CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 166

_id caadria2003_a2-2
id caadria2003_a2-2
authors Halin, G., Bignon, J.-C., Scaletsky, C., Nakapan, W. and Kacher, S.
year 2003
title Three Approaches of The Use of Image to Assist Architectural Design
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 183-198
summary The image is the support of ideas search in the whole design phase. The definition of assistance tools, by using the image, seems to be applicable whatever the stage of the process of architectural design is. This article presents three approaches, which intend to study the contribution of the image inside of the architectural design process. The first approach rests on the idea that architects use external references as generating elements of new project ideas and that it is possible to organize this referential knowledge by taking the image as structuring entity of this knowledge. The two other approaches intend to use image to support the formulation of information designer's needs in more advanced phases of the design process. The identified needs are those of the architect who searches a particular information in order to justify or to perform some choices, during the act of conception.
series CAADRIA
email halin@crai.archi.fr
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id caadria2003_a5-2
id caadria2003_a5-2
authors Kang, J.H., Park, J. G. and Lho, B.-Ch.
year 2003
title XML-Based Interactive 3D Campus Map
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 631-640
summary This paper presents the development of a prototype XMLbased 3D campus map using the 3D VML library. Many universities in the U.S. use two-dimensional (2D) raster image to provide the campus map along with additional building information on their Web site. Research shows that three-dimensional (3D) expression of the 3D objects helps human beings understand the spatial relationship between the objects. Some universities use 3D campus maps to help visitors more intuitively access the building information. However, these 3D campus maps are usually created using raster images. The users cannot change the view point in the 3D campus map for better understanding of the arrangement of the campus. If the users can navigate around in the 3D campus map, they may be able to locate the building of their interest more intuitively. This paper introduces emerging Web technologies that deliver 3D vector graphics on the Web browser over the internet, and the algorithm of the prototype XML-based 3D campus map. Some advantages of using VML in delivering the interactive 3D campus map are also discussed.
series CAADRIA
email juliankang@tamu.edu, jpark@neo.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id 64c0
id 64c0
authors Pektas, S T
year 2003
title A FRAMEWORK FOR BUILDING DESIGN PROCESS MODELING WITH PARAMETER-BASED DESIGN STRUCTURE MATRICES
source In C. J. Anumba (Ed.), Innovative Developments in Architecture, Engineering, and Construction. (pp. 25-31). Rotterdam: MillPress
summary Architecture/Engineering/Construction (AEC) industry is one of the multidisciplinary domains in which collaboration among related parties is utmost important. While the knowledge needed for building processes are distributed among the different participants from diverse disciplinary backgrounds, the product of their activities, i.e. the building itself, must be highly integrated. Despite the intense flow of information between design professionals, there is a lack of research to better understand and manipulate these flows. Furthermore, most of the current process modeling tools in the AEC industry do not enable analyses of iteration in the process and they represent the process at high levels with very little information at lower levels. In order to resolve the issues mentioned above, this paper introduces the use of parameter-based dependency structure matrix as a process modeling and system analysis tool for building design. The method reveals insights into the process structure, optimum sequence of parameter decisions, iterative cycles and concurrency in the process. A knowledge management framework for parameter-based DSM applications is proposed and the application of the framework is demonstrated through a real life building design problem.
keywords Design Integration, Design Process Modeling, Information Flow, and Parameter-based Dependency Structure Matrix
series other
type normal paper
email suletasli@gmail.com
last changed 2005/12/01 14:52

_id cf2003_m_079
id cf2003_m_079
authors PETRIC, J., CONTI, G. and UCELLI, G.
year 2003
title Designing within Virtual Worlds
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 213-224
summary This paper celebrates the successful outcome of a trial of an innovative multi-platform distributed design decision support system in which the shared design environment exists within the virtual world. The outcome is the result of a sustained three-year research and development effort, within an internationally recognised research group. The project set itself a number of ambitious targets within the broad spectrum of distributed design decision support, viz: • A multi-platform environment: the trial demonstrates inter-operability of different machine platforms - from a home PC to an international standard Virtual Reality Centre. • A distributed environment: the trial demonstrates the high level of understanding amongst the design team separated by time and space. • An ability to propose, discuss and agree upon, design decision from within the virtual world. Hitherto, virtual environments were viewing galleries; designers had to leave them to effect design changes in a conventional CAD package. The trial described in the paper amply demonstrates the potential to design, collaboratively and, in distributed mode, from within the virtual world. The two ideas upon which the system (known as JCAD-VR) is built are: • That all the users present in the virtual world have to be able to share the same virtual environment in a "transparent fashion"; • The user interface, instead of the traditional menu/windows based layout, is part of the virtual world itself. Any element of the interface becomes an object belonging to the 3D world and therefore it is treated as any other object. Each element of the interface can then be moved or scaled according to the user’s needs. The entire project is based on client-server architecture where every user logs into a virtual world and starts sharing design tasks with other users. The authors propose to present a video which demonstrates the positive outcome of the trials to date. More importantly, perhaps, the authors will put the achievements of the R+D into the context of past aspirations and developments in the subject area and, most importantly of all, suggest how these modest achievements will impact on the next decade of increasingly rapid R+D.
keywords collaboration, distributed design, interface, virtual environment
series CAAD Futures
email j.petric@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id sigradi2003_023
id sigradi2003_023
authors Saez, J., Saez, A. and Gómez, G.A.
year 2003
title Tamaño importa r punto (The size is important to the point)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary Our proposal consists of showing how a PIXEL (a small part of a whole) can have a life of its own when it is taken out of its enviroment. This pixel, alone, is nothing, since it depends on others and a context to actually be something (a figure, etc.). Even though we initially emphasized that the pixel could very well be the main character of a play (which we still believe is true) we also wish to point out that today`s subject is to try to go above and below all studies, technology and even science, to try to find the answer in the most basic facts. The PIXEL now teaches us that "it" is the most noble single element that a digital artist can find. Most certainly, this issue will not add anything to science, and it might not change theories or the world itself; furthermore, we probably will not show anything that is not already known and no intelligent discussion will come up regarding the relevance or irrelevance of the pixel isolated from its context. Still, it is important to remark that the PIXEL, the smallest single creature that I know, has been the issue of many, many discussions and quire a few hours of work.
keywords Big things, Little things
series SIGRADI
email Saezlodi@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id sigradi2003_101
id sigradi2003_101
authors Senna, N., de Pellegrin, J.L. and Prietto Souza, C.A.
year 2003
title 5 Séculos de Figuração (5 centuries of figuration)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary The project 5 Centuries of figuration consists in a didactic exhibition, built by students of arts, displaying the different kinds of human representation, in with reference to most significant works created by the great artists of Western History of Art, from the Renaissance period until our days.
keywords Human figure, drawing, painting, history of art, computer graphics
series SIGRADI
email alecrins@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 09:00

_id cf2003_m_113
id cf2003_m_113
authors SMITH, G. J., MAHER, M.L. and GERO, J.S.
year 2003
title Designing 3D Virtual Worlds as a Society of Agents
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 105-114
summary We consider virtual architecture as 3D virtual worlds able to support human activities and collaboration needs in digital virtual environments. 3D virtual worlds can go beyond the simulation of physical worlds to become dynamic, adaptable worlds by incorporating agents in the representation of the world. Agents are software systems that are capable of acting autonomously according to their own goals and beliefs. A society of agents accommodates agent communication and collaboration as part of the agent reasoning. In this paper we present a framework in which agents become the basis for the elements of a 3D virtual world. This framework is presented as having a model for an agent that can interact and reason about the 3D world, and as a model for agent communication. The model is illustrated by the design of a virtual conference room."
keywords agent communication, agents, virtual architecture, virtual world
series CAAD Futures
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id sigradi2003_097
id sigradi2003_097
authors Carnicero, C. , Fornari, G. and Enrich, Rosa
year 2003
title Superficies en las ciudades invisibles (Surfaces in the invisible cities)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary We present as an example a story entitled "Invisible Cities" by Italo Calvino in which the author describes an imaginary city. Appealing to mathematical concepts, students seek to design a type of city or architectural space, arising from each student's interpretation of the text. Here, Literature, Design and Mathematics form a framework in which each discipline justifies the presence of the others. In our private case the need of an evolution of the language is presented besides by means of the use of the Digital Graphic.
series SIGRADI
email ag_fornari@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id diss_2003
id diss_2003
authors Gorczyca, Adam
year 2003
title Interaction of the design methods and the contemporary computer techniques
source Faculty of Architecture, Warsaw University of Technology
summary The thesis researches a bilateral relations between computer techniques and methods of architectural design. It represents a holistic attitude because of a multithread analysis in the field of the theory of design, a new hard- and software used by architects, and a design practice.

Thesis: Contemporary computer science development at the end of the twentieth century pushed architects to use hard- and software as tools, which became an active support (more than just CAAD). It enabled to widen the scope of a form-properties research and a generation of solutions impossible to achieve before, by using traditional methods and tools. This situation leads to new, unpredictable possibilities of architectural research and design. Objectives: 1. Definition of the latest trends in computer technologies applied in architectural offices. 2. Presentation of some practical consequencies of application of those technologies in design and construction. 3. Separation of new design methods caused by use of digital tools. 4. A simplified taxonomy of the methods above, with characteristic features. 5. A research in practical application of digital tools in Polish and foreign offices, as well as at the WUT Faculty of Architecture.

The subject of the work:

The thesis constitutes of five chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, where the range of work is presented in the context of place, time and the research made. The following chapters research three aspects of CAAD: (1) hardware and software, (2) new definition of architecture, which is a result of application of the digital tools, (3) practical problems connected with the use of computer techniques. The second chapter describes the new technologies in use –Virtual Reality (incl. VRD, CAVE’s, Data Gloves, motion-capture), Rapid prototyping (incl. holographic printers, 3D scanners, routers, milling-machines), new types of interfaces (e.g. xWorlds, InfoSpace, Flock of birds), etc. The third chapter is a theoretical one. It presents three types of changes in design methods, which can be classified, judging by results, in architecture of: (a) in-formation (b) de-formation and (c) cyberspace. All the mentioned applications of a digital technology cause redefinition of the range of the architects’ profession. The fourth chapter is concentrated on the application and utilization of technology. It is a detailed analysis of chosen buildings (characteristic examples) and design methods used by some avant-garde and well-known practitioners and visioners of architecture (Eisenman, Gehry, Spuybroek, etc.). It also presents statistics, where the influence of digital tools on the way of working (efficiency, productivity, use of tools) is expressed numerically. A synthesis summarizes the relation between architects and the new digital tools in some aspects: hard- and software, social changes, ergonomics, methodics, linguistic/symbolic and architectural. The mentioned ranges of interaction constitute the proof of the thesis.

series thesis:PhD
email adamgorczyca@interia.pl
last changed 2003/09/17 16:20

_id sigradi2003_119
id sigradi2003_119
authors Bermudez, J., Foresti, S., Agutter, J., Westenskow, D., Syroid, N. Drews, F. Tashjian, E. and Adams, V.
year 2003
title Metodología Interdisciplinaria para Diseñar Nuevas Arquitecturas de Representación de Datos (Interdisciplinaria Methodologies for the Design of a New Architectures of Data Representation)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary Data representation architecture can be defined as the organizational, functional, experiential, formal, and media-technological order defining the interaction between data, representation, and user. This paper presents an interdisciplinary methodology to develop such architectures in order to significantly improve real time decision making in complex data environments. We have reported in some aspects of this work elsewhere. In this occasion, we will describe our working methodology based on complete interdisciplinarity, the design process and evaluation protocols. We will show work done for Finance and Network Monitoring. Our long-term goal is to design a new generation of data representation architectures that is applicable to diverse fields.
keywords Data representation; visualization; design, architecture, interdisciplinary
series SIGRADI
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia03_058
id acadia03_058
authors Cerone, J. and Johnston, S.
year 2003
title Elementary School: The Design Process
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 430
summary Although the fi nal presentation documents were all either generated orprocessed by computer, the steps leading to a fi nal product were theresult of constant interaction between computer and paper. The processbegan on paper with quick sketches of the main grid elements—the mostfundamental pieces of the “kit of parts”.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id cf2003_m_034
id cf2003_m_034
authors DING, L, LIEW, P.-S., MAHER, M.-L., GERO, J.S. and DROGEMULLER, R.
year 2003
title Integrating CAD and 3D Virtual Worlds Using Agents and EDM
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 301-312
summary This paper develops an overall architecture for integrating CAD and virtual worlds. The advantages of having access to the building model in a virtual world include the collaborative nature of the world. The EDM database as an object-oriented database is developed to establish a common object-oriented representation of building model, which can be accessed by both CAD systems and virtual worlds. The integration between CAD systems and an EDM database is implemented through the use of Industry Foundation Classes (IFCs) as an intermediate data model and the communication between the database and virtual worlds is developed through agents.
keywords agents, IFC, virtual world
series CAAD Futures
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id sigradi2003_129
id sigradi2003_129
authors Gaudio, A., De Ponti, J., Nessi, S. and Sautel, S.
year 2003
title Multimedia interactivo para la enseñanza del color: una experiencia empírica (Interactive multimedia for the teaching of color: An empirical experience)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary Multimedia «Color Básico» has an interface that takes into account interaction levels, textual resources, icons, sound and movement, the «gestalt» of the screen, usability and its practical applications. Everything is structured to make a «knowledge interface», so that color contents are part of an interactive experience. Some aspects of design information are analyzed as part of the conclusions of an empiric research.
keywords Interface, interaction, information design, usability, command mode
series SIGRADI
email gaudiothies@ciudad.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id acadia03_036
id acadia03_036
authors Gerzso, J. Michael
year 2003
title On the Limitations of Shape Grammars: Comments on Aaron Fleisher’s Article “Grammatical Architecture?”
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 279-287
summary Shape grammars were introduced by Gips and Stiny in 1972. Since then, there have been many articles and books written by them and their associates. In 1992, Aaron Fleisher, a professor at the School of Planning, MIT, wrote a critique of their work in an article titled “Grammatical Architecture?” published in the journal Environment and Planning B. According to him, Gips, Stiny and later Mitchell, propose a hypothesis that states that shape grammars are presumed to represent knowledge of architectural form, that grammars are “formable,” and that there is a visual correspondence to verbal grammar. The strong version of “the hypothesis requires that an architectural form be equivalent to a grammar.” Fleisher considers these hypotheses unsustainable, and argues his case by analyzing the differences between language, and architecture, and by dealing with the concepts of lexicons, syntax and semantics. He concludes by stating that architectural design is negotiated in two modalities: the verbal and the visual, and that equivalences are not at issue; they do not exist. If there is such thing as a language for design, it would provide the means to maintain a discussion of the consequences in one mode, of the state and conditions of the other. Fleisher’s observations serve as the basis of this paper, a tribute to him, and also an opportunity to present an outline to an alternate approach or hypothesis to shape grammars, which is “nonlinguistic” but “generative,” in the sense that it uses production rules. A basic aspect of this hypothesis is that the only similarity between syntactic rules in language and some rules in architecture is that they are recursive.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id cf2003_m_060
id cf2003_m_060
authors GLASER, D., VOUNG, J., XIAO, L., TAI, B., UBBELOHDE M.S., CANNY, J. and DO, E. Y.-L.
year 2003
title LightSketch - A Sketch-Modelling Program for Lighting Analysis
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 371-382
summary This paper presents a flexible, yet powerful lighting analysis tool, LightSketch. LightSketch is a sketch-based modelling program for lighting analysis. It allows the user to draw both architectural and lighting related symbols which are converted into a 3D model for lighting visualisation. It is motivated by examining the strengths and limitations of current lighting design practices. Its use is illustrated with design scenarios.
keywords sketch, lighting, simulation
series CAAD Futures
email ellendo@cmu.edu
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id sigradi2007_af13
id sigradi2007_af13
authors Granero, Adriana Edith; Alicia Barrón; María Teresa Urruti
year 2007
title Transformations in the educational system, Influence of the Digital Graph [Transformaciones en el sistema educacional, influencia de la Gráfica Digital]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 182-186
summary The educative proposal was based on the summary attained through experiences piled up during the 2 last semester courses, 2/2006-1/2007. This proposal corresponds to a mix of methodology (by personal attendance / by internet). Founding on the Theory of the Game (Eric Berne 1960) and on different theories such as: Multiple intelligences (Haward Gardner 1983), Emotional Intelligence (Peter Salowey and John Mayer 1990, Goleman 1998), Social Intelligence (Goleman 2006), the Triarchy of Intelligence (Stemberg, R.J. 1985, 1997), “the hand of the human power”, it´s established that the power of the voice, that of the imagination, the reward, the commitment and association produce a significant increase of the productivity (Rosabeth Moss Kanter 2000), aside from the constructive processes of the knowledge (new pedagogical concepts constructivista of Ormrod J.E. 2003 and Tim O´Reilly 2004).
series SIGRADI
email ag@ub.edu.ar adriana.granero@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id 4450
id 4450
authors J Jupp and JS Gero
year 2003
title TOWARDS COMPUTATIONAL ANALYSIS OF STYLE IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
source IJCAI03 Workshop on Computational Approaches to Style Analysis and Synthesis, S Argamon (ed), IJCAI, Acapulco, pp 1-10.
summary This paper proposes a computational model of design that attempts to capture within a social context two important aspects of style: ‘content’ and ‘manner’. We present a characterisation of style for the artefact based on a framework that consists of information theoretic measures. We discuss the benefits the study of social networks offers a computational analysis of both aspects of style. It is our aim to bring style as ‘content’ and style as ‘manner’ together using this approach.
keywords style, information theory
type normal paper
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2004/04/10 00:15

_id avocaad_2003_13
id avocaad_2003_13
authors John L. Heintz
year 2003
title Communication and Value in Networked Design Coalitions
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary The advent of the Internet has led us to believe that we live in an era of unprecedented globalization. In the field of building design, we now expect both that the local market for design services will be altered, and that many firms will take up the opportunity to pursue commissions beyond their local market. To some extent this is true, but it is instructive to recall that in the 19th century London based architectural firms and public works designers designed buildings throughout the Empire. Designing for projects beyond the local market is not new, what is new is our expectation that such a task is now fundamentally altered, made easier and more transparent, by the abundance of new communications technologies.It remains the case that working outside one’s local context is difficult and that when doing so, problems are likely to arise out of cultural differences. Distance too imposes its burdens, as the possibility to meet other members of the team face to face is reduced as the travel costs increase. This breaks down the possibilities of building informal networks among the individual designers working for the firms that are members of the design team. A re-instantiation of this informal network can only be done on the basis of a model of formal and informal communication in the design team. Many of the difficulties of collaborative work outside one’s local market are problems that have already been with us a long time. These problems arise out of the fact that buildings are designed by heterogeneous groups of people. The members of such groups must communicate with each other to share information and coordinate decisions and actions. Yet they are in different relations to the project at hand and have differing values arising out of their different backgrounds. This leads inevitably to conflict. Therefore, if we are to discuss communication and value then we must devote our attentions to conflict.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design, Communication, values, informal communication, value resolution, design team, design coalition.
series AVOCAAD
email J.L.Heintz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

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