CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 599

_id cf2003_m_056
id cf2003_m_056
authors De GRASSI, M., GIRETTI, A., BAZZANELLA, L and CANEPARO, L.
year 2003
title The AEC Virtual University - Design Oriented Knowledge Transfer Methods and Technologies
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 313-323
summary The paper introduces the Web based INtelligent Design Support (WINDS) European Project to support education in design, a.k.a. the AEC Virtual University. The Project is divided into two actions. First, the research technology action will implement a learning environment integrating an intelligent design tutoring system, a computer instruction management system and a set of co-operative supporting tools. Second, the development action will build a large knowledge base supporting Architecture, Civil Engineering and Construction Design Courses and to experiment a comprehensive AEC Virtual University.
keywords design pedagogy, case-based teaching, e-learning, goal-based scenario, knowledge-based
series CAAD Futures
email luca.caneparo@polito.it
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id ecaade03_195_52_delic
id ecaade03_195_52_delic
authors Delic, Alenka and Kincl, Branko
year 2003
title Architecture of the virtual in housing
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 195-198
summary Information and communication technologies (ICT) have brought about a revolution in architecture and urban planning; they are transforming learning and practice and presenting new challenges in our understanding of space, place and society. An entirely new world of architectural expression and experiment is opening up to us. At Faculty of Architecture in Zagreb a new optional course, Virtuality in Housing Architecture, has been proposed and is being taught for the first time. Subjects cover a wide area of use of ICT in housing architecture: research into the role of the computer in architecture as a creative discipline; encouragement of new challenges to the concept of the role of digital media in housing architecture through research of digital concepts such as computerization, information, electronic media, virtuality and cyberspace; themes related to development of intelligent environment and spaces, interactive buildings, virtual reality and cyberspace as directions of development. In our work we try to implement the method of e-learning, teamwork, communication and design through the Internet. Through experimental projects and research of new housing concepts, students create a basis for discussions on theoretical and practical solutions for the housing of the future, create new ways of presentation and open new fields of research. We shall here present the experience from our work.
keywords ICT, housing, virtuality, teamwork, e-learning
series eCAADe
email ad@grad.hr
more http://kdvlab6.arhitekt.hr
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ecaade03_595_49_delic
id ecaade03_595_49_delic
authors Delic, Davor and Turk, Ziga
year 2003
title HYCE – Hyperlearning in Civil Engineering Curricula A Pilot Course in Implementation of Information Technology Course - a Case Study at the Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Zagreb
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 595-600
summary Outline of development of a revised base ITC course at the Faculty is shown here. The course, called Introduction To Information Technology Implementation is aimed for 2nd year students (3rd semester) of the study. For the first time it was held in the winter semester of 2002/03 as a pilot course replacing the old way of course delivery. This implementation was carried out through a “pathfinder” project WORMES from February 2002 till March 2003 and would be used as a template for future Hyperlearning implementation on other courses through other Faculty education programes. The objective was to establish continuous students teamwork around a problem – a project completely accomplished in IT surround. A slightly adapted methodology known as Hyperlearning – a version of Problem Based Learning, was chosen as a based learning methodology for a new way of course delivery. The gained results were really impressive. Not only efficiency of delivery was increased in many ways (less hours spent on exercises, better knowledge detaining...) but also huge enthusiasm among students was constantly maintained and their creativity was emphasized surprisingly. A lot of data were collected, analyzed and some of the results are published here.
keywords Hyperlearning, Problem based learning, IT course development
series eCAADe
email dd@grad.hr
more http://www.grad.hr
last changed 2003/09/18 07:16

_id sigradi2004_169
id sigradi2004_169
authors Edison Pratini
year 2004
title An experience on supporting the learning of technical graphics and improving visualization
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This paper presents an experience of applying computer graphics, virtual reality and Internet resources in the teaching of technical graphics in engineering and design courses at the University of Brasilia, Brazil. Our motivation was the fact that most of the students have a lack of previous knowledge on the basis of drawings, resulting difficulties in both understanding and visualizing technical drawings. As an experimental method, we introduced VRML 3D modeling in addition to CAD and regular pencil-and-paper drawings study and practice. To better support learning, we first provided a website with animations and virtual reality resources, avoiding the usual textbook metaphor. Since 2003 we are providing a CD-ROM containing all the former website material which is updated each semester. This experience is intended to improve the learning in a way that motivates the students. Classes, website and CD-ROM material was conceived to take advantage of computers´ interactivity and animated resources.
keywords Distance learning, interactivity, Internet, technical graphics, 3D modeling
series SIGRADI
email pratini@unb.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id caadria2003_a6-2
id caadria2003_a6-2
authors Embi, M. Hamid, M. and Rafi, A.
year 2003
title Learning Basic Principles of Fire Regulations An Experimental Teaching and Learning Tool
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 771-786
summary The study on integrating fire regulations into the design process is described through several study and analysis. However not all of them address the real issue of which fire regulation are difficult to be considered at the early stage of the design process. There are few factors on which fire regulation was not being considered at the early stage of the design. Two strong factors are the complexity of the regulations and the lack of knowledge among architects about fire regulations. Therefore fire requirements are always considered towards the end of the design process. This paper intends to address about the issue of difficulties in fire regulations and how we think these can be solve. We also design a system that can be used either by students or architects to understand the principles of the regulations and its applications in the design process. Finally a prototype system is demonstrated on how we envisage the system that can be used to help architects integrate fire regulations at the early stage of design process.
series CAADRIA
email b-rashid@utm.my
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id a2de
id a2de
authors Gao, Song; Kvan, Thomas
year 2003
title AN ANALYSIS OF PROBLEM FRAMING ACTIVITIES IN DIGITAL VERSUS PAPER MEDIA
source Architectural Education, Southeast University, Nanjing, China, December 2003, pp. 183-189
summary Architectural design is described in part as the solving of ill-defined or wicked problems. In these activities, designers are not only simply given well-stated problems but also need to find and formulate problems. This process is called as ‘problem framing’. Paper media have been for many years the design tools used by designers to help them engage, and hence frame, problems. Computer technologies have gained prominence in design processes but have typically been used in discrete problem solving processes or in presentation. It has been stated that problem exploration is more difficult using a computer tool. This attitude has influenced the teaching and use of computers in architectural education. The purpose of this study is to understand how digital and paper media are used respectively in ‘problem framing’ activities in support of students’ design learning. This paper reports a pilot laboratory study to test the validity of a proposed coding scheme comparing design activities using digital and paper media and report initial results of the research. Through this research we wish to gain insight of ways in which students engage in ‘problem framing’ activities using different media and suggest ways in which digital media might better support problem framing activities.
keywords Problem framing; digital design; protocol analysis; studio teaching
series other
type normal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2004/09/24 12:34

_id ecaade03_199_196_gatermann
id ecaade03_199_196_gatermann
authors Gatermann, Harald and Czerner, Juergen
year 2003
title Modular E-Learning-Environment for Architecture
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 199-202
summary IMLAB (Interdisciplinary Modular Learning System for Architecture and Building Science) is a project, startet by three schools of architecture in Germany: a modular, digital and online-based system, which has the aim to collect and improve teaching elements from architectural schools around the world. The development of digital teaching materials at every single university is very expensive - so the idea is to motivate schools all over the world to contribute their teaching materials and teaching moduls. It could work like an architectural ""napster"". The initial development of this kind of teaching community was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Research as a research project. The momentary state of work is documentated on the following website: www.imlab.de. Unfortunately all the information is in German up to now - we will develop the english version as soon as possible. We do have interactive workshops and design-projects beetween different universities up to now (in Germany) and several contacts to international partners. We would like to use eCAADe 2003 as a platform for multiplying this idea and finding more partners from all over the World.
keywords e-learning, modular, synchronous, asynchronous, knowledge-base
series eCAADe
email harald.gatermann@fh-bochum.de
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id sigradi2003_009
id sigradi2003_009
authors Giordano, R., Falco, C., Pieragostini, P. and Osella, M.
year 2003
title Migración Digital y Transformación Curricular en la Enseñanza del Diseño y del Arte (Digital Migration and Curricular Transformation in the Teaching of Design and Art)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary The National University of the Litoral UNL, Santa Fe, Argentina, through its policies of Distance Education at the moment has the possibility of approaching novel educative strategies taking advantage of the satellite technology, the telematics networks, the television, the cd-rom, the electronic mail, computer science, elearning, the video, among other resources. This way, they harness and they assure realization of learning and education processes, the development of capacities and competitions, and the update of knowledge to people who do not need to attend an educative centre; what avoids the uprooting and increases the possibilities of access to the world of the work within its own community.
series SIGRADI
email rgiordano70@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ecaade03_161_192_grunau
id ecaade03_161_192_grunau
authors Grunau, Jens-Peter
year 2003
title A different approach to planning and design - Combining a planning theory in architectual design with elearning.
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 161-164
summary We have developed a rather uncommon way of understanding and teaching architectual design and the use of computers in this process: Our idea consists in defining the design process not only as finding a nice shape for an object like a building or a new car. We see designing and planning as the ""art"" of solving complex problems. This implies, that the design process is not the mere use of methods or tools to solve a given problem, but the process of understanding the roots of the problem and finding a suitable and often alternative and unusual solution. The way we teach this process is enhanced by the use of computers and webbased applications. In this paper we will describe the key elements of the planning and design theory used as well as the methods for teaching these ideas to graduate students. Lastly, we point out the experience that came from the practical implementation.
keywords Approach to Planning and Design, e-learning, course-design, educational design, computer supported collaborative work
series eCAADe
email grunau@igp.uni-stuttgart.de
more http://www.igp.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id heyligheneaae2003
id HeylighenEAAE2003
authors Heylighen, Ann
year 2003
title A maintenance contract for the architect's degree - Concept, materialisation and post-occupancy
source Ebbe Harder (ed.), Writings in Architectural Education, Transactions on architectural education No 15, EAAE/AEEA, pp.134-147
summary Today, architecture is confronted with changing concepts of time, space and place. These changes are largely induced by the advent of the information society and in turn induce the need for entirely new ways of conceiving architectural education. It is obvious, however, that architectural education does not hold absolute sway over the need for renewal, as other domains and disciplines too are confronted with the inevitable learning society: a society in which individuals, groups and companies are learning on a permanent basis. What architectural education does hold absolute sway over – or at least should be granted a patent for – is the unique way in which it used to prepare (and still prepares) its students for practice in the design studio. Therefore, instead of throwing out the design studio with the bathwater, we consider it as an outstanding lead for pursuing the learning society within the context of architecture. Furthermore, we see ICT not only as a cause of, but at the same time as an ally in this pursuit, as it allows reinforcing the studio as “espace transitoire”. To this end, we propose to literally connect the studio with the world of practice through an on-line platform constructed of concrete cases.
keywords Architectural education, ICT
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2004/03/25 16:54

_id ijac20031203
id ijac20031203
authors Heylighen, Ann; Neuckermans, Herman
year 2003
title (Learning from Experience)? Promises, Problems and Side-effects of Case-Based Reasoning in Architectural Design
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary Learning from experience is the essence of Case-Based Reasoning (CBR). Because architects are said to learn design by experience, CBR seemed to hold great promises for their field, which inspired, in the 1990s, the development of various Case-Based Design (CBD) tools. Learning from the experience of developing and using these tools is the objective of this paper. On the one hand, the original expectations seem far from being accomplished today. Reasons for this limited success can be found at three different levels: the cognitive model underlying CBR, the implementation of this model into concrete CBD tools, and the context in which these tools are to be used. On the other hand, CBR research seems to have caused some interesting side effects, such as an increased interest in creativity and copyright, and a re-discovery of the key role that cases play in architectural design.
series journal
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ijac20031108
id ijac20031108
authors Hirschberg, Urs
year 2003
title Transparency In Information Architecture: Enabling Large Scale Creative Collaboration in Architectural Education over the Internet
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary This paper is about networked collaboration in architectural education and about information architecture for networked collaborations. It presents results of a quantitative process analysis of two types of courses in Computer Aided Architectural Design that were taught using database-driven online environments. The main focus of the quantitative analysis is the performance of these online environments as information structures, designed to accommodate the presentation and the peer-to-peer exchange of design information for relatively large groups of between 60 and 150 participants. Using the database records to reconstruct the processes, three different quantitative analyses are described.Their results indicate that for these projects the web-environments were successful in enhancing peer-to-peer learning and that they promoted a more objective assessment of the submitted works. The study also looks at the effect that the environments themselves had on the process. Finally it draws some conclusions about these environments' information architecture: it presents tentative guidelines about how such environments must be designed to handle the dynamic display of design data, from many different authors, in a way that is transparent to the users.
series journal
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2003_c5-3
id caadria2003_c5-3
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title Collaborative Design Simulation Game
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 745-758
summary Collaboration is an is an important aspect of the architect's education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills, because it can only be revealed when the number of participants exceed a certain threshold, and when actions made by others affect the individual's design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player games provides an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstraction helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to 'work,' encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating design collaboration. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other-in adversarial or collaborative manner-to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what is collaboration, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build 'houses' made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players.' A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player or by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points 'wins.'
series CAADRIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id acadia03_018
id acadia03_018
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title Collaborative Design Process Simulation Game
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 133-141
summary Collaboration is an important aspect of the architect’s education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills. Being a process, rather than a product, it cannot be revealed by judging the results alone, which is often how form-making skills are taught and judged. Rather, the process of collaboration is only evident when the number of the participants exceeds a certain threshold, and when actions taken by other participants affect an individual’s on-going design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player simulation games provides an analogy and an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstract nature helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to “work,” encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating the design collaboration process. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other—in adversarial or collaborative manners—to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what collaboration is, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build “houses” made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players. Actions taken by one player immediately affect his/her neighbors. A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player and by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points “wins.”
series ACADIA
email ywjeong@uclink.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ijac20031407
id ijac20031407
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.; Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title A Collaborative Design Simulation Game
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 4
summary Collaboration is an is an important aspect of the architect's education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills, because it can only be revealed when the number of participants exceed a certain threshold, and when actions made by others affect the individual's design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player games provides an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstraction helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to 'work,' encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating design collaboration. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other - in adversarial or collaborative manner - to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what is collaboration, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build 'houses' made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players.' A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player or by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points 'wins.'
series journal
email kalay@socrates.Berkeley.edu
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ijac20031105
id ijac20031105
authors Kieferle, Joachim B.; Herzberger, Erwin
year 2003
title The "Digital year for Architects" - Experiences with an Integrated Teaching Concept
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary The "digital year for architects" is an integrated course for graduate architecture students that has been running since 1997, at Stuttgart University. Its concept is to link together traditional design teaching and working with computers. Three seminar classes and one design project form the framework of the course. In it the students are taught the design of, for example, image and space composition, typography, video, and using virtual reality. Additionally we cover theoretical basics for the final design project, such as information management or working environments. The course takes in approximately a dozen software packages and ends with a visionary design project. The products have shown the advantage of an integrated course compared to separate courses. The course proves to be more intensive in dealing with the project as well as achieving better skills when learning the associated new digital media. An important feature is that because the project topics are different from conventional architectural schemes, and tend to be more abstract, a key effect is to widen the students' way of thinking about designing.
series journal
email kieferle@architektur.fh-wiesbaden.de
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ecaade03_145_160_koutamanis
id ecaade03_145_160_koutamanis
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2003
title CAAD influences in Web-based teaching
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 145-152
summary A recent restructuring of the CAAD department at the Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, was based on the principle of coupling technological and methodical development to application areas. This resulted into decentralization of CAAD and the positioning of computerization groups in other departments. The task of these groups is to stimulate broad integration of ICT and initiate the development of computational applications relating to specific tasks and areas. The paper is a description of a channel for such integration and applications: a Web site intended as a support to the research and educational activities of a whole department. In addition to its conventional role in presenting the department, the site accommodates the majority of learning aids for the students (lecture notes and presentations, readers, syllabi, audiovisual material) and a comprehensive database of completed and ongoing research output (online publications for internal use). The design of the site was based on earlier experiences with Web-based teaching and collaborative design environments, which were projected on the processes and products of the new context.
keywords web-based education, computer-mediated communication, interaction, collaboration
series eCAADe
email A.Koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.re-h.nl
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id caadria2003_b4-1
id caadria2003_b4-1
authors Kuo, Chung-Jen
year 2003
title Spatial Analysis of Chinese Garden Designs with Machine Learning
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 541-552
summary This research intends to propose a scheme for analyzing Chinese Garden Design by incorporating spatial theory, data mining, concept of object, and network-like data structure. Design elements of Chinese garden are placed in a network according to the existing gardens according to spatial theory. Collected networks are then divided into pair of elements connected by their relationship and stored in a database. Later, data mining is applied to attain patterns from the node-and-relationship pairs. Meanwhile, the elements of the same level can be classified and data grouping can be done by the implementation itself. Thru this research, we can gain insight upon the spatial information and relationship between elements of Chinese garden designs. The result is a set of more concise and structural descriptions, which reveals the rhythm behind the Chinese garden design and can be a great pedagogical aid.
series CAADRIA
email cjkuo@cjkuo.com
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id ec9c
authors Kvan, Th., Wong, J.T.H. and Vera, A.H.
year 2003
title THE CONTRIBUTION OF STRUCTURAL ACTIVITIES TO SUCCESSFUL DESIGN
source International Journal of Computer Applications in Technology , 16:2/3, pp. 122-126
summary Examining case studies in design teaching and their analysis; we identify the role of structural activities and other solution searching activities in design learning and problem solving. The case studies follow students working on the same problem under two conditions – one group is taught using traditional face-to-face teaching while the other group is additionally supported by a text-based web board. The design activities of two students were followed in each condition through a semester; followed by in-depth interviews at the end of semester. The results show that cases with above average design work involved more structural activities than the mediocre cases. It also showed that design problem dissections are more organized in the better cases. These successful cases engaged in textual expression of their design solutions. Computer tools for design should therefore support multiple representations of design work.
keywords Structure Activity; Representation; Text; Models; Teaching; Learning
series journal paper
type normal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2004/09/24 12:39

_id 2206
id 2206
authors Kvan, Thomas
year 2004
title REASONS TO STOP TEACHING CAAD
source Mao-Lin Chiu (ed), Digital design education, Garden City Publishing, Taipei 2003, ISBN 9867705203
summary Computers are a problem. They are expensive, even if the prices have dropped dramatically and promise to continue dropping. They do not look after themselves but demand considerable attention – we have to hire computer specialists to ensure they talk to each other, staff are required to make sure software is installed and to fix things when it no longer works. Learning to use them is tedious; skills have to be developed to master several idiosyncratic software systems. The hardware and software regularly malfunction. It is faster to draw a line by hand than with software. Students already have enough trouble learning how to stop a window leaking or ensure a fire escape route will protect people in time of trouble, why make them learn all these other things. We should stop teaching CAAD. Although technological and economic issues are very real and not to be dismissed lightly, the real problems of teaching CAAD are not these. The real issues we need to address is how we teach and, behind that, why we teach. This paper explores the what and why.
keywords pedagogy
series other
type normal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2004/09/27 05:10

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