CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 595

_id acadia03_030
id acadia03_030
authors Sirbu, Daniela
year 2003
title Digital Exploration of Unbuilt Architecture: A Non-Photorealistic Approach
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 235-245
summary This paper presents a new approach to the digital investigation of unbuilt architecture. A navigable world, emulating the architect’s graphic style, is built as a 3D non-photorealistic reconstruction of the unbuilt project. A cinematic journey through this world intermediates the exploration of the architect’s possible mental visualizations during the creative stages. The goals of the proposed approach are: to open new avenues for investigating the conception of architecture, to help architectural students visualize and experience important unbuilt projects that have shaped the practice of architecture, and to popularize lesser-known architects to the general public. The approach stems from the idea that architectural drawings are the artifacts reflecting most accurately the architect’s creative and thinking processes. Anchored in the concept of multi-dimensional space developed by the author, the proposed method uses the original drawing of the artist as the main artifact on which the reconstruction process is based. The present paper concentrates on those aspects related to extracting information from the architect’s drawing and embedding historic knowledge in the 3D reconstruction of the unbuilt project. It calls to attention the idea that technological progress creates tools that the Architect uses to operate with the fundamental concepts of place, space, and time.
series ACADIA
email daniela.sirbu@uleth.ca
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id c5c5
id c5c5
authors Calderon, C., Cavazza M. and Diaz, D.
year 2003
title A NEW APPROACH TO VIRTUAL DESIGN FOR SPATIAL CONFIGURATION PROBLEMS,
source 7th IEEE International Information Visualisation Conference, London, UK, 16-17 July 2003. http://www.graphicslink.demon.co.uk/IV03/
summary In this paper, we present a new framework for the use of Virtual Reality (VR) in engineering design for configuration applications. Traditional VR systems support the visual exploration of a design solution but do not assist the user in exploring alternative solutions based on domain knowledge. Extending previous work in the area of Intelligent Virtual Environment, we propose an intelligent configuration system based on constraint logic programming (CLP), integrated in a real-time 3D graphic environment. This type of integration facilitates the expression of design knowledge in the VE and enables the user to interactively solve and/or refine a spatial configuration problem. In the system described in this paper, the user can visually explore configurations, but his interaction with objects of the configuration problem triggers new cycles of constraint propagation from the modified configuration to produce a new compatible solution.
keywords Virtual Reality, Virtual Design
series other
type normal paper
email carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/12/02 10:31

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id ecaade03_427_177_gibson
id ecaade03_427_177_gibson
authors Gibson, Kathleen
year 2003
title Spatial Mapping: Connections between Virtual and Physical Navigation
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 427-432
summary Using Lynch’s (1960) treatise The Image of the City as a model, user navigation of e-retailing web sites was analyzed using defined categories: paths, districts, edges, nodes, and landmarks. Results from this study suggest that elements in the urban landscape and their use by individuals for way finding and legibility may be similar to those necessary for navigating the World Wide Web.
keywords Spatial mapping; way finding; e-retailing; built environment; world wideweb
series eCAADe
email kjg4@cornell.edu
more http://www.humec.cornell.edu/faculty/facultybio.cfm?netid=kjg4&facs=1
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id acadia03_032
id acadia03_032
authors Senagala, Mahesh
year 2003
title Digital Theory
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 254
summary The computer has gone from being an isolated box to become part of a gigantic digital network of networks that shapes our collective future. The way and pace at which we connect, communicate, memorize, imagine and control the flows of valuable information have changed forever. There are at least six digital phenomena that directly affect the architectural world: miniaturization (of all that can be shrunk), ubiquity (being everywhere, global), realtime (communing globally in realtime, which is 1/10th of a second), noospherization (networking every-thing), virtuality (all that is solid melts into knowledge), and anamnesia (inability to forget). Temporal contiguity and temporal connectivity have taken precedence over spatial and geographical contiguity. The strands that animate our life today emanate from spatially distant but temporally contiguous/connected places. These phenomena have squeezed, stretched, restructured, reconfigured, and redistributed most major human institutions. Consequently, the built world’s role, importance and nature have changed. Architecture as traditionally understood has become more marginalized than before. Many practices, however, have been repositioning themselves to take advantage of the new opportunities beyond the bounds of traditional architectural practice. Design, practice, fabrication and construction are increasingly becoming networked affairs. The new measures of architecture are connectivity and speed. The architecture of a new world needs to recognize these transformations and think differently.
series ACADIA
email mahesh@mahesh.org
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ecaade03_365_75_senyapili
id ecaade03_365_75_senyapili
authors Senyapili, Burcu
year 2003
title The Visual Matrix: The case of Mimar Sinan Project Site
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 365-368
summary This paper introduces a web-based ‘visual reference system’ model for architectural education and research. The system utilizes visualization to aid in spatial comprehension and comparative analysis of abstract architectural concepts. The system establishes a resource for architectural heritage and differs from such other sources by its matrix-based visualization format.
keywords visual reference system: architectural education; multimedia resources; elearning
series eCAADe
email burcu@bilkent.edu.tr
more http://www.art.bilkent.edu.tr/iaed
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id 3cc0
authors Zimmermann, Christopher
year 2003
title Travelpost: Media Access via Geographic and Temporal Information
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary The versatility with which digital media such as images, sounds, and video clips can be presented, combined with the ease of sharing and accessing digital media through the internet, creates opportunities for displaying media in new and useful ways. Associating meta-data (additional information about the media) with digital media extends these opportunities by enabling the media to organize itself. For example, a collection of media items that “knows” where and when they were recorded can position themselves on a map and a timeline. With these visual tools a person can better understand the location and time of a specific media item, as well as its spatial and temporal relationship to the other items. This paper presents an internet application that implements these ideas. Travelpost (http://www.dandelion.org/travelpost), is a system for browsing media recorded during a persons travels. A map, a timeline, and a regular web browser window offer three interrelated browsers to the user. This allows the user to investigate the entire data-set, in this case a travelers journey, from a geographic, temporal, or media specific view.
series other
email topherz@dandelion.org
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id f8f7
id f8f7
authors Bhzad Sidawi
year 2003
title The pattern of Internet use for information management by architectural practices in the UK
source Cardiff University, Welsh School of Architecture Cardiff, UK
summary In recent history, architects have experienced problems related to the use and management of new innovations. The Internet presents one such challenge. It offers considerable expansion in types of communication and sources of business information and connects people and businesses around the globe. As is argued in this research, these services could play a positive role in architectural practice. This research examines the use of the Internet by architectural practices in UK in order to reveal how aware they are of the opportunities it presents, the extent to which they are taking advantage of them, and the problems they are experiencing. A field study was conducted of two types of practices: RIBA private practices and local authority practices. A number of research tools were used to inspect how these practices are using the Internet to manage various types of information that used and produced in the practice, namely: the acquisition of web information, the exchange of the practice’s information through the web and the presentation of the practice’s information on the web. Explanations for the results were sought by correlating variables from the questionnaire study, using simple statistical tests. The field study shows that many Internet services are unpopular among architects, and that practices have problems in adopting and using the technology. The pace at which the Internet is being absorbed and accepted by practices is slow. The study suggests that possible causes are: the little knowledge of users’ about IT, the poor resources of the practice, and old or imperfect Internet installations and the absence of the Internet support to the architect’s activities. The research argues that there are a number of links between these negative factors which make the practice unable to utilize the Internet and to manage the practice’s information through the Internet. To break these links, the research suggests that practices should adopt a specific management strategy to promote more utilization of Internet services in the office and to manage information. Practices need to make certain changes to the way they manage the Internet and work with it, if they plan to integrate the Internet more successfully into their practice. The research discusses techniques for improving practice management which would help practices to digest Internet technology and to use it more effectively in the practice.
keywords Internet, Architectural practices, Information management, Communications
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email sidawib@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/11/03 22:29

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id c5d7
authors Kuffer, Monika
year 2003
title Monitoring the Dynamics of Informal Settlements in Dar Es Salaam by Remote Sensing: Exploring the Use of Spot, Ers and Small Format Aerial Photography
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary Dar es Salaam is exemplary for cities in the developing world facing an enormous population growth. In the last decades, unplanned settlements have tremendously expanded, causing that around 70 percent of the urban dwellers are living now-a-days in these areas. Tools for monitoring such tremendous growth are relatively weak in developing countries, thus an effective satellite based monitoring system can provide a useful instrument for monitoring the dynamics of urban development. An investigation to asses the ability of extracting reliable information on the expansion and consolidation levels (density) of urban development of the city of Dar es Salaam from SPOT-HRV and ERS-SAR images is described. The use of SPOT and ERS should provide data that is complementary to data derived from the most recent aerial photography and from digital topographic maps. In a series of experiments various classification and fusion techniques are applied to the SPOT-HRV and ERS-SAR data to extract information on building density that is comparable to that obtained from the 1992 data. Ultimately, building density is estimated by linear and non-linear regression models on the basis of an one ha kernel and further aggregation is made to the level of informal settlements for a final analysis. In order to assess the reliability, use is made of several sample areas that are relatively stable over the study period, as well as, of data derived from small format aerial photography. The experiments show a high correlation between the density data derived from the satellite images and the test areas.
series other
email monika.kuffer@oeaw.ac.at
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id sigradi2003_020
id sigradi2003_020
authors Abarca, R., Díaz, S. and Moreno, S.
year 2003
title Desarrollo de material informatico-educativo para la enseñanza de la geometría a estudiantes de diseño (Development of IT-based educational material for the teaching of geometry to students of design)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary This paper is born as an answer to the meaningful learning difficulties and academic performance in Spatial and Flat Geometry course on second year Design School at Universidad de las Americas University, Santiago de Chile. The problem is faced from the potentiality that digital environment gives us in representation, display options, shape and projection testing, analysis and non visual accounts to teach flat and spatial geometry within the receptors' codes and coherent with designer's own language.
series SIGRADI
email rabarca@terra.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id avocaad_2003_09
id avocaad_2003_09
authors Alexander Asanowicz
year 2003
title Form Follows Media - Experiences of Bialystok School of Architectural Composition
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary This paper considers transition from physical modelling to digital methods of the creation of architectural forms. Every type of creation has constructed the proper means of expression and its own methodology. The main thesis of this paper is that a specific character of the composition activity of an architect is determined by the modelling methods. As the research on architectural modelling, the two methods of creating spatial architectural forms (cardboard model and computer model) have been compared. Research has been done on the basis of the same exercise for both media. The process of creation proceeded in the same way, too. As the start point students have found the inspiration. Each student presented photos of existing architectural objects and a text, which explained the reasons of the choice. Next steps were sketches of the idea and realisation of the model. The achieved results of creative activity fully confirm the thesis of the research.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id diss_anders
id diss_anders
authors Anders, P.
year 2003
title A Procedural Model for Integrating Physical and Cyberspaces in Architecture
source Doctoral dissertation, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, U.K
summary This dissertation articulates opportunities offered by architectural computation, in particular the digital simulation of space known as virtual reality (VR) and its networked, social variant cyberspace. Research suggests that environments that hybridize technologies call for a conception of space as information, i.e. space is both a product of and tool for cognition. The thesis proposes a model whereby architecture can employ this concept of space in creating hybrids that integrate physical and cyberspaces.The dissertation presents important developments in architectural computation that disclose concepts and values that contrast with orthodox practice. Virtual reality and cyberspace, the foci of this inquiry, are seen to embody the more problematic aspects of these developments. They also raise a question of redundancy: If a simulation is good enough, do we still need to build? This question, raised early in the 1990's, is explored through a thought experiment - the Library Paradox - which is assessed and critiqued for its idealistic premises. Still, as technology matures and simulations become more realistic the challenge posed by VR/cyberspace to architecture only becomes more pressing. If the case for virtual idealism seems only to be strengthened by technological and cultural trends, it would seem that a virtual architecture should have been well established in the decade since its introduction.Yet a history of the virtual idealist argument discloses the many difficulties faced by virtual architects. These include differences between idealist and professional practitioners, the failure of technology to achieve its proponents' claims, and confusion over the meaning of virtual architecture among both architects and clients. However, the dissertation also cites the success of virtual architecture in other fields - Human Computer Interface design, digital games, and Computer Supported Collaborative Work - and notes that their adoption of space derives from practice within each discipline. It then proposes that the matter of VR/cyberspace be addressed from within the practice of architecture, a strategy meant to balance the theoretical/academic inclination of previous efforts in this field.The dissertation pursues an assessment that reveals latent, accepted virtualities in design methodologies, instrumentation, and the notations of architectural practices. Of special importance is a spatial database that now pervades the design and construction processes. The unity of this database, effectively a project's cyberspace, and its material counterpart is the subject of the remainder of the dissertation. Such compositions of physical and cyberspaces are herein called cybrids. The dissertation examines current technologies that cybridize architecture and information technology, and proposes their integration within cybrid wholes. The concept of cybrids is articulated in seven principles that are applied in a case study for the design for the Planetary Collegium. The project is presented and critiqued on the basis of these seven principles. The dissertation concludes with a discussion of possible effects of cybrids upon architecture and contemporary culture.
series thesis:PhD
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2005/09/09 10:58

_id acadia03_022
id acadia03_022
authors Anders, Peter
year 2003
title Towards Comprehensive Space: A context for the programming/design of cybrids
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 161-171
summary Cybrids have been presented as mixed realities: spatial, architectural compositions comprised of physical and cyberspaces (Anders 1997). In order to create a rigorous approach to the design of architectural cybrids, this paper offers a model for programming their spaces. Other than accepting cyberspaces as part of architecture’s domain, this approach is not radical. Indeed, many parts of program development resemble those of conventional practice. However, the proposition that cyberspaces should be integrated with material structures requires that their relationship be developed from the outset of a project. Hence, this paper provides a method for their integration from the project’s earliest stages, the establishment of its program. This study for an actual project, the Planetary Collegium, describes a distributed campus comprising buildings and cyberspaces in various locales across the globe. The programming for these cybrids merges them within a comprehensive space consisting not only of the physical and cyberspaces, but also in the cognitive spaces of its designers and users.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/27 14:21

_id 745f
id 745f
authors Bauni Hamid; Devin Defriza
year 2003
title A Preliminary Model of Community-based Integrated Information System for Urban Spatial Development
source Proceeding of the 3rd China Urban Housing Conference, July 3-5 2003, Center for Housing Innovations, Chinese University of Hong Kong, ISBN 962-8272-26-8, pp. 417-424
summary This paper describes a research on building Integrated Information System for Urban Spatial Development. The objective of the research phase discussed in this paper is to define a prototype of information system that basically facilitates information communication among involved participants in an urban spatial development planning. The system is designed by putting stress on local community. Their spatial perception and the availability of GIS technology in local context become constraints in building the system. Internet becomes the main alternative for information dissemination for this phase. This is also supported by the use of web-based GIS as framework of information system. Through few socialization sessions, the proposed model has indicated a prospected alternative to be seamless communication media among participants. To support an easy-access for local people in using this information system a mechanism of information access has been proposed in the form of local information center.
keywords information system, digital model, urban development, community, participation
series other
type paper session
email bauni@berkeley.edu
last changed 2007/02/04 05:15

_id c35c
authors Bender, Oliver
year 2003
title The Geographical Alpine Information System “Galpis” in the Raumalp Project. Outlay and Output
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary RAUMALP, an interdisciplinary research project of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, shall examine problem areas of spatial development on community level in the Austrian alpine region. The aim is the investigation of scientific basics for political decision finding, especially for the regional-specific realisation of the Alpine Convention. All ascertained information shall be included in “GALPIS”, a comprehensive Alpine Space Information System. GALPIS based on ESRI ArcGIS and MS Access software works with data from different sources, like ISIS, the electronic data base of Statistic Austria, and original data and maps gathered and elaborated by the working groups of RAUMALP. This also includes ecological raster data. Dealing with administrative units, „real“ space and raster space, RAUMALP will integrate the different space levels mostly to administrative spatial units representing the existing 1145 communities of the RAUMALP study area. This will be realised by overlay of grids, types of land use and communitypolygons. Major task of GALPIS is a conversion of former communal data (p. e. 1451 communities in 1951) that should represent the recent administrative boundaries. By this way it is possible to make thematic and time-integrative analyses of community data. GIS modelling of the six case studies is more complex. The conceptual model has to integrate several vector and raster layers such as land plots (“Digitale Katastralmappe”), types of land use (“Land Use and Land Cover Austria” by M. Seger) and biodiversity. P. e., the working group settlement is using a logical data model based on the entity “building” with the attributes “construction”,“function”, etc.
series other
email oliver.bender@oeaw.ac.at
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id acadia07_174
id acadia07_174
authors Bontemps, Arnaud; Potvin, André; Demers, Claude
year 2007
title The Dynamics of Physical Ambiences
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 174-181
summary This research proposes to support the reading of physical ambiences by the development of a representational technique which compiles, in a numerical interface, two types of data: sensory and filmic. These data are recorded through the use of a portable array equipped with sensors (Potvin 1997, 2002, 2004) as well as the acquisition of Video information of the moving environment. The compilation of information is carried out through a multi-media approach, by means of a program converting the environmental data into dynamic diagrams, as well as the creation of an interactive interface allowing a possible diffusion on the Web. This technique, named APMAP/Video, makes it possible to read out simultaneously spatial and environmental diversity. It is demonstrated through surveys taken at various seasons and time of the day at the new Caisse de dépôt et de placement headquarters in Montreal which is also the corpus for a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) research grant on Environmental Adaptability in Architecture (Potvin et al. 2003-2007). This case study shows that the technique can prove of great relevance for POEs (Post Occupancy Evaluation) as well as for assistance in a new design project.
series ACADIA
email arnaudbontemps@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id eaea2003_11-bremer-sander
id eaea2003_11-bremer-sander
authors Bremer, S. and Sander, H.
year 2004
title View from the Road: Environmental Simulation for the Fractal City of Rhine Ruhr
source Spatial Simulation and Evaluation - New Tools in Architectural and Urban Design [Proceedings of the 6th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 80-227-2088-7], pp. 43-47
summary Highway seems to be more an issue of traffic planning than of urban design. But the highway can be a very important factor for the modern city pattern. Highways shape the spatial form of the fractal city. The modern highway can define new cores outside and “interior edges” within the city. Seen as a planning tool, highways are the great neglected opportunity in city and regional design. The 1st Architecture Biennial, 1ab, taking place from May 2003 to July 2003 in Rotterdam, explores the creative potentials of modern highways worldwide. An international research team discovered the spatial functions of highways in modern agglomerations. This lecture will give an overview of the results of the worldwide analyses and the design projects that had been undertaken. Both authors are members of the German research team. The German team examined the A 42 running through the Ruhrgebiet, a former coal and steal area in western Germany. The Ruhr Area is converting from an industrially orientated region to an agglomeration of high technology and science. But the regional image remains the same due to the fact that the changes cannot be seen, neither physically, nor from the road. Here, the highway could be used as a catalyst supporting and structuring the spatial changes to make them more legible for the people of Rhine-Ruhr. The nature becomes the most important tool of highway design. Landscape forms a linkage between the different cities of the region. Together with the A 40 and other local highways the region becomes the most important (and largest) public space of the new Rhine-Ruhr. The highway seen as a work of urban art can be designed only from the perspective of the driving car.
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id fd5c
id fd5c
authors Derix C and Simon C
year 2003
title Morphogenetic CA: 69’ 40’ 33 north
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2003
summary We would like to present some recent work using cellular automata and agent modelling for the generative design of building configurations. The cellular automata is based on a 3d terrain model of a site (taken from the recent Europan competition) which is encoded with both topological and economic data, and agents that are light sensitive and which reconfigure the developing architecture by checking overshadowing and spatial occupation. The emergent pattern of development therefore results from an understanding of the programmatic and the spatial parameters of the task, and is intimately related to the site and its peculiarities.
keywords urban planning, cellular automata, agent modelling, solar performance, hierarchical massing
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 19:37

_id c53f
authors Dorau, U., Sanopoulos, A. and Schrenk, M.
year 2003
title Erfahrungen und Erfolge bei der Umsetzung von RAPIS - Raum- und Projektinformationssystem für die Vienna Region [Experience and Results with the RAPS-System for the Viennese Region]
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary In shortest terms: RAPIS is a metadatabase on spatial information in the “Vienna Region”. More interesting then this simple fact is the way how theproject was implemented and what the effects on regional development are.RAPIS is the acronym for “Regional Planning and Project Information System for the Vienna Region” and was implemented as the Austrian part of the Interreg IIc Project IM-PLAN (Implementation of models for co-operative planning in metropolitan regions). The aim was to create aninformation platform for planning relevant information for the whole region, integrating existing data sources from federal and state administrationas well as private companies. RAPIS enables an overview of the available spatial datasets in the "Vienna Region " and focuses on the following questions: Which datasets relevant for planning and development are available within the region? Who can use these datasets under which conditions? Which plans and projects do exist for the region? In addition also metainformation on the most important international data sources was collected as well as information to projects and plans with regional and trans-regional impacts. During the implementation great importance was given to communication and sensitisation for the importance the topic: geo-informationinfrastructre as a key ressource for spatial development and regional co-operation. It showed up that Austria and the "Vienna Region" have a very good initial position and excellent databases on national, state, local and international level. However, it seems that almost everything exists already but hardly anybody knows about it ... – potential users do not know what data and information already exists and how to get and use it. Intensive communication, information and permanent discussion of the topic „(Geo-) Information“ within the „planners community“ carried the topic into the public and strengthened the consciousness for the importance of information-infrastructure for regional co-operation.
series other
email dorau@multimediaplan.at
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

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