CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 599

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id maver_106
id maver_106
authors Maver, T.W. and Petric, J.
year 2003
title Security Sustainable Environments: The role of Computer Modelling
source Chapter 9 in Bioclimatic Design and Urban Generation (Ed Babalis, D), Edizione Polistampa, pp. 59-64
summary Design is the activity of making explicit proposals for a change from some existing state to some future state which more closely approximates to mankind's concept of the ideal. As such it embraces a wide spectrum of human endeavour; the outcomes of design activity are part and parcel of our everyday life and are determinants, for better or worse, of our man-made future. In common with all complex human functions the activity of design is ill-understood: it involves the most rational and systematic process of human thought and also the most intuitive and conjectural leaps within the human mind.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:36

_id sigradi2003_060
id sigradi2003_060
authors Tramontano, Marcelo and Trevisan, Nilton
year 2003
title A dimensão digital de Solonópole, Brasil (Digital dimensions of Solonópole, Brazil)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary In the countryside of Ceara state, one of the poorest of Brazil, stays the city of Solonopole. Despite the lack of resources, some applications of information and communication technologies are being employed in daily life, by low income population. Almost all of local schools have computers and also free access to the internet, and so do citizens from their houses but also from a telecentro. This is only possible thanks to the use of free software, as Linux, and radio waves connection.
keywords Solonopole, information and communication technologies, internet, low-income population, telecenter
series SIGRADI
email tramont@sc.usp.br
last changed 2016/03/10 09:01

_id ecaade03_237_51_zone
id ecaade03_237_51_zone
authors Lee, Y.Z. Lim, C.K. and Liu, Y.T.
year 2003
title Multiple digital media in realizing various urban spaces: Project 2050 Taiwan
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 237-246
summary In Taiwan, it is a common phenomenon that landscape, urban spaces, and buildings are not considered as a whole by governments at all levels and private clients. More terribly, the government has never proposed any urban statement for the future. The Minister strongly therefore proposes this statement: 2050 vision Taiwan, aim to design the public spaces for the life of Taiwan in the year 2050. The Council for Culture Affairs plans to spend two years to cover 100 locations and invite 20 design teams to provide new vision of the places. Our design team, AleppoZONE first conducts the initial stage of this project that includes three areas of Taiwan: Taipei as the capital of Taiwan is expected to become a better place reflecting new and old space combination. Hsinchu is planned to explore the prototype for a digital city where digital technology is wellinstalled in the city plaza and public buildings. In the island of Pen-Hu, the ecology and high-tech transportation are equally considered to shape Pen-Hu as an island with nature. In the process, design team successfully synthesizes digital models and dynamic films into virtual and physical coexisting environmental animations by using multiple digital media in realizing the 2050 vision cities. The aim of this research is to give a throughout introduction of this project.
keywords Digital media; urban spaces; representation
series eCAADe
email zone@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id caadria2003_a7-2
id caadria2003_a7-2
authors Papamichael, K.
year 2003
title The Role of Computers in the Building Life Cycle - What Computers Can and Cannot Do
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 905-918
summary The objective of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework that facilitates the development of integrated software environments that address the data and process needs of all building-related disciplines through the whole buil ding life cycle. The conceptual framework is based on a comprehensive analysis of the data and processes involved in d ecision-making, which is the common abstraction of all disciplines throughout the building life cycle. The role of computers is examined in every step of the decision-making process and through the building life cycle, focusing on what computers can and cannot do. The capabilities of computers are the used to present a vision for what the future of building design, construction and operation may be. While the vision is based on technologies that are already available, its realization requires significant research and development efforts. Conceptual, technical and strategic challenges to realizing the vision are presented and discussed.
series CAADRIA
email kostas@ucla.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id cf2011_p163
id cf2011_p163
authors Park, Hyoung-June
year 2011
title Mass-Customization in the Design of 4,000 Bus Stops
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 265-278.
summary In Hawaii, ‚"TheBus‚" has been a main transportation system since 1971. Considering the high cost of living in Hawaii and the absence of a rail system, the use of ‚"TheBus‚" has been an instrumental vein of the city life in Honolulu with rhythmical pauses at about 4,000 bus stops in Honolulu. However, existing undifferentiated bus stops are developed from a cost effective mass production system so that they have been problematic for satisfying specific needs from various site conditions. In this research, an integrated computational method of mass-customization for designing 4,000 bus stops is introduced. According to various site conditions, the design of each bus stop is customized. Unlike the mass‚Äêproduced bus stops commonly seen in cities today, the proposed computational method in this paper produces bus stop design outcomes that fit into the physical characteristics of the location in which they are installed. Mass-customization allows for the creation and production of unique or similar buildings and building components, differentiated through digitally‚Äêcontrolled variation (Kolarevic, 2003). The employment of a computational mass‚Äêcustomization in architectural design extends the boundary of design solutions to the satisfaction of multi-objective requirements and unlimited freedom to search alternative solutions (Duarte, 2001; Caldas, 2006). The computational method developed in this paper consists of 1) definition of a prototype, 2) parametric variation, 3) manual deformation, and 4) simulation based deformation. The definition of a prototype is the development of a basic design to be transformed for satisfying various conditions given from a site. In this paper, the bus stop prototype is developed from the analysis of more than 300 bus stops and the categorization of the existing bus stops according to their physical conditions, contextual conditions, climatic conditions, and existing amenities. Based upon the outcome of the analysis, the design variables of a bus stop prototype are defined. Those design variables then guide the basic physical parameters for changing the physical configuration of the prototype according to a given site. From this, many possible design outcomes are generated as instances for further developments. The process of manual deformation is where the designer employs its intuition to develop the selected parametric variation. The designer is compelled to think about the possible implication derived from formal variation. This optional process allows every design decision to have a creative solution from an individual designer with an incidental quality in aesthetics, but substantiated functional quality. Finally the deformation of the selection is guided and controlled by the influence of sun direction/ exposure to the selection. The simulation based deformation starts with the movement of the sun as the trigger for generating the variations of the bus stop prototype. The implementation of the computational method was made within the combination of MEL (Maya Enbedded Language), autodesk MAYA and Ecotect environment.
keywords mass-customization, parametric variation, simulation based deformation
series CAAD Futures
email hjpark@hawaii.edu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 64c0
id 64c0
authors Pektas, S T
year 2003
title A FRAMEWORK FOR BUILDING DESIGN PROCESS MODELING WITH PARAMETER-BASED DESIGN STRUCTURE MATRICES
source In C. J. Anumba (Ed.), Innovative Developments in Architecture, Engineering, and Construction. (pp. 25-31). Rotterdam: MillPress
summary Architecture/Engineering/Construction (AEC) industry is one of the multidisciplinary domains in which collaboration among related parties is utmost important. While the knowledge needed for building processes are distributed among the different participants from diverse disciplinary backgrounds, the product of their activities, i.e. the building itself, must be highly integrated. Despite the intense flow of information between design professionals, there is a lack of research to better understand and manipulate these flows. Furthermore, most of the current process modeling tools in the AEC industry do not enable analyses of iteration in the process and they represent the process at high levels with very little information at lower levels. In order to resolve the issues mentioned above, this paper introduces the use of parameter-based dependency structure matrix as a process modeling and system analysis tool for building design. The method reveals insights into the process structure, optimum sequence of parameter decisions, iterative cycles and concurrency in the process. A knowledge management framework for parameter-based DSM applications is proposed and the application of the framework is demonstrated through a real life building design problem.
keywords Design Integration, Design Process Modeling, Information Flow, and Parameter-based Dependency Structure Matrix
series other
type normal paper
email suletasli@gmail.com
last changed 2005/12/01 14:52

_id ijac20031306
id ijac20031306
authors Rall, Juan Carlos
year 2003
title The Digital Environment of Urban Dynamic Analysis
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 3
summary Urban sprawl and complexity are increasing at an alarming rate causing huge energetic waste and affecting the quality of life of people and life on earth in general. This paper proposes Urban Dynamic Analysis as a feasible approach to address this negative phenomenon. Urban Dynamic Analysis is a multidisciplinary holistic method that inquires into temporal relations between structures and related characteristics in cities. A range of simulation tools are being adapted and developed aiming to assess different morphological configurations of urban spaces, to improve the welfare of citizens and to optimise energy consumption. All these tools are based on digital image utilization, with simple computational techniques.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ecaade03_017_136_franz
id ecaade03_017_136_franz
authors Franz, G., Von der Heyde, M. and Bülthoff, H.H.
year 2003
title An empirical approach to the experience of architectural space in VR - Exploring relations between features and affective appraisals of rectangular interiors
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 17-24
summary While it is well known that the built environment influences our emotional state, it is often difficult to attribute these experiences to particular properties. In fact, a systematic investigation of the relation between physical structure and emotional experience of architecture has not yet been done. Now virtual reality simulations facilitate a completely controlled variation of spatial properties and thus allow to empirically evaluate architectural hypothesises. The aim of the presented study was to investigate which factors from a component-based description of rooms significantly correlate with cardinal dimensions of experience. In a perceptual experiment experiental qualities of 16 virtual vacant rectangular interiors were rated in eight principal categories by 16 participants using the semantic differential scaling technique. The scenes were generated by a custom made graphics tool that also automatically generated the component-based scene descriptions. The data analysis revealed several interesting correlations between scene features and rated experience: For example, a preference for ratios near to the golden section could be observed for spatial proportions, which are not directly perceivable. Altogether, a set of five independent factors (openness, two room proportions, room area and balustradeheight) appeared to be effective for widely describing the observed variance of the averaged attributed experiental qualities. Our combination of realistic virtual reality simulations and psychophysical data raising methods proved to be effective for basic architectural research. It allowed us to demonstrate quantitative relations between physical properties from a component-based description of architectural space and its emotional experience.
keywords Experiental Qualities; Psychophysics; Correlation Analysis; Virtual Reality
series eCAADe
email gf@tuebingen.mpg.de
more http://www.kyb.tuebingen.mpg.de/~gf
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id acadia03_036
id acadia03_036
authors Gerzso, J. Michael
year 2003
title On the Limitations of Shape Grammars: Comments on Aaron Fleisher’s Article “Grammatical Architecture?”
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 279-287
summary Shape grammars were introduced by Gips and Stiny in 1972. Since then, there have been many articles and books written by them and their associates. In 1992, Aaron Fleisher, a professor at the School of Planning, MIT, wrote a critique of their work in an article titled “Grammatical Architecture?” published in the journal Environment and Planning B. According to him, Gips, Stiny and later Mitchell, propose a hypothesis that states that shape grammars are presumed to represent knowledge of architectural form, that grammars are “formable,” and that there is a visual correspondence to verbal grammar. The strong version of “the hypothesis requires that an architectural form be equivalent to a grammar.” Fleisher considers these hypotheses unsustainable, and argues his case by analyzing the differences between language, and architecture, and by dealing with the concepts of lexicons, syntax and semantics. He concludes by stating that architectural design is negotiated in two modalities: the verbal and the visual, and that equivalences are not at issue; they do not exist. If there is such thing as a language for design, it would provide the means to maintain a discussion of the consequences in one mode, of the state and conditions of the other. Fleisher’s observations serve as the basis of this paper, a tribute to him, and also an opportunity to present an outline to an alternate approach or hypothesis to shape grammars, which is “nonlinguistic” but “generative,” in the sense that it uses production rules. A basic aspect of this hypothesis is that the only similarity between syntactic rules in language and some rules in architecture is that they are recursive.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id acadia03_028
id acadia03_028
authors Shih, Chien-Hung
year 2003
title To Proceed Analysis of Dynamic Virtual Environment by Using Physical Model as a Protagonist
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 219-225
summary This paper intends to combine architecture with state-of-the-art software technologies and operational methods of other domains to free architectural rendering from the restrictions of cold, still graphics or unrealistic computer pictures. The author transforms physical models into digital models through industrial design software, and synthesizes these digital models into motion pictures of the environment via film production software. This way, a designer can effectively turn the ideas of his mind into rough handmade models, instead of spending enormous amounts of time building computer models, and viewers will be able to quickly grasp the conditions of the site through the motion pictures.
series ACADIA
email shihnj@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id acadia03_062
id acadia03_062
authors Fure, Adam and Daubmann, Karl
year 2003
title housemc - Mass-CraftingNumerical instructions for construction
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 434
summary Craft oriented culture was eventually displaced by mass-production, and it was not until the early 1990’s when a new paradigm began to emerge, one of infinite customer driven flexibility. Mass customization promises a flexible and efficient mode of production for customized parts or services at low cost. The catalyst for such a revolution has been computer-aided design and computer controlled manufacturing.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ijac20031305
id ijac20031305
authors Kos, José R.
year 2003
title 3D models of urban icons: tracing Benjamin and Koolhaas
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 3
summary Walter Benjamin and Rem Koolhaas developed two significant investigations, which explored the culture of Paris and New York through the analysis of their architectural artifacts. Their research projects successfully construct, from a few meaningful components of the built environment, an understanding of the overall city and its society. The objective of this paper is to address the similarities between the research carried out at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and the work of these two acclaimed writers. Our group aims to select urban icons, from different moments and areas in Rio de Janeiro, to be studied in order to understand the city evolution in the 20th Century. The distinguished Ministry of Education building is the investigation's prototype, analyzed thorough several 3D models and other digital techniques. We conclude that a thorough study of Benjamin's and Koolhaas' work should be considered a primary support for the interrogation of our own investigation.
series journal
type normal paper
email josekos@ufrj.br
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id sigradi2003_096
id sigradi2003_096
authors Alvarez, Valeria and Albero, Constanza
year 2003
title Una rama en la arquitectura de la era digital (A branch in architecture of the digital age)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary Genetic information determines the germ of life, the first idea, that encloses all the power of creation. In every "germ" lays the identity, the strength to seek and fulfill expression in form. History, technical and scientific progress require new answers and provide new tools while encouraging investigation. A "Branch", a simple nature element, is reinterpreted into bits of information, reconstructed after being apprehended. This process reveals new elements that could have never been conceived with traditional methods. Nature and Technology complement each other in an embriological growing system that provides a new concept in the construction of real spaces.
series SIGRADI
email valvarez@farq.unr.edu.ar;
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia03_042
id acadia03_042
authors Anzalone, Phillip and Clarke, Cory
year 2003
title Architectural Applications of Complex Adaptive Systems
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 325-335
summary This paper presents methods and case studies of approaching architectural design and fabrication utilizing Complex Adaptive Systems (CASs). The case studies and observations described here are findings from a continuing body of research investigating applications of computational systems to architectural practice. CASs are computational mechanisms from the computer science field of Artificial Life that provide frameworks for managing large numbers of elements and their inter-relationships. The ability of the CASs to handle complexity at a scale unavailable through non-digital means provides new ways of approaching architectural design, fabrication, and practice.
series ACADIA
email phil@a-node.net
last changed 2003/11/27 14:22

_id sigradi2003_075
id sigradi2003_075
authors Arroyo, Julio
year 2003
title Imagen del espacio público e imagen digital (Image of the public space and digital image)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary This paper refers to the concept, image and meaning of the public space in media size cities. The premise is the displacement of the social comprehension and valuation of the public due to economical, political and cultural features of contemporary. The concept of public understood as an adjective of urban space moves to the public as a substantive that refers to a general condition of life in city. Digital image and its informational manipulation are the main resources for processing the public. The research depends on images both from its methodological or epistemological point of view.
series SIGRADI
email jarroyo@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2003_071
id sigradi2003_071
authors Arroyo, Julio and Chiarella, Mauro
year 2003
title Laboratorio proyectual (Design Laboratory)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary The concern about public space, digital graphic and a non-habitual theoretical background are the elements of an on-process research this paper relates to. The premise of the research is the current uncertain experience of both socio-cultural and physical-spatial public space in an Argentinean intermediate city. The focus is a workshop carried out to explore how forms for the public space may be designed when urban conditions are unstable, such the case of vacant areas, lost places or terrain-vague. Digital liquid shapes and post-structural concepts are alternative resources applied to this exploration that assumes the cultural and material complexity of our urban life.
series SIGRADI
email jarroyo@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2008_049
id sigradi2008_049
authors Benamy, Turkienicz ; Beck Mateus, Mayer Rosirene
year 2008
title Computing And Manipulation In Design - A Pedagogical Experience Using Symmetry
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary The concept of symmetry has been usually restricted to bilateral symmetry, though in an extended sense it refers to any isometric transformation that maintains a certain shape invariant. Groups of operations such as translation, rotation, reflection and combinations of these originate patterns classified by modern mathematics as point groups, friezes and wallpapers (March and Steadman, 1974). This extended notion represents a tool for the recognition and reproduction of patterns, a primal aspect of the perception, comprehension and description of everything that we see. Another aspect of this process is the perception of shapes, primary and emergent. Primary shapes are the ones explicitly represented and emergent shapes are the ones implicit in the others (Gero and Yan, 1994). Some groups of shapes known as Semantic Shapes are especially meaningful in architecture, expressing visual features so as symmetry, rhythm, movement and balance. The extended understanding of the concept of symmetry might improve the development of cognitive abilities concerning the creation, recognition and meaning of forms and shapes, aspects of visual reasoning involved in the design process. This paper discusses the development of a pedagogical experience concerned with the application of the concept of symmetry in the creative generation of forms using computational tools and manipulation. The experience has been carried out since 1995 with 3rd year architectural design students. For the exploration of compositions based on symmetry operations with computational support we followed a method developed by Celani (2003) comprising the automatic generation and update of symmetry patterns using AutoCAD. The exercises with computational support were combined with other different exercises in each semester. The first approach combined the creation of two-dimensional patterns to their application and to their modeling into three-dimensions. The second approach combined the work with computational support with work with physical models and mirrors and the analysis of the created patterns. And the third approach combined the computational tasks with work with two-dimensional physical shapes and mirrors. The student’s work was analyzed under aspects such as Discretion/ Continuity –the creation of isolated groups of shapes or continuous overlapped patterns; Generation of Meta-Shapes –the emergence of new shapes from the geometrical relation between the generative shape and the structure of the symmetrical arrangement; Modes of Representation –the visual aspects of the generative shape such as color and shading; Visual Reasoning –the derivation of 3D compositions from 2D patterns by their progressive analysis and recognition; Conscious Interaction –the simultaneous creation and analysis of symmetry compositions, whether with computational support or with physical shapes and mirrors. The combined work with computational support and with physical models and mirrors enhanced the students understanding on the extended concept of symmetry. The conscious creation and analysis of the patterns also stimulated the student’s understanding over the different semantic possibilities involved in the exploration of forms and shapes in two or three dimensions. The method allowed the development of both syntactic and semantic aspects of visual reasoning, enhancing the students’ visual repertoire. This constitutes an important strategy in the building of the cognitive abilities used in the architectural design process.
keywords Symmetry, Cognition, Computing, Visual reasoning, Design teaching
series SIGRADI
email mateusbeck@pop.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2003_043
id sigradi2003_043
authors Bianchi, N., Montelpare, A. and Soboleosky, L.
year 2003
title El aprendizaje inicial del proceso proyectual (The initial learning of the design process)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary The act of design using the graphic language is esential to the organization and determination of the process. Introducing digital tools modifies the design project research. Its application faces the traditional experience and encourages different demands conceptually and operatively. We wonder if the use of digital media, from the very beginning, is possible or pupils must have trainning in the use of conventional graphic in order to be meaningfull. Our proposition is to include digital technology from the beginnitng of the teaching process, in order to explore the potencial of each mode and promoving to learn the normative background.
keywords Initial learning design, analog and digital modes
series SIGRADI
email nbianchi@dat1.net.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

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