CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 590

_id ecaade03_441_16_fischer
id ecaade03_441_16_fischer
authors Fischer, T., Burry, M. and Frazer, J.
year 2003
title Triangulation of Generative Form for Parametric Design and Rapid Prototyping
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 441-448
summary In this paper we discuss recent developments in the ongoing implementation of a toolkit for developmental generative design and form finding. We examine tissues of face-centered cubically close-packed voxel cells and topologically related structures for the possibility of 3D data conversion and of rapid prototyping applications. We also demonstrate how generative and parametric design can be integrated in order to enhance design flexibility and control.
keywords Parametric design, digital morphogenesis, cellular expression, geometry triangulation
series eCAADe
email mark.burry@rmit.edu.au
more http://www.sial.rmit.edu.au
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id caadria2003_b5-3
id caadria2003_b5-3
authors Jirapong, Kamon and Krawczyk, Robert J.
year 2003
title Digital Methods of Abstracting Forms from Nature
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 695-706
summary Using mathematics and digital methods as a tool of investigation in both the natural and architectural form gives us a flexibility of exploring mu ltiple forms and allows us to implement new parameters into the mathematical framework to generate rather more complex architectural geometry. The method of generating architectural forms in this research is developed by selecting seashell as natural object and investigating its mathematical description then abstracting each mathematical parameter with others possible mathematical functions. Each selected mathematical function represents a mathematical abstraction of a specific seashell parameter as it occurs in nature. These enable the exploring of new mathematical relationships to generate a variety of architectural forms. In the seashell form these mathematical functions are limited to those that appeared in the actual geometry of shell such as logarithmic spiral, circle and ellipse. However, in the architectural form the limitations are less.
series CAADRIA
email jirapong@spu.ac.th
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id ecaade03_047_70_maher
id ecaade03_047_70_maher
authors Maher, M.L., Liew, P.-S., Gu, N. and Ding, L.
year 2003
title An Agent Approach to Supporting Collaborative Design in 3D Virtual Worlds
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 47-52
summary 3D Virtual worlds facilitate a level of communication and collaboration not readily available in conventional CAD systems. The integration of virtual worlds and CAD systems using a common data model can make a significant impact on synchronous collaboration and real time multi-user multi-disciplinary modification of building data. By using agents, the integration of 3D virtual worlds and CAD systems can go beyond that of passive data transfer. With sensors and effectors, each agent can interact with its environment by responding to changes in the CAD system or 3D virtual world, which can take the form of an update to the geometry, or as a recommendation to change non geometric information or to propagate changes to other parts of the design. The reasoning process for each agent can vary from a reflexive behaviour in which the agent responds directly to the sensor data to a reflective behaviour in which the agents reasons about its goals and alternatives before making a change to the environment. We demonstrate this approach using ArchiCAD and Active Worlds as the CAD system and the virtual world platform. An EDM database is used as the central repository for storing the representation of the relevant data model. A multi-agent system is developed to connect the virtual world to this database to allow active data sharing. This agent approach can be extended to the integration of other applications and data models.
keywords Design Collaboration, Virtual World, Agent and CAD
series eCAADe
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/~mary
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ecaade03_337_95_mark
id ecaade03_337_95_mark
authors Mark, Earl
year 2003
title Programming Architectural Geometry and CNC: Advancing A Design Paradigm with Mathematical Abstraction
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 337-342
summary Direct computer programming of architectural geometry and of CNC tool pathways can control the fabrication of form and the related treatment of material. When the entire form creation and tool path process is taken on as a design problem, there is potentially a closer link between formal design intentions and their physical realization. This paper describes several case studies that engage computer programming as a first stage in an iterative design process coupled with more explicit control over CNC tool paths. It indirectly critiques the design exploration of geometry where there is only user command control over a CAD system and where the specification of CNC pathways is also less explicit. Examples of different strategies are compared in the same educational context.
keywords CNC, geometrical modeling, design, computer programming
series eCAADe
email ejmark@virginia.edu
more http://www.people.virginia.edu/~ejm9k
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id eaea2003_11-bremer-sander
id eaea2003_11-bremer-sander
authors Bremer, S. and Sander, H.
year 2004
title View from the Road: Environmental Simulation for the Fractal City of Rhine Ruhr
source Spatial Simulation and Evaluation - New Tools in Architectural and Urban Design [Proceedings of the 6th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 80-227-2088-7], pp. 43-47
summary Highway seems to be more an issue of traffic planning than of urban design. But the highway can be a very important factor for the modern city pattern. Highways shape the spatial form of the fractal city. The modern highway can define new cores outside and “interior edges” within the city. Seen as a planning tool, highways are the great neglected opportunity in city and regional design. The 1st Architecture Biennial, 1ab, taking place from May 2003 to July 2003 in Rotterdam, explores the creative potentials of modern highways worldwide. An international research team discovered the spatial functions of highways in modern agglomerations. This lecture will give an overview of the results of the worldwide analyses and the design projects that had been undertaken. Both authors are members of the German research team. The German team examined the A 42 running through the Ruhrgebiet, a former coal and steal area in western Germany. The Ruhr Area is converting from an industrially orientated region to an agglomeration of high technology and science. But the regional image remains the same due to the fact that the changes cannot be seen, neither physically, nor from the road. Here, the highway could be used as a catalyst supporting and structuring the spatial changes to make them more legible for the people of Rhine-Ruhr. The nature becomes the most important tool of highway design. Landscape forms a linkage between the different cities of the region. Together with the A 40 and other local highways the region becomes the most important (and largest) public space of the new Rhine-Ruhr. The highway seen as a work of urban art can be designed only from the perspective of the driving car.
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id ecaade2010_233
id ecaade2010_233
authors Guerbuez, Esra; Cagdas, Guelen; Alacam, Sema
year 2010
title A Generative Design Model for Gaziantep’s Traditional Pattern
source FUTURE CITIES [28th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-9-6] ETH Zurich (Switzerland) 15-18 September 2010, pp.841-849
wos WOS:000340629400090
summary This paper describes a research to develop new urban designalternatives for Gaziantep by using fractal based approaches. The aim of the research is not only generating new form alternatives but also considering the continuity of traditional architectural and urban pattern which faces deterioration. Within this study, it is intended to test the applicability of the fractal based generative approaches and explore the potential advantages. The method called CADaFED (Ediz, 2003) is updated to be used in one of the 3d modeling programs, 3DsMax scripting and it is used as an experimental tool in two-day student workshop. The working field is limited as Bey Neighbourhood in Gaziantep for its well-preserved architectural characteristics. In this paper, the outcomes of the student workshop will be evaluated and discussed in the sense of affirmative effects of fractal based design approaches.
keywords Generative design; Fractal based design; Computational architectural design; Traditional pattern
series eCAADe
email esra.gurbuz@gmail.com
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id caadria2010_003
id caadria2010_003
authors Vaughan, Josephine and Michael J. Ostwald
year 2010
title Refining a computational fractal method of analysis: testing Bovill’s architectural data
source Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Hong Kong 7-10 April 2010, pp. 29-38
summary In 1996 Bovill applied Mandelbrot’s fractal method for calculating the approximate visual complexity of images to architecture. This method is one of only a limited number of quantifiable approaches to provide a measure of the relative complexity of an architectural form. However, the method has rarely been tested despite many scholars uncritically repeating Bovill’s conclusions. While Bovill’s original work was calculated manually, a software program, Archimage, is presently being developed by the authors as a tool to assist architectural designers and researchers to understand the visual complexity of building designs. The present research returns to Bovill’s original architectural data (elevations of famous buildings) and re-calculates the results published therein using Archimage and the commercial software Benoit. These results are then compvared with those produced by Bovill (1996) and Lorenz (2003), to determine if any consistency can be found between the sets. The level of consistency will assist in determining the validity of Bovill’s method and provide important data in the ongoing process to refine the Archimage software and the analytical method.
keywords Computational analysis tools; design analysis; visual complexity
series CAADRIA
email Josephine.Vaughan@newcastle.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id sigradi2003_020
id sigradi2003_020
authors Abarca, R., Díaz, S. and Moreno, S.
year 2003
title Desarrollo de material informatico-educativo para la enseñanza de la geometría a estudiantes de diseño (Development of IT-based educational material for the teaching of geometry to students of design)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary This paper is born as an answer to the meaningful learning difficulties and academic performance in Spatial and Flat Geometry course on second year Design School at Universidad de las Americas University, Santiago de Chile. The problem is faced from the potentiality that digital environment gives us in representation, display options, shape and projection testing, analysis and non visual accounts to teach flat and spatial geometry within the receptors' codes and coherent with designer's own language.
series SIGRADI
email rabarca@terra.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id avocaad_2003_17
id avocaad_2003_17
authors Anna Maria Chrabin, Jaroslaw Szewczyk and Herman Neuckermans
year 2003
title A Critical Evaluation of Early Stages Software in its Capacity of Coping with Contextual Issues
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary In this paper we analyse critically early design stages software in its capacity of coping with contextual data at large (i.e. representing cultural, aesthetical context, etc.). We identified 5 categories of early stages software: geometry based graphic editors, evaluation architectural software, generative and shape-grammar based systems, evolutionary systems and other systems. Calling the object under creation during of the early stages a CAD conceptual model, we will investigate to what extend this software allows the architect to experience and represent the context in which a design is situated. Especially we will focus on its capacity to allow interaction, playful interaction on our way to the design. Designers, and particularly architects, interact with the local context similarly to interacting in a game: the context influences the users’ decisions, surprises them and causes permanent changes to their ways of thinking. On the other hand, architects permanently shape and reshape the context, and reduce the context to a protean point of reference. Such behaviour characterises creative thinking that is crucial for the early stage of design. The investigation led us to the conclusions that the effective interactivity with the context needs simple rules, a plain interface and data reduced as simple as possible, especially when interaction with the context is performed during the early stages of a design process. The findings can be used in organising computer environments for early-stage design.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email Herman.Neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id cf2003_m_103
id cf2003_m_103
authors CHANG, T.-W., WOODBURY, R. and DATTA, S.
year 2003
title Interactive Mapping between Knowledge Level and Symbol Level with Geometry. A KL-Model for Design Space Exploration
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 157-166
summary Design space exploration is long-standing motivating ideas in computer-aided design. It realises this vision through a model of design states for making and moving amongst states and an organisation of states into a structure called a design space. Using a design space structuring mechanism based on a subsumption relation, this paper sketches a theory called Geometric Typed Feature Structures (GTFS) to preserve the formal properties of the design space movement algorithms for geometry. It also provides the theory for incorporation of user-guided exploration in the design space. Consequently, the clear division between knowledge level and symbol level, such that functional decomposition •• formal symbol level and design •• model symbol level, disappears. We can therefore use the same subsumption relation to structure the design space exploration interactively. Such interactive mapping between knowledge level and symbol level provides the fine-grained opportunities for user intervention in formal design space movement algorithms. In this paper, we summarize this approach with an example of GTFS subsumption process.
keywords design space, geometric description, knowledge level, subsumption, unfolding
series CAAD Futures
email rob_woodbury@sfu.ca
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id acadia03_003
id acadia03_003
authors Chang, W. and Woodbury, R.
year 2003
title Undo Reinterpreted
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 19-27
summary The class of operations known as “undo” has proven to be a valuable addition to most professional work tools. In practice though, its use is frustrating: undo often undoes too much. Its essential informal semantics are that it returns the user to a prior state by recapitulating all intervening states. Why not give the user greater control over which aspects of a design to undo? An alternative is to seek to reuse prior work in any logically-coherent pattern—user input is a precious commodity. The area of generative systems provides insights in a search for alternatives to undo, in particular that prior user and system actions can be changed and reused in new contexts. We contingently introduce a concept we label as design promotions to describe system designs that demonstrate a tight coupling between interactive authorship and system-led generation, that treat past user actions as valuable intentional statements, and that treat alternative user choices as first-class objects of concern. In practice these three properties emphasize reuse. We briefly survey the current state of undo-like operations and potential candidates for implementing design promotions strategies. Through examples, we demonstrate approaches to realizing undo-like operations over specific representations, especially that of constructive solid geometry.
series ACADIA
email wchang@sfu.ca
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id cf2003_m_015
id cf2003_m_015
authors CHIU, Yi-Chang and CHIU, Mao-Lin
year 2003
title Right Tools for Designing Free-form Geometry More than Representation and Manipulation
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 433-444
summary This paper examines what the appropriate strategy for designers to handle the complex object is and how digital and conventional tools are involved in presenting and representing design artefacts for presenting design ideas and deliver design information, particularly in 3D free-form geometry. A series of precedent studies are conducted to examine the argument. The manipulation of digital tools is not merely a technical problem but a strategy about what the right tool for designing geometry is and how design process and principles are innovated. Two demonstrative projects are presented to illustrate how designers can better analyse and define the best choice of medium and design tools, and create a digital design platform to reach the merit of the tools created.
keywords design thinking, digital tools, free-form, prototype
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id caadria2006_597
id caadria2006_597
authors CHOR-KHENG LIM, CHING-SHUN TANG, WEI-YEN HSAO, JUNE-HAO HOU, YU-TUNG LIU
year 2006
title NEW MEDIA IN DIGITAL DESIGN PROCESS: Towards a standardize procedure of CAD/CAM fabrication
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 597-599
summary In 1990, due to the traditional architecture design and construction method difficult to build the complicated and non-geometry free-form Fish Structure in Barcelona, architect Frank Gehry started learn from the field of aerospace to utilize CAD/CAM technology in design and manufacture process. He created the free-form fish model in CAD system and exported the digital CAD model data to CAM machine (RP and CNC) to fabricate the design components, and finally assembled on the site. Gehry pioneered in the new digital design process in using CAD/CAM technology or so-called digital fabrication. It becomes an important issue recently as the CAD/CAM technology progressively act as the new digital design media in architectural design and construction process (Ryder et al., 2002; Kolarevic, 2003). Furthermore, in the field of architecture professional, some commercial computer systems had been developed on purpose of standardizes the digital design process in using CAD/CAM fabrication such as Gehry Technologies formed by Gehry Partners; SmartGeometry Group in Europe and Objectile proposed by Bernard Cache. Researchers in the research field like Mark Burry, Larry Sass, Branko Kolarevic, Schodek and others are enthusiastic about the exploration of the role of CAD/CAM fabrication as new design media in design process (Burry, 2002; Schodek et al., 2005; Lee, 2005).
series CAADRIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id ecaade03_473_175_flanagan_neu
id ecaade03_473_175_flanagan_neu
authors Flanagan, Robert H.
year 2003
title Generative Logic in Digital Design
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 473-484
summary This exploration of early-stage, architectural design pedagogy is in essence, a record of an ongoing transformation underway in architecture, from its practice in the art of geometry of space to its practice in the art of geometry of space-time. A selected series of student experiments, from 1992 to the present, illustrate a progression in architectural theory, from Pythagorean concepts of mathematics and geometry, to the symbolic representation of space and non-linear time in film. The dimensional expansion of space, from xyz to xyz+t (time), represents a tactical and strategic opportunity to incorporate multisensory design variables in architectural practice, as well as in its pedagogy.
keywords Generative; process; derivative; logic; systemic
series eCAADe
email rflanaga@carbon.cudenver.edu
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ecaade03_519_209_gruber
id ecaade03_519_209_gruber
authors Gruber, A., Hirschberg, U. and Dank, R.
year 2003
title Calculated Bananas: Defining a new introductory course in visual design for first year architecture students
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 519-522
summary A novel introductory course in visual design is presented that combines the teaching of various subjects and skills around the development of digital fruit. – A mandatory subject for first year architecture students at Graz University of Technology, the course is jointly offered by two institutes and combines the teaching of hand sketching, descriptive geometry, computer aided design, generative algorithms, image processing, desktop and online publishing and networked collaboration. The ambitious pedagogy uses information technology to provide links and synergies between the different subjects. The digital fruit are developed in a collaborative environment that fosters the evolution of new kinds of forms and structures through exchanging and crossbreeding of CAAD data. The paper reports on the experiences gained during the first installment the course in which 130 students were enrolled.
keywords Creative collaboration: evolutionary processes; digital fruit; complex geometry; methods of representation.
series eCAADe
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
more http://ikg.tugraz.at/
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id e962
authors Hesina, Gerd and Tobler, Robert F.
year 2003
title Secure and Fast Urban Visualization
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary Due to the rising interest in urban visualization, a number of issues have emerged that need to be solved for practical application. The most prominent of these issues are: visualization performance and security. Visualization speed concerns the usability of urban visualization. In order to make urban visualization practical, it is necessary to completely hide all latency of loading data. Here we will demonstrate techniques like multi-threading, different rendering methods and level-of-detail that our platform uses to maintain interactive frame-rates in the face of the large amounts of data that are common in urban visualization environments. The secondissue, securing the geometry and image information contained in an urban model is of eminent importance for the owner of the data. We will point out a number of techniques that have been incorporated in our viewing platform in order to maintain a high level of data security: data compression and encryption, obfuscation of access keys, compression and encryption of executables. While perfect security is an unattainable goal, the multi-staged approach of security in our system significantly raises the cost of illegally obtaining access to the geometry or image data. By demonstrating solutions for both issues our framework serves as a viable platform for urban visualization.
series other
email hesina@vrvis.at
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id acadia03_045
id acadia03_045
authors Hoon, Michael and Kehoe, Michael
year 2003
title Enhancing Architectural Communication with Gaming Engines
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 349-355
summary This paper makes a case for exploring the feasibility of utilizing the advanced graphics and sound systems of contemporary gaming engines to promote architecturally relevant work. Gaming engines, while developed largely for the PC entertainment industry, have vast potential for application in architecture. This paper will explore the depth of this potential and will outline work demonstrating the advantages and the limitations of this technology. The supporting research and observations examine the technology and reveal its potential usefulness as an instructional or depictive authoring tool. Game engines were selected that had appropriate graphical prowess, but were customizable as to allow the removal of game-specific features (to create a “professional” user interface). Projects were authored that expressed complex building details using the engine for visual depiction. The details, which included constructional components, structural assemblies, or simple design nuances, were modeled with 3D geometry and realistically textured and lighted. The game engine allowed one user or many remote simultaneous users in the virtual environment to interactively explore the presentation in real time. Scripts were developed to encourage end-users to interactively disassemble or reassemble building components as desired. Audile and/or text-based information regarding the assembly sequence were provided by exploiting the game interface features. Furthermore, interactive object scaling was provided to facilitate analysis of component relationships.
series ACADIA
email hoon@njit.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

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