CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 108

_id 8780
authors Abdelhameed, W., Ozel, F., Addelatiff, M. and Daef, A.
year 2002
title Assessment of the Impact of Digital-Manual Media Types on the Basic Design Capabilities of Architects: A Proposed Framework and Directive Measures
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 275-276
summary The research attempts to defi ne and classify the design capabilities of architects into a basic framework. This defi nition will be useful in understanding and determining the types and nature of impact introduced by digital and manual media used during architecturaldesign process. The research consists of three parts. The First part reviews the main stages, tasks and activities of the architectural design process. The second part builds the proposed framework of design capabilities relating them to the specifi c tasks and activities conductedby the architect along the design process. The third part proposes some useful measures as to how to make use of the proposed framework in assessing the impact of media on the design capabilities of architects.
series SIGRADI
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 1d66
authors Asanowicz, Aleksander
year 2002
title Hybrid Design Environment
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 572-576
summary This paper discusses some preliminary ideas concerning new design environment or environment of designing. Main thesis of this paper is that process of creation and perception of architecture proceed between Real and Virtual. Architecture is created by analog and/or digital media. A the result we have the multitude and diversity of spaces and tools. Defining these terms is important for understanding a new process of design and a new space of designing. It gives us possibilities to create the new design environment, in which creation of architectural form may be considered as an integrated process connecting the analog, the digital, the real and the virtual. Architectural space, as we know it from physical environments, is supplemented by a virtual space. Physical, architectural and virtual spaces share very similar features in simulation. In virtual models, the boundary between the representation of physical sites and imaginary, virtual sites is vanishing rapidly, resulting in a new reality.
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 9fde
authors Chen, S.C.
year 2002
title Aided Design Strategy Under the Professional Knowledge-Orientation
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 293-300
summary Professional knowledge is a key component of the decision making process, as well as a major part of the thinking process. This research uses a strategy oriented by professional knowledge to assist the analysis of strategies in the design process, and to incite different design thinking under the operation models of media; through the basis of the design process, analyse the utilization of professional knowledge by designers in the design process and the different knowledge understanding methods under different media utilizations.
series CAADRIA
email Phd222@iris.seed.net.tw
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 2d54
authors Clayton, M.J., Warden, R.B. and Parker, Th.W.
year 2002
title Virtual construction of architecture using 3D CAD and simulation
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 227-235
summary 3D modeling and computer simulations provide new ways for architecture students to study the relationship between the design and construction of buildings. Digital media help to integrate and expand the content of courses in drafting, construction and design. This paper describes computer-based exercises that intensify the student's experience of construction in several courses from sophomore to senior level. The courses integrate content from drafting and design communication, construction, CAD, and design. Several techniques are used to strengthen students' awareness and ability in construction. These include: Virtual design–build projects in which students construct 3D CAD models that include all elements that are used in construction. Virtual office in which several students must collaborate under the supervision of a student acting as project architect to create a 3D CAD model and design development documents. Virtual sub-contracting in which each student builds a trade specific 3D CAD model of a building and all of the trade specific models must be combined into a single model. Construction simulations (4D CAD) in which students build 3D CAD models showing all components and then animate them to illustrate the assembly process. Cost estimating using spreadsheets. These techniques are applied and reapplied at several points in the curriculum in both technical laboratory courses and design studios. This paper compares virtual construction methods to physical design–build projects and provides our pedagogical arguments for the use of digital media for understanding construction.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id b74f
authors Dijkstra, Jan and Timmermans, Harry
year 2002
title Towards a multi-agent model for visualizing simulated user behavior to support the assessment of design performance
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 135-145
summary We introduce the outline of a multi-agent model that can be used for visualizing simulated user behavior to support the assessment of design performance. We will consider various performance indicators of building environments, which are related to user reaction to design decisions. This system may serve as a media tool in the design process for a better understanding of what the design will look like, especially for those cases where design or planning decisions will affect the behavior of individuals. The system is based on cellular automata and multi-agent simulation technology. The system simulates how agents move around in a particular 3D (or 2D) environment, in which space is represented as a lattice of cells. Agents represent objects or people with their own behavior, moving over the network. Each agent will be located in a simulated space, based on the cellular automata grid. Each iteration of the simulation is based on a parallel update of the agents conforming local rules. Agents positioned within an environment will need sensors to perceive their local neighborhood and some means with which to affect the environment. In this way, autonomous individuals and the interaction between them can be simulated by the system. As a result, designers can use the system to assess the likely consequences of their design decisions on user behavior. We think that the system provides a potentially valuable tool to support design and decision-making processes, related to user behavior in architecture and urban planning.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 2205
authors Gabriel, Gerard Cesar and Maher, Mary Lou
year 2002
title Coding and modelling communication in architectural collaborative design
source Automation in Construction 11 (2) (2002) pp. 199-211
summary Although there has been some research done on collaborative face-to-face (FTF) and video-conferencing sessions involving architects, little is known about the effects these different media have on collaborative design in general and on collaborative communication and design representation in particular. In this paper, we argue that successful computer-mediated collaborative design (CMCD) does not necessarily mean emulating close-proximity environments. In order to investigate this view, we carried out experiments examining the effect and significance of different communication channels in collaborative sessions between architects. The experiments were conducted in different environments and classified into three categories. The first category is FTF. The second, CMCD sessions with full communication channels, CMCD-a. The third category was conducted also through CMCD sessions but with limited communication channels, CMCD-b. A custom coding scheme is developed using data, external and theoretically derived coding categories as a base. Examples of how the proposed coding scheme works are given from all three categories of experiments. The coding scheme provides the basis for modelling and understanding communication in collaborative design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 998d
authors Lee, Alpha Wai Keung
year 2002
title Design Computing Education Software Development Integration of Scaffolding Strategies and Multiple Representations
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 140-143
summary Design Computing is an interdisciplinary field that centres on the intersection of design, computer science and linguistics. This multidimensional face of the new paradigm of design computing necessitates a mutual understanding of computing and designs as a whole, which are usually, conceived as separated stages of computed-mediated design. Based on cognitive and computational approach, with the integration of scaffolding strategies and multiple representations, an interactive and real-time design computing learning system is constructed. By interactively manipulating the various attributes, codes, parameters and digital media contents in a distributed system, learners are gradually exposed to the mutual relationship of representational digital multimedia and the underlining programming syntax in a collaborative environment. The author attempted the use of game programming technology in the development of the above system to support design learning and research in understanding design activities. The aim is to identify the design process that if taught well would address the core goals of design education.
series eCAADe
email alpha@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id c7e9
authors Maver, T.W.
year 2002
title Predicting the Past, Remembering the Future
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 2-3
summary Charlas Magistrales 2There never has been such an exciting moment in time in the extraordinary 30 year history of our subject area, as NOW,when the philosophical theoretical and practical issues of virtuality are taking centre stage.The PastThere have, of course, been other defining moments during these exciting 30 years:• the first algorithms for generating building layouts (circa 1965).• the first use of Computer graphics for building appraisal (circa 1966).• the first integrated package for building performance appraisal (circa 1972).• the first computer generated perspective drawings (circa 1973).• the first robust drafting systems (circa 1975).• the first dynamic energy models (circa 1982).• the first photorealistic colour imaging (circa 1986).• the first animations (circa 1988)• the first multimedia systems (circa 1995), and• the first convincing demonstrations of virtual reality (circa 1996).Whereas the CAAD community has been hugely inventive in the development of ICT applications to building design, it hasbeen woefully remiss in its attempts to evaluate the contribution of those developments to the quality of the built environmentor to the efficiency of the design process. In the absence of any real evidence, one can only conjecture regarding the realbenefits which fall, it is suggested, under the following headings:• Verisimilitude: The extraordinary quality of still and animated images of the formal qualities of the interiors and exteriorsof individual buildings and of whole neighborhoods must surely give great comfort to practitioners and their clients thatwhat is intended, formally, is what will be delivered, i.e. WYSIWYG - what you see is what you get.• Sustainability: The power of «first-principle» models of the dynamic energetic behaviour of buildings in response tochanging diurnal and seasonal conditions has the potential to save millions of dollars and dramatically to reduce thedamaging environmental pollution created by badly designed and managed buildings.• Productivity: CAD is now a multi-billion dollar business which offers design decision support systems which operate,effectively, across continents, time-zones, professions and companies.• Communication: Multi-media technology - cheap to deliver but high in value - is changing the way in which we canexplain and understand the past and, envisage and anticipate the future; virtual past and virtual future!MacromyopiaThe late John Lansdown offered the view, in his wonderfully prophetic way, that ...”the future will be just like the past, onlymore so...”So what can we expect the extraordinary trajectory of our subject area to be?To have any chance of being accurate we have to have an understanding of the phenomenon of macromyopia: thephenomenon exhibitted by society of greatly exaggerating the immediate short-term impact of new technologies (particularlythe information technologies) but, more importantly, seriously underestimating their sustained long-term impacts - socially,economically and intellectually . Examples of flawed predictions regarding the the future application of information technologiesinclude:• The British Government in 1880 declined to support the idea of a national telephonic system, backed by the argumentthat there were sufficient small boys in the countryside to run with messages.• Alexander Bell was modest enough to say that: «I am not boasting or exaggerating but I believe, one day, there will bea telephone in every American city».• Tom Watson, in 1943 said: «I think there is a world market for about 5 computers».• In 1977, Ken Olssop of Digital said: «There is no reason for any individuals to have a computer in their home».The FutureJust as the ascent of woman/man-kind can be attributed to her/his capacity to discover amplifiers of the modest humancapability, so we shall discover how best to exploit our most important amplifier - that of the intellect. The more we know themore we can figure; the more we can figure the more we understand; the more we understand the more we can appraise;the more we can appraise the more we can decide; the more we can decide the more we can act; the more we can act themore we can shape; and the more we can shape, the better the chance that we can leave for future generations a trulysustainable built environment which is fit-for-purpose, cost-beneficial, environmentally friendly and culturally significactCentral to this aspiration will be our understanding of the relationship between real and virtual worlds and how to moveeffortlessly between them. We need to be able to design, from within the virtual world, environments which may be real ormay remain virtual or, perhaps, be part real and part virtual.What is certain is that the next 30 years will be every bit as exciting and challenging as the first 30 years.
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id bb35
authors Paranandi, Murali
year 2002
title An Inquiry Into Computers in Design: When Cardboard Met Computer
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 329-337
summary This paper reflects on the experiences of teaching undergraduate design studios for past 4 years and presents a systematic investigation conducted in a classroom setting to further understand the role of computer in conceptual stages of design. A case study project inquiring the implications of using two different forms of media, namely cardboard and computer, for design development during conceptual stages is presented. Twelve novice designers were challenged to learn and use computers in a five-week design project. A conceptual framework for understanding the discovery and usefulness of computer in their design process was developed and tested. An analysis of the outcome indicated that computers played a positive role in student innovation, improving possibilities for discovery. It further revealed that the employing cardboard was useful in turning the abstract discoveries made by the computers into productive and useful design solutions. It also supported the notion that the novice designer’s use of photorealistic possibilities offered by computer visualization (rendering, animation) during conceptual stages of design had an effect of distraction rather than a design aid.
series CAADRIA
email paranam@muohio.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 6348
authors Schnabel, Marc Aurel and Kvan, Thomas
year 2002
title Interaction in virtual building space, Distributing Knowledge in Building
source CIB W78 Conference 2002, Proceedings, Vol. 2, pp91-98, Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark, 12 –14 June
summary This paper presents the results from two experiments in working on descriptions of form in immersive virtual environments (IVE). Recently; Virtual Environments (VE) are increasingly used as environments for design and research. Using VE to visualize ideas from the initial steps of design; the architect is challenged to deal with perception of space; solid and void; without translations to and from a two dimensional media. From this new ability; we might expect new forms of design interaction and expression. The goal of our studies was to identify how designers use and communicate early design ideas by using immersive three-dimensional (3D) VEs and how they describe 3D volumes using different media. We set up a series of experiments including navigation- and perception-tasks; designing in IVE; transcription of design; remote communication between design partners and controlled observations. We explored initial intentions of 3D-immersive design schemes; textual descriptions and collaborations within IVE. This paper describes the outcome of creation; interpretation and communication of architectural design; by using an Immersive Joint Design Studio; as well as the description and translation of a 3D cubic structure. We discuss frameworks and factors influencing how architectural students communicate their proposals in an immersive Virtual Environment Design Studio (VeDS) and how this approach of design studio enables to understand volumes and spatial relationships.
keywords Virtual Environment; Remote Collaboration; Design Evaluation; Spatial Understanding
series other
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 83ce
authors Schnabel, Marc Aurel and Kvan, Thomas
year 2002
title Design, Communication & Collaboration in Immersive Virtual Environments
source International Journal of Design Computing, 4, 2002 Special Issue on Designing Virtual Worlds
summary Virtual Environments (VE) are increasingly offered as environments for design. Using VE to visualize ideas from the initial steps of design; the architect is challenged to deal with perception of space; solid and void; without translations to and from a two dimensional media. From this new ability; we might expect new forms of design expression.
keywords Virtual Environment; Remote Collaboration; Design Evaluation; Spatial Understanding
series journal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2002/11/15 17:29

_id 8ea2
authors Simondetti, Alvise
year 2002
title Computer-generated physical modelling in the early stages of the design process
source Automation in Construction 11 (3) (2002) pp. 303-311
summary This paper illustrates some of the opportunities arising from the introduction of computer-generated physical modelling1 in the early stages of the architectural design process. The use of this technology in the design process differs from previous research and practise in that it looks at the use of computer-generated physical modelling recursively in design process rather than as a means to create a final presentation model [W.J. Mitchell, M. McCullough, Digital Design Media, Van Nostrand Reihnold, New York, 1994]. Previous research in the field by the author identified recursive strategy in the design process as the area in which computer-generated physical modelling offers unique opportunities to the designer. Three unique advantages in the use of computer-generated physical modelling technology are illustrated by three case studies. These advantages are: (1) understanding kinetic design, (2) understanding design involving complex geometry and (3) understanding design at the interface with the human body.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 428c
authors Smith, A.C., Bermúdez, J. and Striefel, S.
year 2002
title Visualizando la Naturaleza No-Visual de la Arquitectura [Visualizing the Non-Visual Nature of Architecture]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 19-23
summary During the last several years our architecture school has gone through the process of fully digitizing the studios. We, as faculty are learning much about the advantages and difficulties of teaching architectural design in this new electronic environment. This knowledge has been included in our development of a beginning design communications course that wefeel offers an important improvement in regards to our changing teaching situation. This paper presents one project from this course that introduces our students to the use of digital media for dealing with non-visual and subjective content — something contrary to what is usually associated with the teaching of digital graphics. We believe that this project breaks new ground for teaching and investigating the nature of computer graphics and through it into the very essence of our experience and understanding of architecture.
series SIGRADI
email asmith@arch.utah.edu, bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:00

_id ddssar0227
id ddssar0227
authors Tomlinson, James D. and Holmes, Michael V.
year 2002
title Digital Representational Tools Impact on the Design Decision Process
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary This paper presents two pilot studies that explore the impact of virtual reality representations on the evaluative judgements of trained designers and design students. These projects are intended to explore several aspects of spatial perception as impacted by the representational media in an attempt to identify the potential impact of this media on the development of design solutions. The participants were exposed todifferent representational media and modes of representation or simulation: traditional “physical media” (plan, elevations, and model), physical place and projected computer generated media including flat screen animation and hemispherical corrected animation for display on the VisionDome. The 4-meter VisionDome is an immersive, multi-user, single projection virtual reality environment. The results of theseefforts potentially indicate that when trained designers view a simulation of a space their perception of the space is, to some degree, affected by the representational media. The walk-through mode emphasized theperceptual differences between traditional and computer generated representations. A low level of detail in a computer-generated “walk-through” simulation provides perceptual elements, which allow the viewer todevelop an understanding of the spatial relationships of the design.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id e601
authors Braga, Gisele Pinna
year 2002
title Uma Interface Multimídia para a Comunicação do Projeto Arquitetônico [A multimedia interface for the architectural design communication]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 193-197
summary The purpose of this work is the development of a Digital Learning Material that helps the process of understanding complex concepts, specifically architectural projects. In order to optimize the comprehension of architectural projects new materials can be developed based on multimedia technology. This technology mix different sorts of messages in one single interface, stimulating students in different ways. As an architectural project has many different information to be tansmittd and assimilated, multimedia technology is a good way to organize all of them to comunicate in an efficient way. All these concepts are applied in a proposal for a multimedia learning material: a prototype about an “Architectural Project”.
series SIGRADI
email giipinna@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id 09a8
authors Chiu, M.L., Lin, C.J., Jeng, T.S. and Lee, C.H.
year 2002
title Re-Searching The Research Problems with CAAD: Datamining in i-CAADRIA
source CAADRIA 2002 [Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 983-2473-42-X] Cyberjaya (Malaysia) 18–20 April 2002, pp. 031-38
summary This study attempts to develop an online CAAD research archive of conference papers, i-CAADRIA, and apply data mining techniques to find research patterns. Research papers are clustered for building semantic relationship. The system and early feedbacks are presented. This study suggests that smart web query and user interface can enhance our understanding of the research patterns.
series CAADRIA
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2002/04/25 17:26

_id 30ff
authors Coyne, R., Park, H. and Wiszniewski, D.
year 2002
title Design devices: digital drawing and the pursuit of difference
source Design Studies 23 (3) (2002) pp. 263-286
summary We examine the uses of a prototypic device, in research and in design, for incorporating manual sketching into computer environments. We move from empirical and evolutionary conceptions of the role of such devices to the phenomenology of disclosure, attending to the revealing, generative, catalytic, metaphoric, signalling and provocative characteristics introduced by such devices. The discussion takes us through a series of steps that each amplifies the role of philosophical concepts of negation and difference in understanding the device.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id ddssar0208
id ddssar0208
authors Cumming, Michael
year 2002
title A Bottom-Up Approach to Design Coordination
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary The design industry like any other industry could benefit from process support for its practitioners. However, what constitutes legitimate process support for designers is a difficult research question. In order to support designers in their processes, first one needs to know what designers do. This is not only a question of knowing what designers do in general, but also what particular designers do in their own individual design practice. How to find out what designers do, that is, how to acquire knowledge abouttheir design processes, is also a difficult research question. Providing process support for designers is seen as a task, which cannot be divorced from design process acquisition. That is, one is unlikely to provideprocess support, without acquiring an understanding, what individual designers actually do, and conversely, one is unlikely to acquire an understanding of what designers do, without providing process support for designers. An application whose goal it is to provide both design process support for designers working in collaborative design teams, and also acquires a particular type of design process representationof design processes, is described.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id acadia17_202
id acadia17_202
authors Cupkova, Dana; Promoppatum, Patcharapit
year 2017
title Modulating Thermal Mass Behavior Through Surface Figuration
source ACADIA 2017: DISCIPLINES & DISRUPTION [Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-96506-1] Cambridge, MA 2-4 November, 2017), pp. 202-211
summary This research builds upon a previous body of work focused on the relationship between surface geometry and heat transfer coefficients in thermal mass passive systems. It argues for the design of passive systems with higher fidelity to multivariable space between performance and perception. Rooted in the combination of form and matter, the intention is to instrumentalize design principles for the choreography of thermal gradients between buildings and their environment from experiential, spatial and topological perspectives (Figure 1). Our work is built upon the premise that complex geometries can be used to improve both the aesthetic and thermodynamic performance of passive building systems (Cupkova and Azel 2015) by actuating thermal performance through geometric parameters primarily due to convection. Currently, the engineering-oriented approach to the design of thermal mass relies on averaged thermal calculations (Holman 2002), which do not adequately describe the nuanced differences that can be produced by complex three-dimensional geometries of passive thermal mass systems. Using a combination of computational fluid dynamic simulations with physically measured data, we investigate the relationship of heat transfer coefficients related to parameters of surface geometry. Our measured results suggest that we can deliberately and significantly delay heat absorption re-radiation purely by changing the geometric surface pattern over the same thermal mass. The goal of this work is to offer designers a more robust rule set for understanding approximate thermal lag behaviors of complex geometric systems, with a focus on the design of geometric properties rather than complex thermal calculations.
keywords design methods; information processing; physics; smart materials
series ACADIA
email danacupkova@gmail.com
last changed 2017/10/17 09:12

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