CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 462

_id caadria2003_b5-2
id caadria2003_b5-2
authors Caldas, Luisa G.
year 2003
title Shape Generation Using Pareto Genetic Algorithms Integrating Conflicting Design Objectives in Low-Energy Architecture
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 681-694
summary The Generative Design System [GDS] presented in this paper was developed to assist designers in researching low-energy architecture solutions. The GDS has the capability to evolve architectural forms that are energy-efficient, while complying to design intentions expressed by the architect, and responding to conflicting objectives. To achieve this evolutionary development, the system integrates a search and optimization method [Genetic Algorithm], a building energy simulation software [DOE2.1E], and Pareto multicriteria optimization techniques. The GDS adaptively generates populations of alternative solutions, from an initial schematic layout and a set of rules and constraints designed by the architect to encode design intentions. The two conflicting objective functions considered in this paper are maximizing daylighting use, and minimizing energy consumption for conditioning the building. The GDS generated an uniformly sampled, continuous Pareto front, from which six points were visualized in terms of the proposed architectural solutions.
series CAADRIA
email luisa@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id ijac20031402
id ijac20031402
authors Caldas, Luisa G.; Norford, Leslie K.
year 2003
title Shape Generation Using Pareto Genetic Algorithms: Integrating Conflicting Design Objectives in Low-Energy Architecture
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 4
summary The Generative Design System [GDS] presented in this paper was developed to assist designers in researching low-energy architecture solutions. The GDS has the capability to evolve architectural forms that are energy-efficient, while complying to design intentions expressed by the architect and responding to conflicting objectives. To achieve this evolutionary development, the system integrates a search and optimization method [Genetic Algorithm], building energy simulation software [DOE2.1E], and Pareto multicriteria optimization techniques. The GDS adaptively generates populations of alternative solutions, from an initial schematic layout and a set of rules and constraints designed by the architect to encode design intentions. The two conflicting objective functions considered in this paper are maximizing daylighting use and minimizing energy consumption for conditioning the building. The GDS generated an uniformly sampled, continuous Pareto front, from which six points were visualized in terms of the proposed architectural solutions.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2003_b1-2
id caadria2003_b1-2
authors Chakraborty, Somen
year 2003
title Automated Generation of Residential Roomlayout within a Constrained Covered Area
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 85-100
summary A significant quantum of all buildings constructed in modern times is designed for residential purpose. A tremendous amount of money is being spent every year for construction of residential buildings. Therefore, optimization of design becomes very important. In a country like India most people in urban area live in houses having constrained area. A significant part of residential units comes under mass housing either as high-rise building blocks or as plotted developments. In any of such schemes there are large number of housing units for a group of families of whom general characteristics are known but characteristics of individual families are not known at the time of designing. This situation is, however, suitable for scientific investigation and analysis based on statistical surveys. Broadly speaking, this paper suggests approach to deal with this situation of finding optimum layout of rooms of a housing unit for any target group of families when the covered area is so constrained that freedom of using different criteria like aesthetics, structural systems, materials and methods of construction in varieties of ways is drastically reduced. In such constrained area for housing units rooms are generally found rectangular within overall rectangular outline of each unit. Method shown here is valid under this restriction. It is also assumed that number of rooms will be restricted to such number that exhaustive search for design is practically possible within a reasonable time with present day capabilities of normally available PCs.
series CAADRIA
email somen_c@eudoramail.com
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id acadia11_272
id acadia11_272
authors Dimcic, Milos; Knippers, Jan
year 2011
title Free-form Grid Shell Design Based on Genetic Algorithms
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 272-277
summary In the 21st century, as free-form design grows in popularity, grid shells are becoming a universal structural solution, enabling the conflation of structure and skin (façade) into one single element (Kolarevic 2003). This paper presents some of the results of a comprehensive research project focused on the automated design and optimization of grid structures over some predefined free form shape, with the goal of generating a stable and statically efficient structure. It shows that by combining design and FEM software in an iterative, Genetic Algorithms-based optimization process, stress and deformation in grid shell structures can be significantly reduced, material can be saved and stability enhanced.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email m.dimcic@itke.uni-stuttgart.de
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id ijac20031208
id ijac20031208
authors Ozel, Filiz; Pahle, Robert; Juyal, Manu
year 2003
title An XML Framework for Simulation and Analysis of Buildings
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 2
summary This study focuses on the problem of how to structure spatial and component based building data with the intention to use it in the simulation and analysis of the performance of buildings. Special attention was paid to the interoperability and optimization of the resulting data files.The study builds its investigation onto XML (Extensible Markup Language) data modeling framework.The authors have studied different ways of arranging building information in XML format for effective data storage and have developed a data modeling framework called bmXML for buildings. Initial results are two-fold: a VBA application was developed to create the appropriate building model in AutoCAD with the intention to write building data in bmXML format, and a JAVA application to view the file thus created.This paper primarily focuses on the former, i.e. the AutoCAD application and the bmXML format.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id sigradi2003_066
id sigradi2003_066
authors Vazquez, J., Armesto, T. and Dri, E.
year 2003
title Análisis del Comportamiento Lumínico en Edificios mediante Herramientas Digitales (Analysis of the lighting Behavior in Buildings by means of Digital Tools)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary In temperate humid climates, like Rosario city, (33 S, 60 W), in which heating and cooling loads are required seasonally, daylighting and artificial lighting optimization, under an energy saving basis are essential issues for designers. Energy reduction in buildings permits lower functioning costs, better maintenance, and overall economy. Electricity consumption in offices has increased in the latest years due to an intensive use of artificial lighting and new appliances (computers, printers). This equipment also generates heat which must be eliminated, increasing further energy consumption. This paper focuses on spaces assessment and adjustment through digital tools aid, so as to evaluate strategies of interior lighting performance.
series SIGRADI
email jvazquez@agatha.unr.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id ascaad2004_paper12
id ascaad2004_paper12
authors Al-Qawasmi, Jamal
year 2004
title Reflections on e-Design: The e-Studio Experience
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary The influence of digital media and information technology on architectural design education and practice is increasingly evident. The practice and learning of architecture is increasingly aided by and dependant on digital media. Digital technologies not only provide new production methods, but also expand our abilities to create, explore, manipulate and compose space. In contemporary design education, there is a continuous demand to deliver new skills in digital media and to rethink architectural design education in the light of the new developments in digital technology. During the academic years 2001-2003, I had the chance to lead the efforts to promote an effective use of digital media for design education at Department of Architecture, Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST). Architectural curriculum at JUST dedicated much time for teaching computing skills. However, in this curriculum, digital media was taught in the form of "software use" education. In this context, digital media is perceived and used mainly as a presentation tool. Furthermore, Computer Aided Architectural Design and architectural design are taught in separate courses without interactions between the two.
series ASCAAD
email jamalq@kfupm.edu.sa
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id avocaad_2003_17
id avocaad_2003_17
authors Anna Maria Chrabin, Jaroslaw Szewczyk and Herman Neuckermans
year 2003
title A Critical Evaluation of Early Stages Software in its Capacity of Coping with Contextual Issues
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary In this paper we analyse critically early design stages software in its capacity of coping with contextual data at large (i.e. representing cultural, aesthetical context, etc.). We identified 5 categories of early stages software: geometry based graphic editors, evaluation architectural software, generative and shape-grammar based systems, evolutionary systems and other systems. Calling the object under creation during of the early stages a CAD conceptual model, we will investigate to what extend this software allows the architect to experience and represent the context in which a design is situated. Especially we will focus on its capacity to allow interaction, playful interaction on our way to the design. Designers, and particularly architects, interact with the local context similarly to interacting in a game: the context influences the users’ decisions, surprises them and causes permanent changes to their ways of thinking. On the other hand, architects permanently shape and reshape the context, and reduce the context to a protean point of reference. Such behaviour characterises creative thinking that is crucial for the early stage of design. The investigation led us to the conclusions that the effective interactivity with the context needs simple rules, a plain interface and data reduced as simple as possible, especially when interaction with the context is performed during the early stages of a design process. The findings can be used in organising computer environments for early-stage design.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email Herman.Neuckermans@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia06_150
id acadia06_150
authors Boza, Luis Eduardo
year 2006
title (Un) Intended Discoveries Crafting the Design Process
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 150-157
summary Computer Numeric Controlled (CNC) fabrication machineries are changing the way we design and build. These technologies have increased productivity through greater efficiencies and have helped to create new forms of practice, including increased specializations and broader collaborative approaches. (Kieran Timberlake 2003: 31). However, some argue that these technologies can have a de-humanizing effect, stripping the human touch away from the production of objects and redistributing the associated skills to machines. (Dormer 1997: 103). The (Digital) Craft studio explored the notions of technology and craft to understand how and when designers should exploit the tools employed (both the hand and the machine) during the design and production processes.
series ACADIA
email boza@cua.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id cf2003_m_001
id cf2003_m_001
authors CHEVRIER, Christine and PERRIN, Jean Pierre
year 2003
title ModLum - Illumination Project Aided Design Tool
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 361-370
summary Illumination phenomena simulation is important for architectural project design and communication: simulation tools must assist efficiently the designer; results have to be reliable and realistic for the decision-makers. Indeed, it is very difficult, for a nonspecialist to imagine the result of an illumination from the light designer plans. Experience shows that the success of a photo-realistic simulation relies essentially on the choice of the light source characteristics and their correct positioning in the scene. This paper first presents the specificities of illumination projects (very large geometrical data bases enlightened by a large amount of light sources) and the difficulties of their set-up. Light arrangement requires tricky compositions, judicious choices and accurate studies. Currently there is no specific modeller for the handling of light sources as they are considered in radiosity software. Then we present the interactive tool we have developed, named ModLum, in order to set up light sources in a 3D architectural model in order to save time during the design step and simplify the source handling. ModLum specifications and principles are presented. Finally, an application is presented: the illumination project of two cloisters in Quito (Ecuador, South America).
keywords architecture, lighting, simulation
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id cf_2003_000
id cf_2003_000
authors Chiu, M.-L., Tsou, J.-Y., Kvan, Th., Morozumi, M. and Jeng, T.-S. (Eds.)
year 2003
title Digital Design - Research and Practice
source Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1 / Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, 464 p.
summary The use of computers in the design of the built environment has reached a watershed. From peripheral devices in the design process, they have in recent years come to take centre stage. An illustration is immediately at hand. Just as the entries to the competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower in 1922 defined the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentieth century, we have a similar marker at the end of the century, the competition in 2002 to replace the World Trade Centre towers in Lower Manhattan offered us a range of architectural solutions that exemplified the state-of-the-art eighty years later, setting forth not only architectural statements but also illustrating clearly the importance of computers in the design of the built environment. In these entries of 2002, we can see that computers have not only become essential to the communication of design but in the investigation and generation of structure, form and composition. The papers in this book are the current state-of-the-art in computer-aided design as it stands in 2003. It is the tenth in a series sponsored by the CAAD Futures Foundation, compiled from papers presented at the biennial CAAD Futures Conferences. As a series, the publications have charted the steady progress in developing the theoretical and practical foundations for applications in design practice. This volume continues in that tradition; thus, this book is entitled Digital Design: Research and Practice. The papers are grouped into three major categories, reflecting thrusts of research and practice, namely: Data and information: its organisation, handling and access, including agents; Virtual worlds: their creation, application and interfaces; and Analysis and creation of form and fabric. The editors received 121 abstracts after the initial call for contributions. From these, 61 abstracts were selected for development into complete papers for further review. From these submissions, 39 papers were chosen for inclusion in this publication. These papers show that the field has evolved from theoretical and development concerns to questions of practice in the decade during which this conference has showcased leading work. Questions of theoretical nature remain as the boundaries of our field expand. As design projects have grasped the potentials of computer-aided design, so have they challenged the capabilities of the tools. Papers here address questions in geometric representation and manipulation (Chiu and Chiu; Kocaturk, Veltkamp and Tuncer), topics that may have been considered to be solved. As design practice becomes increasingly knowledge based, better ways of managing, manipulating and accessing the complex wealth of design information becomes more pressing, demanding continuing research in issues such as modelling (Yang; Wang; Zreik et al), data retrieval and querying (Hwang and Choi; Stouffs and Cumming; Zreik, Stouffs, Tuncer, Ozsariyildiz and Beheshti), new modes of perceiving data (Segers; Tan). Tools are needed to manage, mine and create information for creative work, such as agents (Liew and Gero; Smith; Caneparo and Robiglio; Ding et al) or to support design processes (Smith; Chase). Systems for the support and development of designs continue (Gero; Achten and Jessurun). As progress is made on some fronts, such as user interfaces, attention is again turned to previously research areas such as lighting (Jung, Gross and Do; Ng et al; Wittkopf; Chevier; Glaser, Do and Tai) or services (Garcia; Chen and Lin). In recent years the growth of connectivity has led to a rapid growth in collaborative experience and understanding of the opportunities and issues continues to mature (Jabi; Dave; Zamenopoulos and Alexiou). Increasing interest is given to implications in practice and education (Dave; Oxman; Caneparo, Grassi and Giretti). Topics new to this conference are in the area of design to production or manufacture (Fischer, Burry and Frazer; Shih). Three additional invited papers (Rekimoto; Liu; Kalay) provide clear indication that there is still room to develop new spatial concepts and computer augmented environments for design. In conclusion, we note that these papers represent a good record of the current state of the evolving research in the field of digital design.
series CAAD Futures
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw
more http://www.caadfutures.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id caadria2003_b4-2
id caadria2003_b4-2
authors Choi, Jin Won and Park, Jae Wan
year 2003
title Developing a Building Design Compiler that Frequently evaluates Building Design Performance within the Design Process
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 553-566
summary This paper demonstrates an experience in the development of a design performance evaluation system that can frequently evaluate building design performance within the design process in a real-time manner. The evaluation system, that we call "design compiler," is composed of several modules such as a front-end component-based CAD engine, a knowledge base, and a set of design agents. The notion of the design compiler is quite similar to a compiler for computer programming such as a C compiler. While a computer programmer compiles a set of programming codes to check compiling errors during the implementation of a software system, an architectural designer can 'compile' his/her intermediate design product to evaluate design errors during the design process. The compilation can be done immediately at any level or any time during the design process in a real-time manner. We expect that this compiling process will dramatically increase design feedbacks, and thus result in a better design product. Further research issues that have been identified at the end of the research include increasing the modeling capability, extending to multi-story building representation, developing various design agents, exploring better ways to request and manage design knowledge, and supporting design collaboration.
series CAADRIA
email jchoi@yonsei.ac.kr, pelli@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id sigradi2003_036
id sigradi2003_036
authors Donath, Dirk and González, Luis Felipe
year 2003
title Rule-based spaces configuration procedures to support user-designed housing
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary This article reports on our current explorations on systemizable tasks of architectural design and parametric design supported by rule-based generation methods of spatial configuration alternatives to assist user-design processes of progressive development low-cost dwellings. This exploration is part of an ongoing major research towards an integrated planning support system for low-income housing; we called Esther, which is focused on the development of a network-based set of tools to support logistics of self-designed /-built dwellings life-cycle. Esther addresses the systemized collaborative work between dwellers and specialists during the whole development cycle of dwellings.
keywords Planning tool; user-designed housing; parametric design; decision support; adaptable dwelling
series SIGRADI
email caad@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id c53f
authors Dorau, U., Sanopoulos, A. and Schrenk, M.
year 2003
title Erfahrungen und Erfolge bei der Umsetzung von RAPIS - Raum- und Projektinformationssystem für die Vienna Region [Experience and Results with the RAPS-System for the Viennese Region]
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary In shortest terms: RAPIS is a metadatabase on spatial information in the “Vienna Region”. More interesting then this simple fact is the way how theproject was implemented and what the effects on regional development are.RAPIS is the acronym for “Regional Planning and Project Information System for the Vienna Region” and was implemented as the Austrian part of the Interreg IIc Project IM-PLAN (Implementation of models for co-operative planning in metropolitan regions). The aim was to create aninformation platform for planning relevant information for the whole region, integrating existing data sources from federal and state administrationas well as private companies. RAPIS enables an overview of the available spatial datasets in the "Vienna Region " and focuses on the following questions: Which datasets relevant for planning and development are available within the region? Who can use these datasets under which conditions? Which plans and projects do exist for the region? In addition also metainformation on the most important international data sources was collected as well as information to projects and plans with regional and trans-regional impacts. During the implementation great importance was given to communication and sensitisation for the importance the topic: geo-informationinfrastructre as a key ressource for spatial development and regional co-operation. It showed up that Austria and the "Vienna Region" have a very good initial position and excellent databases on national, state, local and international level. However, it seems that almost everything exists already but hardly anybody knows about it ... – potential users do not know what data and information already exists and how to get and use it. Intensive communication, information and permanent discussion of the topic „(Geo-) Information“ within the „planners community“ carried the topic into the public and strengthened the consciousness for the importance of information-infrastructure for regional co-operation.
series other
email dorau@multimediaplan.at
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id 6915
authors Dorninger, Peter
year 2003
title XML Technologies and Geodata
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing are very important methods for acquisition of geodata. During the previous decade, severalrevolutionary changes occurred in this area. Until the appearance of automated image analysis tools, it was necessary to measureselected points in the images given. At that time, it was much faster and even cheaper to get images of real world objects compared tothe time and money consuming process of manual analyses. So one tried to minimize this effort by measuring only characteristicpoints such as edges, break-lines, peaks and valleys and, for sure, a grid with a given grid step which was selected to meet the efforts.Lots of information in the images was neglected.Digital point matching algorithms and airborne laser scanning provide many new possibilities. The only restriction on spatialresolution is the one of the used sensors. Given a more precise image sensor, the matching algorithm will be able to match moresurface points; given a higher frequency laser scanner, more points can be measured of the same area. And those sensors get moreand more precise every day. Besides, those techniques allow for fast repetition which is necessary to create time series as a basis for4D modeling! However, this fact is accompanied by several problems concerning the capability of available computers. Some years ago, as the first ideas of 3D city models arose, it was very difficult to acquire the necessary data. Today the new sensors and methods have thenecessary capability, but we are not able to handle the available datasets efficiently, because of shortcomings in the past. In a time ofworld wide data exchange through the internet and global datasets, it is necessary to have efficient methods and algorithms tomanage the available data. There is a need for international, vendor independent data exchange and management standards that haveto be accepted and supported by the industry. This article is going to present several methods of data encoding using standardized data formats based on eXtensible Markup Language (XML). After an introduction to this kind of data encoding, two derived applications for management, storage and presentation of geodata are described. As XML data is written in text format, the datasets have the ability to become rather long.Therefore some promising methods to reduce the amount of data are introduced afterwards. XML documents are mainly used fordata exchange between databases. Therefore the capabilities of commonly used database systems for storage of geodata are describedin the end and current implementation results of the Institute of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (I.P.F.) are presented.
series other
email pdo@ipf.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id 43f0
id 43f0
authors Flynn, D., van Schaik, P., Blackman, T., Fencott, P.C., Hobbs, B., & Calderon, C.
year 2003
title DEVELOPING A VIRTUAL REALITY-BASED METHODOLOGY FOR PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA: A FEASIBILITY STUDY.
source Journal of CyberPsychology and Behavior, Vol6, Number6, 2003.
summary The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of virtual reality (VR) technology for use by persons with dementia (PWD). Data were obtained directly from six PWD regarding their experiences with a virtual environment (VE) of a large outdoor park. A user-centered method was developed to assess: (a) presence; (b) user inputs; (c) display quality; (d) simulation fidelity; and (e) overall system usability. The extent to which PWD could perform four functional activities in the VE was also investigated (e.g., mailing a letter). In addition, physical and psychological well-being of PWD while interacting with the VE was assessed objectively by recording heart rate during the VR sessions and subjectively with discrete questionnaire items and real-time prompts. Symptom profiles associated with simulator sickness were assessed with an adapted version of the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire. The study found that PWD to some extent experienced presence; perceived that objects were realistic and moved naturally; generally felt in control of the interaction; and demonstrated little difficulty using a joystick for navigation. The study also demonstrated that VR is an appropriate medium for assessing functional behavior within the context of an ecologically valid VE. PWD did not experience any significant increase in symptoms associated with simulator sickness, or detriments to their psychological and physical well-being. These findings demonstrated that it is feasible to work in VEs with PWD.
keywords Dementia, VR
series journal paper
type normal paper
email carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/12/02 10:36

_id ijac20031206
id ijac20031206
authors Glaser, Daniel; Peng, James
year 2003
title On Classifying Daylight for Design
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 2
summary In this paper, we present LiQuID, a tool for clustering lighting simulation data. Photographs are useful vehicles for both describing and making assessments of architectural lighting systems. A significant barrier to using photographs during the design process relates to the sheer volume of renderings that needs to be analyzed. Although there have been efforts to produce novel visualization systems to manage large sets of photographs, this research aims to reduce the complexity by classifying data into representative prototypes.A hypothetical case study is discussed.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ecaade03_519_209_gruber
id ecaade03_519_209_gruber
authors Gruber, A., Hirschberg, U. and Dank, R.
year 2003
title Calculated Bananas: Defining a new introductory course in visual design for first year architecture students
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 519-522
summary A novel introductory course in visual design is presented that combines the teaching of various subjects and skills around the development of digital fruit. – A mandatory subject for first year architecture students at Graz University of Technology, the course is jointly offered by two institutes and combines the teaching of hand sketching, descriptive geometry, computer aided design, generative algorithms, image processing, desktop and online publishing and networked collaboration. The ambitious pedagogy uses information technology to provide links and synergies between the different subjects. The digital fruit are developed in a collaborative environment that fosters the evolution of new kinds of forms and structures through exchanging and crossbreeding of CAAD data. The paper reports on the experiences gained during the first installment the course in which 130 students were enrolled.
keywords Creative collaboration: evolutionary processes; digital fruit; complex geometry; methods of representation.
series eCAADe
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
more http://ikg.tugraz.at/
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

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