CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 599

_id acadia03_002
id acadia03_002
authors Anders, Peter
year 2003
title Four Degrees Of Freedom
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 17
summary Letting go is hard to do. Remember back to when, after months of trying, you let go of the handlebars of your bicycle and sailed down the street, effortless and assured. It was a freedom born of mastery, balance and technique. You had let go, but were in control. Technique extends to other devices as well and we are here to discuss architectural computation. Here too, as we will see, mastery is shown by letting go. These papers explore new degrees of freedom in design computation. Each is on a separate aspect of architecture, whether it be aesthetics, process, or structure. Two papers inquire into the entities of design and the processes by which they are manifested. They pose important questions. If we can affect the course of design going forward, are we free to change its past? By defining the characteristics of objects at the outset, are we through automation free to choose from a refined spectrum of outcomes? From the evidence of these papers, the answer to both questions is yes. Through the agency of parametric design we can affect the future and past of architectural processes and their products. Rather than being locked into rigid, linear decisions we are temporally free to choose, tweak and modify. Choice and chance play an important role in aesthetics as well. This has become emblematic of design trends as we have seen in recent years. One of our papers addresses the indeterminacy of particle systems in the design of a monument to the victims of 9/11. By letting go of the handlebars of the computer, the author has been freed to new, poetic forms and processes. Another paper opens urban design to its client community by use of a sophisticated web site. In the tradition of populist innovators like Charles Moore and Lucien Kroll, the authors have extended the design process beyond the office walls to the city itself. The designers, by loosening their grip on the project have made the effort democratic and participatory. Intriguingly, at the end of the paper, they note that this use of cyberspace opens the door to a non-physical architecture. Could architecture, then, let go its materialist biases as well? We hope to engage this and other questions shortly.We are pleased then, to share with you these insights and projects. Wassim and I hope that these presentations will be as liberating for you as they were for us.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/27 14:21

_id avocaad_2003_13
id avocaad_2003_13
authors John L. Heintz
year 2003
title Communication and Value in Networked Design Coalitions
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary The advent of the Internet has led us to believe that we live in an era of unprecedented globalization. In the field of building design, we now expect both that the local market for design services will be altered, and that many firms will take up the opportunity to pursue commissions beyond their local market. To some extent this is true, but it is instructive to recall that in the 19th century London based architectural firms and public works designers designed buildings throughout the Empire. Designing for projects beyond the local market is not new, what is new is our expectation that such a task is now fundamentally altered, made easier and more transparent, by the abundance of new communications technologies.It remains the case that working outside one’s local context is difficult and that when doing so, problems are likely to arise out of cultural differences. Distance too imposes its burdens, as the possibility to meet other members of the team face to face is reduced as the travel costs increase. This breaks down the possibilities of building informal networks among the individual designers working for the firms that are members of the design team. A re-instantiation of this informal network can only be done on the basis of a model of formal and informal communication in the design team. Many of the difficulties of collaborative work outside one’s local market are problems that have already been with us a long time. These problems arise out of the fact that buildings are designed by heterogeneous groups of people. The members of such groups must communicate with each other to share information and coordinate decisions and actions. Yet they are in different relations to the project at hand and have differing values arising out of their different backgrounds. This leads inevitably to conflict. Therefore, if we are to discuss communication and value then we must devote our attentions to conflict.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design, Communication, values, informal communication, value resolution, design team, design coalition.
series AVOCAAD
email J.L.Heintz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id sigradi2006_e149b
id sigradi2006_e149b
authors Kendir, Elif
year 2006
title Prêt-à-Construire – An Educational Inquiry into Computer Aided Fabrication
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 162-165
summary This paper aims to show and discuss the relevance of developing necessary strategies for reintegrating the concept of fabrication into the architectural design process. The discussion will be partly based on the outcome of a graduate architectural design studio conducted in Spring semester 2002-2003. The graduate studio was part of a series of exploratory studies conducted on the nature of architectural design process transformed by information technologies. Preceded by studios investigating cognition and representation, this last studio focused on the concept of fabrication. The overarching aim of the studio series was to put CAD and CAM in context both within the actual architectural design process and within architectural education. The last of this series, which will be discussed within the frame of this paper, has specifically focused on CAM and the concept of fabrication in architecture. In accordance with the nature of a design studio, the research was more methodological than technical. The studio derived its main inspiration from the constructional templates used in dressmaking, which can be considered as an initial model for mass customization. In this context, the recladding of Le Corbusier’s Maison Domino was given as the main design problem, along with several methodological constraints. The main constraint was to develop the design idea through constructional drawings instead of representational ones. The students were asked to develop their volumetric ideas through digital 3D CAD models while working out structural solutions on a physical 1/50 model of Maison Domino. There was also a material constraint for the model, where only specified types of non-structural paper could be used. At this stage, origami provided the working model for adding structural strength to sheet materials. The final outcome included the explanation of different surface generation strategies and preliminary design proposals for their subcomponents. The paper will discuss both the utilized methodology and the final outcome along the lines of the issues raised during the studio sessions, some of which could be decisive in the putting into context of CAD – CAM in architectural design process. One such issue is mass customization, that is, the mass production of different specific elements with the help of CAM technologies. Another issue is “open source” design, indicating the possibility of a do-it-yourself architecture, where architecture is coded as information, and its code can be subject to change by different designers. The final key issue is the direct utilization of constructional drawings in the preliminary design phase as opposed to representational ones, which aimed at reminding the designer the final phase of fabrication right from the beginning. Finally, the paper will also point at the problems faced during the conduct of the studio and discuss those in the context of promoting CAM for architectural design and production in countries where there is no actual utilization of these technologies for these purposes yet.
keywords Education; Fabrication; CAM
series SIGRADI
email s3131573@student.rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id f59d
authors Koelbl, R., Bruntsch, St. and Knoflacher, H.
year 2003
title Perspective Vienna – A Comparison of Planning Scenarios and Real Development
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary With the suspension of national boarders in unions of nations, cities and their regions gain in significance for the economic, social and cultural development. This is particularly valid for Vienna, which lies close to the eastern boarder of the European Union, which should fall with the enlargement of EU in the near future. Of prominent importance is therefore to obtain a comprehensive understanding between proposed and defined aims for an urban development, the related measures and their extent ofimplementations and their actual or real effects. This paper attempts to give a strategic analysis of the Viennese urban and traffic development programs, from 1962, 1972, 1984 and 1994, on the one hand, and the data analysis of the statistical year books beginning from 1960 until 2000, on the other. The results show that adjustments have been made not only in response to certain trends, but also to a change of philosophy of urban development. It can be seen that certain assumptions of, for example, economic and transport measures can have the opposite outcome in relation to the intended objectives. Hence, one main question remains to beanswered: How should Vienna deal with the challenges ahead, to secure and foster a sustainable development under such circumstances on a long-term basis. In this respect, some measures are given, which should make it possible to overcome successfully these challenges.
series other
email stefan.bruntsch@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id ecaade03_000
id ecaade03_000
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang and Hirschberg, Urs (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design
source 21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 0-9541183-1-6], Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, 677 p.
summary Digital Design is not only the title of the 21st eCAADe conference 2003 in Graz but also one of the main keywords in Architectural Education nowadays. Information Technology has managed to influence all fields of the “architectural process” and has developed straight from the calculation tools of the engineers over the CAD drafting boards of big architectural firms to every architectural professional and student. This process was incredibly quick in terms of the architectural chronology but very slow in terms of architectural education at universities (at least in Austria). Not very long ago it was sometimes forbidden to deliver CAD drawings for design projects at our faculty. In fact, the early experiments in using the computer in the design process quite often failed because of the restrictions of the available (and affordable) hard-and software. Today, even our first year students start some of their earliest design experiences quite naturally with the computer. However, there are still many questions to be answered and maybe some new questions to be asked in the relationship between architectural design and the computer. Architectural design is mainly a “game of imagination” and today computer tools start to enhance and support the architects visions after a longer period where they were often reduced by the limitations of the tools. Still, there are many different ways to design because every designer has a different approach towards architectural design and there is no such thing as “the perfect digital design tool” for everyone. We hope that this conference with all the different approaches documented in this book plays a major role in the discussion and development of all these aspects and brings us “one step further”.
series eCAADe
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ascaad2007_036
id ascaad2007_036
authors Pratini, E.F.
year 2007
title Experimental Tools for the Teaching of Technical Graphics and Improving Visualization
source Em‘body’ing Virtual Architecture: The Third International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2007), 28-30 November 2007, Alexandria, Egypt, pp. 457-468
summary This paper presents an updated evaluation of an experience of applying computer graphics, virtual reality and Internet resources in the teaching of technical graphics at the University of Brasilia, Brazil. It differs from a previous paper (Pratini, 2004) for the addition of an overview of the course, the context and the new teaching methodology. It is an extended, more detailed paper, which includes examples, and closes with some results of surveys on the didactic material and the methodology. Our motivation for this experiment is the fact that most of the students have a lack of previous knowledge on the basis of drawings, resulting difficulties in both understanding and visualizing technical drawings. In this experiment, we introduced VRML 3D modeling in addition to CAD and regular pencil-and-paper drawings study and practice. To support the learning of this broad knowledge not present in the technical graphics bibliography, we first provided a website with animations and virtual reality resources. Since 2003 we are providing a CD-ROM containing all the former website material which is updated each semester. At the present time, the CD-ROM contains almost all the needed didactic material and software for the one semester technical graphics course. This experience was intended to improve and to support learning in a way that motivates the students, young people who are used to play video and computer games. Classes, website and CD-ROM material were conceived to take advantage of computers´ interactivity and animated resources. The use of computers´ technology and new media to support the learning resulted a new methodology and several new unanswered questions.
series ASCAAD
email pratini@unb.br
last changed 2008/01/21 21:00

_id sigradi2003_119
id sigradi2003_119
authors Bermudez, J., Foresti, S., Agutter, J., Westenskow, D., Syroid, N. Drews, F. Tashjian, E. and Adams, V.
year 2003
title Metodología Interdisciplinaria para Diseñar Nuevas Arquitecturas de Representación de Datos (Interdisciplinaria Methodologies for the Design of a New Architectures of Data Representation)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary Data representation architecture can be defined as the organizational, functional, experiential, formal, and media-technological order defining the interaction between data, representation, and user. This paper presents an interdisciplinary methodology to develop such architectures in order to significantly improve real time decision making in complex data environments. We have reported in some aspects of this work elsewhere. In this occasion, we will describe our working methodology based on complete interdisciplinarity, the design process and evaluation protocols. We will show work done for Finance and Network Monitoring. Our long-term goal is to design a new generation of data representation architectures that is applicable to diverse fields.
keywords Data representation; visualization; design, architecture, interdisciplinary
series SIGRADI
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia03_011
id acadia03_011
authors d’Estrée Sterk, Tristan
year 2003
title Using Actuated Tensegrity Structures to Produce a Responsive Architecture
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 85-93
summary The major theoretical roots of responsive architecture lie within the work of Nicholas Negroponte, and its most inspiring realization, to date, is found in the work of dECOi Architects. The work of NOX, and Diller & Scofidio provide two other built examples of responsive architectures. Each of these works is impressive within its own right. However, all of them have their shortcomings, suggesting that several possibilities for alternative visions still exist. While Negroponte’s work identifies the characteristics of a responsive architecture, it does not propose a model that is suitable for implementation. On the other hand, the work of dECOi architects does not address the technical needs of a building envelope designed for real world conditions of weather and structural load. Diller & Scofidio’s work, also does not have a functional envelope, and NOX’s work lacks physical responsiveness, favoring a palate of virtual responses instead.This paper, after examining the four specific precedents of Negroponte, dECOi, Diller & Scofidio, and NOX, will examine how a fifth precedent—that of Buckminster Fuller’s model of tensegrity structures—may be applied. The paper will propose that by actuating a tensegrity structure a responsive architectural envelope that addresses real world weather and structural loading conditions becomes feasible.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email tsterk@artic.edu
more admin
last changed 2017/04/10 11:09

_id acadia03_036
id acadia03_036
authors Gerzso, J. Michael
year 2003
title On the Limitations of Shape Grammars: Comments on Aaron Fleisher’s Article “Grammatical Architecture?”
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 279-287
summary Shape grammars were introduced by Gips and Stiny in 1972. Since then, there have been many articles and books written by them and their associates. In 1992, Aaron Fleisher, a professor at the School of Planning, MIT, wrote a critique of their work in an article titled “Grammatical Architecture?” published in the journal Environment and Planning B. According to him, Gips, Stiny and later Mitchell, propose a hypothesis that states that shape grammars are presumed to represent knowledge of architectural form, that grammars are “formable,” and that there is a visual correspondence to verbal grammar. The strong version of “the hypothesis requires that an architectural form be equivalent to a grammar.” Fleisher considers these hypotheses unsustainable, and argues his case by analyzing the differences between language, and architecture, and by dealing with the concepts of lexicons, syntax and semantics. He concludes by stating that architectural design is negotiated in two modalities: the verbal and the visual, and that equivalences are not at issue; they do not exist. If there is such thing as a language for design, it would provide the means to maintain a discussion of the consequences in one mode, of the state and conditions of the other. Fleisher’s observations serve as the basis of this paper, a tribute to him, and also an opportunity to present an outline to an alternate approach or hypothesis to shape grammars, which is “nonlinguistic” but “generative,” in the sense that it uses production rules. A basic aspect of this hypothesis is that the only similarity between syntactic rules in language and some rules in architecture is that they are recursive.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ijac20031108
id ijac20031108
authors Hirschberg, Urs
year 2003
title Transparency In Information Architecture: Enabling Large Scale Creative Collaboration in Architectural Education over the Internet
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary This paper is about networked collaboration in architectural education and about information architecture for networked collaborations. It presents results of a quantitative process analysis of two types of courses in Computer Aided Architectural Design that were taught using database-driven online environments. The main focus of the quantitative analysis is the performance of these online environments as information structures, designed to accommodate the presentation and the peer-to-peer exchange of design information for relatively large groups of between 60 and 150 participants. Using the database records to reconstruct the processes, three different quantitative analyses are described.Their results indicate that for these projects the web-environments were successful in enhancing peer-to-peer learning and that they promoted a more objective assessment of the submitted works. The study also looks at the effect that the environments themselves had on the process. Finally it draws some conclusions about these environments' information architecture: it presents tentative guidelines about how such environments must be designed to handle the dynamic display of design data, from many different authors, in a way that is transparent to the users.
series journal
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2003_c5-1
id caadria2003_c5-1
authors Hoon, M. , Jabi, W. and Goldman, G.
year 2003
title Immersion, Interaction, and Collaboration In Architectural Design Using Gaming Engines
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 721-738
summary "This paper investigates the role of gaming engines in the architectural design process through the introduction of features such as immersion, interaction and collaboration. While traditional 3D modelling and visualization systems such as 3D Studio MAX and form?Z offer increasingly convincing visual simulations, gaming engines are approaching the visual realism of such systems and are offering additional interactive features that are usually available only in more expensive immersive virtual reality systems . Additionally, the capability to have multiple individuals inhabit and navigate the space offers unique opportunities for collaboration as well as the investigation of human behaviour. Participants with internet access can be invited to access a shared virtual environment. Collaboration among users can be further enhanced by combining immersive navigation with peer-to-peer instant messaging and/or adding a voice channel. This paper analyzes these issues through research summary and the creation and user testing of a prototype based on a publicly available gaming engine. Through a series of assignments within an academic course, students in the school of architecture were asked to iteratively use and test this prototype for the collaborative exploration of designed environments. Students made their environments available for others to navigate in real-time and offer comments. A final design review was conducted in which critics were asked to enter the designed environment, explore it at will and interact with the student as well as others present in the same virtual space. This paper will illustrate some of the student projects and describe the immersive,"
series CAADRIA
email hoon@njit.edu , jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id caadria2007_057
id caadria2007_057
authors Kouide, Tahar; G. Paterson
year 2007
title BIM as a Viable Collaborative Working Tool: A Case Study
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary For the majority of design practices in the construction industry the use of CAD systems have been used to merely automate hand drafting (Cohen 2003). This is the traditional way of working that has changed very little since the introduction of commercial CAD systems. These practices as means of communication are being replaced by a virtual building model environment which encapsulates all of the information for an entire construction project and thereby enables computer-supported co-operative working practices. (Newton 2003) This study aims to determine whether Building Information Modelling (BIM) can, and whether it will, replace traditional communication media as the standard in the industry for computersupported co-operative working practices in the Architecture Engineering and construction (AEC) sector. The bulk of the research comprises an extensive literature review looking at the principal reasons behind the development of BIM, the potential advantages and drawbacks of the technology, and the barriers and obstacles which inhibit its adoption as a means of computer-supported co-operative working. The findings of the study have been validated and analysed against current practice in the field through a live case study analysis of the on-going Heathrow airport Terminal 5 Project in London (UK). The Terminal 5 case study demonstrates that present software tools, although usable, still present significant implicit technical constraints to wider implementation among Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). The case study has also shown that in practice, the success of BIM depends just as much on the working practices and ethos of participants in the project chain as it does on the capabilities of the software itself, in particular the willingness of practitioners to change traditional working practices. The case study has shown that the present investment, in terms of time, cost, and effort required to implementing the technology means that BIM is unlikely to be adopted on small simple projects where conventional CAD is still adequate. It also highlighted that BIM tools currently available are not yet adequately developed to satisfy the requirements of the many procurement and especially contractual arrangements which presently exist and many firms will be frightened off by the unresolved legal issues which may arise from implementing BIM in their practices.
series CAADRIA
email g.j.paterson@rgu.ac.uk
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id avocaad_2003_11
id avocaad_2003_11
authors Michael Cumming
year 2003
title The promise of peer-to-peer computing versus the utility of centralised data models in collaborative design
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary Peer-to-peer (P2P), or distributed computing, involves having computers on a net¬work -peers- acting as both suppliers, as well as consumers of information. With recent developments, most notably the JXTA initiative by Sun Microsystems, such P2P technology will soon become quite easy to implement, in a standardised and secure fashion. P2P technology holds promise in the domain of collaborative design in that it allows design collaborators to exchange information in a manner that appears to have certain advantages over centralised systems, such as greater spontaneity, the ability to self-organize, better scalability, and the ability to handle transient resources in a more robust manner. However, it is not clear how this new technology can be applied to the information needs of collaborative design, in which centralised data models are usually seen as useful. This paper examines some of the positive and negative implications of this new technology in the context of collaborative design.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email m.cumming@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id avocaad_2003_07
id avocaad_2003_07
authors Penttilä, Hannu
year 2003
title Think Globally – Act Locally in Architectural Information Management
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary This paper tries to describe the conceptual connection between the larger-scale, somewhat idealistic global visions and trends in the architectural-ICT-education, and on the other hand the smaller-scale real-life activities that are carried out in the local educational institutions.The local activities are demonstrated with a handful of case-study experiences from HUT/architecture.A proposal for the future, is to establish a continuous web-forum for architectural schools• To submit and maintain their organizational and educational data• To benchmark their education content with other schools• An early version is already available in:
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
type normal paper
email penttila@mittaviiva.fi
last changed 2009/06/04 05:04

_id caadria2003_b3-1
id caadria2003_b3-1
authors Stipech, Alfredo and Morahan, Thomas
year 2003
title Digital Media Its Incorporation into the Education of Architects and Graphic Designers
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 397-410
summary Here we introduce a pedagogic experience in the Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina. It has begun about ten years ago, with the first intents of incorporating the computer into the design and teaching process , until current days with the setting of a Class for Introduction to Digital Media (IMD), as an obligatory subject in the first course of careers such as Architecture and Urbanism (AU) and Graphic Design of Visual Communication (DGCV). The introduction of "Computing Science" in this university resembled the process of other Universities (Pentill‰ Hannu, 2001), Today we can see that this was not adjusted to the necessities of these professions neither in the educational process nor in the professional production. In our case we will address particular experiences that enabled us to evolve in a pedagogic model towards the concept of Digital Media (DM) that we currently practice.
series CAADRIA
email arqasoc@satlink.com
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id caadria2003_c6-3
id caadria2003_c6-3
authors Tadic, Ron Z.
year 2003
title Participation In Design of Community Centres Designing With Electronic Medium
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 871-888
summary Until recently, most of the architectural projects had only two players - an Architect and a Client Architect was commissioned by a client and did what that client wanted. Now, end users, citizens, communities, voters and ordinary people want to have a say in projects that are provided for them. The days of an Architect being a tool of moneyed clients and politicians are gone. Social and political changes in the second half of 20th century provided a platform for affirmation of individual and collective rights of citizens to take active roles in decision-making. In the field of Architecture, this in particular applies to the process of design. What was once a one-way street for decision-making is now a profoundly different - multidirectional process of initiative, consultation and agreement between all parties that are or will be directly or indirectly involved in a project. In this way completed projects are the result of a variety of contributions of all stakeholders, thus potentially better meeting a broader variety of their needs and expectations. Stakeholders' participation is required not only during the design, but also after the completion of a built project. Once they start using 'their' finished project, they provide feedback about its qualities and shortfalls. This is done through the Post Occupancy Evaluation (P.O.E.). Data collected in this way can then be used to revisit the original design and draw lessons from it, making the next design better suited to the stakeholders of future projects. These laborious, repetitive and complex tasks were difficult to achieve without spending vast amounts of time and resources. This process threatened to be detrimental to the overall success of a project.
series CAADRIA
email Ron.Tadic@projectservices.qld.gov.au
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id caadria2003_a7-3
id caadria2003_a7-3
authors Zhou, Q.
year 2003
title From CAD to iAD - A Prototype Simulation of the Internet-based Steel Construction Consulting for Architects
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 919-936
summary Information technology has become so powerful and interactive that what is conventionally called CAD might evolve into iAD (Internet Aided Design). For Internet applications in the AEC (Architecture, Engineering and Construction) industry, most of the efforts and applications have been concentrated on project management and collaboration, while in the area of design and engineering consulting, limited progress has been made. Even with some of this success, contemporary development has not changed the nature of the fragmentation of the AEC industry. Based on previous research surveys (Zhou & Krawczyk 2001) of the development of Internet applications in the AEC industry and the proposal of a conceptual model of Internet-based engineering consulting in architecture, this research will apply these theories and concepts into a specified area of steel construction consulting for architects. The first phase of this research will define the content and scope of steel construction consulting and the potential Internet application. Second, a proposed solid working model is developed covering organizational structure, user network, services provided and technology. In the third phase (as this paper presented), a prototype simulation is used to apply the concepts and methodology in a preliminary design application to demonstrate how this Internet-based consulting model would work.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id acadia03_015
id acadia03_015
authors Bernhardt, Matthew and Blostein, Beth
year 2003
title APPROPRIATE LEVELS OF ACCESS: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY ON THE AVAILABILITY OF COMPUTERS IN STUDIO
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 119-127
summary One of the most significant technological challenges facing architecture schools today is how to provide an appropriate level of access to computing resources. As the computer has become a significant tool in the study and practice of architecture, students need to have access to that tool in order to further their studies. But in facing this question of access, what is “appropriate”? Is there such a thing as too much access? Is 1:1 access—a computer for every student—the minimum level of access that schools and students should accept? Or is there a point beyond which more resources just means more waste; computers sitting idle and unused, or students using the computer for unproductive ends? These questions were the subject of an experimental series of studios in the spring of 2002, wherein three studios were given varying numbers of computers for a term. The use of these computers was then tracked, and compared with previous terms. In tandem, the quality of work produced by these three studios was compared. While additional experiments are most likely needed to draw firm conclusions, the results of this experiment seem to support defining “an appropriate level of access” at less than 1:1.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email bernhardt.7@osu.edu
last changed 2004/12/09 16:42

_id sigradi2003_037
id sigradi2003_037
authors Klinger, Kevin R.
year 2003
title Digitalfutures: defining digital discourse
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary In order to configure a necessary infrastructure for discourse on digital futures, we must engage in the hard work of clarifying emergent trends in architecture directly resulting from the influences of digital technology. This paper aims at addressing the necessity for a rigorous and clearly defined infrastructure in the emerging area of digital architecture. A series of critical interrogations results from an examination of relevant literature of which it is intended to frame the discourse on the subject of digital architecture. Some final questions and projections will be offered as a call for future research and pedagogical strategies amongst digitally minded organizations.
keywords (digital)discourse, (digital)architecture, (digital)design, (digital)skills, (digital)principles
series SIGRADI
email krklinger@bsu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 29HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_290941 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002