CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 598

_id ascaad2004_paper12
id ascaad2004_paper12
authors Al-Qawasmi, Jamal
year 2004
title Reflections on e-Design: The e-Studio Experience
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary The influence of digital media and information technology on architectural design education and practice is increasingly evident. The practice and learning of architecture is increasingly aided by and dependant on digital media. Digital technologies not only provide new production methods, but also expand our abilities to create, explore, manipulate and compose space. In contemporary design education, there is a continuous demand to deliver new skills in digital media and to rethink architectural design education in the light of the new developments in digital technology. During the academic years 2001-2003, I had the chance to lead the efforts to promote an effective use of digital media for design education at Department of Architecture, Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST). Architectural curriculum at JUST dedicated much time for teaching computing skills. However, in this curriculum, digital media was taught in the form of "software use" education. In this context, digital media is perceived and used mainly as a presentation tool. Furthermore, Computer Aided Architectural Design and architectural design are taught in separate courses without interactions between the two.
series ASCAAD
email jamalq@kfupm.edu.sa
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id 792a
authors Blaschke, Thomas and Tiede, Dirk
year 2003
title Bridging GIS-based landscape analysis/modelling and 3D-simulation.Is this already 4D?
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary Several studies have used remote sensing to map patterns of e.g. deforestation or to analyse the rates of land use change. Thesestudies have proven useful for interpreting the causes of urbanization, deforestation etc. and the impact of such changes on theregion. Monitoring of change (e.g. deforestation or reforestation) is frequently perceived as one of the most important contributionsof remote sensing technology to the study of global ecological and environmental change (Roughgarden et al. 1991). Manyresearchers believe that the integration of remote sensing techniques within analysis of environmental change is essential if ecologistsare to meet the challenges of the future, specifically issues relating to global change; however, in practice, this integration has so farbeen limited (Griffiths & Mather 2000). Considerable difficulties are encountered in linking, on the one hand, the biologies oforganisms and the ecologies of populations to the fluxes of material and energy quantifiable at the level of ecosystems. In this paper,we concentrate on the methodological aspects of the delineation of landscape objects and touch the ecological application onlysuperficially but we elucidate the potential of the proposed methodology for several ecological applications briefly.
series other
email thomas.blaschke@uni-tuebingen.de
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ecaade03_117_101_bund
id ecaade03_117_101_bund
authors Bund, Sébastien and Do, Ellen Yi-Luen
year 2003
title SPOT! Fetch Light - Interactive navigable 3D visualization of direct sunlight
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 117-124
summary SPOT is a 3D environment for direct sunlight visualization. Implemented in Java 3D, SPOT features two distinct and complementary components: Time Projection and Navigable Animation for virtual interaction. SPOT supports multi-dimensional data visualization including sun angle variations with diurnal and annual cycles in threedimensional space. In SPOT users can sketch on any surface in the 3D environment to indicate the area for simulation. SPOT then generates a spatial distribution representation of the illuminance level on a selected surface over time, rendered with colors of varied gradients. SPOT also enables designers to visualize the temporal information of light distribution over time for a given point. For each point clicked on the 3D model, SPOT generates a calendar diagram where the X and Y axis represent the months of the year and the time of the day. The color of each cell of the calendar is the result of the calculation of the light amount reaching the selected point.
keywords Daylighting, virtual worlds, virtual environments, sketching in 3D, gestureinterface, multi-dimension information visualization
series eCAADe
email ellendo@cmu.edu
more http://depts.washington.edu/archbook
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id caadria2003_c2-1
id caadria2003_c2-1
authors Chevrier, C., Bur, D. and Perrin, J. P.
year 2003
title Architecture as a Reference for the Development of A Cad Lighting Tool
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 281-294
summary As light is increasingly perceived as a factor of quality of urban life, it is not surprising that cultural heritage buildings and even civil engineering works are being more and more often illuminated at night. The designers of the projects are revealing a nocturnal vision of the buildings which is often a reflection of the architecture: rhythm, pattern, evenness, symmetry, composition, axes, and so on. The idea of developing a "lighting-modeller" is based upon this assertion. Thus, if we express the needs in terms of functionalities, we can conclude that the hierarchical structure of the architectural edifice can fit in with a "lighting-structure". As a result, concepts like hierarchy, linking, grouping, networking, linearity-polarity, are the basis of the objects and functions that are effective for the great majority of buildings and projects. This "lighting-modeller" can then lead beyond its simulation capabilities to become a design conception tool: hypothesis and variants are quickly realized and tested, and technical data (illumination data, visual comfort) can be obtained as well.
series CAADRIA
email chevrier@crai.archi.fr, bur@crai.archi.fr, perrin@crai.archi.fr
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id acadia03_054
id acadia03_054
authors Hume, Andrew and Schultz, Amy
year 2003
title SANDbox Urbanism - suggestions for deserting the city
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 426
summary This studio sought to examine the unique representational phenomena ofthe city through the design proposal of a Hotel + Experience for Las Vegas. Students were asked to craft their own “realities” - project and program- from research on a series of topics: From all-things-Disney to corporatebranding; from World’s Fairs to themed environments and utopiancommunities; from simulation and synthetic environments to surface, skinand computer graphics concepts. Students drew upon Vegas culture andthe particularities of site (and non-site) to develop proposals which furtherexplored issues of identity construction, consumption and production, andimage in popular culture.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id cf2003_m_062
id cf2003_m_062
authors JUNG, T., GROSS, M. D. and DO, E. Y.-L.
year 2003
title Light Pen - Sketching Light in 3D
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 327-338
summary We describe a lighting design system driven by sketching on 3D virtual models. Conventional lighting design tools simulate the lighting effects of design decisions such as window locations, surface treatments, and fixture placement. Light Pen takes the inverse approach by allowing the designer to indicate desired illumination on a 3D model. This serves as input to a knowledge-based lighting design system, which recommends what lights to use and where to place them, based on the designer's expressed intentions and on the geometry of the space.
keywords knowledge-based, lighting, sketch, virtual environment
series CAAD Futures
email ellendo@cmu.edu
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id sigradi2006_e149b
id sigradi2006_e149b
authors Kendir, Elif
year 2006
title Prêt-à-Construire – An Educational Inquiry into Computer Aided Fabrication
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 162-165
summary This paper aims to show and discuss the relevance of developing necessary strategies for reintegrating the concept of fabrication into the architectural design process. The discussion will be partly based on the outcome of a graduate architectural design studio conducted in Spring semester 2002-2003. The graduate studio was part of a series of exploratory studies conducted on the nature of architectural design process transformed by information technologies. Preceded by studios investigating cognition and representation, this last studio focused on the concept of fabrication. The overarching aim of the studio series was to put CAD and CAM in context both within the actual architectural design process and within architectural education. The last of this series, which will be discussed within the frame of this paper, has specifically focused on CAM and the concept of fabrication in architecture. In accordance with the nature of a design studio, the research was more methodological than technical. The studio derived its main inspiration from the constructional templates used in dressmaking, which can be considered as an initial model for mass customization. In this context, the recladding of Le Corbusier’s Maison Domino was given as the main design problem, along with several methodological constraints. The main constraint was to develop the design idea through constructional drawings instead of representational ones. The students were asked to develop their volumetric ideas through digital 3D CAD models while working out structural solutions on a physical 1/50 model of Maison Domino. There was also a material constraint for the model, where only specified types of non-structural paper could be used. At this stage, origami provided the working model for adding structural strength to sheet materials. The final outcome included the explanation of different surface generation strategies and preliminary design proposals for their subcomponents. The paper will discuss both the utilized methodology and the final outcome along the lines of the issues raised during the studio sessions, some of which could be decisive in the putting into context of CAD – CAM in architectural design process. One such issue is mass customization, that is, the mass production of different specific elements with the help of CAM technologies. Another issue is “open source” design, indicating the possibility of a do-it-yourself architecture, where architecture is coded as information, and its code can be subject to change by different designers. The final key issue is the direct utilization of constructional drawings in the preliminary design phase as opposed to representational ones, which aimed at reminding the designer the final phase of fabrication right from the beginning. Finally, the paper will also point at the problems faced during the conduct of the studio and discuss those in the context of promoting CAM for architectural design and production in countries where there is no actual utilization of these technologies for these purposes yet.
keywords Education; Fabrication; CAM
series SIGRADI
email s3131573@student.rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id acadia03_010
id acadia03_010
authors Kilian, Axel
year 2003
title Fabrication of Partially Double-Curved Surfaces out of Flat Sheet Material Through a 3D Puzzle Approach
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 75-83
summary The topic of this paper is the connection of digital modeling with generative programming and rapid prototyping, to produce physical sketch surface models. The physical surface models are assembled out of developable strips connected through a puzzle-like detail. The use of programming as a design approach allows the generation of connection details that corresponds to the rules of flat sheet rapid prototyping techniques of laser cutting and water jet cutting. With numerically controlled cutting, there is no need to keep the joint detail related to manually achievable forms or to apply a standardized dimension. This paper demonstrates the possibilities of programming to generate cutting geometries that adapt to the local surface properties. The larger perspective of the research approach is the question of how to formulate and capture design intention through programming. What influence does the use of generative modeling in combination with rapid prototyping have on the design language of physical objects?
series ACADIA
email akilian@mit.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id caadria2003_k-1
id caadria2003_k-1
authors Patummanon, Tipsuda
year 2003
title Architecture of A49 - Architecture of Khun Nithi Sathapitanonda [Keynote]
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 5-11
summary I approach a bridge, an escape from the hard concrete floor of Bangkok, and happen to eavesdrop on the silent call of an elephant herd marching into my perception. It now appears in a forest behind the window of a large wall. The forest spreads deeper and deeper beyond the limit of a brick and concrete surface. The wall transforms into the mysterious rain forest of Thailand - robust, complex and healthy. A beam of friendly sunlight penetrates the air of an open well and greets the floor of the forest, it enters to enlighten all of its inhabitants' hearts. ... As I am immersed in the forest, I hear the chimes of its quietness and come face to face with the herd of elephants, marching into the middle of the place. ... All of the elephants in fact are made of wood, however their skin transcends the form of a hard wooden object for it is now transformed into the breathing skin of real elephants - the mothers of the forest. Wherever is felt the breath of the mother of the forest the place flourishes as a healthy world for all life. Here, I can hear the sonority of the quietness upon a visit to the office of A49, the office of Khun Nithi Sathapitanonda.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id 6c78
authors Schechtner, K., Zajicek, J. and Allison, L.
year 2003
title Changes of access in local and global facilities due to the development of transport information systems TIS
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary The advent of communications technology has revolutionised the way that we conduct our affairs. Services are now more prolific andaccessible. Traffic Information Systems are helping to deliver those services. It is important to recognise which services are sought after by the public and how they can be improved by TIS (Traffic InformationSystems). Freight transport is one service that will increase due to the perceived chance in global access (Internet orders) and that canbe improved by TIS. If goods are to be regularly ordered from afar then they need to be cheaper and be delivered quickly. TIS systems through VMS signs, real-time traffic prognosis and public transport information are allowing us to conserve time as part of our daily lifestyles so that we can access our local facilities as readily as the improved freight networks allow us to access our global facilities. The correct implementation of TIS will make transport easier, and reduce congestion times, however it will only be able to do so, if it is possible to break the correlation of increase in GNP and traffic. Otherwise TIS services will still be useful but greatlymuted so.
series other
email katja.schechtner@arsenal.ac.at
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id acadia03_037
id acadia03_037
authors Anders, Peter
year 2003
title Cynergies: Technologies that Hybridize Physical and Cyberspaces
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 289-297
summary This paper presents ways in which cybrids depend for their technology upon three existing models of architectural hybrid: display space, environmental computing, and augmented/mixed reality. Cybrids bring these techniques together into a synergistic whole that depends as much on the observer for its consistency as it does on its comprising technologies. This synergy is a product of corroborative behavior between different modes, which provide cybrid users with a coherent social/spatial experience. The paper notes cybrids’ similarity to theater, not only for their technological dependency, but also for the tacit yet vital role of the observer in their effect.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/27 14:20

_id acadia03_008
id acadia03_008
authors Cabrinha, Mark
year 2003
title Function Follows Form: 10 Sticks (and a Bench)
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 57-65
summary While the introduction of digital media in the design studio often emphasizes virtual realms, the effect of new fabrication technology on the architect brings the architect back to the realm of master-builder rather than distancing the architect from reality. While purely digital projects have pushed the development of form, they have also placed an emphasis on form over material. However, with the intention to physically build a project, the connections between process, form, and material become intertwined. The inception of this project also served as a clear reminder that the tools we use affect the way we think. This project began as a simple idea: how a column becomes animated to form an arch over time. The digitization of this idea took literally minutes in Maya. It was exported and further modeled in AutoCAD, and then rendered and reanimated in 3D Studio-Viz. This was a very brief, two-week introductory project, in a class on drafting and wood light-frame construction. It served to make a greater connection between digital media, the design process, analog drawing, and the role of craft and material.
series ACADIA
email mcabrinh@calpoly.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id caadria2003_a5-3
id caadria2003_a5-3
authors Chang, Teng-Wen and Lai, Ih-Cheng
year 2003
title Navigation In 3D Information Landscape-A 3D Museum for Civic Buildings
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 641-650
summary Navigation is about information that requires visual feedback and spatial orientation in both information representation and userinteraction. Among those, spatial orientation is the primary research question for navigating in 3D information landscape. By inspired by Ware's three control loops, 'spatial metaphors' and 'visual components" are proposed as the fundamental concepts of a navigation framework called 'i-Room'. i-Room is comprised of four constituents-handles, i-Bag, i-Map and Focus/scale. An information landscape based on a repository of diverse digital media of 11 significant civic buildings in Taiwan is designed for testing this navigation framework. An implementation of i-Room based on Muse of navigation realization and their interaction behaviors with spatial metaphors/visual components is also reported in this paper.
series CAADRIA
email tengwen@arch.nctu.edu.tw, ihcheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id sigradi2003_026
id sigradi2003_026
authors Flanagan, Robert
year 2003
title Persistence of Perception: Encoding Reality
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary "Liquid architecture makes liquid cities, cities that change at the shift of value, where visitors with different backgrounds see different landmarks, where neighborhoods vary with ideas held in common, and evolve as the ideas mature or dissolve." In 1991, Marcos Novak in 'Liquid Architectures in Cyberspace' projected a future of individual and blended realities of things perceived and perceived things - a place of "fertile dreams". In the cathedral, "The dream and making were one." In the present he concludes, "Curiously the practice of architecture has become increasingly disengaged from those dreams." This paper addresses inherent limitations in today's digital technology that restrict its ability to participate in the future design of the "fertile dream." It does not address the technology required, but the requirements of the technology.
series SIGRADI
email rflanaga@carbon.cudenver.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id 43f0
id 43f0
authors Flynn, D., van Schaik, P., Blackman, T., Fencott, P.C., Hobbs, B., & Calderon, C.
year 2003
title DEVELOPING A VIRTUAL REALITY-BASED METHODOLOGY FOR PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA: A FEASIBILITY STUDY.
source Journal of CyberPsychology and Behavior, Vol6, Number6, 2003.
summary The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of virtual reality (VR) technology for use by persons with dementia (PWD). Data were obtained directly from six PWD regarding their experiences with a virtual environment (VE) of a large outdoor park. A user-centered method was developed to assess: (a) presence; (b) user inputs; (c) display quality; (d) simulation fidelity; and (e) overall system usability. The extent to which PWD could perform four functional activities in the VE was also investigated (e.g., mailing a letter). In addition, physical and psychological well-being of PWD while interacting with the VE was assessed objectively by recording heart rate during the VR sessions and subjectively with discrete questionnaire items and real-time prompts. Symptom profiles associated with simulator sickness were assessed with an adapted version of the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire. The study found that PWD to some extent experienced presence; perceived that objects were realistic and moved naturally; generally felt in control of the interaction; and demonstrated little difficulty using a joystick for navigation. The study also demonstrated that VR is an appropriate medium for assessing functional behavior within the context of an ecologically valid VE. PWD did not experience any significant increase in symptoms associated with simulator sickness, or detriments to their psychological and physical well-being. These findings demonstrated that it is feasible to work in VEs with PWD.
keywords Dementia, VR
series journal paper
type normal paper
email carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/12/02 10:36

_id ijac20031406
id ijac20031406
authors Fukuda, Tomohiro; Nagahama, Ryuichiro; Kaga, Atsuko; Sasada, Tsuyoshi
year 2003
title Collaboration Support System for City Plans or Community Designs Based on VR/CG Technology
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 4
summary This paper reports on a collaboration support system for city plans or community designs based on virtual reality (VR) or computer graphics (CG) technology. It reports on an extension to an ongoing research programme, and in particular it introduces the developments of portable VR equipment, and an expression method using CG to enable the realistic viewing of night scenes, and application to real projects.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ijac20031108
id ijac20031108
authors Hirschberg, Urs
year 2003
title Transparency In Information Architecture: Enabling Large Scale Creative Collaboration in Architectural Education over the Internet
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary This paper is about networked collaboration in architectural education and about information architecture for networked collaborations. It presents results of a quantitative process analysis of two types of courses in Computer Aided Architectural Design that were taught using database-driven online environments. The main focus of the quantitative analysis is the performance of these online environments as information structures, designed to accommodate the presentation and the peer-to-peer exchange of design information for relatively large groups of between 60 and 150 participants. Using the database records to reconstruct the processes, three different quantitative analyses are described.Their results indicate that for these projects the web-environments were successful in enhancing peer-to-peer learning and that they promoted a more objective assessment of the submitted works. The study also looks at the effect that the environments themselves had on the process. Finally it draws some conclusions about these environments' information architecture: it presents tentative guidelines about how such environments must be designed to handle the dynamic display of design data, from many different authors, in a way that is transparent to the users.
series journal
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ecaade2014_147
id ecaade2014_147
authors James Charlton and Markus Brune
year 2014
title Towards a dynamic evacuation system: developing methodologies to simulate the evacuation capabilities of subway stations in response to a terrorist attack with CBRNE weapons
source Thompson, Emine Mine (ed.), Fusion - Proceedings of the 32nd eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, UK, 10-12 September 2014, pp. 109-118
summary Events in recent times have highlighted the vulnerability of underground public transportation to possible terrorist attacks. A key question therefore is how an evacuation can be accomplished from underground stations safely. The strategy “go up and take the nearest exit to the surface” might not be the best response. Evidence from the Daegu subway station fire in 2003, investigated by Tsujimoto (2003) and Jeon and Hong (2009) establish that smoke or toxic airborne substances from a terrorist attack tend to use the same direct routes used by the fleeing passengers and as result significant injuries or fatalities can occur. This study proposes the concept of a dynamic evacuation system which would guide subway users along safe routes. To test how this system may operate, the study discussed combines measurements from tracer gas experiments with climate measurements to establish how toxic agents spread in subway stations under certain conditions and combines these results with those from pedestrian simulations applied to calculate evacuation times for possible escape routes. By integrating the resulting dataset from these methods, an evidence base of how a dynamic evacuation system may work can start to form.
wos WOS:000361384700010
keywords Pedestrian simulation, subway climatology; cbrne; subway evacuation; tracer gas experiments
series eCAADe
email j.charlton@northumbria.ac.uk
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id acadia03_052
id acadia03_052
authors Juyal, M., Kensek, K. and Knowles, R.
year 2003
title SolCAD: 3D Spatial Design Tool Tool to Generate Solar Envelope
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 411-419
summary In this research the concept of Solar Envelope has been used to develop a 3D Spatial Design Tool tool, SolCAD, for generating an envelope over a given site based on various design parameters. The solar envelope can be imagined as a container, whose boundaries are derived from the sun’s relative motion. Buildings within this container will not overshadow their surroundings during critical periods of solar access for passive and low-energy architecture. The solar envelope is a space-time construct. Its spatial limits are defined by the parameters of land parcel size, shape, orientation, topography and latitude. It also depends on the time or the period of the time for which it is designed. Its time limits are defined by the hours of each day and the season for which solar access is provided to the land parcel (Knowles 1981). This tool intends to generate an envelope over a site of any shape, size and orientation and for different boundary and height conditions of shadow lines. It is suitable for initial stages of building design process to determine the shape of the building even before the design has been conceptualized.
series ACADIA
email manu.juyal@asu.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

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