CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id acadia03_057
id acadia03_057
authors Greinacher, Udo (et al.)
year 2003
title URBAN FURNITURE: from gazebo to digi-booth
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 429
summary Recent years have seen the steady increase of automated kiosks and temporary structures that begin to replace traditional building types. In this course we studied and analyzed the development of the gazebo/kiosk in urban/rural settings both inside and outside over time, assessed its value for commerce and social equity, proposed a forward projection regarding the role digital info-booths/commercial kiosks will play in our urban environment, and developed new spatial models that can become an integral part of our daily experience.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id avocaad_2003_05
id avocaad_2003_05
authors Alexander Koutamanis
year 2003
title Autonomous mechanisms in architectural design systems
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary The development of architectural design systems that describe fully the form, structure and behaviour of a design relies heavily on the incorporation of intelligence in the representations, analyses, transformations and transactions used by the computer. Traditionally such intelligence takes either of two forms. The first is a methodical framework that guides actions supported by the design system (usually in a top-down fashion). The second is local, intelligence mechanisms that resolve discrete, relatively well-defined subproblems (often with limited if any user intervention). Local intelligent mechanisms offer the means for adaptability and transformability in architectural design systems, including the localization of global tendencies. This refers both to the digital design technologies and to the historical, cultural and contextual modifications of design styles and approaches.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email A.Koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id acadia07_174
id acadia07_174
authors Bontemps, Arnaud; Potvin, André; Demers, Claude
year 2007
title The Dynamics of Physical Ambiences
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 174-181
summary This research proposes to support the reading of physical ambiences by the development of a representational technique which compiles, in a numerical interface, two types of data: sensory and filmic. These data are recorded through the use of a portable array equipped with sensors (Potvin 1997, 2002, 2004) as well as the acquisition of Video information of the moving environment. The compilation of information is carried out through a multi-media approach, by means of a program converting the environmental data into dynamic diagrams, as well as the creation of an interactive interface allowing a possible diffusion on the Web. This technique, named APMAP/Video, makes it possible to read out simultaneously spatial and environmental diversity. It is demonstrated through surveys taken at various seasons and time of the day at the new Caisse de dépôt et de placement headquarters in Montreal which is also the corpus for a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) research grant on Environmental Adaptability in Architecture (Potvin et al. 2003-2007). This case study shows that the technique can prove of great relevance for POEs (Post Occupancy Evaluation) as well as for assistance in a new design project.
series ACADIA
email arnaudbontemps@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id eaea2003_11-bremer-sander
id eaea2003_11-bremer-sander
authors Bremer, S. and Sander, H.
year 2004
title View from the Road: Environmental Simulation for the Fractal City of Rhine Ruhr
source Spatial Simulation and Evaluation - New Tools in Architectural and Urban Design [Proceedings of the 6th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 80-227-2088-7], pp. 43-47
summary Highway seems to be more an issue of traffic planning than of urban design. But the highway can be a very important factor for the modern city pattern. Highways shape the spatial form of the fractal city. The modern highway can define new cores outside and “interior edges” within the city. Seen as a planning tool, highways are the great neglected opportunity in city and regional design. The 1st Architecture Biennial, 1ab, taking place from May 2003 to July 2003 in Rotterdam, explores the creative potentials of modern highways worldwide. An international research team discovered the spatial functions of highways in modern agglomerations. This lecture will give an overview of the results of the worldwide analyses and the design projects that had been undertaken. Both authors are members of the German research team. The German team examined the A 42 running through the Ruhrgebiet, a former coal and steal area in western Germany. The Ruhr Area is converting from an industrially orientated region to an agglomeration of high technology and science. But the regional image remains the same due to the fact that the changes cannot be seen, neither physically, nor from the road. Here, the highway could be used as a catalyst supporting and structuring the spatial changes to make them more legible for the people of Rhine-Ruhr. The nature becomes the most important tool of highway design. Landscape forms a linkage between the different cities of the region. Together with the A 40 and other local highways the region becomes the most important (and largest) public space of the new Rhine-Ruhr. The highway seen as a work of urban art can be designed only from the perspective of the driving car.
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id caadria2003_b3-4
id caadria2003_b3-4
authors Bruton, Dean and Radford, Antony
year 2003
title The Grammatical Studio Disrupting Regularities in Digital Media Design Education
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 433-446
summary Grammar governs the ordered way in which words are modified and combined in human languages to convey complex concepts beyond the simplicities of individual words. By extension (but less susceptible to analysis) grammar governs the way in which visual elements are modified and combined in art and design compositions. In this paper we focus on the outcomes and effects of placing grammar and contingency in the forefront of studio teaching with digital media in architecture and art, and how experience in these two domains can inform each other.
series CAADRIA
email dean.bruton@adelaide.edu.au
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id sigradi2003_000
id sigradi2003_000
authors Carmena, Sonia and Utgés, Raúl (eds.)
year 2003
title SiGradi2003
source Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics Graphics / ISBN 987-9459-51-2] Rosario (Argentina) 5-7 november 2003, 411 p.
summary The conference topic "Digital Culture & Difference" encourages creative and critical inquiries about the idea of measuring differences within and between culture manifestations of digital age towards new information for knowledge completion. Submitted work may address this topic or other significant aspect of Digital Media. Type of Work Categories: 1- Completed work; 2- Work in-progress; 3- Graphic or visual works (posters). Areas of Inquiry: Design; Architecture, Cinematography; Arts; etc. Focus:  Professional applications; Academic experiences; Scientific research; Theory, epistemology, philosophy; Project, design, communication; Environment, preservation, sustainability; Technology, tools, media; etc.
series SIGRADI
email soniacarmena@arnet.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id caadria2006_597
id caadria2006_597
authors CHOR-KHENG LIM, CHING-SHUN TANG, WEI-YEN HSAO, JUNE-HAO HOU, YU-TUNG LIU
year 2006
title NEW MEDIA IN DIGITAL DESIGN PROCESS: Towards a standardize procedure of CAD/CAM fabrication
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 597-599
summary In 1990, due to the traditional architecture design and construction method difficult to build the complicated and non-geometry free-form Fish Structure in Barcelona, architect Frank Gehry started learn from the field of aerospace to utilize CAD/CAM technology in design and manufacture process. He created the free-form fish model in CAD system and exported the digital CAD model data to CAM machine (RP and CNC) to fabricate the design components, and finally assembled on the site. Gehry pioneered in the new digital design process in using CAD/CAM technology or so-called digital fabrication. It becomes an important issue recently as the CAD/CAM technology progressively act as the new digital design media in architectural design and construction process (Ryder et al., 2002; Kolarevic, 2003). Furthermore, in the field of architecture professional, some commercial computer systems had been developed on purpose of standardizes the digital design process in using CAD/CAM fabrication such as Gehry Technologies formed by Gehry Partners; SmartGeometry Group in Europe and Objectile proposed by Bernard Cache. Researchers in the research field like Mark Burry, Larry Sass, Branko Kolarevic, Schodek and others are enthusiastic about the exploration of the role of CAD/CAM fabrication as new design media in design process (Burry, 2002; Schodek et al., 2005; Lee, 2005).
series CAADRIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id ecaade03_083_03_dobson
id ecaade03_083_03_dobson
authors Dobson, Adrian and Lancaric, Peter
year 2003
title From Virtuality to Reality - Collaborative Digital Design in the Urban Environment
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 83-87
summary This paper describes work in progress on a collaborative project being undertaken by the Department of Art and Design at the University of Luton with the architecture and planning departments at Luton Borough Council and community participation. Focussing on the Plaiters Lea urban zone in Luton, the project uses a three-dimensional digital urban model of the townscape, as a collaborative design and communication tool for urban regeneration. The proposals being developed include elements of architectural and urban design, landscape design and public art. The philosophical motivation for the project is that of the community architecture and arts movements, in which a wide constituency of stakeholders is involved in the evolution of design proposals. The digital model is the key feature of a world-wide-web site that facilitates the exchange of design data between the participants. Digital modelling work has been used for undergraduate CAD skills development, and students are contributing design proposals as part of their studio work. Hence the project also has a pedagogic component.
series eCAADe
email adrian.dobson@luton.ac.uk
more http://www.luton.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id ecaade03_473_175_flanagan_neu
id ecaade03_473_175_flanagan_neu
authors Flanagan, Robert H.
year 2003
title Generative Logic in Digital Design
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 473-484
summary This exploration of early-stage, architectural design pedagogy is in essence, a record of an ongoing transformation underway in architecture, from its practice in the art of geometry of space to its practice in the art of geometry of space-time. A selected series of student experiments, from 1992 to the present, illustrate a progression in architectural theory, from Pythagorean concepts of mathematics and geometry, to the symbolic representation of space and non-linear time in film. The dimensional expansion of space, from xyz to xyz+t (time), represents a tactical and strategic opportunity to incorporate multisensory design variables in architectural practice, as well as in its pedagogy.
keywords Generative; process; derivative; logic; systemic
series eCAADe
email rflanaga@carbon.cudenver.edu
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id acadia03_013
id acadia03_013
authors Jabi, W., Goldman, G. and Johnson, B.
year 2003
title REQUIREMENTS FOR AN EFFECTIVE DISTRIBUTED DESIGN REVIEW
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 99-105
summary With the wider availability of high-bandwidth communication networks and the maturity of commercial collaboration software, schools of architecture are experimenting with computer-aided distributed design reviews. A distributed design review enables geographically-distant participants to discuss a common design project using computer-supported collaborative technologies such as videoconferencing, voice over IP, and shared applications. While potentially beneficial to students, and attractive to teachers, there are a number of challenges facing the integration of synchronous distributed design reviews into the design studio by technically inexperienced faculty without significant technical support. This paper seeks to make it easier for faculty to make routine utilization of such reviews by examining our own experiences with a number of such reviews, in a variety of contexts, distilling out a set of guidelines for future reviews.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2004/09/18 18:21

_id caadria2007_057
id caadria2007_057
authors Kouide, Tahar; G. Paterson
year 2007
title BIM as a Viable Collaborative Working Tool: A Case Study
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary For the majority of design practices in the construction industry the use of CAD systems have been used to merely automate hand drafting (Cohen 2003). This is the traditional way of working that has changed very little since the introduction of commercial CAD systems. These practices as means of communication are being replaced by a virtual building model environment which encapsulates all of the information for an entire construction project and thereby enables computer-supported co-operative working practices. (Newton 2003) This study aims to determine whether Building Information Modelling (BIM) can, and whether it will, replace traditional communication media as the standard in the industry for computersupported co-operative working practices in the Architecture Engineering and construction (AEC) sector. The bulk of the research comprises an extensive literature review looking at the principal reasons behind the development of BIM, the potential advantages and drawbacks of the technology, and the barriers and obstacles which inhibit its adoption as a means of computer-supported co-operative working. The findings of the study have been validated and analysed against current practice in the field through a live case study analysis of the on-going Heathrow airport Terminal 5 Project in London (UK). The Terminal 5 case study demonstrates that present software tools, although usable, still present significant implicit technical constraints to wider implementation among Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). The case study has also shown that in practice, the success of BIM depends just as much on the working practices and ethos of participants in the project chain as it does on the capabilities of the software itself, in particular the willingness of practitioners to change traditional working practices. The case study has shown that the present investment, in terms of time, cost, and effort required to implementing the technology means that BIM is unlikely to be adopted on small simple projects where conventional CAD is still adequate. It also highlighted that BIM tools currently available are not yet adequately developed to satisfy the requirements of the many procurement and especially contractual arrangements which presently exist and many firms will be frightened off by the unresolved legal issues which may arise from implementing BIM in their practices.
series CAADRIA
email g.j.paterson@rgu.ac.uk
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id acadia03_034
id acadia03_034
authors Luhan, G.A., Bhavsar, S. and Walcott, B.L.
year 2003
title Deep-Time ProbeInvestigations in Light Architecture
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 258-266
summary This paper presentation presents an interdisciplinary research project conducted by a design team comprised of faculty from the Colleges of Architecture, Engineering, and Astrophysics. The title of the project, Deep-Time Probe, Investigations in Light-Architecture, explores the use of an optically active-SETI experiment that centers on the thematic of time, vision, and movement through space. The realm of architecture was the digital glue that united the varied disciplines. The core of the project is broken down into three intrinsically linked components—data representation—collection, storage, and modulation; the Project Mission Wall; and the resultant Light Architecture or Deep-Time Probe. A small team of architecture students under the direction of one architecture faculty member designed the Mission Wall while the Robotics Department provided CNC machinery to digitally mill and fabricate its components. This same team assembled the 40’x60’x15’ structure in one day. The site of the launch created an adequate interface for the public art structure at the scale of an urban park. The scale of the Mission Wall addressed a variety of places, paces, and scales that mediated between the laser, the context of the surrounding plaza, and pedestrian and vehicular circulation, all while concealing the laser from direct view. The Mission Wall served three functions. It provided a housing for the Deep-Time Probe laser. It created windows and scaffolding for lighting. Moreover, it established a series of “View Corridors” that provided the onlooker with multiple vantage points and thus multiple-readings of information as architecture. Nearly fifty “Time Probe Reporters” gathered information through oral interviews. In addition to messages linked to the interviews, the Deep-Time Probe contained verbal and graphic information, images depicting the design and fabrication processes. At the time of the launch, the design team digitized, specially formatted, converted, and modulated the data into a special high-powered laser that was “launched” into space. An advanced civilization in the universe could theoretically receive and decode this information. The Deep-Time Probe project visualized the strengths of each profession, fostered the creative aspects of each team member, and resulted in a unique and dynamic experience. The deep time probe is right now passing through the Oort Cloud, the debris left over from the formation of our Sun and planets, present as a halo surrounding our solar system . . . a distance of nearly 1.5 trillion miles.
keywords Interdisciplinary Design Research, Information Visualization, and Fabrication
series ACADIA
email galuhan@uky.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id acadia03_016
id acadia03_016
authors Luhan, Gregory A.
year 2003
title Digital Curricula: Effective Integration of Digital Courses. Stitched-spaces and Digital Permutations
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 128-129
summary If, “the purpose of art is to awaken reality” as Paul Klee writes, what then, is the generative purpose of the digital as it relates to architecture? By uniting the traditional ways of knowing with the more contemporary and technologically advanced ways of knowing, the architect then would be able to develop the capacity to visualize and to understand unseen spatial relationships and exploit their latent characteristics. The computer consequently allows a direct synthesis to occur between the original idea and its formal application, in a sense providing new questions to old answers.
series ACADIA
email galuhan@uky.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id avocaad_2003_11
id avocaad_2003_11
authors Michael Cumming
year 2003
title The promise of peer-to-peer computing versus the utility of centralised data models in collaborative design
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary Peer-to-peer (P2P), or distributed computing, involves having computers on a net¬work -peers- acting as both suppliers, as well as consumers of information. With recent developments, most notably the JXTA initiative by Sun Microsystems, such P2P technology will soon become quite easy to implement, in a standardised and secure fashion. P2P technology holds promise in the domain of collaborative design in that it allows design collaborators to exchange information in a manner that appears to have certain advantages over centralised systems, such as greater spontaneity, the ability to self-organize, better scalability, and the ability to handle transient resources in a more robust manner. However, it is not clear how this new technology can be applied to the information needs of collaborative design, in which centralised data models are usually seen as useful. This paper examines some of the positive and negative implications of this new technology in the context of collaborative design.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email m.cumming@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id ecaade03_279_128_mueller
id ecaade03_279_128_mueller
authors Mueller, Volker and Talbott, Kyle
year 2003
title Architectural Design Methods with Commercial Computer Aided Design Systems
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 279-286
summary This paper seeks to contribute to the discussion about the changed expectations towards computers as design tools by presenting three case studies describing how a computer aided design (CAD) system is used in a design setting. The first case describes how the commercial CAD system is presented to students of architecture at a university. The second and third case studies show how designers in an architectural firm have evolved distinctly different ways of augmenting their creative thinking using the CAD system. The three cases demonstrate how designers adopt standard tools and adapt their individual design processes to utilize digital media creatively.
keywords CAD, digital design, architectural profession, innovative processes, creativeprocesses
series eCAADe
email vmueller@nbbj.com
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id 7655
authors Okeil, Ahmad and El Araby, Mostafa
year 2003
title Realism vs. Reality in Digital Reconstruction of Cities
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary The digital reconstruction of existing cities using virtual reality techniques is being increasingly used. For consultants, municipalities and planning departments these models provide decision support through visual simulations (El Araby, 2001). For academia they provide a new tool for teaching students urban design and planning (Okeil, 2001). For authorities they provide a tool for promoting the city on the world wide web trying to attract more businesses and tourists to it. The built environment is very rich in detail. It does not only consist of open spaces surrounded by abstract buildings but it also includes many smaller objects such as street furniture, traffic signs, street lights, different types of vegetation and shop signs for example. All surfaces in the built environment have unique properties describing color, texture and opacity. The built environmentis dynamic and our perception is affected by factors such as pedestrian movement, traffic, environmental factors such as wind, noise and shadows. The built environment is also shaped by the accumulation of changes caused by many influences through time. All these factors make the reconstruction of the built environment a very complex task. This paper tries to answer the question: how realistic the reconstructed models of urban areas can be. It sees “Realism“ as a variable floating between three types of realties. The reality of the physical environment which we are trying to represent. The reality of the digital environment which will host the digitally reconstructed city. And the reality of the working environment which deals with the problem of limitation of resources needed to digitally reconstruct the city. A case study of building a 3D computer model of an urban area in the United Arab Emirates demonstrates that new time-saving techniques for data acquisition can enhance realism by meetingbudget limitations and time limitations.
keywords Virtual Reality; Photo Realism; Texture Maps; 3D Modeling; Urban Design
series other
email a.okeil@uaeu.ac.ae
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id cf2003_m_079
id cf2003_m_079
authors PETRIC, J., CONTI, G. and UCELLI, G.
year 2003
title Designing within Virtual Worlds
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 213-224
summary This paper celebrates the successful outcome of a trial of an innovative multi-platform distributed design decision support system in which the shared design environment exists within the virtual world. The outcome is the result of a sustained three-year research and development effort, within an internationally recognised research group. The project set itself a number of ambitious targets within the broad spectrum of distributed design decision support, viz: • A multi-platform environment: the trial demonstrates inter-operability of different machine platforms - from a home PC to an international standard Virtual Reality Centre. • A distributed environment: the trial demonstrates the high level of understanding amongst the design team separated by time and space. • An ability to propose, discuss and agree upon, design decision from within the virtual world. Hitherto, virtual environments were viewing galleries; designers had to leave them to effect design changes in a conventional CAD package. The trial described in the paper amply demonstrates the potential to design, collaboratively and, in distributed mode, from within the virtual world. The two ideas upon which the system (known as JCAD-VR) is built are: • That all the users present in the virtual world have to be able to share the same virtual environment in a "transparent fashion"; • The user interface, instead of the traditional menu/windows based layout, is part of the virtual world itself. Any element of the interface becomes an object belonging to the 3D world and therefore it is treated as any other object. Each element of the interface can then be moved or scaled according to the user’s needs. The entire project is based on client-server architecture where every user logs into a virtual world and starts sharing design tasks with other users. The authors propose to present a video which demonstrates the positive outcome of the trials to date. More importantly, perhaps, the authors will put the achievements of the R+D into the context of past aspirations and developments in the subject area and, most importantly of all, suggest how these modest achievements will impact on the next decade of increasingly rapid R+D.
keywords collaboration, distributed design, interface, virtual environment
series CAAD Futures
email j.petric@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id acadia03_025
id acadia03_025
authors Serriano, Pierluigi
year 2003
title Form Follows Software
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 185-205
summary Software selection affects design outcome. Computer applications externalize in their graphical interface and in their internal logic a set of assumptions about how objects are constructed and space is represented. Accessibility of tools is in direct correlation with their rate of use. Depending on how user-friendly particular functions are, their use will appear with higher frequency than those foreign to the technological frames of the user groups for which software is designed. As each software is geared towards the needs of specific communities, it replicates in digital fashion those disciplinary practices already present in the analog world. However, modeling results are bracketed at its inception the very moment a particular 3D package is chosen from a diverse array of digital offerings. If the application adopted is designed to appeal to the computer animation industry, the modeling results will bear the imprint of those organic qualities: buildings will appear character-like. Since computer programs have built-in slant meant to aid disciplinary specific users, they yield families of designs with formal commonalities. Unquestionably, proficiency of software use also broadens inventiveness of design. Nevertheless some applications make particular transformations harder to achieve, and as a result will be likely to exclude those modeling options from architects’ imaginary world.
keywords modeling options, built-in slants, form-making, technology of orders.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id acadia05_254
id acadia05_254
authors Sheil, Bob and Leung, Chris
year 2005
title ‘Kielder Probes’ – bespoke tools for an indeterminate design process
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 254-259
summary Sixteen (makers) are a group of practicing architects, academics, designers and makers who assemble when key questions surrounding design, fabrication, use and adaptability in architecture emerge. Initially, the group was formed out of a motivation to engage as designers with the physical and tactile aspects of production without a dependency upon drawing. Now, in the post digital age, the age of digital fabrication, boundaries between drawing and making, between the designer and the maker, have dissolved. Consequently sixteen*(makers) work is now engaged with questions of knowledge transfer, expertise, and innovation where modes of investigation are equally embedded within in the analogue and the digital world. This article relates to our latest ongoing work which is due for completion in 2005/06. The work has been developed as a specific response to the award of an architectural residency by the Art and Architecture Partnership at Kielder Park, Northumbria, England. From the outset, it has not been a requirement of the residency that an outcome is identified early on. In fact, as I write, the outcome remains open. Presented with an extraordinary site and coinciding with a time of rapid change the work has begun by exploring a design process that is adaptable, indeterminate, and informed by site conditions. In October 2003, sixteen*(makers) were awarded an architecture residency by The Art and Architecture Programme at Kielder (AAPK) of Northumbria, UK. This organization is well known for commissioning works such as the ‘Belvedere’ by Softroom and the ‘Skyspace’ by James Turrell. Coordinated by Peter Sharp, AAPK consists of a number of large public bodies, including The Forestry Commission, Northumbrian Water and Tyndale District Council. Together they manage a land area of 62,000 ha’s centred on the UK’s largest reservoir and surrounded on all sides by one of Europe’s largest managed forests.
series ACADIA
email r.sheil@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id acadia03_028
id acadia03_028
authors Shih, Chien-Hung
year 2003
title To Proceed Analysis of Dynamic Virtual Environment by Using Physical Model as a Protagonist
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 219-225
summary This paper intends to combine architecture with state-of-the-art software technologies and operational methods of other domains to free architectural rendering from the restrictions of cold, still graphics or unrealistic computer pictures. The author transforms physical models into digital models through industrial design software, and synthesizes these digital models into motion pictures of the environment via film production software. This way, a designer can effectively turn the ideas of his mind into rough handmade models, instead of spending enormous amounts of time building computer models, and viewers will be able to quickly grasp the conditions of the site through the motion pictures.
series ACADIA
email shihnj@mail.ntust.edu.tw
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

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