CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 599

_id cf2003_m_113
id cf2003_m_113
authors SMITH, G. J., MAHER, M.L. and GERO, J.S.
year 2003
title Designing 3D Virtual Worlds as a Society of Agents
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 105-114
summary We consider virtual architecture as 3D virtual worlds able to support human activities and collaboration needs in digital virtual environments. 3D virtual worlds can go beyond the simulation of physical worlds to become dynamic, adaptable worlds by incorporating agents in the representation of the world. Agents are software systems that are capable of acting autonomously according to their own goals and beliefs. A society of agents accommodates agent communication and collaboration as part of the agent reasoning. In this paper we present a framework in which agents become the basis for the elements of a 3D virtual world. This framework is presented as having a model for an agent that can interact and reason about the 3D world, and as a model for agent communication. The model is illustrated by the design of a virtual conference room."
keywords agent communication, agents, virtual architecture, virtual world
series CAAD Futures
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id cf2003_m_079
id cf2003_m_079
authors PETRIC, J., CONTI, G. and UCELLI, G.
year 2003
title Designing within Virtual Worlds
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 213-224
summary This paper celebrates the successful outcome of a trial of an innovative multi-platform distributed design decision support system in which the shared design environment exists within the virtual world. The outcome is the result of a sustained three-year research and development effort, within an internationally recognised research group. The project set itself a number of ambitious targets within the broad spectrum of distributed design decision support, viz: • A multi-platform environment: the trial demonstrates inter-operability of different machine platforms - from a home PC to an international standard Virtual Reality Centre. • A distributed environment: the trial demonstrates the high level of understanding amongst the design team separated by time and space. • An ability to propose, discuss and agree upon, design decision from within the virtual world. Hitherto, virtual environments were viewing galleries; designers had to leave them to effect design changes in a conventional CAD package. The trial described in the paper amply demonstrates the potential to design, collaboratively and, in distributed mode, from within the virtual world. The two ideas upon which the system (known as JCAD-VR) is built are: • That all the users present in the virtual world have to be able to share the same virtual environment in a "transparent fashion"; • The user interface, instead of the traditional menu/windows based layout, is part of the virtual world itself. Any element of the interface becomes an object belonging to the 3D world and therefore it is treated as any other object. Each element of the interface can then be moved or scaled according to the user’s needs. The entire project is based on client-server architecture where every user logs into a virtual world and starts sharing design tasks with other users. The authors propose to present a video which demonstrates the positive outcome of the trials to date. More importantly, perhaps, the authors will put the achievements of the R+D into the context of past aspirations and developments in the subject area and, most importantly of all, suggest how these modest achievements will impact on the next decade of increasingly rapid R+D.
keywords collaboration, distributed design, interface, virtual environment
series CAAD Futures
email j.petric@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id cf2003_m_034
id cf2003_m_034
authors DING, L, LIEW, P.-S., MAHER, M.-L., GERO, J.S. and DROGEMULLER, R.
year 2003
title Integrating CAD and 3D Virtual Worlds Using Agents and EDM
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 301-312
summary This paper develops an overall architecture for integrating CAD and virtual worlds. The advantages of having access to the building model in a virtual world include the collaborative nature of the world. The EDM database as an object-oriented database is developed to establish a common object-oriented representation of building model, which can be accessed by both CAD systems and virtual worlds. The integration between CAD systems and an EDM database is implemented through the use of Industry Foundation Classes (IFCs) as an intermediate data model and the communication between the database and virtual worlds is developed through agents.
keywords agents, IFC, virtual world
series CAAD Futures
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id ecaade03_047_70_maher
id ecaade03_047_70_maher
authors Maher, M.L., Liew, P.-S., Gu, N. and Ding, L.
year 2003
title An Agent Approach to Supporting Collaborative Design in 3D Virtual Worlds
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 47-52
summary 3D Virtual worlds facilitate a level of communication and collaboration not readily available in conventional CAD systems. The integration of virtual worlds and CAD systems using a common data model can make a significant impact on synchronous collaboration and real time multi-user multi-disciplinary modification of building data. By using agents, the integration of 3D virtual worlds and CAD systems can go beyond that of passive data transfer. With sensors and effectors, each agent can interact with its environment by responding to changes in the CAD system or 3D virtual world, which can take the form of an update to the geometry, or as a recommendation to change non geometric information or to propagate changes to other parts of the design. The reasoning process for each agent can vary from a reflexive behaviour in which the agent responds directly to the sensor data to a reflective behaviour in which the agents reasons about its goals and alternatives before making a change to the environment. We demonstrate this approach using ArchiCAD and Active Worlds as the CAD system and the virtual world platform. An EDM database is used as the central repository for storing the representation of the relevant data model. A multi-agent system is developed to connect the virtual world to this database to allow active data sharing. This agent approach can be extended to the integration of other applications and data models.
keywords Design Collaboration, Virtual World, Agent and CAD
series eCAADe
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/~mary
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id caadria2003_b1-1
id caadria2003_b1-1
authors Gu, Ning and Maher, Mary Lou
year 2003
title A Grammar for The Dynamic Design of Virtual Architecture Using Rational Agents
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 71-84
summary Virtual Architecture is a virtual place that uses the metaphor of architecture and provides an online environment for various human activities. While Virtual Architecture inherits many of the characteristics of physical architecture, it is possible to reconsider the virtual in terms of flexibility and autonomy. This paper presents a Usercentred Virtual Architecture (UcVA) Agent, a kind of rational agent capable of representing a person in virtual worlds and designing virtual worlds based on current needs. The UcVA agent model has a design component that uses the shape grammar formalism. This model and a sample grammar are demonstrated for a meeting room scenario.
series CAADRIA
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id ijac20031404
id ijac20031404
authors Gu, Ning; Maher, Mary Lou
year 2003
title A Grammar for the Dynamic Design of Virtual Architecture Using Rational Agents
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 4
summary Virtual Architecture is a virtual place that uses the metaphor of architecture and provides an online environment for various human activities. While Virtual Architecture inherits many of the characteristics of physical architecture, it is possible to reconsider the virtual in terms of flexibility and autonomy. This paper presents a User-centred Virtual Architecture (UcVA) Agent; a kind of rational agent capable of representing a person in virtual worlds and designing virtual worlds based on current needs. The UcVA agent model has a design component that uses the shape grammar formalism. This model and a sample grammar are demonstrated for a meeting room scenario.
series journal
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2004_024
id 2004_024
authors Holmgren, S., Rüdiger, B., Storgaard, K. and Tournay, B.
year 2004
title The Electronic Neighbourhood - A New Urban Space
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 24-34
summary During the event Cultural Market Days on 23 and 24 August 2003 at Noerrebro Park in Copenhagen, visitors could also enter the marketplace from their home via the Internet, as a digital 3D model had been constructed that showed the marketplace with all its information booths and activities. This virtual marketplace functioned as an extension of the urban space, allowing you to take part in the flow of information, activities and experiences that were offered in the marketplace. And this just by a click on the Internet address: http://www.e-kvarter.dk. Furthermore at certain times of the day you could chat with people from some of the many working groups of the urban regeneration project in Noerrebro. The digital 3D model is similar to the marketplace, but it creates its own universe in the green surroundings of Noerrebro Park. And now, when the Cultural Market Days are finished and the booths and people have gone, the Electronic Marketplace still remains on the Internet, with a potential for developing a new public space for information, dialogue and cooperation between the actors of the urban regeneration project. This paper presents the results of a 3-year research project, The Electronic Neighbourhood (2000-2004). Researchers have developed and tested a digital model of the urban area and other digital tools for supporting the dialogue and cooperation between professionals and citizens in an urban regeneration project in Copenhagen. The Danish Agency for Enterprise and Housing, the Ministry for Refugees, Immigration and Integration and Copenhagen Municipality have financed the research, which is planned to be published 2004. The results can also be followed on the Internet www.e-kvarter.dk.
keywords 3D Modelling; Virtual Environments; Design Process; Human-Computer Interaction; Collaborative Design; Urban Planning
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id 6943
id 6943
authors ML Maher, G Smith and JS Gero
year 2003
title DESIGN AGENTS IN 3D VIRTUALWORLDS
source IJCAI03 Workshop on Cognitive Modeling of Agents and Multi-Agent Interaction, R Sun (ed), IJCAI, Acapulco, pp 92-100.
summary Design agents are rational agents that monitor and modify elements of a designed environment. Special characteristics of design agents include the ability to reason about patterns and concepts, and the ability to act autonomously in modifying or changing the design to achieve their own goals. 3D Virtual Worlds are multi-user distributed systems that provide a designed environment and a closed world environment for studying design agents in a multiagent system. We present a model for a design agent reasoning process and a model for constructing a memory of the agent’s knowledge and interaction with a virtual world. The reasoning process includes sensation, perception, conception, hypothesizing, and planning a sequence of actions. Each agent has a constructed memory: a dynamic and changing view of the designed world that is determined by the agents sense data and reasoning. The agents construct and maintain a representation of the relevant objects in the world using a Function- Behavior-Structure formalism in order to reason about the intended and actual functions of the designed objects in the world. We have implemented this agent model by extending the Active Worlds platform so that each object in the 3D world can have agency. We illustrate the model with a door agent and a multi-agent room that reason about the use of the 3D world.
keywords design agents, virtual worlds, FBS framework
type normal paper
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2004/04/10 00:47

_id ecaade03_133_119_reffat
id ecaade03_133_119_reffat
authors Reffat, Rabee M.
year 2003
title Semantic-Based Virtual Design Environments for Architecture
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 133-140
summary 3D Virtual Environments (VEs) have the potential to reach beyond the limitations of CAD systems and can be utilised as design tools for architecture. This paper introduces a framework of semantic-based Virtual Design Environment(VDE) that aims to provides designers of VEs with virtual observers of designers’ actions (intelligent design agents and collaborative assistant agent) to investigate the current design and respond to these actions when the need arises. The paper presents the development of a representation structure of building-objects and their relationships to be used in constructing building designs in the 3D VDE and outlines sets of design semantics to be incorporated within the VDE.
series eCAADe
email rabee@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id cf2003_m_026
id cf2003_m_026
authors WYELD, Theodor G.
year 2003
title An Object Server System for 3D Digital Design Collaboration
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 235-248
summary Moving through and between computer generated 3D objects we experience a 'virtual world'. Virtual Worlds have created a dream-like landscape. They also have facilitated a paradigm shift for architects working with CAD tools where they now desire to “design three-dimensional spaces in an immersed way” (Strehlke and Engeli 2001). Architects are already working in computer-moderated collaborative networked organisations. A 3D Virtual World offers a different kind of collaboration. To understand how architects might design in an 'immersed way', three experiments are described. The experiments attempt to investigate how participants experience the 3D spaces within which they collaborated. In particular, the last experiment makes use of 'shared objects' in the scene. The software chosen to create these Virtual Worlds was VRML and JAVA due to their flexibility and rapid prototyping. Where VRML differs from most CAD languages is in its openness. This paper describes an object sharing client-server architecture based on a simple multi-user system providing navigation in CosmoPlayer 2.11 ported through Netscape. The Object Server System allows multiple clients, as avatars, and objects to be manipulated in a 3D Virtual World. The system updates the transforms of the objects explicitly allowing their transform values to be shared across multiple browser sessions.
keywords collaboration, multi-user, object sharing
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id ecaade03_541_131_fiamma
id ecaade03_541_131_fiamma
authors Fiamma, Paolo
year 2003
title Object oriented Thinking for Technical Architecture Modelling
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 541-546
summary Today it is increasingly important to focus the efforts of research on thinking about the great innovation introduced by digital 3D modelling in the housing sector, not only in the merits but also in the methods of the designing conception. Thinking of an object-orientated constructive 3D model does not only mean to represent it, but to conceive it, by generating it within an existing although virtual space. This encourages one to focus not only on the formal and compositive side, but also on the technical and technological side of the future building, whose constructive components are brought in, arranged and above all connected within the virtual building, as will happen in the practice of building, according to the building rules.
keywords Virtual Architecture, 3D Model, Object Oriented, Project Thinking
series eCAADe
email paolo.fiamma@ing.unipi.it
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ecaade03_029_203_kieferle
id ecaade03_029_203_kieferle
authors Kieferle, Joachim and Wössner, Uwe
year 2003
title Combining Realities - Designing with Augmented and Virtual Reality
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 29-32
summary Augmented Reality (AR), the layering of reality and virtuality, can be used as a tool in architecture in model scale as well as in 1:1 scale on site. By combining real architecture models with virtual representations like e.g. wind simulation an intensive understanding for impacts can be observed. Coupling AR with further virtual environments (AR and Virtual Reality) in one scenario makes AR a tangible interface for VR and on the other hand supports the group discussion of distributed teams.
keywords Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, Visualization, Interaction, Simulation
series eCAADe
email kieferle@architektur.fh-wiesbaden.de
more http://www.architektur.fh-wiesbaden.de
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ijac20031105
id ijac20031105
authors Kieferle, Joachim B.; Herzberger, Erwin
year 2003
title The "Digital year for Architects" - Experiences with an Integrated Teaching Concept
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary The "digital year for architects" is an integrated course for graduate architecture students that has been running since 1997, at Stuttgart University. Its concept is to link together traditional design teaching and working with computers. Three seminar classes and one design project form the framework of the course. In it the students are taught the design of, for example, image and space composition, typography, video, and using virtual reality. Additionally we cover theoretical basics for the final design project, such as information management or working environments. The course takes in approximately a dozen software packages and ends with a visionary design project. The products have shown the advantage of an integrated course compared to separate courses. The course proves to be more intensive in dealing with the project as well as achieving better skills when learning the associated new digital media. An important feature is that because the project topics are different from conventional architectural schemes, and tend to be more abstract, a key effect is to widen the students' way of thinking about designing.
series journal
email kieferle@architektur.fh-wiesbaden.de
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ecaade03_037_79_lang
id ecaade03_037_79_lang
authors Lang, Silke and Hovestadt, Ludger
year 2003
title An architectural framework within a spatially immersive real-time environment for advanced communication and collaboration
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 37-43
summary In this paper we present a framework for use in the blue-c, a collaborative telepresence environment. We implemented the framework on top of the blue-c API to enable new ways of designing digital 3D spaces in an immersive way. The framework will be used to support designers in creating spatial scenarios within CAVETM – like environments. It concentrates on the integration aspect of different media and data types. Architectural knowledge and information technology is combined to introduce a new approach for designing virtual environments.
keywords Virtual Reality; Tele-Immersion; Collaborative Environment; 3D Video;Human-Computer Interaction
series eCAADe
email hovestadt@arch.ethz.ch
more http://www.caad.arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2004/01/21 17:23

_id acadia03_064
id acadia03_064
authors Malnar, Joy Monice (et al.)
year 2003
title Make No Little Plans: Designing the Chicago Lakefront in a Virtual Reality Environment
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 436
summary Architects have always needed somewhere to draw. History has seen dirt, stone, wood, and paper each serve in turn as the architect’s medium. Every technological advance has helped to manifest these exploratory visions in ever-increasing fidelity, while influencing the way in which the design process is conducted. Computer technology is the latest step in this progression, adding a third dimension to the architect’s drawings. Programs like form•Z, 3DS max, etc. allow the architect to build lifelike models and take clients on fly-throughs. Now, virtual reality has advanced architectural drawing to “full body design”, letting architects experience their creations, rather than just seeing those creations in front of them. ShadowLight-Mirage offers a unique environment in virtual reality in which to create rich ambiances of vibrancy, vitality and vigor.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id cf2003_m_110
id cf2003_m_110
authors OXMAN, Rivka
year 2003
title Designing the Virtual Design University
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 291-300
summary Universities are currently providing learning opportunities to students and teachers exploiting information and communication technologies to deliver their programs and provide tuition support. However, since architectural design education is unique, general models of e-learning are not applicable. Regarding a potential virtual design university there is therefore a particular need for a theoretical pedagogical framework. The objective of this paper is to present a theoretical basis for the design and implementation of a unique e-learning environment suitable for design learning and design teaching in the architectural and engineering domains. The ideas and the concepts are currently being implemented in the WINDS project. Three theoretical and methodological aspects that provide unique consideration for the construction of a virtual learning environment for design are presented and discussed: 1) A unique structure of design knowledge as required in virtual education; 2) A requisite pedagogic framework for virtual design education; and 3) A particular technology designed and implemented to support these aspects in WINDS.
keywords design pedagogy, e-learning, virtual university
series CAAD Futures
email arrro01@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id b1f3
id b1f3
authors Rafi A, Karboulonis P, Fazidin J, Badrolhisham H
year 2003
title Virtual environments in architecture and planning design: 4 possible approaches
source International Journal of Design Computing
summary Advancements in information retrieval (IR), local and wide area networks (LAN, WAN) and the Internet, human-computer interaction (HCI), and virtual reality (VR) technologies have enabled the emergence and availability of affordable real-time computer data visualisation and manipulation systems that can be deployed and interfaced to most Computer Aided Design (CAD) software systems. However, the rapid advancement and adoption of information visualisation in different areas is currently challenging VR system designers to formulate and deploy strategies and tools to effectively visualise, navigate and effectively communicate various types of information within a virtual environment (VE). A further problem relates to the fact that even within a single area or application the requirements are still diverse to the extent that different approaches and technologies still need to be employed before a satisfactory solution is reached.

This paper presents four possible approaches in identifying and designing effective VR systems for architecture and planning design to allow the user to effectively communicate and share their experiences and ideas in a collaborative manner. It is also proposed that VEs should look beyond plain representations and reproductions of the real world environments that they portray and bear higher interpretation and expression values. The value of eliciting structuring and interfacing information and knowledge to a VE is also highlighted, as is the need for efficient database systems and CAD systems capable of exchanging information and data with VEs. Current efforts in prolonging the lifetime of VEs are being examined through four case studies that highlight the ever-escalating requirements that currently face VR researchers.

keywords Virtual Reality, Virtual Environment, Collaborative Design
series journal paper
type normal paper
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
more http://wwwfaculty.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/ijdc/vol05/papers/rafiFrameset.htm
last changed 2006/09/29 01:05

_id sigradi2003_013
id sigradi2003_013
authors Russel, Peter
year 2003
title Understanding Virtual
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary Since the introduction of terms like "cyberspace" and "virtual reality", the term "Virtual" has been attached to a range of projects including using computers to draw buildings, distributed studio projects and heavily technologically dependent interfaces for "sensing" digitally modeled environments. The only common aspect of these "virtual" projects is their use of computers. As a way to re-infuse meaning to the term Virtual, the paper describes a theoretical basis for understanding the meaning of being virtual (as opposed to being "Real, Actual" or "Possible") with special attention to the manipulation of ideas as is the case in designing architecture.
keywords Virtual Reality; Design Theory; Virtual Systems
series SIGRADI
email russell@caad.arch.rwth-aachen.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id cf2003_m_051
id cf2003_m_051
authors ZAMENOPOULOS, Theodore and ALEXIOU, Katerina
year 2003
title Computer-Aided Creativity and Learning in Distributed Cooperative Human-Machine Networks
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 191-202
summary In this paper we discuss designing abilities, such as creativity and learning, as abilities that emerge though interaction in cooperative human-machine networks. We concentrate in a design system that can exhibit and support creative behaviour using knowledge learnt through distributed human-machine interaction. In this context, conflict resolution and coordination is a main issue, as well as a main indicator for the creative and adaptive ability of the design system. More specifically, we are going to present a model of coordination developed using learning control and multi-agent systems methodologies and techniques. A prototype system is tested in a virtual collaborative design assignment for simple location and three-dimensional configuration problems.
keywords collaboration, creativity, e-learning, human-machine networks
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

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