CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 508

_id ddssar0211
id ddssar0211
authors Fröst, Peter
year 2002
title Interactive Tools for Collaborative Architectural Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Today’s rapidly changing society is continuously developing towards an increased demand for multistakeholder knowledge and influence in the architectural planning and design process. Accordingly, we are working with developing and setting up a partner engaged collaborative design process. It includes active collaboration between users, external partners and designers, and visualizations in conceptual design and scenario building. My research is focusing on integrating visualization technology in theseprocesses by application of digital tools. We have developed a working prototype for an interactive design tool. The prototype is an extremely “easy to use” digital modeling tool called “ForeSite Designer.” With this tool one builds one’s own spatial environment with elements on a 2D surface.With one command the 2D layout is exported to a lit-up 3D/Virtual Reality world in the computer game “Half-Life”. ForeSite Designer has lately been used in a series of workshops together with external users. In these processes ForeSite Designer has played a crucial role as an arena of building spatially arranged concepts of future environments. The results show that it works, and, importantly, promotes a collaborative engagement among the users.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id sigradi2006_e149b
id sigradi2006_e149b
authors Kendir, Elif
year 2006
title Prêt-à-Construire – An Educational Inquiry into Computer Aided Fabrication
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 162-165
summary This paper aims to show and discuss the relevance of developing necessary strategies for reintegrating the concept of fabrication into the architectural design process. The discussion will be partly based on the outcome of a graduate architectural design studio conducted in Spring semester 2002-2003. The graduate studio was part of a series of exploratory studies conducted on the nature of architectural design process transformed by information technologies. Preceded by studios investigating cognition and representation, this last studio focused on the concept of fabrication. The overarching aim of the studio series was to put CAD and CAM in context both within the actual architectural design process and within architectural education. The last of this series, which will be discussed within the frame of this paper, has specifically focused on CAM and the concept of fabrication in architecture. In accordance with the nature of a design studio, the research was more methodological than technical. The studio derived its main inspiration from the constructional templates used in dressmaking, which can be considered as an initial model for mass customization. In this context, the recladding of Le Corbusier’s Maison Domino was given as the main design problem, along with several methodological constraints. The main constraint was to develop the design idea through constructional drawings instead of representational ones. The students were asked to develop their volumetric ideas through digital 3D CAD models while working out structural solutions on a physical 1/50 model of Maison Domino. There was also a material constraint for the model, where only specified types of non-structural paper could be used. At this stage, origami provided the working model for adding structural strength to sheet materials. The final outcome included the explanation of different surface generation strategies and preliminary design proposals for their subcomponents. The paper will discuss both the utilized methodology and the final outcome along the lines of the issues raised during the studio sessions, some of which could be decisive in the putting into context of CAD – CAM in architectural design process. One such issue is mass customization, that is, the mass production of different specific elements with the help of CAM technologies. Another issue is “open source” design, indicating the possibility of a do-it-yourself architecture, where architecture is coded as information, and its code can be subject to change by different designers. The final key issue is the direct utilization of constructional drawings in the preliminary design phase as opposed to representational ones, which aimed at reminding the designer the final phase of fabrication right from the beginning. Finally, the paper will also point at the problems faced during the conduct of the studio and discuss those in the context of promoting CAM for architectural design and production in countries where there is no actual utilization of these technologies for these purposes yet.
keywords Education; Fabrication; CAM
series SIGRADI
email s3131573@student.rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id 6fbc
authors Tunçer, Bige, Stouffs, Rudi and Sariyildiz, Sevil
year 2002
title Cooperating on Architectural Analyses
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 20-27
summary As part of a fourth semester architectural design studio, students perform an analysis of selected precedents according to various criteria. For this purpose, they are provided with a web-based environment for the storage and management of their analyses. In this way, , and By integrating the analysis results into a common, extensible, library, the students are able to benefit from a collaboration with peers, and draw upon each others’ results for comparisons and relationships between different design aspects or buildings. In order to support this integration and strengthen the collaboration, we are developing organization and presentation tools that are integrated within the webbased environment. In this paper, we describe the context as provided by the design studio course, reflect on the advantages of a web-based repository for managing design and analysis information, describe the techniques we are developing to improve this process, and present the implementation of the resulting tools within the web-based environment.
series eCAADe
email b.tuncer@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id caadria2010_042
id caadria2010_042
authors Celento, David
year 2010
title Open-source, parametric architecture to propagate hyper-dense, sustainable urban communities: parametric urban dwellings for the experience economy
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 443-452
summary Rapid developments in societal, technological, and natural systems suggest profound changes ahead if research in panarchical systems (Holling, 2001) is to be believed. Panarchy suggests that systems, both natural and man-made, rise to the point of vulnerability then fail due to disruptive forces in a process of ‘creative destruction.’ This sequence allows for radical, and often unpredictable, renewal. Pressing sustainability concerns, burgeoning urban growth, and emergent ‘green manufacturing’ laws, suggest that future urban dwellings are headed toward Gladwell’s ‘tipping point’ (2002). Hyper-dense, sustainable, urban communities that employ open-source standards, parametric software, and web-based configurators are the new frontier for venerable visions. Open-source standards will permit the design, manufacture, and sale of highly diverse, inter-operable components to create compact urban living environments that are technologically sophisticated, sustainable, and mobile. These mass-customised dwellings, akin to branded consumer goods, will address previous shortcomings for prefabricated, mobile dwellings by stimulating consumer desire in ways that extend the arguments of both Joseph Pine (1992) and Anna Klingman (2007). Arguments presented by authors Makimoto and Manners (1997) – which assert that the adoption of digital and mobile technologies will create large-scale societal shifts – will be extended with several solutions proposed.
keywords Mass customisation; urban dwellings; open source standards; parametric design; sustainability
series CAADRIA
email dcelento@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id 1804
authors Chitchian, D. and Bekkering, H.
year 2002
title An Urbanistic Design Tool
source Thresholds - Design, Research, Education and Practice, in the Space Between the Physical and the Virtual [Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-11-X] Pomona (California) 24-27 October 2002, pp. 339-344
summary The existing CAD and CAAD programs and design applications hardly support the urbanistic designactivities. Although those applications are useful means to be utilized generally in design tasks, they arenot suitable tools as urbanism community needs. Most existing CAD programs are based on thearchitectural design process and therefore not suitable for urbanistic design. The conceptual differencebetween architecture and urbanism necessitates developing new CAD software based on the urbanisticdesign process. We believe that our developed Urban-CAD system assists designers with urbanisticdesign activities and overcomes the limitations of the already existing CAD applications.
series ACADIA
email d.chitchian@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/10/26 23:25

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id ddssup0210
id ddssup0210
authors Krempi, A.P., Brondino, N.C.M. and Silva, A.N.R.
year 2002
title Evaluating Transportation Accessibility with Spatial Statistics Toolsin a GIS Environment
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In several developing countries it is often assumed that low-income segments of the population living at the periphery of the cities are those affected the most by poor conditions of transportation accessibility. Inorder to gain a better understanding of the way transportation accessibility is distributed across different regions of an urban area, the main aim of this work is to analyze, making use of Spatial Statistics tools ina GIS (Geographical Information System) environment, the relationship between accessibility and geographical locations in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Data of an origin-destination (O-D) survey carried out in the city of Bauru, which brings information about four different transportation modes, were used in this study. Such data, grouped following the census tracts, were carefully examined in a Geographic Information System in order to look for spatial patterns of accessibility that are not visible inthe traditional approaches. One of the interesting outcomes of the application was the identification of regions with particular dynamics, which go against the pattern found in the overall urban area. This andother results of the case study clearly indicate that Spatial Statistics analyses in a GIS environment create a powerful tool to extend conventional transportation accessibility analysis.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 1edc
authors Mourshed, M.M., Matipa, W.M., Kelliher, D. and Keane, M.
year 2002
title Towards Interoperability: ICT in Academic Curricula for Sustainable Construction
source Proceedings CIB W107 Conference: Creating a sustainable construction industry in developing countries, South Africa
summary Sustainability has been regarded as a key issue in both process and product development in industries, e.g., manufacturing, production. The construction industry has recently recognized the importance of sustainable processes in achieving overall sustainability. Demands for cheaper, faster and better products coupled with the globalisation of the economic markets are forcing the construction industry to move towards an integrated business process. In order to achieve this integration, information and knowledge sharing are considered vital to reduce waste of resources hence fostering sustainability.

Integration of process and information in a diversified, multi-disciplinary workforce like construction depends mostly on the individual’s level of expertise. Efforts at producing interoperable information standards by a growing number of alliances changing the information flow from horizontal to vertical and from sequential to cyclic. This implies that the actors in the industry must be proficient with the current and emerging Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Recent surveys show that, there is a widening gap between required ICT skill in the workplace and those taught in academic institutions.

This paper establishes the need for ICT in construction education emphasizing interoperability as a concept among processes to achieve sustainability.

keywords Sustainable Construction; Interoperability; ICT; Academic Curriculum
series other
email monjur@ecaad.com
last changed 2003/03/31 19:13

_id d4c7
authors Penttilä, Hannu
year 2002
title Architectural-IT and Educational Curriculumns - A European Overview
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 106-109
summary The main objective of this on-going post-graduate study, is to describe the role of ”modern digital information technology” within the educational curriculumns of European schools of architecture. Information technology understood in its widest meaning. Essential questions of the study are: [1] How widely the digital media, tools and methods have been adopted in the education? [the volume] [2] In what ways information technology is utilized in architectural education of our age [the methods]. [3] What kind of changes the digital media in fact has caused to the architectural working and educational environments. The results will be published and “weblished” in the form of searchable public web-databases. The results should contain helpful elementary information for those developing and targeting the future architectural education of “the digital age” The research study was started in April/2002, and will [hopefully] reach the conclusion during the year 2002.
series eCAADe
email hannu.penttila@hut.fi
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 7400
authors Rizal, H. and Ahmad Rafi, M.E.
year 2002
title The Impact of Internet Enabled Computer Aided Design (iCAD) in Construction Industry
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 085-92
summary The advent of the Internet has opened up and given, particularly, the developing countries and the world in general, a transformation into collective intelligence (Levy, 1998) societies linked to digital communication (Rafi, 2001). Apart from large corporations, the rapid evolution of border-less communication has also synergise between the art and science expertise to form low-cost internet-based networks that have become multi-million dollar companies within a short period of time (e.g. Linux) (Rafi, 2001). In the context of architectural designs and construction industries, the birth of Internet-based CAD (iCAD) solutions has offered a new dimension to architectural practice. The function of CAD has expanded as a tool to communicate and collaborate as well as to better control all phases of the architectural practices. This paper will review the current available iCAD tools and explore the possible utilisation of iCAD in architectural practices. The opportunities for modifying current professional practice standards to best use iCAD will be rationalised as well as the elements in ensuring the effectiveness of iCAD implementation. The final component of the paper will be an evaluation framework to measure the value of iCAD in an architectural practice. The framework will become an early platform for an architectural practice to decide and plan their future in utilising and applying iCAD in the most efficient way.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email rizalhusin@hotmail.com
last changed 2006/09/29 05:18

_id ddssup0216
id ddssup0216
authors Saarloos, D.J.M., Arentze, T.A., Borgers, A.W.J. and Timmermans, H.J.P.
year 2002
title Towards a Local Planning Support System,Introducing the MASQUE Framework
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary Urban planning is an important instrument for improving the quality of life, but it is hampered by the fact that the effects of many decisions, to be made by the planner, are practically unknown or at best unclear. The high level of complexity, uncertainty and subjectivity involved in urban plan development is seriously troubling the planner. One way of facilitating the plan development process, and potentially improving the decision-making, is developing a Planning Support System (PSS) that combines artificialintelligence with a gamut of computational tools that support the process. At the Eindhoven University of Technology a research program is conducted to develop such a system for local urban planning in the Netherlands. The system, named MASQUE (Multi-Agent System for supporting the Quest forUrban Excellence), applies Multi-Agent technology to incorporate multidisciplinary expertise on both tools and domains as well as to enable intelligent guidance and assistance towards the user. Strong emphasis is put on the scenario-based way of working that is common in urban planning. This paper puts forward the difficulties faced in local planning practice and discusses the possibilities for computer-assistance. This finally resolves into the introduction of the MASQUE framework, describing how the system is organized and how the agents will be involved.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 9c70
authors Stouffs, R., Tunçer, B., Venne, R-F. and Sariyildiz, I.S.
year 2002
title InfoBase: A multimedia learning environment to support group work
source Proceedings of ITC@EDU 1st International Workshop on Construction Information Technology in Education, Portoroz, Slovenia, 12-13 September 2002
summary We are developing a multimedia learning environment to support group work and discourse. It aims to offer the student the means and tools to organize his or her learning activities in cooperation with oth-ers. The focus is on information and document management, presentation and publication, communication and discourse, and cooperation and group work. The design of this environment is considered in relationship to an educational process in which the student becomes familiar with the use of ICT for supporting communi-cation and cooperation. We believe that such an environment plays a vital role in the application of e-learning to the design context, and that it will facilitate the initiation of networks or working groups that serve as vir-tual centers of knowledge and experimentation.
series other
email R.Stouffs@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id e80d
authors Szewczyk, Jaroslaw
year 2002
title Architectural Meaning in the Existing Architectural Notations - The Technologies for Interoperable Architectural Data Management
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 230-237
summary The paper presents results of investigations upon possible representations of architectural objects containing ‘architectural meaning’. Five groups of such existing representations are analyzed briefly: (1) structural EXPRESS–based definitions, (2) object EXPRESS- and IFC- based notations, (3) XML-based notations, (4) experimental ones, and (5) binary notations. The working taxonomy of the notations is presented and their shortcomings are mentioned. The potential of XML notations for CAD data has been recognized by software vendors and standard organizations all over the world. Many corporations and standardization bodies are developing XML-based notations of CAD data, focusing on interoperability problems. Some of these notations are becoming standards (aecXML, i-drop), influencing the development of all CAAD industry. There are some main groups of problems with the existing commercial standards: Lack of ‘open’ data in its ‘open’ context, lack of architectural meaning in commercial notations, problems with simpler intuitive standards for notation of conceptual design data in early design stages, too complex data semantics, too atomized data, and richness of the data structures. The problems are taken under consideration in order to discuss the present state of architectural standards. Nowadays architects are forced to work with semi-architectural notations, lacking their essence, i.e. lacking methods to describe elements of cultural heritage connected to geometry forms. Instead of language of architecture they deal with virtual cyber-slang.
series eCAADe
email cad.cam@interia.pl
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 156e
authors Tsou, J.-Y., Chow, B. and Lam, S.
year 2002
title Performance-Based Simulation for the Planning and Design of Hyper Dense Urban Habitation
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 249-256
summary The rapid development of the economy and urbanization create great pressure on population of Hong Kong, China and other developing countries. This not only brings great changes on the form and style of the urban sphere, but also, challenges to the natural environment and resources to support urban habitation. Regarding the process of urbanization, the development of the housing industry becomes the focus to resolve the need of materialization for urban living. For this reason, from time to time, technical and economical considerations are always prior to the significance of human settlement environment, humanity, and sustainable development. Considering the deficiency in urban human settlements environment, especially in responsiveness to the natural environment. Information technology (IT) undoubtedly can help to promote and assess the design and planning quality in both environmental and regional microenvironment aspects. A research project-Environmental Responsible Architecture and Urban Design (ERAU)-is established to support urban scale planning, information processing, and computer-aided performance evaluation on both micro and macro building design and planning efficiency.
series CAADRIA
email jinyeutsou@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 2d44
authors Tsou, Jin-Yeu and Chow, Benny
year 2002
title Integrating Scientific Simulation with Rapid-Prototyping Modeling for Design Curriculum Development
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 548-551
summary Although Computer-Aided Architectural Design tools have been introduced to studios for design visualization and communication, tangible models constructed by cardboard or other modeling materials still play an important role in assisting students on developing their conceptual framework related to spatial organization. A Rapid Prototyping (RP) system could provide a paradigm shift from the existing workflow of hand-made architectural model into an automated computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) environment. The introduction of computer controlled manufacturing technology will not limit the use of current conventional model making, and it will provide new capabilities for precise scaled model making and the possibility to generate free-form surface models for design representation. Because the technical capabilities of RP system could dramatically change the design workflow, the computer-aided manufacturing approach for architectural design has been adopted by overseas and local academic institutions. In this paper, we report the findings of a pilot study that applied rapid prototyping technology in architectural design education for helping students exploring an automated computer-aided manufacturing environment during early stage of design development.
series eCAADe
email jinyeutsou@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 02e3
authors Hirschberg, Urs
year 2002
title Transparency In Information Architecture Enabling large scale creative collaboration over Internet in architectural education
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 174-179
summary This paper presents some results of a quantitative process analysis of two types of courses in Computer Aided Architectural Design that were taught using database-driven online environments. It focuses on the performance of these online environments as information structures, designed to accommodate the presentation and the peer-to-peer exchange of design information for relatively large groups of between 60 and 150 participants. Using the database records to reconstruct the processes, three different quantitative analyses are described. Their results indicate that for these projects the webenvironments were successful in enhancing peer-to-peer learning and that they promoted a more objective assessment of the submitted works. The study also looks at the effect that the environments themselves had on the process. Finally it makes some conclusions about how such environments must be designed to handle the dynamic display of design data in a way that is transparent to the users.
series eCAADe
email uhirschberg@gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id ecaade03_561_150_martens
id ecaade03_561_150_martens
authors Martens, Yuri and Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2003
title Realestate online information systems
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 561-567
summary Several commercial real-estate sites provide listings of available commercial property on the Internet. These listings are generated on the basis of selection criteria as floor area, price and location. Despite the obvious utility of the listings and their promise for the transaction process and market transparency, one third of commercial realestate listing sites went bankrupt in 2001 and 2002. To provide an explanation for the failure, 63 commercial real-estate sites were analysed and classified into three basic business models: the Research / Information model, the Marketing model and the Transaction model. A common success factor for all models is the functionality of the site, especially interaction between the user and the available information. The paper proposes that the transfer of existing architectural representations, information-processing instruments and decision-taking tools is an essential component of future development towards integrated services that accompany a building throughout its lifecycle. This transfer amounts to (1) the addition of building and contextual information from standard documentation and online information services, (2) the derivation and coherent description of programmatic requirements database, and (3) advanced user interaction with building information.
keywords e-commerce, human-computer interaction, building information systems,web-based communication
series eCAADe
email A.Koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.re-h.nl
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id 1992
authors Russell, Peter
year 2002
title Using Higher Level Programming in Interdisciplinary teams as a means of training for Concurrent Engineering
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 14-19
summary The paper explains a didactical method for training students that has been run three times to date. The premise of the course is to combine students from different faculties into interdisciplinary teams. These teams then have a complex problem to resolve within an extremely short time span. In light of recent works from Joy and Kurzweil, the theme Robotics was chosen as an exercise that is timely, interesting and related, but not central to the studies of the various faculties. In groups of 3 to 5, students from faculties of architecture, computer science and mechanical engineering are entrusted to design, build and program a robot which must successfully execute a prescribed set of actions in a competitive atmosphere. The entire course lasts ten days and culminates with the competitive evaluation. The robots must navigate a labyrinth, communicate with on another and be able to cover longer distances with some speed. In order to simplify the resources available to the students, the Lego Mindstorms Robotic syshed backgrounds instaed of synthetic ones. The combination of digitally produced (scanned) sperical images together with the use of HDR open a wide range of new implementation in the field of architecture, especially in combining synthetic elements in existing buildings, e.g. new interior elements in an existing historical museum).ural presentations in the medium of computer animation. These new forms of expression of design thoughts and ideas go beyond mere model making, and move more towards scenemaking and storytelling. The latter represents new methods of expression within computational environments for architects and designers.its boundaries. The project was conducted using the pedagogical framework of the netzentwurf.de; a relatively well established Internet based communication platform. This means that the studio was organised in the „traditional“ structure consisting of an initial 3 day workshop, a face to face midterm review, and a collective final review, held 3,5 months later in the Museum of Communication in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In teams of 3 (with each student from a different university and a tutor located at a fourth) the students worked over the Internet to produce collaborative design solutions. The groups ended up with designs that spanned a range of solutions between real and virtual architecture. Examples of the student’s work (which is all available online) as well as their working methods are described. It must be said that the energy invested in the studio by the organisers of the virtual campus (as well as the students who took part) was considerably higher than in normal design studios and the paper seeks to look critically at the effort in relation to the outcomes achieved. The range and depth of the student’s work was surprising to many in the project, especially considering the initial hurdles (both social and technological) that had to overcome. The self-referential nature of the theme, the method and the working environment encouraged the students to take a more philosg and programming a winning robot. These differences became apparent early in the sessions and each group had to find ways to communicate their ideas and to collectively develop them by building on the strengths of each team member.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email russell@bazillus.architektur.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2013/02/04 06:17

_id ddssar0201
id ddssar0201
authors Achten, H.H.
year 2002
title Requirements for Collaborative Design in Architecture
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary The concept of collaborative design has recently come under renewed attention in the field of computer aided architectural design support. Although collaborative design deals with the same aspects of cooperation by various participants in the design process as previously studiedin, for example, concurrent engineering and multi-disciplinary design, it nevertheless puts a different research emphasis. Collaborative design looks at how the process can be improved in such a way that collaboration –working together in a manner to enhance each participants contribution to the design– emerges from the process. In engineering design practice, thismeans a shift forward in the design process where engineers are asked earlier for their input in the design solution. For CAAD research, the phenomenon of collaborative design poses the question how design tools and environments can be made in such a way that collaboration will occur. In this paper, the aims is to describe the concept of collaborative design in architecture, and to give an outline of the perceived requirements in the organisation of design and Computer Aided Design Support to achieve collaborative design.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 12e3
authors Ahmad Rafi, M.E., Che Zulkhairi, A. and Karboulonis, P.
year 2002
title Interactive Storytelling and Its Role in the Design Process
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 151-158
summary Projects of ever increasing complexity and size have incited the need for new and robust design methodologies and tools in an effort to manage complexity, lower costs, ascertain quality and reduce risk. Technology convergence through the growing availability of networked computers, rapid progress in Computer Aided Design (CAD) and information management have encouraged the undertaking of even more complex designs that demand high degrees of interaction, collaboration and the efficient sharing and dissemination of information. It is suggested that interactive storytelling and interactive design (Rafi and Karboulonis, 2001) techniques that use non-linear information mapping systems can be deployed to assist users as they navigate information that is structured to address localized needs as they arise. The design process is a collaborative effort that encompasses diverse knowledge disciplines and demands the management and utilization of available resources to satisfy the needs of a single or set of goals. It is thought that building industry specialists should work close together in an organised manner to solve design problems as they emerge and find alternatives when designs fall short. The design process involves the processing of dynamic and complex information, that can be anything from the amount of soil required to level lands - to the needs of specific lightings systems in operation theatres. Other important factors that affect the design process are related to costs and deadlines. This paper will demonstrate some of our early findings in several experiments to establish nonlinear storytelling. It will conclude with a recommendation for a plausible design of such a system based on experimental work that is currently being conducted and is reaching its final stages. The paper will lay the foundations of a possible path to implementation based on the concept of multi-path animation that is appropriate for structuring the design process as used in the building industry.
series CAADRIA
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 25HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_786132 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002