CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 595

_id acadia03_049
id acadia03_049
authors Lim, Chor-Kheng
year 2003
title An Insight into the Freedom of Using a Pen: Pen-based System and Pen-and-paper
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 385-393
summary In earlier researches on freehand sketching, the cognitive behavior of designers was studied. In recent years, some researchers began to look into this area from the design media aspect. The pen-based system, developed by Gross, Landay and other researchers, used the pen as an input device, allowing sketches to be freely drawn in a computer environment. The importance of the freehand sketch lies in its ability to freely represent various drawing projections using ambiguous sketches. However, as for the various drawing projections, such as diagrams, symbols, plans, elevations, sections, perspectives, etc., how are they interrelated to a designer’s thinking process and the cognitive behavior? Different media have different abilities to represent different projections. Would they affect the designer’s design thinking as well? Targeting different media, i.e., conventional freehand sketches vs. the computer pen-based system, this research uses case studies and think-aloud protocol analysis to present an analysis and discussion. Research results show that there is a relationship of gradual embodiment that is mutually complementary, going from a whole perspective to being the dissected into sections between the different projections. In addition, these projections restrict the designer’s various design thinking processes, while the use of different media may somewhat change the actual design thinking of the designer
series ACADIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ecaade03_419_107_tsai
id ecaade03_419_107_tsai
authors Tsai, K.-P., Chien, S.-F. and Cheng, H.-M.
year 2003
title Toward a machine for living: A literature survey of smart homes
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 419-422
summary Are we finally archiving Le Corbusier’s vision of the house as a machine for living? This paper examines houses of future with ubiquitous computing. We review recent research on smart homes and experimental prototype studies of the domestic environment. We survey several new concepts of architectural and device design, and study technologies for creating smart homes. We envisage a new generation of CAAD designers, who may integrate information technologies together with traditional building materials achieve a new machine for living as Le Corbusier once did.
keywords Smart homes; ubiquitous computing; CAAD
series eCAADe
email M9013213@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ec9c
authors Kvan, Th., Wong, J.T.H. and Vera, A.H.
year 2003
title THE CONTRIBUTION OF STRUCTURAL ACTIVITIES TO SUCCESSFUL DESIGN
source International Journal of Computer Applications in Technology , 16:2/3, pp. 122-126
summary Examining case studies in design teaching and their analysis; we identify the role of structural activities and other solution searching activities in design learning and problem solving. The case studies follow students working on the same problem under two conditions – one group is taught using traditional face-to-face teaching while the other group is additionally supported by a text-based web board. The design activities of two students were followed in each condition through a semester; followed by in-depth interviews at the end of semester. The results show that cases with above average design work involved more structural activities than the mediocre cases. It also showed that design problem dissections are more organized in the better cases. These successful cases engaged in textual expression of their design solutions. Computer tools for design should therefore support multiple representations of design work.
keywords Structure Activity; Representation; Text; Models; Teaching; Learning
series journal paper
type normal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2004/09/24 12:39

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id b1f3
id b1f3
authors Rafi A, Karboulonis P, Fazidin J, Badrolhisham H
year 2003
title Virtual environments in architecture and planning design: 4 possible approaches
source International Journal of Design Computing
summary Advancements in information retrieval (IR), local and wide area networks (LAN, WAN) and the Internet, human-computer interaction (HCI), and virtual reality (VR) technologies have enabled the emergence and availability of affordable real-time computer data visualisation and manipulation systems that can be deployed and interfaced to most Computer Aided Design (CAD) software systems. However, the rapid advancement and adoption of information visualisation in different areas is currently challenging VR system designers to formulate and deploy strategies and tools to effectively visualise, navigate and effectively communicate various types of information within a virtual environment (VE). A further problem relates to the fact that even within a single area or application the requirements are still diverse to the extent that different approaches and technologies still need to be employed before a satisfactory solution is reached.

This paper presents four possible approaches in identifying and designing effective VR systems for architecture and planning design to allow the user to effectively communicate and share their experiences and ideas in a collaborative manner. It is also proposed that VEs should look beyond plain representations and reproductions of the real world environments that they portray and bear higher interpretation and expression values. The value of eliciting structuring and interfacing information and knowledge to a VE is also highlighted, as is the need for efficient database systems and CAD systems capable of exchanging information and data with VEs. Current efforts in prolonging the lifetime of VEs are being examined through four case studies that highlight the ever-escalating requirements that currently face VR researchers.

keywords Virtual Reality, Virtual Environment, Collaborative Design
series journal paper
type normal paper
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
more http://wwwfaculty.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/ijdc/vol05/papers/rafiFrameset.htm
last changed 2006/09/29 01:05

_id cf2003_m_024
id cf2003_m_024
authors SEGERS, Nicole S. and de VRIES, Bauke
year 2003
title The Idea Space System - Words as Handles to a Comprehensive Data Structure
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 31-40
summary The Idea Space System is a CAAD system that supports an architect in the early phase of the design process, by reducing fixation in the process and enhancing the ‘flow’ of work. Mostly in the field of CAAD research, the emphasis lies on sketching or modelling. However the architect uses multiple representations in developing the design. In this research the focus lies on the use of words. The Idea Space System captures all design data and then uses the words to provide the architect with new associations and relations between words (real time), which stimulate the generation of new ideas. Architecture students have used our first prototype of the Idea Space System in a small experiment. This gave us better insight in the ideas and relations made by the architect in the early phase of the design process and what kind of feedback preferred. Afterwards a study was done about the representation of the feedback. In this paper we focus on the textual input provided by the architecture students and the description of the Idea Space System, handling this textual input and providing the architecture students with the proper feedback.
keywords conceptual, information modelling, design thinking, text
series CAAD Futures
email b.d.vries@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/11/22 06:23

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id cf2003_m_015
id cf2003_m_015
authors CHIU, Yi-Chang and CHIU, Mao-Lin
year 2003
title Right Tools for Designing Free-form Geometry More than Representation and Manipulation
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 433-444
summary This paper examines what the appropriate strategy for designers to handle the complex object is and how digital and conventional tools are involved in presenting and representing design artefacts for presenting design ideas and deliver design information, particularly in 3D free-form geometry. A series of precedent studies are conducted to examine the argument. The manipulation of digital tools is not merely a technical problem but a strategy about what the right tool for designing geometry is and how design process and principles are innovated. Two demonstrative projects are presented to illustrate how designers can better analyse and define the best choice of medium and design tools, and create a digital design platform to reach the merit of the tools created.
keywords design thinking, digital tools, free-form, prototype
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id caadria2003_b7-1
id caadria2003_b7-1
authors Kuo, Jen-Hui
year 2003
title A Diagram-Based Computer-Aided Design Interface in Conceptual Design
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 939-950
summary The paper describes a prototype of diagram-based interface (which we call DBI) in conceptual design. We are interested in the interface in visual thinking process. From diagram studies in three areas, we summarize the concepts as the essential utility of DBI. Then we introduce the component of DBI, implementation and mechanism.
series CAADRIA
email kjh@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id 572a
id 572a
authors Mao-Lin Chiu (ed.)
year 2003
title CAAD TALKS 2: DIMENSIONS OF DESIGN COMPUTATION
source Taipei, Taiwan, Garden City Publishing Ltd.
summary This is the second book of a serial of CAAD Talks publication. In this volume, 17 articles in regarding with the studies in design computation and cognition are compiled. The review of CAAD pioneer work such as H. A. Simon, W. Mitchell, T. Sasada, U. Flemming, J. Gero, O. Akin, G. Schmitt., M. Gross, etc.
keywords Design computation, CAAD research
type keynote paper
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
last changed 2004/04/10 10:11

_id ecaade03_279_128_mueller
id ecaade03_279_128_mueller
authors Mueller, Volker and Talbott, Kyle
year 2003
title Architectural Design Methods with Commercial Computer Aided Design Systems
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 279-286
summary This paper seeks to contribute to the discussion about the changed expectations towards computers as design tools by presenting three case studies describing how a computer aided design (CAD) system is used in a design setting. The first case describes how the commercial CAD system is presented to students of architecture at a university. The second and third case studies show how designers in an architectural firm have evolved distinctly different ways of augmenting their creative thinking using the CAD system. The three cases demonstrate how designers adopt standard tools and adapt their individual design processes to utilize digital media creatively.
keywords CAD, digital design, architectural profession, innovative processes, creativeprocesses
series eCAADe
email vmueller@nbbj.com
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id avocaad_2003_05
id avocaad_2003_05
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2003
title Autonomous mechanisms in architectural design systems
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary The development of architectural design systems that describe fully the form, structure and behaviour of a design relies heavily on the incorporation of intelligence in the representations, analyses, transformations and transactions used by the computer. Traditionally such intelligence takes either of two forms. The first is a methodical framework that guides actions supported by the design system (usually in a top-down fashion). The second is local, intelligence mechanisms that resolve discrete, relatively well-defined subproblems (often with limited if any user intervention). Local intelligent mechanisms offer the means for adaptability and transformability in architectural design systems, including the localization of global tendencies. This refers both to the digital design technologies and to the historical, cultural and contextual modifications of design styles and approaches.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email A.Koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id caadria2003_a1-1
id caadria2003_a1-1
authors Burrow, A., Burry, J., More, G., Tengono, Y. and Burry, M.
year 2003
title Visual and Sonic Communication Representations to Support Design Interaction
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 29-42
summary Interaction between collaborating parties exerts strong and surprising forces on the design process and thus its outcomes. Hence, there is much to be gained by investigating the nature of these communications. By definition, an organisation establishes clear protocols to realise effective communication, and does so in response to business needs. In contrast, creative endeavours must often harness loose teams of specialised individuals, working in different contexts, disciplines, and language bases, and relying on nonformalised yet highly selective exchanges of information. It is therefore a considerable challenge to comprehend and improve these processes. One approach is to exploit the discrete information contained within digital communications to produce models of these complex conditions. This paper reports preliminary work to identify the components of an email visualisation system. The goal is to apprehend developing structures, providing the collective with the capacity for reflection.
series CAADRIA
email andrew.burrow@rmit.edu.au, jane.burry@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id acadia03_003
id acadia03_003
authors Chang, W. and Woodbury, R.
year 2003
title Undo Reinterpreted
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 19-27
summary The class of operations known as “undo” has proven to be a valuable addition to most professional work tools. In practice though, its use is frustrating: undo often undoes too much. Its essential informal semantics are that it returns the user to a prior state by recapitulating all intervening states. Why not give the user greater control over which aspects of a design to undo? An alternative is to seek to reuse prior work in any logically-coherent pattern—user input is a precious commodity. The area of generative systems provides insights in a search for alternatives to undo, in particular that prior user and system actions can be changed and reused in new contexts. We contingently introduce a concept we label as design promotions to describe system designs that demonstrate a tight coupling between interactive authorship and system-led generation, that treat past user actions as valuable intentional statements, and that treat alternative user choices as first-class objects of concern. In practice these three properties emphasize reuse. We briefly survey the current state of undo-like operations and potential candidates for implementing design promotions strategies. Through examples, we demonstrate approaches to realizing undo-like operations over specific representations, especially that of constructive solid geometry.
series ACADIA
email wchang@sfu.ca
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ee5c
id ee5c
authors D Gunaratnam, T Degroff and JS Gero
year 2003
title IMPROVING NEURAL NETWORK MODELS OF PHYSICAL SYSTEMS THROUGH DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS
source Journal of Applied Soft Computing 2(4): 283-296.
summary The paper presents a technique for generating concise neural network models of physical systems. The neural network models are generated through a two-stage process. The first stage uses information embedded in the dimensions or units in which the data is represented. Dimensional analysis techniques are used initially to make this information explicit, and a limited search in the neural network architecture space is then conducted to determine dimensionless representations of variables/parameters that perform well for a given model complexity. The second stage uses information available in the numerical values of the data to search for high-level dimensionless variables/parameters, generated from simple combinations of dimensionless quantities generated in the first stage and which result in concise neural network models with improved performance characteristics. The search for these high-level dimensionless variables/parameters is conducted in an enhanced representation space using functional link networks with flat or near flat architectures. The use and effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated for three applications. The first is the design and analysis of reinforced concrete beams, which is representative of the class of problems associated with the design and analysis of composites. The second is the classical elastica problem, for predicting non-linear post-buckled behaviour of columns and the third, the analysis of a bent bar under a specified combination of loads.
keywords neural networks, dimensional analysis
series journal
type normal paper
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2004/04/09 23:57

_id cf2003_m_033
id cf2003_m_033
authors DAVE, Bharat
year 2003
title Hybrid Spaces of Practice
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 181-190
summary Research projects in computational design typically view digital tools as existing independently of their physical settings. However, what we witness are hybrid spaces of practice, one in which there is an increasing fusion and overlap of physical and digital objects and environments. Instead of focusing on digital tools and information in isolation, this paper argues for the need to conceptualise and experiment with hybrid work environments through combinations of place, time, scale, resolution and other dimensions to develop hybrid spaces of practice. The paper describes experiments with a work environment that consists of multiple displays and representations to motivate and characterise hybrid spaces of physical and digital work environments.
keywords collaboration, ephemeral, tangible, virtual environment
series CAAD Futures
email b.dave@unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id heyhlighenijdc2003
id HeyhlighenIJDC2003
authors Heylighen, Ann and Segers, Nicole
year 2003
title Look Who's Suggesting
source International Journal of Design Computing, 2003, Volume 6
summary During design architects do not only sketch, they combine different kinds of information and representations. The combination of text, image, sketch and/or draft can provoke new associations that keep the design process going. The sketchbook presented here enables architects to use all representations simultaneously, so as to fully exploit their cross-fertilisation. More importantly, it steadily makes suggestions for continuing development of design ideas. These suggestions can take the form of words that are semantically related to the users’ ideas, or of images showing how other architects have developed related ideas into built artefacts. To this end, the sketchbook captures all information the architect/user puts ‘on paper’ and forwards it to a design idea recorder/interpreter called Idea Space System (ISS). In trying to understand the user’s ideas, ISS places all elements captured into a gigantic network, as if part of the frame of reference is made explicit. In the network nodes are words, sketches or images, while links represent relations of various origins. The semantic relations that ISS identifies are shown to the user. At the same time, words are processed as search criteria in DYNAMO, a growing architectural case base, to detect and display design projects that exemplify related ideas. Through the explicit links between early ideas and concrete design cases, the sketchbook acts as a permanent source of inspiration, while stimulating both architects’ creativity and their awareness of the downstream implications of design ideas.
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/journal/vol6/
last changed 2004/03/25 16:51

_id avocaad_2003_20
id avocaad_2003_20
authors Jaroslaw Szewczyk
year 2003
title Digital Representations of Values and Heritage in Architecture
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary The paper presents the analyses of potential of networked media and computer tools for acting with the digital representations of local cultural values in order to describe and manage architectural cultural heritage. The classification of cultural heritage identifiers is presented, focussing on its applicability to organise digital storage and computer-assisted acting with cultural heritage.The objective of the paper is to inspire discussion about representing of “cultural identity” of digital data, in emphasize to possibilities of creating more digital tools and methods for management of cultural heritage. It is stated that handling complexity of architectural design should refer to heritage values. Generally, digital representations of architectural objects, similarly to real architecture, must have their cultural identities.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email jarsz@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

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