CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 462

_id sigradi2004_101
id sigradi2004_101
authors Guillermo Vásquez de Velasco de la Puente
year 2004
title En la aplicación de pantallas interactivas de plasma en el taller de diseño [The Application of Interactive Plasma Screens in the Design Studio]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This paper elaborates on the use of electronic pin-ups in real-time local reviews making use of larger format interactive plasma screens. The paper briefly explains the technical aspects of an actual implementation in the College of Architecture at Texas A&M University. The main focus of the paper is placed on the use of a 61. interactive plasma screen in a graduate design studio during the second semester of 2003 and the benefits that such an implementation has reported. The narrative explains how the use of an interactive plasma screen for informal as well as formal reviews is not only saving printing resources but it is also having a very positive impact on how we conduct design reviews.
series SIGRADI
email vasquez@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id heylighen_ds2003
id Heylighen DS2003
authors Heylighen , Ann and Verstijnen, Ilse M.
year 2003
title Close encounters of the architectural kind
source Design Studies, Volume 24, Issue 4, 2003, pp. 313-326
summary Throughout their career architects collect an extensive record of architectural cases, which they use as a source of inspiration and knowledge during design. Being novices, student architects do not yet have such a record. In order to compensate for this lack of knowledge, teachers in architecture engage their students into realistic yet simulated projects and introduce them to relevant architectural precedents for these projects. Within the realm of AI, case-based reasoning (CBR) stresses the importance of cases too. So far, however, applications that flow from CBR research have rarely found their way into architecture. The experiment that is reported in this article examines the conditions under which CBR technology can be useful in architectural education. The results show that in order for students to benefit from this technology, it should supply cases that are closely related to the project at hand. These results are consistent with psychological theories of knowledge representation in novices.
keywords case-based reasoning; design education; analogical reasoning
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2004/03/25 16:57

_id heylighenieee2003
id HeylighenIEEE2003
authors Heylighen, A., Neuckermans, H. and Morisse, P.
year 2003
title What You See is What You Get
source IEEE Multimedia, July-Sept 2003, Vol. 10, No. 3, pp. 48-56
summary As the amount of visual information stored on electronic media grows, the need for appropriate access mechanisms becomes more critical. Information system developers in fields as varied as agriculture, medicine, and security must not only create systems to represent, store, and process visual content, but also re-examine the indexing procedure and conceive interfaces that make visual information easily accessible. Architectural design, a field overrun by myriad case libraries, manifests this challenge. Cases – specific designs from the past – are a significant source of knowledge in the architectural design field. Using current information technologies, researchers in this field have created a variety of multimedia case collections, storing them on CD-ROM, local networks, and the Internet. Several tools for accessing case collections exist; however most rely on verbal descriptions to index cases. For the collections to support architects during design, cases should not only be represented visually, but should also be accessible through a visual medium. We’ve developed a working prototype of a visual indexing and access mechanism that uses visual keys – small pictogram-like icons expressing an architectural feature. Users can consult an online case base using these keys or create new keys to label and link cases. A pilot study, in which student and professional architects used and evaluated the prototype, supports the need for such a mechanism.
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2004/03/25 16:55

_id heyhlighenijdc2003
id HeyhlighenIJDC2003
authors Heylighen, Ann and Segers, Nicole
year 2003
title Look Who's Suggesting
source International Journal of Design Computing, 2003, Volume 6
summary During design architects do not only sketch, they combine different kinds of information and representations. The combination of text, image, sketch and/or draft can provoke new associations that keep the design process going. The sketchbook presented here enables architects to use all representations simultaneously, so as to fully exploit their cross-fertilisation. More importantly, it steadily makes suggestions for continuing development of design ideas. These suggestions can take the form of words that are semantically related to the users’ ideas, or of images showing how other architects have developed related ideas into built artefacts. To this end, the sketchbook captures all information the architect/user puts ‘on paper’ and forwards it to a design idea recorder/interpreter called Idea Space System (ISS). In trying to understand the user’s ideas, ISS places all elements captured into a gigantic network, as if part of the frame of reference is made explicit. In the network nodes are words, sketches or images, while links represent relations of various origins. The semantic relations that ISS identifies are shown to the user. At the same time, words are processed as search criteria in DYNAMO, a growing architectural case base, to detect and display design projects that exemplify related ideas. Through the explicit links between early ideas and concrete design cases, the sketchbook acts as a permanent source of inspiration, while stimulating both architects’ creativity and their awareness of the downstream implications of design ideas.
series journal paper
email Ann.Heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/journal/vol6/
last changed 2004/03/25 16:51

_id 2004_024
id 2004_024
authors Holmgren, S., Rüdiger, B., Storgaard, K. and Tournay, B.
year 2004
title The Electronic Neighbourhood - A New Urban Space
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 24-34
summary During the event Cultural Market Days on 23 and 24 August 2003 at Noerrebro Park in Copenhagen, visitors could also enter the marketplace from their home via the Internet, as a digital 3D model had been constructed that showed the marketplace with all its information booths and activities. This virtual marketplace functioned as an extension of the urban space, allowing you to take part in the flow of information, activities and experiences that were offered in the marketplace. And this just by a click on the Internet address: http://www.e-kvarter.dk. Furthermore at certain times of the day you could chat with people from some of the many working groups of the urban regeneration project in Noerrebro. The digital 3D model is similar to the marketplace, but it creates its own universe in the green surroundings of Noerrebro Park. And now, when the Cultural Market Days are finished and the booths and people have gone, the Electronic Marketplace still remains on the Internet, with a potential for developing a new public space for information, dialogue and cooperation between the actors of the urban regeneration project. This paper presents the results of a 3-year research project, The Electronic Neighbourhood (2000-2004). Researchers have developed and tested a digital model of the urban area and other digital tools for supporting the dialogue and cooperation between professionals and citizens in an urban regeneration project in Copenhagen. The Danish Agency for Enterprise and Housing, the Ministry for Refugees, Immigration and Integration and Copenhagen Municipality have financed the research, which is planned to be published 2004. The results can also be followed on the Internet www.e-kvarter.dk.
keywords 3D Modelling; Virtual Environments; Design Process; Human-Computer Interaction; Collaborative Design; Urban Planning
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id cf2009_poster_09
id cf2009_poster_09
authors Hsu, Yin-Cheng
year 2009
title Lego Free-Form? Towards a Modularized Free-Form Construction
source T. Tidafi and T. Dorta (eds) Joining Languages Cultures and Visions: CAADFutures 2009 CD-Rom
summary Design Media is the tool designers use for concept realization (Schon and Wiggins, 1992; Liu, 1996). Design thinking of designers is deeply effected by the media they tend to use (Zevi, 1981; Liu, 1996; Lim, 2003). Historically, architecture is influenced by the design media that were available within that era (Liu, 1996; Porter and Neale, 2000; Smith, 2004). From the 2D plans first used in ancient egypt, to the 3D physical models that came about during the Renaissance period, architecture reflects the media used for design. When breakthroughs in CAD/CAM technologies were brought to the world in the twentieth century, new possibilities opened up for architects.
keywords CAD/CAM free-form construction, modularization
series CAAD Futures
type poster
last changed 2009/07/08 20:12

_id acadia03_052
id acadia03_052
authors Juyal, M., Kensek, K. and Knowles, R.
year 2003
title SolCAD: 3D Spatial Design Tool Tool to Generate Solar Envelope
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 411-419
summary In this research the concept of Solar Envelope has been used to develop a 3D Spatial Design Tool tool, SolCAD, for generating an envelope over a given site based on various design parameters. The solar envelope can be imagined as a container, whose boundaries are derived from the sun’s relative motion. Buildings within this container will not overshadow their surroundings during critical periods of solar access for passive and low-energy architecture. The solar envelope is a space-time construct. Its spatial limits are defined by the parameters of land parcel size, shape, orientation, topography and latitude. It also depends on the time or the period of the time for which it is designed. Its time limits are defined by the hours of each day and the season for which solar access is provided to the land parcel (Knowles 1981). This tool intends to generate an envelope over a site of any shape, size and orientation and for different boundary and height conditions of shadow lines. It is suitable for initial stages of building design process to determine the shape of the building even before the design has been conceptualized.
series ACADIA
email manu.juyal@asu.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id sigradi2006_e149b
id sigradi2006_e149b
authors Kendir, Elif
year 2006
title Prêt-à-Construire – An Educational Inquiry into Computer Aided Fabrication
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 162-165
summary This paper aims to show and discuss the relevance of developing necessary strategies for reintegrating the concept of fabrication into the architectural design process. The discussion will be partly based on the outcome of a graduate architectural design studio conducted in Spring semester 2002-2003. The graduate studio was part of a series of exploratory studies conducted on the nature of architectural design process transformed by information technologies. Preceded by studios investigating cognition and representation, this last studio focused on the concept of fabrication. The overarching aim of the studio series was to put CAD and CAM in context both within the actual architectural design process and within architectural education. The last of this series, which will be discussed within the frame of this paper, has specifically focused on CAM and the concept of fabrication in architecture. In accordance with the nature of a design studio, the research was more methodological than technical. The studio derived its main inspiration from the constructional templates used in dressmaking, which can be considered as an initial model for mass customization. In this context, the recladding of Le Corbusier’s Maison Domino was given as the main design problem, along with several methodological constraints. The main constraint was to develop the design idea through constructional drawings instead of representational ones. The students were asked to develop their volumetric ideas through digital 3D CAD models while working out structural solutions on a physical 1/50 model of Maison Domino. There was also a material constraint for the model, where only specified types of non-structural paper could be used. At this stage, origami provided the working model for adding structural strength to sheet materials. The final outcome included the explanation of different surface generation strategies and preliminary design proposals for their subcomponents. The paper will discuss both the utilized methodology and the final outcome along the lines of the issues raised during the studio sessions, some of which could be decisive in the putting into context of CAD – CAM in architectural design process. One such issue is mass customization, that is, the mass production of different specific elements with the help of CAM technologies. Another issue is “open source” design, indicating the possibility of a do-it-yourself architecture, where architecture is coded as information, and its code can be subject to change by different designers. The final key issue is the direct utilization of constructional drawings in the preliminary design phase as opposed to representational ones, which aimed at reminding the designer the final phase of fabrication right from the beginning. Finally, the paper will also point at the problems faced during the conduct of the studio and discuss those in the context of promoting CAM for architectural design and production in countries where there is no actual utilization of these technologies for these purposes yet.
keywords Education; Fabrication; CAM
series SIGRADI
email s3131573@student.rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id acadia03_051
id acadia03_051
authors Lim, Chor-Kheng
year 2003
title G Pen: An Intelligent Designer’s Playmate
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 403-409
summary In the field of design the pen-based system is a newly developed computer interface that provides the designer with the convenience of a pen in freehand sketches. But these pen-based systems only focus on an interface familiar to the designers and the application of the hardware and software that go with it, treating the pen only as a mouse-like input device. As pen and pad are devices for the pen-based system, the hope is that they can be endowed with more intelligent characteristics to let them interact with designer’s gestures and become a creative source for the designers, while simultaneously preventing the design fixation encountered by designers during design process. This research utilizes the unintentional hand gestures made by designers, such as the designer’s grip of the pen or movement involved in playing with the pen, putting it down, knocking it, twisting it or shaking it, during the thinking process or when running into a design fixation. From the interaction between the pen and the pad, certain actions may be generated to stimulate the designer’s thinking process. This research uses a neural network as the main learning mechanism for the eventual development of a prototype of a pen-based drawing system that provides timely visual stimulation: a G Pen system.
series ACADIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ecaade03_615_54_kheng
id ecaade03_615_54_kheng
authors Lim, Chor-Kheng
year 2003
title Is a pen-based system just another pen or more than a pen?
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 615-622
summary Freehand sketch is the most critical stage in the design process. The importance of the freehand sketch is in its ability to freely represent various projections of ambiguous drawing using a convenience tool, pen-and-paper. Recently, pen-based system which developed attempted to use pen as an input device, allowing sketches to be freely drawn on computers. However, as far as the various drawing projections, such as diagram, symbol, plan, elevation, section, perspective, etc., how are they interrelated to a designer’s cognitive behavior? Different media have different abilities to represent projections. What’s the difference of design cognitive behavior between conventional pen-and paper and pen-based system in view of both using a pen as a design medium? This research proceeds a think-aloud protocol analysis to present an analysis and discussion. Research results show that there is a relationship of gradual embodiment, mutually complementary, going from a whole to being dissected into sections between the different projections. Moreover, pen-based system is more than a pen, it allows designer to inspect a 3-D view during the sketching stage. This gives the designer more opportunities during the sketching stage to conduct the design thinking process based on the ambiguous 2-D projections and the more concrete 3-D images, as well as more opportunities for visual feedback
series eCAADe
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ijac20031205
id ijac20031205
authors Martens, Bob; Turk, Ziga
year 2003
title Cumulative Index of CAAD: Current Status and Future Directions
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 2
summary This article discusses the Cumulative Index of CAAD (CUMINCAD.SciX.net) - a digital library set up in 1998 serving the CAAD-community as an important source of scientific information. During the first stage, the metadata of CAAD-related conference proceedings were compiled and published on-line, including all abstracts and approximately 50% of the full-texts. In a subsequent step a Citation Index was created. Currently, theses and dissertations are being added to the library. Furthermore, a hierarchical topic structure was developed for automated classification of publications in the future, with topics being defined by keywords and characteristic papers.The next version of CUMINCAD, expected to be released later this year, will also feature a discussion forum, an event calendar, an option for commenting on and ranking publications as well as creating an on-line personal bibliographic review. CUMINCAD is a unique digital library in the field of CAAD serving a growing user-community. Younger doctoral degree students and junior researchers will benefit most from this edited, structured collection freely available via Internet.
series journal
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ecaade03_229_40_monedero
id ecaade03_229_40_monedero
authors Monedero, Javier and Muñoz, Francisco
year 2003
title Data Organization in City Modeling
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 229-236
summary Working with big models requires a good balance between the technical requirements of the model and the technical requirements of the user. Although every virtual model, whether it is 2d, 3d or 4d, may be regarded as a particular form of a general data base, it is clear that is not, at the present time, a very flexible data base. It does not behave like a relational data base that can be inspected in a flexible way. On the contrary, it has a rigid structure, a hierarchical structure that is well suited for performance but is badly suited for navigating through the data and gathering derived information. These are well known disadvantages and advantages, related to the evolution of the data base software that has moved, in the last 30 years, from a hierarchical to a relational structure. These considerations are relevant for any kind of architectural or engineering model. But are particularly pertinent in the case of the model of a city where everything must have its place, and should relate properly with other parts of the model, be susceptible of further modifications and be able to receive new information. These and other related issues have been encountered and developed during the construction of several models at our Laboratory at the ETS Architecture of Barcelona. Our paper explains the main decisions we had to take during the course of these works with special emphasis on those aspects related with the organization of different kind of data in a unified whole that had to be sent to other professionals and had to be, for that reason, organized in a clear and comprehensible way for its further development.
keywords CAAD; City Modeling; Visual Simulation
series eCAADe
email francisco.javier.a.monedero@upc.es
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ecaade03_485_185_pak
id ecaade03_485_185_pak
authors Pak, B., Özener, O.Ö. and Erdem, A.
year 2003
title Xp-GEN: A randomized design tool for non-deterministic digital design methods in architecture and visual design
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 485-488
summary Experimental generator (XpGEN) is a plug-in that allows user to interact with computer for experimental, intuitive and inspirational assistance during the beginning of the architectural and basic design phase by randomly generating multiple design alternatives according to the limitations of the user. The tool is also an experiment to question the physical limits of architectural design.
keywords Generative Design Tools, Virtual Architecture, Digital Tools in Architecture
series eCAADe
email pakbu@itu.edu.tr
more http://virtuvius.itu.edu.tr
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id sigradi2003_035
id sigradi2003_035
authors Payssé, M., Portillo, J., Barneche, V., Carmona, L., Cardozo, J., Luna, F., Sánchez, A., Agriela, V. and Scarpatti, M.
year 2003
title La Muy Fiel y Reconquistadora Ciudad de San Felipe y Santiago de Montevideo (Virtual) (The Very Faithful and Re-conquering City of San Felipe and Santiago of Montevideo (Virtual))
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary The Project is about virtual reconstruction of the City of Montevideo (Uruguay), around the year of 1807 (during the English Invasions time), based in all the available graphic and chronical material. Images and movies are focused to remind this time and provide architectonic and urbanistic value to the elements still standing or which might be discovered. The idea is to create useful knowledge for the subjects related to this discipline and be able to take the right decisions about future actions on the area being studied.
keywords Digital reconstruction, city planning, virtual heritage, preservation
series SIGRADI
email paysse@farq.edu.uy,
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id c544
id c544
authors Pektas, S T
year 2003
title PROCESS INTEGRATION IN BUILDING DESIGN USING THE PARAMETER-BASED DESIGN STRUCTURE MATRIX
source Design Studies, 27(1), pp. 99-122In B. Tuncer (Ed.), E-Activities in Building Design and Construction. (pp. 63-72). Paris: Europia
summary This paper reviews existing process models in the Architecture-Engineering-Construction (AEC) industry and identifies two common deficiencies in them: 1. Current process models used in the industry still have a top-down approach including very little information about interrelationships at lower levels. Although these models provide a good overview of the design process, they are often too abstract to define, in detail, for complex multi-parameter problems. 2. Iteration is an important problem in collaborative design. However, most of the existing process models fail in identifying and minimizing it. With a view to alleviate these problems, this paper introduces the parameter-based Design Structure Matrix (DSM) as a tool for process integration and improvement in building design. The uses of the tool are shown via simple examples and suggestions are made for further research.

keywords Process Integration, Process Modelling, and Parameter-based Design Structure Matrix
series other
type normal paper
email suletasli@gmail.com
last changed 2005/12/01 14:49

_id acadia03_043
id acadia03_043
authors Peng, J., Liao, B., Glaser, D., Canny, J. and Do, E. Y.L.
year 2003
title LiQuID: Lighting Quality for Design
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 337-345
summary In this paper, we present LiQuID, a tool for seeing lighting quality in design. Photographs are useful vehicles for both describing and making assessments of architectural lighting systems. A significant barrier to using photographs during the design process relates to the sheer volume of renderings that needs to be analyzed. Although there have been efforts to produce novel visualization systems to manage large sets of photographs, this research aims to reduce the complexity by classifying data into representative prototypes. A hypothetical case study is discussed.
series ACADIA
email dcg@cs.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ijac20031101
id ijac20031101
authors Penttillä, Hannu
year 2003
title Architectural-IT and Educational Curriculumns - A European Overview
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary The paper summarizes the analysis of data on european architecture schools, collected in the eCAADe-conferences during the 1990s. Computer-Aided Design has developed into architectural information and communication technology (ICT), to become commonplace in architectural education. However, the general held views on new media use in the schools seems to be slightly optimistic. On the other hand, the invisible more common ICT use (writing, surfing, emailing) accounts for a lot more of the volume of activity than generally appreciated. The major hardware platform in european architecture schools is PC/Windows (90-95%) with Linux and Unix commonly used in servers (25-35%). Macintoshes are also widely used (50-55%). MS Office (90-95%) and PhotoShop (85-90%), are used widely in the schools. The Graphic and DTP tools PageMaker, QuarkXpress, Illustrator, Freehand are also common (30-50%). AutoCAD is the market leader in CAD platforms (80-90%), followed by ArchiCAD. MicroStation/Bentley also has a significant presence in the schools (35-40%). 3DStudio is the most common 3D-modelling tool (80-85%), followed by formZ (35- 40%). Less common (15-25%) are Rhino, Maya, Alias, Lightscape and Radiance.
series other
type normal paper
email penttila@mittaviiva.fi
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2009/06/04 05:06

_id ecaade03_601_68_penttila
id ecaade03_601_68_penttila
authors Penttilä, Hannu
year 2003
title Survey of Architectural-ICT in the Educational Curriculumns of Europe
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 601-606
summary The paper documents the findings of the post-graduate study carried out among the 180 European schools of architecture in more than 30 countries during 2002-2003. The objective has been to describe the role of ""modern digital information technology"" and to give an understandable and measurable overview the current architectural education and its relation with ICT and CAAD. The study material has been collected with a web-survey, with questionnaires to eCAADe-conference participants in Helsinki 2001 and Warsaw 2002, and with direct email-contacts to schools’ key-persons. Computer-aided design has developed into architectural information and communication technology (ICT), to become the main tool of the majority. The general image of new media use in the architectural schools seems to be slightly too positive. The invisible or ”normal” ICT-use - writing, surfing, emailing - has a lot more volume than documented. The major hardware platform in european architecture schools is PC/Windows (90-95 %), Linux and Unix are used also commonly (25-35 %). Macintoshes are also used much more widely within architecture (50-55 %) than within the common computing platforms. MS/Office (90-95 %) and PhotoShop (85-90 %) are obviously also used widely in the architecture schools. Graphic tools PageMaker, QuarkXpress, Illustrator, Freehand are common tools for architecture students (30-50 %). AutoCAD is ”the marketing leader"" in architectural platforms (80-90 %) followed by ArchiCAD (60-65 %). MicroStation/Bentley has also a remarkable volume in the schools (35-40 %). 3DStudio is the most common 3D-modelling tool (80-85 %), followed by formZ (35-40 %). Slightly less volume but still remarkable (15-25 %) have Rhino, Maya, Alias, Lightscape and Radiance.
keywords Architectural education; architectural curriculumns; information and communication technology; IT; ICT; questionnaires; statistics
series eCAADe
email penttila@mittaviiva.fi
more http://www.arkit.net
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ijac20031104
id ijac20031104
authors Petric, Jelena; Ucelli, Giuliana; Conti, Giuseppe
year 2003
title Real Teaching and Learning through Virtual Reality
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary This paper addresses an articulated vision of Virtual Reality, which lends itself to design collaboration in teaching, learning and communication of architectural design ideas among students, design professionals and client bodies during the early stages of the design process. Virtual Reality (VR) has already acquired a new degree of complexity through development of network-based virtual communities and the use of avatars. A key intrinsic quality of VR technology is to support collaborative design experience. The design tools developed for this experiment are capable of creating 3D objects in a shared VR environment, thus allowing the design and its evolution to be shared.The choice of programming language (JavaTM) reflects the desire to achieve scalability and hardware independence, which in turn allows for the creation of a VR environment that can co-exist between high-end supercomputers and standard PCs. The prototype design environment was tested using PC workstations and an SGI system running in a Reality Centre.
series journal
email j.petric@strath.ac.uk
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id avocaad_2003_04
id avocaad_2003_04
authors Rob van Helvoort
year 2003
title Mecano - when CAAD meets ICT
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary For some years ICT (Information and Communication Technology) has been worldwide a hot topic and, especially in the European academic environment, a very fashionable word. No matter where the road would lead to, almost any ICT related project was welcomed as the next step towards a brand new and even better system of education. In the meantime CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design) plays a role of utmost importance during a range of stages in the design process or building project.In this situation a research project is set up to develop an educational environment where CAAD meets ICT. The first application was turned down as the proposed (ICT) technology wasn’t available, according to committee judging. After proving them wrong, the second application was more successful. Even though the project was set up for local values, education in CAAD and related topics in Belgium, it was situated in a networked (internet) world.After running the project for a period of two years a list of pros and cons can be made up. Moreover, both local and on a global scale, ideas have changed.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email rob@vanhelvoort.com
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

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