CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 431

_id cf2003_m_006
id cf2003_m_006
authors ACHTEN, Henri and JESSURUN, Joran
year 2003
title Learning From Mah Jong - Towards a Multi-Agent System that can Recognize Graphic Units
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 115-124
summary Sketching is a major means of exploiting the first conceptual developments in architectural design. If we want to support the architect in the ideas-developing phase of design, then we need to understand the conventions of depiction and encoding in drawings. The theory of graphic units provides an extended list of such conventions that are widely used. We propose that a multi-agent system for recognition of graphic units in drawings is fruitful: agents can specialize in graphic units, a multi-agent system can deal with ambiguity through negotiation and conflict resolution, and multi-agent systems function in dynamically changing environments. We first make a multi-agent system that can do something simpler: playing Mah Jong solitary. The Mah Jong solitary system shares the following important features with a multi-agent system that can recognize graphic units: (1) specialized agents for moves; (2) negotiation between agents to establish the best move; (3) dynamically changing environment; and (4) search activity in more advanced strategies. The paper presents the theoretical basis of graphic units and multi-agents systems. The multi-agent framework and its implementation is presented. Various levels of game play are distinguished, and these are correlated to the multi-agent system. The paper shows how the findings form the basis for graphic unit recognition.
keywords artificial intelligence, games, graphic units, agents
series CAAD Futures
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/22 15:39

_id ascaad2007_036
id ascaad2007_036
authors Pratini, E.F.
year 2007
title Experimental Tools for the Teaching of Technical Graphics and Improving Visualization
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 457-468
summary This paper presents an updated evaluation of an experience of applying computer graphics, virtual reality and Internet resources in the teaching of technical graphics at the University of Brasilia, Brazil. It differs from a previous paper (Pratini, 2004) for the addition of an overview of the course, the context and the new teaching methodology. It is an extended, more detailed paper, which includes examples, and closes with some results of surveys on the didactic material and the methodology. Our motivation for this experiment is the fact that most of the students have a lack of previous knowledge on the basis of drawings, resulting difficulties in both understanding and visualizing technical drawings. In this experiment, we introduced VRML 3D modeling in addition to CAD and regular pencil-and-paper drawings study and practice. To support the learning of this broad knowledge not present in the technical graphics bibliography, we first provided a website with animations and virtual reality resources. Since 2003 we are providing a CD-ROM containing all the former website material which is updated each semester. At the present time, the CD-ROM contains almost all the needed didactic material and software for the one semester technical graphics course. This experience was intended to improve and to support learning in a way that motivates the students, young people who are used to play video and computer games. Classes, website and CD-ROM material were conceived to take advantage of computers´ interactivity and animated resources. The use of computers´ technology and new media to support the learning resulted a new methodology and several new unanswered questions.
series ASCAAD
email pratini@unb.br
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id acadia03_019
id acadia03_019
authors Wu, Pei-Ling
year 2003
title Exploring Playful and Effective Digital Design Process with Games: A Framework for Digital Design Studio Teaching and Learning
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 143-149
summary The idea of developing a framework, to integrate design studios and computer graphics, is derived from the nature of architectural design, which has always combined creativity and technology. Furthermore, as computers are being increasingly used in design studios, a systematic digital pedagogy, which can take advantage of the strengths of computers in all stages of design, should be developed simultaneously to facilitate learning. This paper attempts to propose a playful and effective digital design process that can be flexibly applied to computer-based design studios and design-based computer graphics courses. The pedagogical framework is based on a set of digital design games that follows a general design process presented by the author. First, the components of digital design games will be defined and the relations of those game components will be clearly depicted. Then, a framework will be proposed, followed by the use of an example demonstrating applications of the framework. Continual advancements in digital technology have created generation gaps among teachers at architectural schools. A structured digital design process can help teachers, with varying levels of computer-capabilities know what, when, and how, adjustments should be made to achieve the goal of digital design education.
keywords Digital design process, Playful and Effective, Digital Design Games
series ACADIA
email pvwu@pchome.com.tw
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id acadia03_063
id acadia03_063
authors Wai, Lindsay and Daubmann, Karl
year 2003
title Variations + Versioning
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 435
summary A major holdover from the previous culture of making is that of repetition and modularity. It is true that it is always cheaper and faster to make the same part, component, or building over and over again but then again cheaper is not necessarily better.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ijac20031201
id ijac20031201
authors Camarata, Ken; Gross, Mark D.; Yi-Luen Do, Ellen
year 2003
title A Physical Computing Studio: Exploring Computational Artifacts and Environments
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 2
summary This paper describes a studio that explores interfaces for computationally enhanced artifacts and environments. The studio is designed as a traditional architectural design studio, fostering creative thinking and encouraging hands-on learning. It brings students from art, music, architecture, computer science, and engineering together into teams to design and build physical computing projects.The team's unusual mix of knowledge and experience allows for creative solutions. As a result, the studio has become a test bed for new and interesting ideas.
series journal
email mdgross@u.washington.edu
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id cf2003_m_098
id cf2003_m_098
authors CHAMPION, E., DAVE, B. and BISHOP, I.
year 2003
title Interaction, Agency and Artefacts
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 249-258
summary This paper argues (i) that understanding of a place (especially in heritage environments) requires a level of cultural engagement and (ii) that virtual environments, in their typical current form, fail to provide such engagement. A proposed solution to the issue of cultural presence is to apply the interactive mechanisms commonly used in computer games (social agents, levels of interaction constraint, and task-based manipulation of artefacts) to virtual heritage environments. The hypothesis is that the resulting environment will allow for greater engagement and a more culturally immersive learning environment. Virtual environments also often lack techniques for evaluating the extent to which their design goals are achieved. A proposed secondary outcome is that designers and researchers of virtual environment can also use the above interactive mechanisms for the evaluation of user engagement without simultaneously interrupting the user’s feeling of engagement.
keywords engagement, evaluation, games, HCI, virtual heritage, virtual world
series CAAD Futures
email b.dave@unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id caadria2003_c1-3
id caadria2003_c1-3
authors Cheng, N. Y. and Lane-Cummings, S.
year 2003
title Using Mobile Digital Tools for Learning about Places
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 145-156
summary To explore how mobile digital tools can bring students out from isolated classrooms, we tested several for use in design studio site visits. We focused on small, off-the-shelf tools that are inexpensive and easy to upgrade. In this paper we identify the logistical, efficiency, and learning considerations for the selection and introduction of mobile digital tools , with observations about device usability and administration that are applicable to other kinds of technology introduction. We found that adoption of a tool depends on several factors, including ease of use and inconspicuous nature. Compared to traditional tools, most of these tools require a great deal of set-up time before students can use them efficiently. In addition, they require docking with a computer to analyze the information collected in the field. As a result, most of the learning takes place in the studio, rather than in the field. Our eventual goal is to clarify the potentials of place-recording tools, making it easier to gather and use a toolkit for specific situations.
series CAADRIA
email nywc@uoregon.edu, clc@uoregon.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id ecaade03_195_52_delic
id ecaade03_195_52_delic
authors Delic, Alenka and Kincl, Branko
year 2003
title Architecture of the virtual in housing
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 195-198
summary Information and communication technologies (ICT) have brought about a revolution in architecture and urban planning; they are transforming learning and practice and presenting new challenges in our understanding of space, place and society. An entirely new world of architectural expression and experiment is opening up to us. At Faculty of Architecture in Zagreb a new optional course, Virtuality in Housing Architecture, has been proposed and is being taught for the first time. Subjects cover a wide area of use of ICT in housing architecture: research into the role of the computer in architecture as a creative discipline; encouragement of new challenges to the concept of the role of digital media in housing architecture through research of digital concepts such as computerization, information, electronic media, virtuality and cyberspace; themes related to development of intelligent environment and spaces, interactive buildings, virtual reality and cyberspace as directions of development. In our work we try to implement the method of e-learning, teamwork, communication and design through the Internet. Through experimental projects and research of new housing concepts, students create a basis for discussions on theoretical and practical solutions for the housing of the future, create new ways of presentation and open new fields of research. We shall here present the experience from our work.
keywords ICT, housing, virtuality, teamwork, e-learning
series eCAADe
email ad@grad.hr
more http://kdvlab6.arhitekt.hr
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ecaade03_161_192_grunau
id ecaade03_161_192_grunau
authors Grunau, Jens-Peter
year 2003
title A different approach to planning and design - Combining a planning theory in architectual design with elearning.
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 161-164
summary We have developed a rather uncommon way of understanding and teaching architectual design and the use of computers in this process: Our idea consists in defining the design process not only as finding a nice shape for an object like a building or a new car. We see designing and planning as the ""art"" of solving complex problems. This implies, that the design process is not the mere use of methods or tools to solve a given problem, but the process of understanding the roots of the problem and finding a suitable and often alternative and unusual solution. The way we teach this process is enhanced by the use of computers and webbased applications. In this paper we will describe the key elements of the planning and design theory used as well as the methods for teaching these ideas to graduate students. Lastly, we point out the experience that came from the practical implementation.
keywords Approach to Planning and Design, e-learning, course-design, educational design, computer supported collaborative work
series eCAADe
email grunau@igp.uni-stuttgart.de
more http://www.igp.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ijac20031108
id ijac20031108
authors Hirschberg, Urs
year 2003
title Transparency In Information Architecture: Enabling Large Scale Creative Collaboration in Architectural Education over the Internet
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary This paper is about networked collaboration in architectural education and about information architecture for networked collaborations. It presents results of a quantitative process analysis of two types of courses in Computer Aided Architectural Design that were taught using database-driven online environments. The main focus of the quantitative analysis is the performance of these online environments as information structures, designed to accommodate the presentation and the peer-to-peer exchange of design information for relatively large groups of between 60 and 150 participants. Using the database records to reconstruct the processes, three different quantitative analyses are described.Their results indicate that for these projects the web-environments were successful in enhancing peer-to-peer learning and that they promoted a more objective assessment of the submitted works. The study also looks at the effect that the environments themselves had on the process. Finally it draws some conclusions about these environments' information architecture: it presents tentative guidelines about how such environments must be designed to handle the dynamic display of design data, from many different authors, in a way that is transparent to the users.
series journal
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2003_c5-3
id caadria2003_c5-3
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title Collaborative Design Simulation Game
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 745-758
summary Collaboration is an is an important aspect of the architect's education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills, because it can only be revealed when the number of participants exceed a certain threshold, and when actions made by others affect the individual's design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player games provides an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstraction helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to 'work,' encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating design collaboration. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other-in adversarial or collaborative manner-to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what is collaboration, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build 'houses' made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players.' A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player or by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points 'wins.'
series CAADRIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id acadia03_018
id acadia03_018
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title Collaborative Design Process Simulation Game
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 133-141
summary Collaboration is an important aspect of the architect’s education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills. Being a process, rather than a product, it cannot be revealed by judging the results alone, which is often how form-making skills are taught and judged. Rather, the process of collaboration is only evident when the number of the participants exceeds a certain threshold, and when actions taken by other participants affect an individual’s on-going design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player simulation games provides an analogy and an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstract nature helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to “work,” encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating the design collaboration process. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other—in adversarial or collaborative manners—to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what collaboration is, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build “houses” made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players. Actions taken by one player immediately affect his/her neighbors. A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player and by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points “wins.”
series ACADIA
email ywjeong@uclink.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id caadria2003_b4-1
id caadria2003_b4-1
authors Kuo, Chung-Jen
year 2003
title Spatial Analysis of Chinese Garden Designs with Machine Learning
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 541-552
summary This research intends to propose a scheme for analyzing Chinese Garden Design by incorporating spatial theory, data mining, concept of object, and network-like data structure. Design elements of Chinese garden are placed in a network according to the existing gardens according to spatial theory. Collected networks are then divided into pair of elements connected by their relationship and stored in a database. Later, data mining is applied to attain patterns from the node-and-relationship pairs. Meanwhile, the elements of the same level can be classified and data grouping can be done by the implementation itself. Thru this research, we can gain insight upon the spatial information and relationship between elements of Chinese garden designs. The result is a set of more concise and structural descriptions, which reveals the rhythm behind the Chinese garden design and can be a great pedagogical aid.
series CAADRIA
email cjkuo@cjkuo.com
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id acadia03_051
id acadia03_051
authors Lim, Chor-Kheng
year 2003
title G Pen: An Intelligent Designer’s Playmate
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 403-409
summary In the field of design the pen-based system is a newly developed computer interface that provides the designer with the convenience of a pen in freehand sketches. But these pen-based systems only focus on an interface familiar to the designers and the application of the hardware and software that go with it, treating the pen only as a mouse-like input device. As pen and pad are devices for the pen-based system, the hope is that they can be endowed with more intelligent characteristics to let them interact with designer’s gestures and become a creative source for the designers, while simultaneously preventing the design fixation encountered by designers during design process. This research utilizes the unintentional hand gestures made by designers, such as the designer’s grip of the pen or movement involved in playing with the pen, putting it down, knocking it, twisting it or shaking it, during the thinking process or when running into a design fixation. From the interaction between the pen and the pad, certain actions may be generated to stimulate the designer’s thinking process. This research uses a neural network as the main learning mechanism for the eventual development of a prototype of a pen-based drawing system that provides timely visual stimulation: a G Pen system.
series ACADIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id sigradi2003_136
id sigradi2003_136
authors Natanson, Louis and Paterson, Inga
year 2003
title From Digital Technologists to Computer Artists
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary Historically, there has always been a strong relationship between the emerging technologies of an era and the practice and concerns of artists. These relationships are complex and form over time, involving phases of technology learning, the testing of the boundaries of the medium, the use of the technology as the subject of art and the creation of an economic context for art of the new medium. These phases presage the emergence of recognisable disciplines. This paper explores what can be learnt from such a historical perspective so as to inform a curriculum aimed at forming computer artists.
keywords Digital Technology, Digital Art, Computer Art
series SIGRADI
email L.Natanson@Abertay.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id ecaade03_415_92_koch
id ecaade03_415_92_koch
authors Zwölfer, Michael and Koch, Volker
year 2003
title New Clothes for Robot Albert
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 415-418
summary The projects ‘I, Robot’, ‘New Clothes for Robot Albert’ and ‘Robots House’ are three examples of design projects at the institute for industrial building production (ifib) that illustrate the same didactical approach for the training of students. The common principle is characterised by the confrontation of students of architecture with a kind of task, that almost is not related to architecture and that seems rather strange at the first glance. The background of the task allways has a strong technical regard and is defined by other departments. So already the understanding requires an exchange with some experts of these departments and the solution even a close cooperation with them. In most cases the partners are from the field of mechanical engineering or computer science. The common theme in these three projects is robotics, a forward-looking discipline especially interesting because of its wide complexity as well beyond a purely technical comprehension. In the Project ‘I, Robot’ multidisciplinary teams of students used the Not Quite C developer kit and the Lego Mindstorm Robotics system to develop robots for an indoor rally. This project is repeated annualy at ifib and at RWTH Aachen. In the Project ‘New Clothes for Robot Albert’ students of architecture designed and produced a spacial structure and cover for an existing and running humanoid service robot. This robot was developed by the Institute for Industrial Applications of Informatics and Microsystems (IAIM) of Prof. Dr. Dillmann for experimental purposes regarding learning strategies for service robots. In the Project ‘Robots House’ finaly students of the university cooperate with students of the university of applied science to find a concernment of architecture by today’s and future robots. The background is the demand for service robots in homes of handicapped or elder people triggered by the demographic changes; the approach is to consider today’s service robots as well as handicapped in a certain manner. The project is accompanied by the expert for handicapped accessible planning, Prof. Dr. Loeschcke and by scientists of the IAIM around Dr. Markus Ehrenmann.
keywords Multidisciplinary Design, Robotics, Architecting
series eCAADe
email volker.koch@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
more http://www.ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id diss_anders
id diss_anders
authors Anders, P.
year 2003
title A Procedural Model for Integrating Physical and Cyberspaces in Architecture
source Doctoral dissertation, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, U.K
summary This dissertation articulates opportunities offered by architectural computation, in particular the digital simulation of space known as virtual reality (VR) and its networked, social variant cyberspace. Research suggests that environments that hybridize technologies call for a conception of space as information, i.e. space is both a product of and tool for cognition. The thesis proposes a model whereby architecture can employ this concept of space in creating hybrids that integrate physical and cyberspaces.The dissertation presents important developments in architectural computation that disclose concepts and values that contrast with orthodox practice. Virtual reality and cyberspace, the foci of this inquiry, are seen to embody the more problematic aspects of these developments. They also raise a question of redundancy: If a simulation is good enough, do we still need to build? This question, raised early in the 1990's, is explored through a thought experiment - the Library Paradox - which is assessed and critiqued for its idealistic premises. Still, as technology matures and simulations become more realistic the challenge posed by VR/cyberspace to architecture only becomes more pressing. If the case for virtual idealism seems only to be strengthened by technological and cultural trends, it would seem that a virtual architecture should have been well established in the decade since its introduction.Yet a history of the virtual idealist argument discloses the many difficulties faced by virtual architects. These include differences between idealist and professional practitioners, the failure of technology to achieve its proponents' claims, and confusion over the meaning of virtual architecture among both architects and clients. However, the dissertation also cites the success of virtual architecture in other fields - Human Computer Interface design, digital games, and Computer Supported Collaborative Work - and notes that their adoption of space derives from practice within each discipline. It then proposes that the matter of VR/cyberspace be addressed from within the practice of architecture, a strategy meant to balance the theoretical/academic inclination of previous efforts in this field.The dissertation pursues an assessment that reveals latent, accepted virtualities in design methodologies, instrumentation, and the notations of architectural practices. Of special importance is a spatial database that now pervades the design and construction processes. The unity of this database, effectively a project's cyberspace, and its material counterpart is the subject of the remainder of the dissertation. Such compositions of physical and cyberspaces are herein called cybrids. The dissertation examines current technologies that cybridize architecture and information technology, and proposes their integration within cybrid wholes. The concept of cybrids is articulated in seven principles that are applied in a case study for the design for the Planetary Collegium. The project is presented and critiqued on the basis of these seven principles. The dissertation concludes with a discussion of possible effects of cybrids upon architecture and contemporary culture.
series thesis:PhD
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2005/09/09 10:58

_id sigradi2003_091
id sigradi2003_091
authors Engeli, Maia
year 2003
title Reflection and Expression in an Ego-Shooter Environment
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary This paper is about editing ego-shooter games to elaborate and express ideas by means of virtual spaces. Egoshooter games were chosen because they are a popular media and offer different possibilities for their alteration. The interesting and most challenging aspect is the search for new kinds of designs for the dynamic virtual space of the game environments. Examples from art and workshops with architecture students illustrate these explorations.
keywords Computer Games, Virtual Reality, Virtual Architecture, Digital Messages.
series SIGRADI
email me@i-dat.org
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id cf2003_m_112
id cf2003_m_112
authors LIN, Shang-Li and CHIEN, Sheng-Fen
year 2003
title From Chinese Gardens to Virtual Environments. A Gateway to Cyberspace
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 271-278
summary Chinese gardens provide situated portals through which poets or artists can enter their imaginary worlds. Similarly, a visual interface (virtual environment) of a cyberspace provides entrances to this potentially infinite space. Derived from design principles of Chinese gardens, we propose a design method for creating virtual environments. We use this method to design and visualise several cyberspaces, including web sites, virtual Chinese gardens and 3D computer games. We conduct empirical studies and find virtual environments, created by the proposed method, provide users with experience correlated to the expected result.
keywords cyberspace, virtual world
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id ecaade03_203_206_paterson
id ecaade03_203_206_paterson
authors Paterson, Inga and Natanson, Louis
year 2003
title Computer Art – The future is bright but what is the future?
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 203-208
summary It is a curious characteristic of mankind to both revere and revile the use of technology within art but history proves that when scientific logic marries with artistic reasoning, innovative and original ideas are born. Computer Art can justify a 30-year history but despite its relative maturity, digital art continues to suffer from the age-old perception that art made by machine is not a legitimate art form. This paper looks at the digital-imagery prevalent in the public domain today and compares its stage of development to the historical precedents of perspective, photography and film.
keywords Digital, Art, Technology, 3 Dimensions, Online Games
series eCAADe
email I.Paterson@Abertay.ac.uk, L.Natanson@Abertay.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

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