CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 507

_id ec4b
authors Braga, Gisele Pinna and Ferrarini, Renato
year 2002
title Estratégia de atividade para a motivação do discente no curso de Design Gráfico [Activity strategy for the learning motivation in the Graphic Design course]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 248-251
summary The Graphic Design students of Universidade Tuiuti do Paraná demanded a more motivating teaching metodology. The learning process should be more efficient and the students should participate more in proposed activities. In order to maximize learning, some activities that simulated the real professional life were created. The leaning process was idealized to bring real experience. Students were guided to produce and manage the creation process, in order to make the academic exercise similar to real life. Allthe students were involved in a pedagogical dinamic, in which teorical concepts were sistematically studied in specific time to support practical activities.
series SIGRADI
email ferraferrarini@ig.com.br, giipinna@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 4b05
authors Brazier, Frances M. and Wijngaards, Niek
year 2002
title Role of Trust in Automated Distributed Design
source Gero JS and Brazier FMT (eds) (2002) Agents in Design 2002. Key Centre of Design Computing and Cognition, University of Sydney, pp. 71-83
summary Distributed design involves many participants, each with their own expertise and goals. Information acquired from different participants may be valued differently in terms of accuracy and trustworthiness. Human participants in a distributed design setting often know whom they trust, and whose abilities they value. This knowledge is not often made explicit. It does, however, influence distributed design processes (i.e. the way in which members of a design team assess and incorporate each others' designs, objectives, evaluations). These trust relations need to be made explicit to be able to effectively support distributed design.
series other
email niek@cs.vu.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 3d67
authors Breen, J., Nottrot, R. and Stellingwerff, M.
year 2002
title Relating to the ‘real’ Perceptions of Computer Aided and Physical Modelling
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 134-138
summary Designing - giving form to new objects or environments - is largely a question of anticipating the workings of spatial and material environments, which can become ‘reality’ only by being built. Until ‘realized’ a design is essentially a figment of the designer’s imagination, although his or her ideas may be laid down and conveyed to others via specialized design media. In this way impressions of the design may be shared with clients, colleagues or other ‘actors’ in the design process. Such products of the designer’s imaging process can be relatively abstract or begin to approach - future - reality. Form & Media research can be ‘revealing’, stimulating insights concerning preferences, working processes and the effects of products of the designer’s imagination. In the past ten years we have gained considerable practical experience with both virtual and tangible (scale) models. We have compared different techniques in conference workshops, within educational settings and in our Form & Media research laboratory. The research projects ranged from the development of practical techniques and working methods to protocol analyses of designing architects. This contribution draws comparisons between different computer aided modelling techniques, with an indication of their perspectives, making use of the experience gained from various experiments in an educational context, and will highlight the potentials for different combinations of digital and physical modelling techniques.
series eCAADe
email j.l.h.breen@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id d5e1
authors Bugajska, Malgorzata Maria
year 2002
title Spatial Visualization of abstract Information: A Classification Model for Visual Spatial Design Guidelines in the Digital Domain
source Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich
summary Visualization of abstract information refers to the design of graphical representations of information that has no simple relation to known concrete or physical forms. Designing visualizations of abstract information requires proposing visual representation for often a large body of data pants. determining a meaningful structure for the complex relations among them and suggesting a method for Interacting with this body of data. Spatial perception plays an Important role for cognitive processing when interacting with abstract information, slice spatially-organized Information can be accessed and operated on rapidly and effortlessly, especially when a spatial arrangement reveals the conceptual organization of Information.

This thesis focuses on aspects of the spatial visual design of abstract information presented as computer-generated. dynamic and interactive images accessible through flat displays. The process of spatial visualization design is shaped by various factors including interactive, perceptual, navigational as well as organizational and metaphorical aspects and as such requires an interdisciplinary approach. Therefore, in researching spatial visual design. it is crucial to use methods facilitating the process of sharing competencies among different disciplines.

In this thesis, we introduce a new classification model accommodating features important in designing effective spatial visualizations of abstract information. To enhance the effectiveness of spatial visualization, this model offers a holistic approach in classifiying spatial Visualization features. As part of the model, we analyze properties already used in architectural representation and other visual design disciplines for spatial presentations as well as investigate their potential usage in digital domains of abstract information. The process of spatial visualization In the digital environment is mostly based on the practical experience of a designer. and therefore the majority of spatial design know-how is heuristic in nature. Based on this assumption, we present a set of guidelines addressing the general problem of spatial design.

The Spalial Design Classificahon Model, Visual Spatial Properties and Spatial Design Guidelines build an extendable infrastructure which becomes a first step towards augmenting the quality of spatial information design- We propose to use this infrastructure as a general blueprint for structuring the exchange of expertise in Interdisciplinary problem-solving processes.

series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/05/15 10:22

_id 046e
authors Burry, Mark
year 2002
title Rapid prototyping, CAD/CAM and human factors
source Automation in Construction 11 (3) (2002) pp. 313-333
summary CAD/CAM techniques for rapid prototyping, profile cutting, and form sculpting/routing/moulding are well-advanced for the vehicle and manufacturing industries. Although their migration to the building sector is readily achievable as a substitution for much of traditional construction, there are factors that work against this. Apart from the singular `one-off' nature of most architectural projects that limits ready exploitation of techniques derived in the main for mass-manufacture, there remains the problem of apprenticeship, and how to maintain a healthy lineage of skills for work otherwise less readily taken-up using automated manufacturing procedures. Continuing construction for Gaudí's Sagrada Família Church in Barcelona has provided a fertile test-bed for integrating rapid prototyping and CAD/CAM production where appropriate. Nevertheless, human factors such as maintaining the status quo with regard to apprenticeship and maintaining the skill lineage have provided some healthy insights into both the risks as well as the opportunities for greater involvement with CAD/CAM, and in particular, rapid prototyping in the building construction sector. This paper reports on and discusses the findings of case studies from the Sagrada Família Church project.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id c229
authors Cavazos, María Estela Sánchez
year 2002
title Experiencia en Digitalización de Procesos de Diseño Arquitectónico Caso Taller de Modelación Espacial, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes [Experience in Digitalization Processes of Architectural Design: Study Case of Space Modeling, Independent University of Aguascalientes ]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 252-256
summary This project has been based in an experience that took time in the years 1999 and 2000 where a group of 13 students of the Architectonic Design Masters in the U.A.A. were submitted to a project that consisted in register their Architectonic Design Processing during a year with the main purpose of having the most complete material possible to be used as material for different research projects. At the end of the architectonic project the students scanned all the graphics and ordered them in the format that was established by the group using ACDSee32 as the program, which resulted very simple to manage and permitted to order the graphics and write comments to them as it was thought. The result obtained was 12 ordered texts by seven segments pefectly identifi ed and with easy manage for any investigation that you want to realice with them, in fact today exist two fi nished investigations that were realized with this information added to one formal investigation and some informal in process.
series SIGRADI
email mesanche@correo.uaa.mx
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id 2cd9
authors Ceccato, C. Fischer, Th., Li Chun-Man, G. and Frazer, J.
year 2002
title A Large-Scale Computing Infrastructure for Design Education
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 282-289
summary Most departmental computing infrastructure reflects the state of networking technology and available funds at the time of construction, which converge in a preconceived notion of homogeneity of network architecture and usage patterns. The DMAN (Digital Media Access Network) project, a large-scale server and network foundation for The Hong Kong Polytechnic University’s School of Design, was created as a platform that would support a highly complex academic environment while giving maximum freedom to students, faculty and researchers through simplicity and ease of use. As a centralized multi-user computation backbone, DMAN faces an extremely heterogeneous user and application profile, exceeding implementation and maintenance challenges of typical enterprise, and even most academic server set-ups. This paper summarizes the specification, implementation and application of the system while describing its significance for design education in a computational context.
series eCAADe
email sdtom@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id aef6
authors Chang, David C. and Szalapaj, Peter
year 2002
title Making Sense of Presenting Design Ideas through Animated Form
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 560-563
summary This paper describes both conventional and computational ways of expressing and exploring design concepts with the use of models. We explain the role and function of the model in the design process, and investigate the ways in which models become reflections and representations of architects’ design thinking. We compare and contrast the physical properties of conventional models with those of three-dimensional computer models, and the corresponding processes of model creation, model development, and model modification. The paper includes a brief overview of commonly used forms of computer representations often encountered in Computer Aided Design applications. Whatever the visual richness of computer models in virtual environments can be, we believe that, just as in the use of conventional two-dimensional architectural drawings, computational presentations of architectural design concepts have their own conventions of use. This paper addresses the need to more accurately understand these conventions of using computer models for the representation of architectural design concepts. Therefore, we will illustrate the more dynamic qualities of computer models, which have the potential to allow designers to escape from the restrictions and constraints of physical form. In particular, we demonstrate these qualities in the context of architectural presentations in the medium of computer animation. These new forms of expression of design thoughts and ideas go beyond mere model making, and move more towards scenemaking and storytelling. The latter represents new methods of expression within computational environments for architects and designers.
series eCAADe
email d.chang@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 6440
authors Chang, Y.L., Lee, Y.Z. and Liu, Y.T.
year 2002
title Construction of Digital City in Physical City: Cyberspatial Cognition Approach to the Project of Hsin-Chu Digital City in Taiwan
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 109-116
summary The cyberspace upon physical space forms a new spatial structure to increase the influence on the urban fabric and the concept of space in architecture. Today, digital cities are being developed all over the world. By using a city metaphor, digital cities integrate urban information and create public spaces. How do digital cities directly connect to physical cities and become an imaginable city? Therefore, we argue that a new spatial analysis theory must be established for digital city, comparing with theories of disciplines, to find the explicitly spatial structures and relations in digital city upon physical city.
series CAADRIA
email jecho@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 0ee9
authors Chase, Scott C.
year 2002
title (Re)design of construction assemblies with function/behaviour/structure grammars
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 356-359
summary A formal framework for redesign based upon Function/Behaviour/Structure models and design grammars is described. A proposed application domain is for the design and redesign of construction assemblies. GDL object technology is proposed as a candidate tool for implementation.
series eCAADe
email s.c.chase@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id bbb6
authors Chase, Scott C.
year 2002
title A model for user interaction in grammar-based design systems
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 161-172
summary Grammar-based production systems are considered potentially powerful design tools by their ability to generate sets of designs adhering to user-specified constraints. However, development of such tools has been slow, partly because of the lack of good interaction between user and system. This paper describes modes of user interaction and control possible with grammar-based design systems and presents issues to be examined in the development of models that represent the locus of interactions possible with such systems. The examination of existing grammar-based systems provides empirical evidence to support the validity of such models.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 8cc7
authors Chen, Julie
year 2002
title DAM: Digital Animation Museum
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary The interaction of architecture and technology is, to many, simply a relationship between a building and the materials from which it is constructed. This thesis, however, explores the notion that architectural spaces and forms are influenced not only by construction technology, but also by everyday technology that we use to better our lives, and particularly focuses on the potential impact of wireless information technology on architecture. This thesis asserts that the implementation of information technology in architecture encourages greater interactivity between building and visitor and also increases flexibility in spatial programming. By incorporating wireless information technology as an essential design element of a museum, traditional notions of control points can be eliminated, and the building experience may be manipulated in a variety of ways to interact with and respond to visitor interests and preferences. In this way, both building and visitors are able to collaborate to produce a unique and individualized experience of the building space.
series thesis:MSc
email ix@u.washington.edu
more http://dmg.caup.washington.edu/xmlSiteEngine/browsers/stylin/publications.html
last changed 2004/06/02 17:12

_id 7f0a
authors Chen, K.-Z.,Feng, X.-A. and Ding, L.
year 2002
title Intelligent approaches for generating assembly drawings from 3-D computer models of mechanical products
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 34 (5) (2002) pp. 347-355
summary In order to reduce the time of mechanical product design and ensure the high quality of their assembly drawings, this paper develops an intelligent approach for generatingassembly drawings automatically from three-dimensional (3-D) computer assembly models of mechanical products by simulating the experienced human designer's thinkingmode with the aid of computer graphics and knowledge-based expert system. The key issues include the strategies and methods for selecting the necessary views in anassembly drawing, determining necessary sectional views in each view, eliminating the unreasonable projective overlap of the components in each view, and minimizing thenumbers of both the views in an assembly drawing and the sectional views in each view. Based on the approach, corresponding software prototype was developed. Finally, itis demonstrated, from an example of the fixture in a modularized drilling machine, that its assembly drawing was generated successfully using this intelligent softwareprototype.
keywords CAD, Intelligent CAD, Expert System, Artificial Intelligence, Assembly, Drawing
series journal paper
email kzchen@hkucc.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id f4e4
authors Chiarelli, Julia
year 2002
title Una Posible visión Griega del Realismo geométrico en las Imágenes Arquitectónicas [A Possible Greek Vision of Geometric Realism in Architectural Images ]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 268-271
summary The vision of a reality that is individual and personal. Along the history we see as the different towns they build their cities and their temples with different morphologies and in a different establishment way; but the question is: As they decided their construction? Starting from that law?The Greeks already discovered certain mechanisms of the vision in the century IV B.C This posture on the visual sense made that optic illusions have been analyzed for then to be used with premeditation in theconstruction of certain temples and its location. The departure hypothesis is centered in 2 (two)-investigation levels: 1. The definition of Illusion of Hering (optic illusions) and their with the realism in architectural image2. The analysis of the electronic scale models based on the geometry proyectual.
series SIGRADI
email jchiare@fibertel.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id 4e8c
authors Chien, Sheng-Fen and Flemming, Ulrich
year 2001
title Design space navigation in generative design systems
source Automation in Construction 11 (1) (2002) pp. 1-22
summary Generative design systems make it easier for designers to generate and explore design alternatives, but the amount of information generated during a design session can become very large. Intelligent navigation aids are needed if designers wish to access the information they generate with ease. We present a comprehensive approach to support information navigation in requirement-driven generative design systems, which gain their power form explicit representations of design requirements, which in turn add to the information generated by the system. Our approach takes into account studies dealing with human spatial cognition, wayfinding in physical environments, and information navigation in electronic media. We structure the information to be accessed in terms of a five-dimensional design space model that applies across generative design systems of the type considered here. The model structure supports basic generic navigation operations along its five dimensions. We validated the model in the context of the SEED-Layout system and used it to extend the built-in navigation tools of the system through novel ones, which we subjected to a limited usability study. The study suggests that these tools have promise and warrant further investigation.
series journal paper
email ujf@cmu.edu
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id 2d54
authors Clayton, M.J., Warden, R.B. and Parker, Th.W.
year 2002
title Virtual construction of architecture using 3D CAD and simulation
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 227-235
summary 3D modeling and computer simulations provide new ways for architecture students to study the relationship between the design and construction of buildings. Digital media help to integrate and expand the content of courses in drafting, construction and design. This paper describes computer-based exercises that intensify the student's experience of construction in several courses from sophomore to senior level. The courses integrate content from drafting and design communication, construction, CAD, and design. Several techniques are used to strengthen students' awareness and ability in construction. These include: Virtual design–build projects in which students construct 3D CAD models that include all elements that are used in construction. Virtual office in which several students must collaborate under the supervision of a student acting as project architect to create a 3D CAD model and design development documents. Virtual sub-contracting in which each student builds a trade specific 3D CAD model of a building and all of the trade specific models must be combined into a single model. Construction simulations (4D CAD) in which students build 3D CAD models showing all components and then animate them to illustrate the assembly process. Cost estimating using spreadsheets. These techniques are applied and reapplied at several points in the curriculum in both technical laboratory courses and design studios. This paper compares virtual construction methods to physical design–build projects and provides our pedagogical arguments for the use of digital media for understanding construction.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 6e0a
authors Craig, David Latch and Zimring, Craig
year 2002
title Support for collaborative design reasoning in shared virtual spaces
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 249-259
summary This paper discusses collaborative design, emphasizing the elaboration and transformations of a problem space, and the role that unstructured verbal communication and graphic communication can play in these processes. An asynchronous collaborative system, called the Immersive Discussion Tool (IDT), is introduced as a means for supporting productive design exchanges. IDT allows collaborators to reason about 3-D models over the Internet using view-dependent and view-independent diagrammatic marks, dynamic simulations, geometric design surrogates and text annotations. IDT relies on VRML to view the models, with an extensive Java-based interface driving the interactive behavior, including the construction and playback of graphical annotations, the management of threaded discussions, and the management of file input/output. The development and initial implementation of IDT has revealed the difficulty of constructing complex marks in a virtual 3-D space. Possible strategies for dealing with these problems are suggested.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ddssar0208
id ddssar0208
authors Cumming, Michael
year 2002
title A Bottom-Up Approach to Design Coordination
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary The design industry like any other industry could benefit from process support for its practitioners. However, what constitutes legitimate process support for designers is a difficult research question. In order to support designers in their processes, first one needs to know what designers do. This is not only a question of knowing what designers do in general, but also what particular designers do in their own individual design practice. How to find out what designers do, that is, how to acquire knowledge abouttheir design processes, is also a difficult research question. Providing process support for designers is seen as a task, which cannot be divorced from design process acquisition. That is, one is unlikely to provideprocess support, without acquiring an understanding, what individual designers actually do, and conversely, one is unlikely to acquire an understanding of what designers do, without providing process support for designers. An application whose goal it is to provide both design process support for designers working in collaborative design teams, and also acquires a particular type of design process representationof design processes, is described.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id fe60
authors Cumming, Michael
year 2002
title Flexible and distributed coordination models for collaborative design
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 268-275
summary Designers working in collaborative design situations, attempt to plan or anticipate their activities, such that their work progresses in an orderly manner, according to technical demands of their domain. Designers, and the organizations that employ them, often attempt to formally represent such plans using process representations, such critical path diagrams, or Petri nets. Such process articulation and formalization can have benefits for designers and organizations, such as standardization and improvement of work practices, and improved collaboration and coordination between design parties. In addition to plan making, designers also try to coordinate their actions with the actions of others on the design team. This coordination, which often takes place in real time, is a process that is necessarily social, interactive, and iterative. Here the formulation of suitable process representations is more difficult, due to the dynamic and complex nature of social interactions. How to represent and design such coordination processes, is a continuing research question in the process modeling community. It is possible there exists general coordination mechanisms that could be useful in a variety of domains. Possibilities for distributed methods of design process coordination are examined. A coordination method is proposed that involves the exchange of design process models, represented as Petri nets. Rather than concentrating on the specific content of these models - which is assumed to vary considerably between design domains - general coordinating mechanisms are proposed. One such mechanism involves the communication of social commitments to process models, in addition to communication of the content and authorship of these models.
series eCAADe
email m.cumming@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

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