer, practicing_architect, and builder). Thus, we see technology enable thedenigration and ultimate dissolution of the centuries old craftsman guilds and the master builder. Thetechnology evolution of “drawings” enabled monumental change in the process of architecture over thepast five hundred years. The fission of the master builder, enabled by “drawings”, resulted in disparatefactions which are the forerunners of the modern day litigious design-bid-build project delivery. We nowincreasingly see a return to the fusion of design and building where often the architect is not the projectmanager or leader. Thus, the question looms, will the 21st century architect lead or be led, and whatare the ramifications for the profession?The historical Master Builder is re-emerging as a dynamically networked team of design andconstruction knowledge specialists. Bi-lateral knowledge exchange, enhanced with emerging IT, isoccurring between owners, managers, architects, design specialists, engineers, builders and machines.Technology is disrupting architecture, resulting in increasing specialization and compressed timeframes, and may require reevaluation of the role of the architect as project-leader "integrativegeneralist"or "design-specialist".Conclusively, the concept of ‘cybernetic architecture’ is proposed as an IT reference framework. Failureto appropriately respond to societal evolution, driven by technology, could result in the loss ofprofessional status for the modern architect. Herein lies our dilemma, or opportunity, depending on therole choice of the modern architect.
series ACADIA
email lbarrow@msstate.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 263a
authors Bermúdez, Julio
year 2002
title Implicaciones Arquitectónicas de La Naturaleza del Hacer en Ambientes Digitales [Architectonic Implications of the Nature of the Digital Atmosphere ]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 142-145
summary Architectural Implications of the Nature of Making in Digital Environments There exists an a-priori relationship between the basic structural constrains of an environment and the types of construction that may evolve there. For instance, the inexorable laws of nature have caused architecture to develop as a physical, stable, containing and inert object. Hence there are good reasons to study how cyberspace with its different ontological foundations may define the architecture to be built there. This examination may be best accomplished by concentrating in how what is structurally unique to the cyber impacts architectural design This paper investigates the ontology of construction in cyberspace by analyzing ordinary digital laws that defy reality. The findings both challenge our traditional conceptions of architecture and guide us toward totally unprecedented design potentials. The goal is to begin building a fundamental theory of architectural space, design and construction applicable to cyberspace.
series SIGRADI
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ga0206
id ga0206
authors Biles, John A.
year 2002
title GenJam in Transition: from Genetic Jammer to Generative Jammer
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary GenJam, short for Genetic Jammer, is an evolutionary computation (EC) based software agent that models a jazz improviser. Recently GenJam has evolved away from its roots as an interactive genetic algorithm toward its current state as an autonomous generative system. GenJam has retained its chromosome-based representations and mappings, its intelligent selection, crossover and mutation operators, and its real-time interactive performance capabilities. However, it no longer needs any explicit representation of fitness, which arguably makes it no longer an EC system. This paper considers GenJam as a generative art system. Generative art produces “unique and non-repeatable events” that express a designer’s generating idea. The designer’s generating idea defines a species of events, represented in a genetic code. In music, these events could be individual notes, melodic phrases, even entire pieces. In GenJam the events are four-measure phrases, or “licks” in the jazz vernacular. The format for the genetic code, then, defines a species space from which unique individual events can be generated. Uniqueness is important in jazz because improvisation must be spontaneous and “new.” Hence, improvisation is tailor-made for the generative art paradigm, and in fact, one could argue that improvisation is, by definition, the purest example of generative art applied to music. In other words, generative music is improvisation, and GenJam is the Generative Jammer.
series other
email jab@it.rit.edu
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id eabb
authors Boeykens, St. Geebelen, B. and Neuckermans, H.
year 2002
title Design phase transitions in object-oriented modeling of architecture
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 310-313
summary The project IDEA+ aims to develop an “Integrated Design Environment for Architecture”. Its goal is providing a tool for the designer-architect that can be of assistance in the early-design phases. It should provide the possibility to perform tests (like heat or cost calculations) and simple simulations in the different (early) design phases, without the need for a fully detailed design or remodeling in a different application. The test for daylighting is already in development (Geebelen, to be published). The conceptual foundation for this design environment has been laid out in a scheme in which different design phases and scales are defined, together with appropriate tests at the different levels (Neuckermans, 1992). It is a translation of the “designerly” way of thinking of the architect (Cross, 1982). This conceptual model has been translated into a “Core Object Model” (Hendricx, 2000), which defines a structured object model to describe the necessary building model. These developments form the theoretical basis for the implementation of IDEA+ (both the data structure & prototype software), which is currently in progress. The research project addresses some issues, which are at the forefront of the architect’s interest while designing with CAAD. These are treated from the point of view of a practicing architect.
series eCAADe
email stefan.boeykens@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

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