CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 592

_id steino-thesis
id steino-thesis
authors Steinø, Nicolai
year 2003
title Vision, Plan and Reality
source Aarhus: Aarhus School of Architecture, PhD Thesis
summary How come, that there is often a gap between what is considered good urban design and the built reality of the urban environment? This is the question which the thesis aims to investigate. It has often been stated that urban development can no longer be controlled, and the reason for this has been ascribed, among other things, to the power of the market, postmodern pluralism, or simply to the increased complexity of society. Yet, to decline on the capacity of urban design to guide urban development on such accounts, is to give up on urban design altogether. Rather, if urban design is incapable of achieving what it is aiming at, something must be wrong with it. Thus, the basic argument of the thesis is, that the answer to this question must be sought within urban design itself, rather than within the context in which it operates. In order to approach the research question, the thesis is organized as a twofold investigation, consisting of both an empirical study of the practice of urban design – in the form of a detailed case study of two urban development histories – and a study of the theoretical foundations for this practice. As urban design is regarded as an interdisciplinary activity, the theoretical study is organized as a threefold investigation of urban design theory, planning theory, as well as urban theory. As urban design in practice must consider what the built environment should be like as well as how it is developed, it must include normative as well as procedural considerations. Thus, the issues of normativity and process are central to the understanding of urban design. These issues therefore constitute the foci of both the empirical and the theoretical study.
series thesis:PhD
email steino@aod.aau.dk
last changed 2005/09/09 10:58

_id ijac20031104
id ijac20031104
authors Petric, Jelena; Ucelli, Giuliana; Conti, Giuseppe
year 2003
title Real Teaching and Learning through Virtual Reality
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary This paper addresses an articulated vision of Virtual Reality, which lends itself to design collaboration in teaching, learning and communication of architectural design ideas among students, design professionals and client bodies during the early stages of the design process. Virtual Reality (VR) has already acquired a new degree of complexity through development of network-based virtual communities and the use of avatars. A key intrinsic quality of VR technology is to support collaborative design experience. The design tools developed for this experiment are capable of creating 3D objects in a shared VR environment, thus allowing the design and its evolution to be shared.The choice of programming language (JavaTM) reflects the desire to achieve scalability and hardware independence, which in turn allows for the creation of a VR environment that can co-exist between high-end supercomputers and standard PCs. The prototype design environment was tested using PC workstations and an SGI system running in a Reality Centre.
series journal
email j.petric@strath.ac.uk
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ecaade03_187_11_brandy
id ecaade03_187_11_brandy
authors Brady, Darlene A.
year 2003
title IDEATION: METAPHORICAL EXPLORATIONS AND DIGITAL MEDIA
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 187-190
summary Metaphor in architecture involves two distinct paradigms of ideation and visualization: architecture as a virtual metaphor of an idea and virtual models of architecture as metaphors of an architectural intention or vision. Digital media is a powerful vehicle for the generation and expression of both paradigms. The dominant applications of digital media in architecture are drafting and computer simulations as virtual constructs of an architectural intention. This paper will focus on the us e of digital media and ideation, a design process which uses metaphor to link idea and form early in the design process.
keywords Design creativity, Design process, Generative design, Innovation, Precedents
series eCAADe
email archi-textures@earthlink.net
more http://www.archi-textures.com
last changed 2003/11/22 08:54

_id cf2003_m_103
id cf2003_m_103
authors CHANG, T.-W., WOODBURY, R. and DATTA, S.
year 2003
title Interactive Mapping between Knowledge Level and Symbol Level with Geometry. A KL-Model for Design Space Exploration
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 157-166
summary Design space exploration is long-standing motivating ideas in computer-aided design. It realises this vision through a model of design states for making and moving amongst states and an organisation of states into a structure called a design space. Using a design space structuring mechanism based on a subsumption relation, this paper sketches a theory called Geometric Typed Feature Structures (GTFS) to preserve the formal properties of the design space movement algorithms for geometry. It also provides the theory for incorporation of user-guided exploration in the design space. Consequently, the clear division between knowledge level and symbol level, such that functional decomposition •• formal symbol level and design •• model symbol level, disappears. We can therefore use the same subsumption relation to structure the design space exploration interactively. Such interactive mapping between knowledge level and symbol level provides the fine-grained opportunities for user intervention in formal design space movement algorithms. In this paper, we summarize this approach with an example of GTFS subsumption process.
keywords design space, geometric description, knowledge level, subsumption, unfolding
series CAAD Futures
email rob_woodbury@sfu.ca
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id caadria2003_c2-1
id caadria2003_c2-1
authors Chevrier, C., Bur, D. and Perrin, J. P.
year 2003
title Architecture as a Reference for the Development of A Cad Lighting Tool
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 281-294
summary As light is increasingly perceived as a factor of quality of urban life, it is not surprising that cultural heritage buildings and even civil engineering works are being more and more often illuminated at night. The designers of the projects are revealing a nocturnal vision of the buildings which is often a reflection of the architecture: rhythm, pattern, evenness, symmetry, composition, axes, and so on. The idea of developing a "lighting-modeller" is based upon this assertion. Thus, if we express the needs in terms of functionalities, we can conclude that the hierarchical structure of the architectural edifice can fit in with a "lighting-structure". As a result, concepts like hierarchy, linking, grouping, networking, linearity-polarity, are the basis of the objects and functions that are effective for the great majority of buildings and projects. This "lighting-modeller" can then lead beyond its simulation capabilities to become a design conception tool: hypothesis and variants are quickly realized and tested, and technical data (illumination data, visual comfort) can be obtained as well.
series CAADRIA
email chevrier@crai.archi.fr, bur@crai.archi.fr, perrin@crai.archi.fr
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id acadia03_001
id acadia03_001
authors Jabi, Wassim
year 2003
title Digital Design
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 16
summary Describing design as a sequence of steps cannot convey the complexity of social interactions that it embodies. Design is not merely a process, but a co-evolution of efforts and events in various places and times—both synchronous and asynchronous. Designers share their values, effort and expertise within design settings via artifacts that further the design process. Increasingly, these design settings in academia, research, and professional practice combine physical and virtual modalities such as immersion, projection, and a range of interaction technologies. Peter Anders has described such spaces as cybrids: hybrids that integrate virtual and physical space. In these settings, designers use overlapping physical and virtual artifacts and tools to arrive at a co-operative design resolution. Within collaborative design, these artifacts take on an additional role. As embodiments of design ideas and actions, they become media for communication. Donald Schon asserts that design should be considered a form of making, rather than primarily a form of problem solving, information processing or research. Indeed the line separating creation from design is becoming increasingly blurred. For the design artifact itself may become a part of the design proposal—its virtual presence incorporated within a cybrid structure or object. We may in the future see a proliferation of cybrid settings that support collaborative, digital design. The technologies for this already exist in collaborative tools, networked computing, scanning and immersive media. However, it will take a creative vision to see how these disparate tools and devices can integrate within the ideal design setting.
series ACADIA
email jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ecaade03_237_51_zone
id ecaade03_237_51_zone
authors Lee, Y.Z. Lim, C.K. and Liu, Y.T.
year 2003
title Multiple digital media in realizing various urban spaces: Project 2050 Taiwan
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 237-246
summary In Taiwan, it is a common phenomenon that landscape, urban spaces, and buildings are not considered as a whole by governments at all levels and private clients. More terribly, the government has never proposed any urban statement for the future. The Minister strongly therefore proposes this statement: 2050 vision Taiwan, aim to design the public spaces for the life of Taiwan in the year 2050. The Council for Culture Affairs plans to spend two years to cover 100 locations and invite 20 design teams to provide new vision of the places. Our design team, AleppoZONE first conducts the initial stage of this project that includes three areas of Taiwan: Taipei as the capital of Taiwan is expected to become a better place reflecting new and old space combination. Hsinchu is planned to explore the prototype for a digital city where digital technology is wellinstalled in the city plaza and public buildings. In the island of Pen-Hu, the ecology and high-tech transportation are equally considered to shape Pen-Hu as an island with nature. In the process, design team successfully synthesizes digital models and dynamic films into virtual and physical coexisting environmental animations by using multiple digital media in realizing the 2050 vision cities. The aim of this research is to give a throughout introduction of this project.
keywords Digital media; urban spaces; representation
series eCAADe
email zone@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id acadia03_034
id acadia03_034
authors Luhan, G.A., Bhavsar, S. and Walcott, B.L.
year 2003
title Deep-Time ProbeInvestigations in Light Architecture
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 258-266
summary This paper presentation presents an interdisciplinary research project conducted by a design team comprised of faculty from the Colleges of Architecture, Engineering, and Astrophysics. The title of the project, Deep-Time Probe, Investigations in Light-Architecture, explores the use of an optically active-SETI experiment that centers on the thematic of time, vision, and movement through space. The realm of architecture was the digital glue that united the varied disciplines. The core of the project is broken down into three intrinsically linked components—data representation—collection, storage, and modulation; the Project Mission Wall; and the resultant Light Architecture or Deep-Time Probe. A small team of architecture students under the direction of one architecture faculty member designed the Mission Wall while the Robotics Department provided CNC machinery to digitally mill and fabricate its components. This same team assembled the 40’x60’x15’ structure in one day. The site of the launch created an adequate interface for the public art structure at the scale of an urban park. The scale of the Mission Wall addressed a variety of places, paces, and scales that mediated between the laser, the context of the surrounding plaza, and pedestrian and vehicular circulation, all while concealing the laser from direct view. The Mission Wall served three functions. It provided a housing for the Deep-Time Probe laser. It created windows and scaffolding for lighting. Moreover, it established a series of “View Corridors” that provided the onlooker with multiple vantage points and thus multiple-readings of information as architecture. Nearly fifty “Time Probe Reporters” gathered information through oral interviews. In addition to messages linked to the interviews, the Deep-Time Probe contained verbal and graphic information, images depicting the design and fabrication processes. At the time of the launch, the design team digitized, specially formatted, converted, and modulated the data into a special high-powered laser that was “launched” into space. An advanced civilization in the universe could theoretically receive and decode this information. The Deep-Time Probe project visualized the strengths of each profession, fostered the creative aspects of each team member, and resulted in a unique and dynamic experience. The deep time probe is right now passing through the Oort Cloud, the debris left over from the formation of our Sun and planets, present as a halo surrounding our solar system . . . a distance of nearly 1.5 trillion miles.
keywords Interdisciplinary Design Research, Information Visualization, and Fabrication
series ACADIA
email galuhan@uky.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id cf2003_m_092
id cf2003_m_092
authors NG, E., CHAN, T.Y., LEUNG, R. and PANG, P.
year 2003
title A Daylight Design and Regulatory Method for High-Density Cities Using Computational Lighting Simulations
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 339-350
summary Hong Kong is the most densely populated city in the world. Design of buildings in urban Hong Kong is regulated by the Building (Planning) regulations of the Government. This piece of law is over 40 years old and has been proven to be inadequate. This paper introduces a new simplified method, the Unobstructed Vision Area Method (UVA), for daylight design in high-density cities. The method was developed based on empirical and theoretical formulation as well as extensive validation and studies using computational simulations. The paper highlights the steps necessary to apply computational methods for law making, the difficulties and possibilities in the process, as well as the practical and implementation of adopting computational results and techniques in everyday practical life of the architect and the controlling agency. The Government of Hong Kong has recently adopted the UVA method.
keywords regulations, city, daylighting, simulation
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id caadria2003_a7-2
id caadria2003_a7-2
authors Papamichael, K.
year 2003
title The Role of Computers in the Building Life Cycle - What Computers Can and Cannot Do
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 905-918
summary The objective of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework that facilitates the development of integrated software environments that address the data and process needs of all building-related disciplines through the whole buil ding life cycle. The conceptual framework is based on a comprehensive analysis of the data and processes involved in d ecision-making, which is the common abstraction of all disciplines throughout the building life cycle. The role of computers is examined in every step of the decision-making process and through the building life cycle, focusing on what computers can and cannot do. The capabilities of computers are the used to present a vision for what the future of building design, construction and operation may be. While the vision is based on technologies that are already available, its realization requires significant research and development efforts. Conceptual, technical and strategic challenges to realizing the vision are presented and discussed.
series CAADRIA
email kostas@ucla.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id cf2003_m_017
id cf2003_m_017
authors PENG, Chengzhi
year 2003
title Serial Vision Revisited: Prospects of Virtual City Supported Urban Analysis and Design
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 259-270
summary Following our previous research on developing a dynamic virtual city system (Sheffield Urban Contextual Databank, SUCoD), the paper reports on a study of applying the virtual city resources to an undergraduate urban design course. The study focuses on how the multi-dimensional and multiple types of urban contextual data can be used by student designers directly for urban visual analysis and design development. A link is made with the Serial Vision in Townscape first proposed by Gordon Cullen, which sets out an experiential approach to how a living city environment should be read and understood. Drawing on the project works produced by the students, some patterns of generating urban narratives and 3D spatial designs were observed. Although the current experiment with SUCoD is limited in terms of data scope and modelling capabilities, it reveals a future direction to follow that can turn conventional virtual cities into Web-based online services capable of supporting urban design analyses and syntheses directly.
keywords city, e-learning, serial vision, townscape, urban design, virtual world
series CAAD Futures
email c.peng@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id ecaade03_419_107_tsai
id ecaade03_419_107_tsai
authors Tsai, K.-P., Chien, S.-F. and Cheng, H.-M.
year 2003
title Toward a machine for living: A literature survey of smart homes
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 419-422
summary Are we finally archiving Le Corbusier’s vision of the house as a machine for living? This paper examines houses of future with ubiquitous computing. We review recent research on smart homes and experimental prototype studies of the domestic environment. We survey several new concepts of architectural and device design, and study technologies for creating smart homes. We envisage a new generation of CAAD designers, who may integrate information technologies together with traditional building materials achieve a new machine for living as Le Corbusier once did.
keywords Smart homes; ubiquitous computing; CAAD
series eCAADe
email M9013213@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id f8f7
id f8f7
authors Bhzad Sidawi
year 2003
title The pattern of Internet use for information management by architectural practices in the UK
source Cardiff University, Welsh School of Architecture Cardiff, UK
summary In recent history, architects have experienced problems related to the use and management of new innovations. The Internet presents one such challenge. It offers considerable expansion in types of communication and sources of business information and connects people and businesses around the globe. As is argued in this research, these services could play a positive role in architectural practice. This research examines the use of the Internet by architectural practices in UK in order to reveal how aware they are of the opportunities it presents, the extent to which they are taking advantage of them, and the problems they are experiencing. A field study was conducted of two types of practices: RIBA private practices and local authority practices. A number of research tools were used to inspect how these practices are using the Internet to manage various types of information that used and produced in the practice, namely: the acquisition of web information, the exchange of the practice’s information through the web and the presentation of the practice’s information on the web. Explanations for the results were sought by correlating variables from the questionnaire study, using simple statistical tests. The field study shows that many Internet services are unpopular among architects, and that practices have problems in adopting and using the technology. The pace at which the Internet is being absorbed and accepted by practices is slow. The study suggests that possible causes are: the little knowledge of users’ about IT, the poor resources of the practice, and old or imperfect Internet installations and the absence of the Internet support to the architect’s activities. The research argues that there are a number of links between these negative factors which make the practice unable to utilize the Internet and to manage the practice’s information through the Internet. To break these links, the research suggests that practices should adopt a specific management strategy to promote more utilization of Internet services in the office and to manage information. Practices need to make certain changes to the way they manage the Internet and work with it, if they plan to integrate the Internet more successfully into their practice. The research discusses techniques for improving practice management which would help practices to digest Internet technology and to use it more effectively in the practice.
keywords Internet, Architectural practices, Information management, Communications
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email sidawib@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/11/03 22:29

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id cf2003_m_016
id cf2003_m_016
authors CHEN, Hong-Sheng and LIN, Feng-Tyan
year 2003
title A Simulation Study on Public Building's Staircase Fault Tolerance
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 393-402
summary This paper applies the concept of fault tolerance to staircase layout plan. Fire or smoke may cause some staircases in a building inaccessible. We argue that architects should assess the result from the possible fault of vertical routes. The capability of tolerating staircase faults depends on space usage, arrangement, and pedestrian attributes. In this study, a mathematical model is constructed. For analysing pedestrian's movement in interior space, we employ Monte Carol simulation and Agent-Based Modelling method in a CAAD environment. It helps us to visualise the dynamic process of agent's evacuation process, and to test the problem of possible staircase faults. Finally, a case study brings some important discoveries.
keywords agents, fault tolerance, simulation
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id archidna_thesis
id archidna_thesis
authors Doo Young Kwon
year 2003
title ARCHIDNA: A GENREATIVE SYSTEM FOR SHAPE CONFIGURATONS
source University of Washington, Design Machine Group
summary his thesis concerns a new generation process for shape configurations using a set of operations. The approach derives from analyzing a particular design style and programming them into a computer. It discusses how generative CAD software can be developed that embodies a style and how this software can serve in the architectural design process as a computational design tool. The thesis proposes a prototype software system, ArchiDNA, to demonstrate the use of operations to generate drawings in a specific design style. ArchiDNA employs a set of operations to produce design drawings of shape configuration in Peter Eisenman's style for the Biocentrum building plan in Frankfurt, Germany. The principles of form generation are defined as a set of operations. ArchiDNA generates 2D and 3D drawings similar to Eisenmans plan and model for the Biocentrum building. The extension system of ArchiDNA, called ArchiDNA++, supports designers in defining operations and generating shape configurations. Designers can enter and edit their own shapes for the generation process and also control the parameters and attributes for shape operations. Thus, designers can manage the generation process and explore using ArchiDNA++, to generate shape configurations that are consistent with their own drawing style.
series thesis:MSc
type normal paper
email kwon@u.washington.edu
last changed 2004/06/02 17:40

_id c53f
authors Dorau, U., Sanopoulos, A. and Schrenk, M.
year 2003
title Erfahrungen und Erfolge bei der Umsetzung von RAPIS - Raum- und Projektinformationssystem für die Vienna Region [Experience and Results with the RAPS-System for the Viennese Region]
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary In shortest terms: RAPIS is a metadatabase on spatial information in the “Vienna Region”. More interesting then this simple fact is the way how theproject was implemented and what the effects on regional development are.RAPIS is the acronym for “Regional Planning and Project Information System for the Vienna Region” and was implemented as the Austrian part of the Interreg IIc Project IM-PLAN (Implementation of models for co-operative planning in metropolitan regions). The aim was to create aninformation platform for planning relevant information for the whole region, integrating existing data sources from federal and state administrationas well as private companies. RAPIS enables an overview of the available spatial datasets in the "Vienna Region " and focuses on the following questions: Which datasets relevant for planning and development are available within the region? Who can use these datasets under which conditions? Which plans and projects do exist for the region? In addition also metainformation on the most important international data sources was collected as well as information to projects and plans with regional and trans-regional impacts. During the implementation great importance was given to communication and sensitisation for the importance the topic: geo-informationinfrastructre as a key ressource for spatial development and regional co-operation. It showed up that Austria and the "Vienna Region" have a very good initial position and excellent databases on national, state, local and international level. However, it seems that almost everything exists already but hardly anybody knows about it ... – potential users do not know what data and information already exists and how to get and use it. Intensive communication, information and permanent discussion of the topic „(Geo-) Information“ within the „planners community“ carried the topic into the public and strengthened the consciousness for the importance of information-infrastructure for regional co-operation.
series other
email dorau@multimediaplan.at
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id caadria2003_b1-4
id caadria2003_b1-4
authors Gero, John S. and Jupp, Julie R.
year 2003
title Feature Based Qualitative Representation of Architectural Plans Information Contained In 2-Dimensional Design Drawings.
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 117-130
summary This paper develops an approach to the qualitative representation of architectural plan drawings. We describe a schema for representing the internal shapes features and their associated spatial relations using syntactic pattern and contour specifications. This schema uses a qualitative symbolic representation to detect features. An example application of this representation is presented.
series CAADRIA
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au, jupp_j@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id cf2003_m_046
id cf2003_m_046
authors HWANG, Jie-Eun and CHOI, Jin-Won
year 2003
title SpaceScope: Spatial Content-Based Retrieval of Architectural Floor Plans
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 53-62
summary This research investigates spatial information retrieval in architecture, based on an efficient metadata that is crucial for content-based retrieval. SpaceCore is the metadata schema for spatial information on a floor plan implemented with RDF (Resource Description Framework). To generate metadata, we analyse the factors of spatial information, and then construct a data model containing the content and structure of spatial information. To exploit the metadata, we suggest various query operations with possible predicates and interfaces. SpaceScope, the spatial information retrieval system, consists of three modules: an input data module, a query module, and a browse module. As to implementation, we have already developed the real time plan-structuring system, called “Vitruvius”, as an inputting and modelling data module (using C++). Based on the database, the system performs the similarity analysis and then evaluates the alternative plans with the retrieval goals. At the end of the paper we discuss the potential of SpaceScope in the schematic design stage of the architectural design process, possibly improving and triggering the designer’s conceptual approach against a logical background and facilitate rapid decision-making after full consideration.
keywords case-based reasoning, content-based retrieval, metadata, RDF, semantic
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id avocaad_2003_23
id avocaad_2003_23
authors Jadwiga C. Zarnowiecka
year 2003
title AND WOULD COMPUTER SAVE THE MAGIC PLACE? A BOJARY STORY
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary Each city has its own magic, the spirit of the place. Not always are these ‘magic’ places commonly known. There are cities, however, for which such places are their pride and fame. Is there anybody who would not associate the Golden Street with Prague, or the Spanish Stairs with Rome? In Bialystok the magic quality is attributed to the district of Bojary.Currently Bojary is one of the districts of Bialystok. The town was first created as such in the 18th century as a result of merging of two villages: Bojary and Skorupy, church grounds and Kolonia Lowiecka known as Krolikarnia. Only Bojary has retained the old communication plan of the former village and characteristic type of wooden structure from the 19th and the first half of the 20th century.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
type normal paper
email zarnow@pb.bialystok.pl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

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