CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 542

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ascaad2004_paper5
id ascaad2004_paper5
authors Abdelhameed, Wael A.
year 2004
title A Java Program Model for Design-Idea Exploration in Three Dimensions
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary Visual Perception of depictions is the basis of the act of imagining employed in visual design thinking of design process, and consequently in design-idea exploration. Digital-media use plays a significantly important role in these exploration processes. The underlying assumption of the research is that Visual Perception affects Design-Idea Exploration processes. The research investigates and sheds more light on the processes of Visual Perception, which architects use in mass exploration of design ideas. The research is a part of a series that presents a Java program based on creating 3d shapes, in order for architects to explore initial shapes related to design ideas. The initial version of the program, which is a part of another research, creates 3d shapes through controlling their dimensions and insertion point. Functions of painting, controlling the light position, and shading are added to the program that is presented in this research. The research discusses Design-Idea Exploration and Visual Perception and their correlation. The added features of the program that is used as a design medium are also presented and linked to the investigated areas.
series ASCAAD
email w_wel@yahoo.com
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia11_138
id acadia11_138
authors Buell, Samantha; Shaban, Ryan; Corte, Daniel; Beorkrem, Christopher
year 2011
title Zero-waste, Flat Pack Truss Work: An Investigation of Responsive Structuralism
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 138-143
summary The direct and rapid connections between scripting, modeling and prototyping allow for investigations of computation in fabrication. The manipulation of planar materials with two-dimensional CNC cuts can easily create complex and varied forms, volumes, and surfaces. However, the bulk of research on folding using CNC fabrication tools is focused upon surfaces, self-supporting walls and shell structures, which do not integrate well into more conventional building construction models.This paper attempts to explain the potential for using folding methodologies to develop structural members through a design-build process. Conventional building practice consists of the assembly of off-the-shelf parts. Many times, the plinth, skeleton, and skin are independently designed and fabricated, integrating multiple industries. Using this method of construction as an operative status quo, this investigation focused on a single structural component: the truss. A truss is defined as: “A triangulated arrangement of structural members that reduces nonaxial external forces to a set of axial forces in its members.” (Allen and Iano 2004)Using folding methodologies and sheet steel to create a truss, this design investigation employed a recyclable and prolific building material to redefine the fabrication of a conventional structural member. The potential for using digital design and two-dimensional CNC fabrication tools in the design of a foldable truss from sheet steel is viable in the creation of a flat-packed, minimal waste structural member that can adapt to a variety of aesthetic and structural conditions. Applying new methods to a component of the conventional ‘kit of parts’ allowed for a novel investigation that recombines zero waste goals, flat-packing potential, structural expression and computational processes.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email srbuell2@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id sigradi2004_213
id sigradi2004_213
authors Carlos Roberto Barrios Hernandez
year 2004
title Parametric Gaudi
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This research is a work in progress in the development of parametric systems for modeling of complex shapes. The research takes on the fundamental rules for form generation of column knots of the Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona. Designed by the Spanish Architect, Antonio Gaudi, the forms of the Sagrada Familia represent a synthesis of manipulation of simple geometrical rules and the use of basic procedures which result in a rich language with no precedents in architecture.
keywords Parametric modeling, design variations, evaluation of designs
series SIGRADI
email cabeto@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id 109caadria2004
id 109caadria2004
authors Hyun-Ah Choi, Han-Jong Jun
year 2004
title A Fundamental Study on Analysis of Interaction By Sketches and Acts of Creative Design in Architectural Design Process - Focusing on Emergent Shapes
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 133-144
summary One of the characteristics of design process in the area of architectural design is the use of a number of different types of sketches. Designers place a great deal of emphasis on sketches often because it is thought to be associated with innovation and creativity. The emphasis has come to drive researchers to increasingly focus on sketch and its role in designing. Firstly, this paper is to review closely related researches that have looked at the role of sketches in design process. And then, this study is to review analogy and emergence that can be effective in facilitating creative design. Mutational emergent shapes are introduced in the last stage.
series CAADRIA
email hyuna7@unitel.co.kr
last changed 2004/05/20 16:37

_id caadria2004_k-1
id caadria2004_k-1
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 2004
title CONTEXTUALIZATION AND EMBODIMENT IN CYBERSPACE
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 5-14
summary The introduction of VRML (Virtual Reality Markup Language) in 1994, and other similar web-enabled dynamic modeling software (such as SGI’s Open Inventor and WebSpace), have created a rush to develop on-line 3D virtual environments, with purposes ranging from art, to entertainment, to shopping, to culture and education. Some developers took their cues from the science fiction literature of Gibson (1984), Stephenson (1992), and others. Many were web-extensions to single-player video games. But most were created as a direct extension to our new-found ability to digitally model 3D spaces and to endow them with interactive control and pseudo-inhabitation. Surprisingly, this technologically-driven stampede paid little attention to the core principles of place-making and presence, derived from architecture and cognitive science, respectively: two principles that could and should inform the essence of the virtual place experience and help steer its development. Why are the principles of place-making and presence important for the development of virtual environments? Why not simply be content with our ability to create realistically-looking 3D worlds that we can visit remotely? What could we possibly learn about making these worlds better, had we understood the essence of place and presence? To answer these questions we cannot look at place-making (both physical and virtual) from a 3D space-making point of view alone, because places are not an end unto themselves. Rather, places must be considered a locus of contextualization and embodiment that ground human activities and give them meaning. In doing so, places acquire a meaning of their own, which facilitates, improves, and enriches many aspects of our lives. They provide us with a means to interpret the activities of others and to direct our own actions. Such meaning is comprised of the social and cultural conceptions and behaviors imprinted on the environment by the presence and activities of its inhabitants, who in turn, ‘read’ by them through their own corporeal embodiment of the same environment. This transactional relationship between the physical aspects of an environment, its social/cultural context, and our own embodiment of it, combine to create what is known as a sense of place: the psychological, physical, social, and cultural framework that helps us interpret the world around us, and directs our own behavior in it. In turn, it is our own (as well as others’) presence in that environment that gives it meaning, and shapes its social/cultural character. By understanding the essence of place-ness in general, and in cyberspace in particular, we can create virtual places that can better support Internet-based activities, and make them equal to, in some cases even better than their physical counterparts. One of the activities that stands to benefit most from understanding the concept of cyber-places is learning—an interpersonal activity that requires the co-presence of others (a teacher and/or fellow learners), who can point out the difference between what matters and what does not, and produce an emotional involvement that helps students learn. Thus, while many administrators and educators rush to develop webbased remote learning sites, to leverage the economic advantages of one-tomany learning modalities, these sites deprive learners of the contextualization and embodiment inherent in brick-and-mortar learning institutions, and which are needed to support the activity of learning. Can these qualities be achieved in virtual learning environments? If so, how? These are some of the questions this talk will try to answer by presenting a virtual place-making methodology and its experimental implementation, intended to create a sense of place through contextualization and embodiment in virtual learning environments.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
last changed 2004/05/20 16:37

_id 2961
id 2961
authors KOUZELEAS Stelios
year 2004
title COMPUTATIONAL PROCESSES OF A HALL CAD MODELISATION FOR ACOUSTIC SIMULATION ACCORDING TO ACCEPTED GEOMETRY FORMAT VIA ACOUSTIC SOFTWARE
source 1st International Conference “From Scientific Computing to Computational Engineering” (IC-SCCE), 8-10 September 2004, Athens, Greece
summary The acoustic computational simulation presents many advantages but at the same time there are some limits corresponding, among others, to the modelisation of the hall geometry. The integrated modelers of geometry of the halls in the acoustic simulation software are based especially on the programming code modelisation via text editors of coordinate points and not on the graphical modelisation, as the CAD software is. In cases of complex architectural shapes of halls, the majority of the acoustic simulation software imperatively needs to import a model from a CAD software. However, the modelisation of the geometry of the hall must take into account several criteria in order to run in an acoustic simulation software, and optimize the calculation results, such as the plane surfaces, the limited number of surfaces in some cases, the elimination of the unnecessary elements, the accepted geometry model format, etc. This paper explains the description and the particularities of three different modelisation processes of the Architectural School Amphitheater of Bordeaux in a CAD system in order to be adequate for acoustic simulation via acoustic software, such as ASCII, dxf and normals orientation model formats. It also presents computer automatization aspects of these processes integrated in a plate-form adaptable to a CAD system named “CAD-Acoustic.” These modelisation processes can also be a helpful tool during the architectural conception of the acoustic hall.
keywords CAD modelisation process, Architectural acoustics, Acoustic simulation
series other
type normal paper
email stelios_kouzeleas@yahoo.fr
more http://ic-scce.upatras.gr/
last changed 2005/10/25 07:47

_id 407caadria2004
id 407caadria2004
authors Larry Sass
year 2004
title Rapid Prototyping Techniques for Building Program Study
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 655-670
summary This paper is original research that demonstrates new design possibilities for evaluation in the schematic phase of design through the use rapid prototyping as a tool of representation verses 2D drawing. These program shapes are created from CAD files using a threedimensional printing and laser cutting CAM tools. This way of working is in response to two dimensional plan representation and evaluation (Mitchell 1976). This research combines the best of the visual aspects of plan representation and the formal representation of solid block modeling. The models in this paper demonstrate the building’s physical scale of spaces, building use and overall form. Resulting models will demonstrate a new way of designing in CAD one that combined physical and visual ways or representation.
series CAADRIA
email lsass@mit.edu
last changed 2004/05/20 17:41

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id 2004_318
id 2004_318
authors Ng, Edward
year 2004
title Optimise Urban Daylight Design Using Computational Simulations
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 318-324
summary Urban design is about providing an infrastructure for its inhabitants. An important consideration of design is to provide natural outdoor conditions that are pleasant and conductive to human activities. A well designed outdoor urban environment will also make the design of individual buildings within it easier. There are many design parameters, for example: Development Density, Plot ratio, Site Coverage, Skyline, Building to Space Ratio, Permeability, Building Shapes and so on. This paper reports a study based on „skylines“ as a design parameter, and how it affects daylight and natural ventilation provisions and performance. Experiments are conducted with physical models in artificial sky, as well as using computational lighting simulations. The study establishes that by varying the skylines of the city, the overall daylight performances could be improved when compared to a city with a uniform skyline - given the same density. The message of the paper is that: through better understanding and design, high density cities could be planned and optimised without losing the development efficacy of the land.
keywords Daylight; Parametric Study; Urban Design; Density
series eCAADe
email edwardng@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id sigradi2008_166
id sigradi2008_166
authors Papanikolaou, Dimitris
year 2008
title Digital Fabrication Production System Theory: Towards an Integrated Environment for Design and Production of Assemblies
source SIGraDi 2008 - [Proceedings of the 12th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] La Habana - Cuba 1-5 December 2008
summary A Digital Fabrication Production System (DFPS) is a concept describing a set of processes, tools, and resources that will be able to produce an artifact according to a design, fast, cheap, and easy, independently of location. A DFPS project is a complex assembly of custom parts that is delivered by a network of fabrication and assembly processes. This network is called the value chain. The workflow concept of a DFPS is the following: begin design process with a custom geometric form; decompose it into constructible parts; send the part files for fabrication to various locations; transport all parts at the construction site at the right time; finally, assemble the final artifact. Conceptually it means that based on a well structured value chain we could build anything we want, at anyplace, at controllable cost and quality. The goals of a DFPS are the following: custom shapes, controllable lead time, controllable quality, controllable cost, easiness of fabrication, and easiness of assembly. Simply stated this means to build any form, anywhere, accurately, cheap, fast, and easy. Unfortunately, the reality with current Digital Fabrication (DF) projects is rather disappointing: They take more time than what was planned, they get more expensive than what was expected, they involve great risk and uncertainty, and finally they are too complex to plan, understand, and manage. Moreover, most of these problems are discovered during production when it is already late for correction. However, there is currently no systematic approach to evaluate difficulty of production of DF projects in Architecture. Most of current risk assessment methods are based on experience gathered from previous similar cases. But it is the premise of mass customization that projects can be radically different. Assembly incompatibilities are currently addressed by building physical mockups. But physical mockups cause a significant loss in both time and cost. All these problems suggest that an introduction of a DFPS for mass customization in architecture needs first an integrated theory of assembly and management control. Evaluating feasibility of a DF project has two main problems: first, how to evaluate assemblability of the design; second, how to evaluate performance of the value chain. Assemblability is a system’s structure problem, while performance is a system’s dynamics problem. Structure of systems has been studied in the field of Systems Engineering by Network Analysis methods such as the Design Structure Matrix (DSM) (Steward 1981), and the liaison graph (Whitney 2004), while dynamics of systems have been studied by System Dynamics (Forrester 1961). Can we define a formal method to evaluate the difficulty of production of an artifact if we know the artifact’s design and the production system’s structure? This paper formulates Attribute Process Methodology (APM); a method for assessing feasibility of a DFPS project that combines Network Analysis to evaluate assemblability of the design with System Dynamics to evaluate performance of the value chain.
keywords Digital Fabrication, Production System, System Dynamics, Network Analysis, Assembly
series SIGRADI
email dimp@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id a0d4
id a0d4
authors Rosa Enrich, Andrea Carnicero, Gustavo Fornari & Pedro Orazzi
year 2004
title ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION OF MATHEMATICAL LEARNING STRUCTURES
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Spetial Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 13-21.
summary Abstract: A series of practical tasks have been done under the general name of “Surfaces in invisible cities”. Each task was based on a story taken from the book The Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino. The research carried out allows to design a pedagogical project which makes evident , generates and connects several intentions, motivations and learning structures. It proposes the use of multi- level languages and readings. Therefore, each task takes more time than that of the proposed mathematical class. Its implementation generates a broader view than that seen at the time of design.

From the detailed analysis of the results obtained, the following diverse pedagogical aspects of this work project arise: a. The use of several multiple intelligence: Howard Gardner (1985) found that a man has several distinct intelligence types among which Logical-Mathematical; Spatial; Linguistic -oriented; Musical; Intra-personal; Kinesthetic-Corporal; Interpersonal stand out. Only those types used in the task will be analyzed, making a brief description of each type. b. The architectonic-city planning aspects: architectonic-city planning interpretation of the space imagined after reading the text, with the purpose of identifying figures, shapes, volumes and colors which are expressed via an analogous space. They consist of visual, architectonic and territorial speculations without a rigorous spatial theory and it is pretended that they possess a technical precision at mathematical concept level. c. The mathematical contents: a study of the conical and square shapes present in the designs done and used in a creative manner in students’ compositions following the reading of the story chosen is carried out. An analysis of shapes is performed and mathematical problems are posed within the design context.

Traditional sketching methods have been used in task solving and the possibilities offered by the virtual tools are analyzed.

Emphasis has been put on the vertical and horizontal interchanges in the Chair, generating changes in knowledge transmission perspectives, thus allowing the sharing of contents, abilities and resources. The architectonic work imagined and created by the students will focus on these different working lines creating a harmonious and significant whole. The work is the result of multiple connections and creative proposals.

keywords city, geometry, multiple intelligence
series other
type normal paper
email enrich@infovia.com.ar
last changed 2005/04/07 10:46

_id 9968
id 9968
authors Tinnirello, A.; Voget, R.; De Federico, S.
year 2004
title MATHEMATICS FORMATION AND CREATIVE DESIGN
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Special Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 225-229.
summary One of the earliest human beings desires has been to inhabit a place that may assemble beauty and functionality. Architecture and Design have been the disciplines in charge to formalize it. Their study, as well as the way they are taught have been adapted to fit the needs; and the velocity of their transformation is even greater as well as the link between design, art and technology. Creativity, in it basic generic entity, is the capability to solve appropriately and originally phrased architectural problems which involves not only space, act, environment and semiotics but with everything related to make the project able to be constructed and inhabitable.

New technologies are based on complex algorithms which, by the use of simulators, achieve to produce complexity works that would have been unbelievable twenty year ago. These algorithms have a strong mathematical basis and allow to generate other working methods so as to create wonderful geometrical objects. The study of this New Geometry requires to explore and expand this field of knowledge in the Architecture studies. In order to analyze and use complex design systems to generate non linear experimental models, it is necessary the Mathematical contribution, not only at the University education stage but also at the professional life.

This New Mathematics adequately focused, is able and must be an essential ally to creative design which is born with an exercised imagination in the formation stage; therefore it must aid to establish a space where knowledge and ability for architectural work can be created, synthesized and experimented.

This work tries to encourage students and in relation to Geometry promotes the following aspects: (i) Inspection of new architectural spaces, (ii)Comprehension of the geometrical structure, (iii) Originality and common sense, (iv) Relation between Geometry and design of construction constitutive elements,(v) Insertion of man in the space, (vi) Conditioning of design to human body dimensions, (vii) Fractal geometries.

According to what has been expressed, this proposition acquires a fundamental significance to develop a spatial vision of geometrical shapes in students, in order to stimulate the understanding of the existing relation between abstract geometrical elements and their real applications in Architecture, Geometry and Design and Art. Besides, the purpose of this work has the aim to approach knowledge at the architectural design process and to the study of shapes and mathematical models that such designs sustain , and ultimately demonstrate the importance of an academic organization that involve teachers from different disciplines.

series other
type normal paper
email atinni@citynet.net.ar
last changed 2005/04/07 13:37

_id 311caadria2004
id 311caadria2004
authors Tsung-Hsien Wang
year 2004
title Propagating Figures - A Genetic Algorithm Approach
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 505-518
summary In order to make the computer media get involved into the process of evolving design rather than merely serve as a presenting tool, this study aims to propose a computer-aided design (CAD) tool that could show a great capacity of evolving design and be particularly utilized throughout the early conceptual phase. How to accomplish this objective will start from taking advantage of the cognitive point of view regarding emergent subshapes to assisting designers in reconfigurating/restructuring shapes and figures computationally. Ultimately, by means of using genetic algorithm, this research could conduct a CAD tool, facilitating designers in the very early conceptual phase. In other words, this tool could be employed by designers in generating subshapes or reconfigurating shapes and subshapes during the process of developing concepts.
series CAADRIA
email Michael@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2004/05/20 17:39

_id 2004_228
id 2004_228
authors Özener, Ozan Önder, Akleman, Ergun and Srinivasan, Vinod
year 2004
title Interactive Rind Modeling for Architectural Design
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 228-237
summary The paper presents a new modeling technique for architectural design. Rind modeling provides for the easy creation of surfaces resembling peeled and punctured rinds. We show how the method‘s two main steps of 1) creation of a shell or crust 2) opening holes in the crust by punching or peeling can be encapsulated into a real time semi-automatic interactive algorithm. We include a number of worked examples, some by students in a special modeling workshop that demonstrate the ease with which a large variety of intricate rind shapes can be created. Rind modeling method allows us developing a user-friendly tool for designers and architects. The new tool extends the abilities of polygonal modeling and allows designers to work on structured and consistent models for architectural design purposes. Rind modeling gives architects and designers a processing flexibility. It can be used in conceptual modeling during the early design phase. It can also be efficiently used for creating variety of shell structures for architectural design.
keywords CAAD, Digital Design, 3D Modeling, Subdivision Surfaces
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id ascaad2004_paper14
id ascaad2004_paper14
authors Abdel Mohsen, Ashraf M.
year 2004
title Future Space Cities@Universe (Digi-City Vision)
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary A template for the future city has been carved into the heavens. Ever since the beginning of humankind, we have looked to the sky for the opportunity to make a new start in our imperfect world. Between the stars and the darkness we have imagined utopias beyond the reach of our travel technologies, colonizing space with our fantasies. Now we are in the first stages of an electronic revolution, but in the future 50 years later we will be in a mega-digital era which we have to predict, work and search for the reality of that future. Our planet is recently over loaded with different problems, such as pollution, population, nature disasters. Our vast speed of technology and the curiosity of discovering the invisible, leads to study and find out the nearest Future Space Architecture. With the vast acceleration of technology and digital life, we should start to predict the future architecture on, into or behind the Earth. This paper is one of many perceptions of life and architecture behind the Earth in the digital era, Digi-City Vision.
series ASCAAD
email ashraf@cubeconsultants.net
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2004_paper11
id ascaad2004_paper11
authors Abdelfattah, Hesham Khairy and Ali A. Raouf
year 2004
title No More Fear or Doubt: Electronic Architecture in Architectural Education
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary Operating electronic and Internet worked tools for Architectural education is an important, and merely a prerequisite step toward creating powerful tele-collabortion and tele-research in our Architectural studios. The design studio, as physical place and pedagogical method, is the core of architectural education. The Carnegie Endowment report on architectural education, published in 1996, identified a comparably central role for studios in schools today. Advances in CAD and visualization, combined with technologies to communicate images, data, and “live” action, now enable virtual dimensions of studio experience. Students no longer need to gather at the same time and place to tackle the same design problem. Critics can comment over the network or by e-mail, and distinguished jurors can make virtual visits without being in the same room as the pin-up—if there is a pin-up (or a room). Virtual design studios (VDS) have the potential to support collaboration over competition, diversify student experiences, and redistribute the intellectual resources of architectural education across geographic and socioeconomic divisions. The challenge is to predict whether VDS will isolate students from a sense of place and materiality, or if it will provide future architects the tools to reconcile communication environments and physical space.
series ASCAAD
email hkhairy@archcairo.org
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2004_349
id sigradi2004_349
authors Adriana Simeone; Roberto Segre; José Ripper Kós
year 2004
title O processo de desenvolvimento da ferramenta cidade interativa [The Developmental Process of an Interactive City Tool]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This paper exposes site .Cidade Interativa. development process, based on: a reflection about importance of users. points of view.s incorporation for space remodelling; a study about theoretical and practical experiences which, in different ways, approached potencialities of participation of a community.s members in a project; and, finally, a investigation of propagation alternatives of individual readings as information source for urban project, trying to enhance points of view that generally remain occult in the form of invisible practices of anonymous users. This site must be understood as concretion of an idea: creating a vehicle from which is possible to become individual readings public, so that these are shared and, also, make them available to people responsible for urban projects as information source.
series SIGRADI
email asimeone@ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2004_081
id sigradi2004_081
authors Adriane Borda Almeida da Silva; Paula Roberta Silveira; Cristina Wildt Torrezan
year 2004
title Materiais didáticos paraoensino presencial e não presencial de perspectiva [Pedagogic Materials for Distance and Face-to-face Teaching of Perspective]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary The didactic activity related to the teaching of Perspective has been revised considering the possibility offered by the computing tools. This review must evaluate the potentialities of concepts and procedures related to the traditional techniques as sources for architectural graphics expression, before suggesting its suppression. It is possible to improve the accuracy and quickness controlling the visualization parameters of three-dimensional models. On the other hand, it is necessary to explore the development of the ability to construct quick hand made perspectives (sketches). This work searches for the development of a structure to the teaching process, which emphasizes the potentiality of both ways, traditional and computerized. It explores the flexibility of teaching, from face to face to distance learning, and introduces an enlarged structure of knowledge able to support the traditional and also a computerized process of representation.
series SIGRADI
email adribord@ufpel.tche.br, paula41@bol.com.br, crisaaw@yahoo.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2004_paper4
id ascaad2004_paper4
authors Ahmad, Sumbul and Scott C. Chase
year 2004
title Design Generation of the Central Asian Caravanserai
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary Challenges for the study of Islamic architecture include its abundance and diversity in expression and its classification based on distinct functional or stylistic types. We address these issues by presenting shape grammars as a methodology for the analysis and design generation of Islamic architecture, with a specific example in the form of a parametric shape grammar for central Asian caravanserais. The grammar is developed by identifying distinct design types. Shape rules are created based on a study of the spatial elements and their organisation in the designs. We illustrate the utility of the grammar by deriving an extant design and as well as, previously unknown designs. We conclude by discussing possible extensions to the current grammar and future work involving the development of a grammar based framework for the comparative analysis of medieval Islamic courtyard buildings.
series ASCAAD
email s.c.chase@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

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