CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 591

_id acadia03_011
id acadia03_011
authors d’Estrée Sterk, Tristan
year 2003
title Using Actuated Tensegrity Structures to Produce a Responsive Architecture
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 85-93
summary The major theoretical roots of responsive architecture lie within the work of Nicholas Negroponte, and its most inspiring realization, to date, is found in the work of dECOi Architects. The work of NOX, and Diller & Scofidio provide two other built examples of responsive architectures. Each of these works is impressive within its own right. However, all of them have their shortcomings, suggesting that several possibilities for alternative visions still exist. While Negroponte’s work identifies the characteristics of a responsive architecture, it does not propose a model that is suitable for implementation. On the other hand, the work of dECOi architects does not address the technical needs of a building envelope designed for real world conditions of weather and structural load. Diller & Scofidio’s work, also does not have a functional envelope, and NOX’s work lacks physical responsiveness, favoring a palate of virtual responses instead.This paper, after examining the four specific precedents of Negroponte, dECOi, Diller & Scofidio, and NOX, will examine how a fifth precedent—that of Buckminster Fuller’s model of tensegrity structures—may be applied. The paper will propose that by actuating a tensegrity structure a responsive architectural envelope that addresses real world weather and structural loading conditions becomes feasible.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email tsterk@artic.edu
more admin
last changed 2017/04/10 11:09

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id sigradi2003_076
id sigradi2003_076
authors Armesto, Tristán
year 2003
title Producción Digital de un Auditorio (Digital Production of an Auditorium)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary In the middle of the year 2001, we had the opportunity to project an Auditory in the particular building of our School of Architecture. The chance to produce the entire project an all the technical documentation was given; using only digital tools. The use of this tools let us to calculate illumination, isolation study, sound an thermical conditioning with a real time visualization of the three dimensional model.
series SIGRADI
email trisar76@yahoo.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id caadria2003_a5-4
id caadria2003_a5-4
authors Chang, Yu-Li
year 2003
title The Prototype of Digital Cities On Line A Cognition-Oriented Approach for Spatially Metaphorical Model
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 651-662
summary The cyberspace upon physical space forms a new spatial structure to increase the influence on the urban fabric and the concept of space in architecture. Today, digital cities are being developed all over the world. By using a city metaphor, digital cities integrate urban information and create public spaces. However, human how to entry into the new emerging digital cities, to percept themselves in around cities, and then taking shape the recognition of digital city forms? How do digital cities directly connect to physical cities and become an imaginable city? Therefore, we argue that a new spatial analysis theory must be established for digital city, comparing with theories of spatial cognition, to find the explicitly spatial structures and relations in digital city upon physical city. This paper studied by the viewpoint of cognition in order to propose a prototype of metaphor of digital city.
series CAADRIA
email jecho@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id ijac20031108
id ijac20031108
authors Hirschberg, Urs
year 2003
title Transparency In Information Architecture: Enabling Large Scale Creative Collaboration in Architectural Education over the Internet
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary This paper is about networked collaboration in architectural education and about information architecture for networked collaborations. It presents results of a quantitative process analysis of two types of courses in Computer Aided Architectural Design that were taught using database-driven online environments. The main focus of the quantitative analysis is the performance of these online environments as information structures, designed to accommodate the presentation and the peer-to-peer exchange of design information for relatively large groups of between 60 and 150 participants. Using the database records to reconstruct the processes, three different quantitative analyses are described.Their results indicate that for these projects the web-environments were successful in enhancing peer-to-peer learning and that they promoted a more objective assessment of the submitted works. The study also looks at the effect that the environments themselves had on the process. Finally it draws some conclusions about these environments' information architecture: it presents tentative guidelines about how such environments must be designed to handle the dynamic display of design data, from many different authors, in a way that is transparent to the users.
series journal
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id acadia03_043
id acadia03_043
authors Peng, J., Liao, B., Glaser, D., Canny, J. and Do, E. Y.L.
year 2003
title LiQuID: Lighting Quality for Design
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 337-345
summary In this paper, we present LiQuID, a tool for seeing lighting quality in design. Photographs are useful vehicles for both describing and making assessments of architectural lighting systems. A significant barrier to using photographs during the design process relates to the sheer volume of renderings that needs to be analyzed. Although there have been efforts to produce novel visualization systems to manage large sets of photographs, this research aims to reduce the complexity by classifying data into representative prototypes. A hypothetical case study is discussed.
series ACADIA
email dcg@cs.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ecaade03_287_199_rebelo
id ecaade03_287_199_rebelo
authors Rebelo, Pedro and Coyne, Richard
year 2003
title Resisting the smooth - Time-based interactive media in the production of distressed space
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 287-291
summary Time is central to architectural design, but to date has not been fully investigated through computational media. The works of Heidegger, Bergson, Virilio and Deleuze suggest that the study of the elusive concept of time has more to contribute to an understanding of the human condition than space. One can argue that contemporary society is being governed increasingly by temporal structures, as the space of the town square is replaced by time-based broadcasting and digital communications. This shift from space to time is commonly associated with the ideal of smoothing boundaries and developing seamless environments. Contrary to this supposition, we propose that the putative “collapse” of time and space exposes disjunction and disruption. We develop the notion of “distressed space” as part of a design strategy in the context of time-based media. We draw on examples from real-time 3D animation using the MAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment and discuss some of its implications for design.
keywords Jitter; time-based architecture; distressed space
series eCAADe
email P.Rebelo@ed.ac.uk
more http://www.lautnet.net
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id acadia03_040
id acadia03_040
authors Katherine A. Liapi, Katherine A. and Kim, Jinman
year 2003
title A Parametric Approach to the Design of a Tensegrity Vaulted Dome for an Ephemeral Structure for the 2004 Olympics
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 301-309
summary Tensegrity, defined as “tensional integrity,” is central to the design of a semi-open exhibition space that was submitted as an entry to the international competition for the design of “Ephemeral Structures for the City of Athens,” in the context of the 2004 Olympic Games. The main feature of the proposed exhibition space is a vaulted dome composed of interconnected detachable and deployable tensegrity units. The most challenging aspect in the design of the tensegrity vault was the generation of alternative spatial configurations for form exploration and study. For this purpose a mathematical code has been developed that links all the parameters that affect the design of tensegrity vaults. The code also allows for the parametric graphical generation of the vault by displaying geometric information in a 3D environment. This paper discusses the geometric basis of the code and its usefulness in the morphological study of the tensegrity vaulted dome for the proposed ephemeral structure. The mathematical code has been shown to significantly facilitate the study of various preliminary configurations of tensegrity vaulted structures.
series ACADIA
email kliapi@mail.utexas.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id avocaad_2003_06
id avocaad_2003_06
authors Arturo F. Montagu and Juan Pablo Cieri
year 2003
title Urbamedia - Development of an urban database of fragments of some Argentinian and Latin-American cities using digital technology
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary The proposal of "Urbamedia" is to undertake the development of 3D virtual and interactive models of historical areas of Latin-American cities. The selected zone is the "Mayo Avenue" including the "Mayo Square", an historical place of the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina; this project is financed by the National Agency of Scientific and Technological Development of Argentina and the University of Buenos Aires.We are presenting the first experimental model of the "Mayo Square" that has been developed at ABACUS, Department of Architecture & Building Aids Computer Unit, University of Strathclyde UK. combined with a system analysis of urban activities using the “Atlas.ti” CAQDAS software.This particular use of the “Atlas.ti” software is under experimental applications to this type of urban analysis procedures; allowed us the possibility to analysed a set of activities by means of graph theory as result of a series of interviews to the people working in the area. We are also looking to include historical areas of three cities: Mar del Plata, Rosario and Santa Fe (Argentina) and eventually other cities from Latin América as Rio de Janeiro and Habana.Due that ABACUS has a strong experience in city modelling plus the powerful software and hardware used there, we must develop a VRML customized menu to be adapted to our low cost PC equipment. The 3D model will be used mainly in urban design simulation procedures and the idea is to extend to other type of simulations of the environmental parameters.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email amontagu@fadu.uba.ar
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id sigradi2008_049
id sigradi2008_049
authors Benamy, Turkienicz ; Beck Mateus, Mayer Rosirene
year 2008
title Computing And Manipulation In Design - A Pedagogical Experience Using Symmetry
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary The concept of symmetry has been usually restricted to bilateral symmetry, though in an extended sense it refers to any isometric transformation that maintains a certain shape invariant. Groups of operations such as translation, rotation, reflection and combinations of these originate patterns classified by modern mathematics as point groups, friezes and wallpapers (March and Steadman, 1974). This extended notion represents a tool for the recognition and reproduction of patterns, a primal aspect of the perception, comprehension and description of everything that we see. Another aspect of this process is the perception of shapes, primary and emergent. Primary shapes are the ones explicitly represented and emergent shapes are the ones implicit in the others (Gero and Yan, 1994). Some groups of shapes known as Semantic Shapes are especially meaningful in architecture, expressing visual features so as symmetry, rhythm, movement and balance. The extended understanding of the concept of symmetry might improve the development of cognitive abilities concerning the creation, recognition and meaning of forms and shapes, aspects of visual reasoning involved in the design process. This paper discusses the development of a pedagogical experience concerned with the application of the concept of symmetry in the creative generation of forms using computational tools and manipulation. The experience has been carried out since 1995 with 3rd year architectural design students. For the exploration of compositions based on symmetry operations with computational support we followed a method developed by Celani (2003) comprising the automatic generation and update of symmetry patterns using AutoCAD. The exercises with computational support were combined with other different exercises in each semester. The first approach combined the creation of two-dimensional patterns to their application and to their modeling into three-dimensions. The second approach combined the work with computational support with work with physical models and mirrors and the analysis of the created patterns. And the third approach combined the computational tasks with work with two-dimensional physical shapes and mirrors. The student’s work was analyzed under aspects such as Discretion/ Continuity –the creation of isolated groups of shapes or continuous overlapped patterns; Generation of Meta-Shapes –the emergence of new shapes from the geometrical relation between the generative shape and the structure of the symmetrical arrangement; Modes of Representation –the visual aspects of the generative shape such as color and shading; Visual Reasoning –the derivation of 3D compositions from 2D patterns by their progressive analysis and recognition; Conscious Interaction –the simultaneous creation and analysis of symmetry compositions, whether with computational support or with physical shapes and mirrors. The combined work with computational support and with physical models and mirrors enhanced the students understanding on the extended concept of symmetry. The conscious creation and analysis of the patterns also stimulated the student’s understanding over the different semantic possibilities involved in the exploration of forms and shapes in two or three dimensions. The method allowed the development of both syntactic and semantic aspects of visual reasoning, enhancing the students’ visual repertoire. This constitutes an important strategy in the building of the cognitive abilities used in the architectural design process.
keywords Symmetry, Cognition, Computing, Visual reasoning, Design teaching
series SIGRADI
email mateusbeck@pop.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia03_015
id acadia03_015
authors Bernhardt, Matthew and Blostein, Beth
year 2003
title APPROPRIATE LEVELS OF ACCESS: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY ON THE AVAILABILITY OF COMPUTERS IN STUDIO
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 119-127
summary One of the most significant technological challenges facing architecture schools today is how to provide an appropriate level of access to computing resources. As the computer has become a significant tool in the study and practice of architecture, students need to have access to that tool in order to further their studies. But in facing this question of access, what is “appropriate”? Is there such a thing as too much access? Is 1:1 access—a computer for every student—the minimum level of access that schools and students should accept? Or is there a point beyond which more resources just means more waste; computers sitting idle and unused, or students using the computer for unproductive ends? These questions were the subject of an experimental series of studios in the spring of 2002, wherein three studios were given varying numbers of computers for a term. The use of these computers was then tracked, and compared with previous terms. In tandem, the quality of work produced by these three studios was compared. While additional experiments are most likely needed to draw firm conclusions, the results of this experiment seem to support defining “an appropriate level of access” at less than 1:1.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email bernhardt.7@osu.edu
last changed 2004/12/09 16:42

_id sigradi2003_094
id sigradi2003_094
authors Bessone, M., Mantovani, G. and Schanz, J.
year 2003
title Multimedia y diseño arquitectónico diferente (Multimedia and different architectural design)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary Hearing and touch may be incorporated into visual representation systems that historically covered creative process, now helped by multimedia. During 2002-2003 we developed an experimental design studio that challenged participants to design architecture from words (using their spelling, pronunciation, location, etc.) and through an inquiry based on the "concept of inwardness". Evoking a word from the association of images and texts as well as seizing its potential tactile and hearing dimensions completed what was a very interactive design process. Such process was utilized to generate images and ideas geared to design/make an "installation" to be displayed at art events.
keywords Architecture, Design, Word, Image, Sound
series SIGRADI
email mbessone@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id f8f7
id f8f7
authors Bhzad Sidawi
year 2003
title The pattern of Internet use for information management by architectural practices in the UK
source Cardiff University, Welsh School of Architecture Cardiff, UK
summary In recent history, architects have experienced problems related to the use and management of new innovations. The Internet presents one such challenge. It offers considerable expansion in types of communication and sources of business information and connects people and businesses around the globe. As is argued in this research, these services could play a positive role in architectural practice. This research examines the use of the Internet by architectural practices in UK in order to reveal how aware they are of the opportunities it presents, the extent to which they are taking advantage of them, and the problems they are experiencing. A field study was conducted of two types of practices: RIBA private practices and local authority practices. A number of research tools were used to inspect how these practices are using the Internet to manage various types of information that used and produced in the practice, namely: the acquisition of web information, the exchange of the practice’s information through the web and the presentation of the practice’s information on the web. Explanations for the results were sought by correlating variables from the questionnaire study, using simple statistical tests. The field study shows that many Internet services are unpopular among architects, and that practices have problems in adopting and using the technology. The pace at which the Internet is being absorbed and accepted by practices is slow. The study suggests that possible causes are: the little knowledge of users’ about IT, the poor resources of the practice, and old or imperfect Internet installations and the absence of the Internet support to the architect’s activities. The research argues that there are a number of links between these negative factors which make the practice unable to utilize the Internet and to manage the practice’s information through the Internet. To break these links, the research suggests that practices should adopt a specific management strategy to promote more utilization of Internet services in the office and to manage information. Practices need to make certain changes to the way they manage the Internet and work with it, if they plan to integrate the Internet more successfully into their practice. The research discusses techniques for improving practice management which would help practices to digest Internet technology and to use it more effectively in the practice.
keywords Internet, Architectural practices, Information management, Communications
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email sidawib@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/11/03 22:29

_id sigradi2003_072
id sigradi2003_072
authors Braga, Gisele Pinna
year 2003
title O modelo digital auxilia a compreensão do desenho arquitetônico ou o desenho arquitetônico auxilia a compreensão do modelo digital (The digital model assists the understanding of the architectural design or the architectural design assists the understanding of the digital models)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary In order to design architecture projects, 1st grade architecture students have to understand the space and how to figure it out. To be succeeded in the design process it is necessary to develop their spatial abstraction capability. Each architectural representation tool can contribute for this development. This work shows the pedagogical experience applied to students of the first grade of architecture course at UNICENP, in Curitiba, Brazil, approaching the strategies of different subjects to increase the development of spatial skills using different architecture design tools.
series SIGRADI
email giipinna@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id caadria2003_b5-2
id caadria2003_b5-2
authors Caldas, Luisa G.
year 2003
title Shape Generation Using Pareto Genetic Algorithms Integrating Conflicting Design Objectives in Low-Energy Architecture
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 681-694
summary The Generative Design System [GDS] presented in this paper was developed to assist designers in researching low-energy architecture solutions. The GDS has the capability to evolve architectural forms that are energy-efficient, while complying to design intentions expressed by the architect, and responding to conflicting objectives. To achieve this evolutionary development, the system integrates a search and optimization method [Genetic Algorithm], a building energy simulation software [DOE2.1E], and Pareto multicriteria optimization techniques. The GDS adaptively generates populations of alternative solutions, from an initial schematic layout and a set of rules and constraints designed by the architect to encode design intentions. The two conflicting objective functions considered in this paper are maximizing daylighting use, and minimizing energy consumption for conditioning the building. The GDS generated an uniformly sampled, continuous Pareto front, from which six points were visualized in terms of the proposed architectural solutions.
series CAADRIA
email luisa@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id ijac20031402
id ijac20031402
authors Caldas, Luisa G.; Norford, Leslie K.
year 2003
title Shape Generation Using Pareto Genetic Algorithms: Integrating Conflicting Design Objectives in Low-Energy Architecture
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 4
summary The Generative Design System [GDS] presented in this paper was developed to assist designers in researching low-energy architecture solutions. The GDS has the capability to evolve architectural forms that are energy-efficient, while complying to design intentions expressed by the architect and responding to conflicting objectives. To achieve this evolutionary development, the system integrates a search and optimization method [Genetic Algorithm], building energy simulation software [DOE2.1E], and Pareto multicriteria optimization techniques. The GDS adaptively generates populations of alternative solutions, from an initial schematic layout and a set of rules and constraints designed by the architect to encode design intentions. The two conflicting objective functions considered in this paper are maximizing daylighting use and minimizing energy consumption for conditioning the building. The GDS generated an uniformly sampled, continuous Pareto front, from which six points were visualized in terms of the proposed architectural solutions.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id cf2003_m_103
id cf2003_m_103
authors CHANG, T.-W., WOODBURY, R. and DATTA, S.
year 2003
title Interactive Mapping between Knowledge Level and Symbol Level with Geometry. A KL-Model for Design Space Exploration
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 157-166
summary Design space exploration is long-standing motivating ideas in computer-aided design. It realises this vision through a model of design states for making and moving amongst states and an organisation of states into a structure called a design space. Using a design space structuring mechanism based on a subsumption relation, this paper sketches a theory called Geometric Typed Feature Structures (GTFS) to preserve the formal properties of the design space movement algorithms for geometry. It also provides the theory for incorporation of user-guided exploration in the design space. Consequently, the clear division between knowledge level and symbol level, such that functional decomposition •• formal symbol level and design •• model symbol level, disappears. We can therefore use the same subsumption relation to structure the design space exploration interactively. Such interactive mapping between knowledge level and symbol level provides the fine-grained opportunities for user intervention in formal design space movement algorithms. In this paper, we summarize this approach with an example of GTFS subsumption process.
keywords design space, geometric description, knowledge level, subsumption, unfolding
series CAAD Futures
email rob_woodbury@sfu.ca
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id acadia03_017
id acadia03_017
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen
year 2003
title Digital Curricula: Effective Integration Of Digital Courses - A Delicate Balance
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 129-130
summary One of the challenges faced by digital design teachers is how to fit our piece into the larger puzzle of architectural education. How can we make computing support architecture’s varied endeavors and thinking modes? Students must be able to explore and communicate design ideas fluidly using digital or traditional media, as suitable to specific queries. We need to expose students to a palette of current and emerging techniques and help them develop a personal set of media skills.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email nywc@uoregon.edu
last changed 2007/10/22 04:59

_id caadria2006_597
id caadria2006_597
authors CHOR-KHENG LIM, CHING-SHUN TANG, WEI-YEN HSAO, JUNE-HAO HOU, YU-TUNG LIU
year 2006
title NEW MEDIA IN DIGITAL DESIGN PROCESS: Towards a standardize procedure of CAD/CAM fabrication
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 597-599
summary In 1990, due to the traditional architecture design and construction method difficult to build the complicated and non-geometry free-form Fish Structure in Barcelona, architect Frank Gehry started learn from the field of aerospace to utilize CAD/CAM technology in design and manufacture process. He created the free-form fish model in CAD system and exported the digital CAD model data to CAM machine (RP and CNC) to fabricate the design components, and finally assembled on the site. Gehry pioneered in the new digital design process in using CAD/CAM technology or so-called digital fabrication. It becomes an important issue recently as the CAD/CAM technology progressively act as the new digital design media in architectural design and construction process (Ryder et al., 2002; Kolarevic, 2003). Furthermore, in the field of architecture professional, some commercial computer systems had been developed on purpose of standardizes the digital design process in using CAD/CAM fabrication such as Gehry Technologies formed by Gehry Partners; SmartGeometry Group in Europe and Objectile proposed by Bernard Cache. Researchers in the research field like Mark Burry, Larry Sass, Branko Kolarevic, Schodek and others are enthusiastic about the exploration of the role of CAD/CAM fabrication as new design media in design process (Burry, 2002; Schodek et al., 2005; Lee, 2005).
series CAADRIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id acadia03_039
id acadia03_039
authors Clayton, Mark J.
year 2003
title Connecting Digital Tools
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 299
summary A decade ago, Bill Mitchell wrote “Chroniclers of our era may one day write ‘What was computer-aided design?’ To them, it will just be design.” Because of the proliferation of digital tools for design, we are rapidly forgetting that there was ever design before computing. Ask an undergraduate student to describe the design process. There is a good chance that the student will mention using CAD and 3D modeling. Ask a contractor how to practice the profession of building.
series ACADIA
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

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