CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 599

_id heyligheneaae2003
id HeylighenEAAE2003
authors Heylighen, Ann
year 2003
title A maintenance contract for the architect's degree - Concept, materialisation and post-occupancy
source Ebbe Harder (ed.), Writings in Architectural Education, Transactions on architectural education No 15, EAAE/AEEA, pp.134-147
summary Today, architecture is confronted with changing concepts of time, space and place. These changes are largely induced by the advent of the information society and in turn induce the need for entirely new ways of conceiving architectural education. It is obvious, however, that architectural education does not hold absolute sway over the need for renewal, as other domains and disciplines too are confronted with the inevitable learning society: a society in which individuals, groups and companies are learning on a permanent basis. What architectural education does hold absolute sway over – or at least should be granted a patent for – is the unique way in which it used to prepare (and still prepares) its students for practice in the design studio. Therefore, instead of throwing out the design studio with the bathwater, we consider it as an outstanding lead for pursuing the learning society within the context of architecture. Furthermore, we see ICT not only as a cause of, but at the same time as an ally in this pursuit, as it allows reinforcing the studio as “espace transitoire”. To this end, we propose to literally connect the studio with the world of practice through an on-line platform constructed of concrete cases.
keywords Architectural education, ICT
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2004/03/25 16:54

_id ijac20031108
id ijac20031108
authors Hirschberg, Urs
year 2003
title Transparency In Information Architecture: Enabling Large Scale Creative Collaboration in Architectural Education over the Internet
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary This paper is about networked collaboration in architectural education and about information architecture for networked collaborations. It presents results of a quantitative process analysis of two types of courses in Computer Aided Architectural Design that were taught using database-driven online environments. The main focus of the quantitative analysis is the performance of these online environments as information structures, designed to accommodate the presentation and the peer-to-peer exchange of design information for relatively large groups of between 60 and 150 participants. Using the database records to reconstruct the processes, three different quantitative analyses are described.Their results indicate that for these projects the web-environments were successful in enhancing peer-to-peer learning and that they promoted a more objective assessment of the submitted works. The study also looks at the effect that the environments themselves had on the process. Finally it draws some conclusions about these environments' information architecture: it presents tentative guidelines about how such environments must be designed to handle the dynamic display of design data, from many different authors, in a way that is transparent to the users.
series journal
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2003_c5-1
id caadria2003_c5-1
authors Hoon, M. , Jabi, W. and Goldman, G.
year 2003
title Immersion, Interaction, and Collaboration In Architectural Design Using Gaming Engines
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 721-738
summary "This paper investigates the role of gaming engines in the architectural design process through the introduction of features such as immersion, interaction and collaboration. While traditional 3D modelling and visualization systems such as 3D Studio MAX and form?Z offer increasingly convincing visual simulations, gaming engines are approaching the visual realism of such systems and are offering additional interactive features that are usually available only in more expensive immersive virtual reality systems . Additionally, the capability to have multiple individuals inhabit and navigate the space offers unique opportunities for collaboration as well as the investigation of human behaviour. Participants with internet access can be invited to access a shared virtual environment. Collaboration among users can be further enhanced by combining immersive navigation with peer-to-peer instant messaging and/or adding a voice channel. This paper analyzes these issues through research summary and the creation and user testing of a prototype based on a publicly available gaming engine. Through a series of assignments within an academic course, students in the school of architecture were asked to iteratively use and test this prototype for the collaborative exploration of designed environments. Students made their environments available for others to navigate in real-time and offer comments. A final design review was conducted in which critics were asked to enter the designed environment, explore it at will and interact with the student as well as others present in the same virtual space. This paper will illustrate some of the student projects and describe the immersive,"
series CAADRIA
email hoon@njit.edu , jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id ecaade03_547_138_ibrahim
id ecaade03_547_138_ibrahim
authors Ibrahim, M., Krawczyk, R. and Schipporeit, G.
year 2003
title CAD Smart Objects: Potentials and Limitations
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 547-552
summary For many years, CAD software depended on entity objects that were manipulated and interpreted by the user as meaningful symbols. These entities only represented the geometrical aspect of the design, but never had knowledge of what they are, or how to behave. With the new CAD systems, this concept has changed into the smart CAD objects. The smart objects will automatically provide all the data related to it: geometry, materials, specifications, price, as well as manufacturers and theoretically any related data. Creating new objects is not an easy straightforward job, and requires more programming skills than previously needed. Taking into consideration the relative difficulties in learning to modify and create new CAD objects, this might lead to a new branch of learning, as the architecture students might not only need to learn how to use the CAD packages but also how to program it in a way that makes them capable of doing what they want rather than doing what the package allow them to do.
keywords Objects; object oriented programming
series eCAADe
email krawczyk@iit.edu
more http://www.iit.edu/~Ibramag
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id caadria2003_c5-3
id caadria2003_c5-3
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title Collaborative Design Simulation Game
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 745-758
summary Collaboration is an is an important aspect of the architect's education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills, because it can only be revealed when the number of participants exceed a certain threshold, and when actions made by others affect the individual's design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player games provides an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstraction helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to 'work,' encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating design collaboration. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other-in adversarial or collaborative manner-to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what is collaboration, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build 'houses' made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players.' A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player or by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points 'wins.'
series CAADRIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id acadia03_018
id acadia03_018
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title Collaborative Design Process Simulation Game
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 133-141
summary Collaboration is an important aspect of the architect’s education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills. Being a process, rather than a product, it cannot be revealed by judging the results alone, which is often how form-making skills are taught and judged. Rather, the process of collaboration is only evident when the number of the participants exceeds a certain threshold, and when actions taken by other participants affect an individual’s on-going design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player simulation games provides an analogy and an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstract nature helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to “work,” encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating the design collaboration process. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other—in adversarial or collaborative manners—to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what collaboration is, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build “houses” made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players. Actions taken by one player immediately affect his/her neighbors. A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player and by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points “wins.”
series ACADIA
email ywjeong@uclink.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ijac20031407
id ijac20031407
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.; Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title A Collaborative Design Simulation Game
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 4
summary Collaboration is an is an important aspect of the architect's education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills, because it can only be revealed when the number of participants exceed a certain threshold, and when actions made by others affect the individual's design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player games provides an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstraction helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to 'work,' encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating design collaboration. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other - in adversarial or collaborative manner - to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what is collaboration, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build 'houses' made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players.' A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player or by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points 'wins.'
series journal
email kalay@socrates.Berkeley.edu
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ijac20031105
id ijac20031105
authors Kieferle, Joachim B.; Herzberger, Erwin
year 2003
title The "Digital year for Architects" - Experiences with an Integrated Teaching Concept
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary The "digital year for architects" is an integrated course for graduate architecture students that has been running since 1997, at Stuttgart University. Its concept is to link together traditional design teaching and working with computers. Three seminar classes and one design project form the framework of the course. In it the students are taught the design of, for example, image and space composition, typography, video, and using virtual reality. Additionally we cover theoretical basics for the final design project, such as information management or working environments. The course takes in approximately a dozen software packages and ends with a visionary design project. The products have shown the advantage of an integrated course compared to separate courses. The course proves to be more intensive in dealing with the project as well as achieving better skills when learning the associated new digital media. An important feature is that because the project topics are different from conventional architectural schemes, and tend to be more abstract, a key effect is to widen the students' way of thinking about designing.
series journal
email kieferle@architektur.fh-wiesbaden.de
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ecaade03_145_160_koutamanis
id ecaade03_145_160_koutamanis
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2003
title CAAD influences in Web-based teaching
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 145-152
summary A recent restructuring of the CAAD department at the Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, was based on the principle of coupling technological and methodical development to application areas. This resulted into decentralization of CAAD and the positioning of computerization groups in other departments. The task of these groups is to stimulate broad integration of ICT and initiate the development of computational applications relating to specific tasks and areas. The paper is a description of a channel for such integration and applications: a Web site intended as a support to the research and educational activities of a whole department. In addition to its conventional role in presenting the department, the site accommodates the majority of learning aids for the students (lecture notes and presentations, readers, syllabi, audiovisual material) and a comprehensive database of completed and ongoing research output (online publications for internal use). The design of the site was based on earlier experiences with Web-based teaching and collaborative design environments, which were projected on the processes and products of the new context.
keywords web-based education, computer-mediated communication, interaction, collaboration
series eCAADe
email A.Koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.re-h.nl
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id caadria2003_c6-2
id caadria2003_c6-2
authors Li Suping, Joo-Hwa Bay
year 2003
title A Cognitive Framework of Collaborative Design Between Architects and Manufacturer-Designers
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 855-870
summary The widespread application of prefabricated products in building has made prefabrication an indispensable part of building processes. In this context, instead of handling every detail by architects themselves, some parts of architectural design have been transferred to manufacturer-designers. This inevitably brings about problems in the integration of prefabricated products and the specific buildings they serve. As a result, collaboration between architects and manufacturer-designers takes place in building processes in various forms and extents (non-, semi-, and full-collaboration). In this study, we aim to investigate collaborative design process from the cognitive aspect of design generation between architects and manufacturer-designers in terms of project-related products design. By applying the Kernel of Conceptual System theory (Tzonis et al., 1978), we intend to set up two empirical models in terms of design differences' formation in collaborative design process based on a case study with seeking the answers for the following research questions: 1. What kinds of design differences are raised in design processes? 2. Why the design differences are raised in design processes? 3. What implications could be made in developing computational models to facilitate collaborative design between architects and manufacturer-designers?
series CAADRIA
email sdep1193@nus.edu.sg, akibayp@nus.edu.sg
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id acadia03_051
id acadia03_051
authors Lim, Chor-Kheng
year 2003
title G Pen: An Intelligent Designer’s Playmate
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 403-409
summary In the field of design the pen-based system is a newly developed computer interface that provides the designer with the convenience of a pen in freehand sketches. But these pen-based systems only focus on an interface familiar to the designers and the application of the hardware and software that go with it, treating the pen only as a mouse-like input device. As pen and pad are devices for the pen-based system, the hope is that they can be endowed with more intelligent characteristics to let them interact with designer’s gestures and become a creative source for the designers, while simultaneously preventing the design fixation encountered by designers during design process. This research utilizes the unintentional hand gestures made by designers, such as the designer’s grip of the pen or movement involved in playing with the pen, putting it down, knocking it, twisting it or shaking it, during the thinking process or when running into a design fixation. From the interaction between the pen and the pad, certain actions may be generated to stimulate the designer’s thinking process. This research uses a neural network as the main learning mechanism for the eventual development of a prototype of a pen-based drawing system that provides timely visual stimulation: a G Pen system.
series ACADIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id acadia03_049
id acadia03_049
authors Lim, Chor-Kheng
year 2003
title An Insight into the Freedom of Using a Pen: Pen-based System and Pen-and-paper
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 385-393
summary In earlier researches on freehand sketching, the cognitive behavior of designers was studied. In recent years, some researchers began to look into this area from the design media aspect. The pen-based system, developed by Gross, Landay and other researchers, used the pen as an input device, allowing sketches to be freely drawn in a computer environment. The importance of the freehand sketch lies in its ability to freely represent various drawing projections using ambiguous sketches. However, as for the various drawing projections, such as diagrams, symbols, plans, elevations, sections, perspectives, etc., how are they interrelated to a designer’s thinking process and the cognitive behavior? Different media have different abilities to represent different projections. Would they affect the designer’s design thinking as well? Targeting different media, i.e., conventional freehand sketches vs. the computer pen-based system, this research uses case studies and think-aloud protocol analysis to present an analysis and discussion. Research results show that there is a relationship of gradual embodiment that is mutually complementary, going from a whole perspective to being the dissected into sections between the different projections. In addition, these projections restrict the designer’s various design thinking processes, while the use of different media may somewhat change the actual design thinking of the designer
series ACADIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ecaade03_615_54_kheng
id ecaade03_615_54_kheng
authors Lim, Chor-Kheng
year 2003
title Is a pen-based system just another pen or more than a pen?
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 615-622
summary Freehand sketch is the most critical stage in the design process. The importance of the freehand sketch is in its ability to freely represent various projections of ambiguous drawing using a convenience tool, pen-and-paper. Recently, pen-based system which developed attempted to use pen as an input device, allowing sketches to be freely drawn on computers. However, as far as the various drawing projections, such as diagram, symbol, plan, elevation, section, perspective, etc., how are they interrelated to a designer’s cognitive behavior? Different media have different abilities to represent projections. What’s the difference of design cognitive behavior between conventional pen-and paper and pen-based system in view of both using a pen as a design medium? This research proceeds a think-aloud protocol analysis to present an analysis and discussion. Research results show that there is a relationship of gradual embodiment, mutually complementary, going from a whole to being dissected into sections between the different projections. Moreover, pen-based system is more than a pen, it allows designer to inspect a 3-D view during the sketching stage. This gives the designer more opportunities during the sketching stage to conduct the design thinking process based on the ambiguous 2-D projections and the more concrete 3-D images, as well as more opportunities for visual feedback
series eCAADe
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id a54a
id a54a
authors M Kavakli and JS Gero
year 2003
title DIFFERENCE BETWEEN EXPERT AND NOVICE DESIGNERS: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUD
source Human Behaviour in Design, edited by U Lindemann, Springer, Berlin, pp 42-51.
summary This chapter investigates the differences in performance between an expert and a novice in terms of their respective strategic knowledge. We examined conceptual design protocols of an expert and a novice, and found that the expert’s cognitive activity and productivity in the design process were almost three times as high as the novice's. The possible reason for this is the difference in their strategic knowledge. The expert’s cognitive processing is structured such that it stays within the limits of human short term memory. This provides empirical evidence for a different strategic knowledge that may be developed with experience. The expert's strategic knowledge allows him to use a smaller number of processes and to form different groupings of processes.
keywords design cognition, strategic knowledge, experts, novices
type normal paper
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2004/04/09 23:43

_id sigradi2003_136
id sigradi2003_136
authors Natanson, Louis and Paterson, Inga
year 2003
title From Digital Technologists to Computer Artists
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary Historically, there has always been a strong relationship between the emerging technologies of an era and the practice and concerns of artists. These relationships are complex and form over time, involving phases of technology learning, the testing of the boundaries of the medium, the use of the technology as the subject of art and the creation of an economic context for art of the new medium. These phases presage the emergence of recognisable disciplines. This paper explores what can be learnt from such a historical perspective so as to inform a curriculum aimed at forming computer artists.
keywords Digital Technology, Digital Art, Computer Art
series SIGRADI
email L.Natanson@Abertay.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id cf2003_m_110
id cf2003_m_110
authors OXMAN, Rivka
year 2003
title Designing the Virtual Design University
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 291-300
summary Universities are currently providing learning opportunities to students and teachers exploiting information and communication technologies to deliver their programs and provide tuition support. However, since architectural design education is unique, general models of e-learning are not applicable. Regarding a potential virtual design university there is therefore a particular need for a theoretical pedagogical framework. The objective of this paper is to present a theoretical basis for the design and implementation of a unique e-learning environment suitable for design learning and design teaching in the architectural and engineering domains. The ideas and the concepts are currently being implemented in the WINDS project. Three theoretical and methodological aspects that provide unique consideration for the construction of a virtual learning environment for design are presented and discussed: 1) A unique structure of design knowledge as required in virtual education; 2) A requisite pedagogic framework for virtual design education; and 3) A particular technology designed and implemented to support these aspects in WINDS.
keywords design pedagogy, e-learning, virtual university
series CAAD Futures
email arrro01@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id ecaade03_607_140_mpapavasiliou
id ecaade03_607_140_mpapavasiliou
authors Papavasiliou, Mattheos
year 2003
title Digital space and ephemeral visuals as determinants of contemporary design: A Survey of Projects of Architectural Students in CAAD
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 607-611
summary Outside of views produced deliberately for the design of architecture, there exists a large body of images; visuals of no materialized spaces, constructed only on paper or in pixels in popular cultural media – editorial illustration, comic strips and books, cinema, television, advertising and web imagery. All the aforementioned visuals, fragments of architecture are within our everyday life and more important influence strong spatial paradigms for students of architecture. The proposed presentation is about the work within a university Computer Aided Architectural Design studio where students asked to investigate the ephemeral environments that surround their everyday life and translate them into architectural intentions. This paper argues that the digitally mediated design of young students of architecture incorporates the ubiquity of contemporary life-style; reflects through student design proposals the new orientations of contemporary architecture and finally revises the integration of the CAAD studio with the ‘traditional’ studios of design within the school of Architecture.
keywords CAAD and Design Studio Teaching
series eCAADe
email MATTHEOS@UTH.GR
more http://www.design-clinic.com/m.papavasiliou/
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id sigradi2003_038
id sigradi2003_038
authors Pizzi, M., Donoso, M., Caviares, A., Alessandri, J. and Villalón, T.
year 2003
title Incorporación de Tecnologías de Modelado Espacial en un Curso Inicial de Formación de Arquitectos (Introduction of Space Modeling Technologies in an Initial Course of the Education of Architects)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary The incorporation of virtual technologies to the learning process in architectural design is still incipient, using graphic software mainly as a rendering tool late in the curriculum. This paper presents an experience carried out with first year studio students, at the School of Architecture of the University of Chile, in which the intention is to incorporate virtual learning as part of the process spatial modification thinking. Through the use of Form Z, friendly software to learn for beginners, applied for simple extrusions, geometric transformations as translation, rotation or scaling, and the transformation of geometries and proportions through the handling of topological levels of polygonal objects. Through increasingly complex exercises we developed an effective complement of a traditional design methodology.
series SIGRADI
email Mpizzi@uchile.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id avocaad_2003_04
id avocaad_2003_04
authors Rob van Helvoort
year 2003
title Mecano - when CAAD meets ICT
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary For some years ICT (Information and Communication Technology) has been worldwide a hot topic and, especially in the European academic environment, a very fashionable word. No matter where the road would lead to, almost any ICT related project was welcomed as the next step towards a brand new and even better system of education. In the meantime CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) plays a role of utmost importance during a range of stages in the design process or building project.In this situation a research project is set up to develop an educational environment where CAAD meets ICT. The first application was turned down as the proposed (ICT) technology wasn’t available, according to committee judging. After proving them wrong, the second application was more successful. Even though the project was set up for local values, education in CAAD and related topics in Belgium, it was situated in a networked (internet) world.After running the project for a period of two years a list of pros and cons can be made up. Moreover, both local and on a global scale, ideas have changed.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email rob@vanhelvoort.com
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id sigradi2003_065
id sigradi2003_065
authors Rocha, Isabel Medero
year 2003
title Da abstração à realidade: O modelo real e virtual como objeto de conhecimento durante o ateliê de projeto de arquitetura (From abstract to reality: the real and the virtual models as object of knowledge in the architectural design studio)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary The work refers to educational-didactic proceed applied to the architectural project learning and introduces the chosen methodology and the obtained results with the experience of introducing practical and theorical contents, during the architectural design, that interferes straight to the architectural and context variations. The basic presuppose is that the use of digital environment as a tool requests the reflection and a deeper study of architectural knowledge as a discipline. This reflection appears in the insertion of an edification in a consolidated urban net, developing the typology and urban morphology concepts during the simulation of digital architectural and urban existent and proposed models.
keywords Digital Architecture, three dimensional simulation, project process on the digital environment
series SIGRADI
email isabel@prisma.unisinos.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

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