CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 61 to 80 of 563

_id 510caadria2004
id 510caadria2004
authors Ju-Yeon Kim & Hyun-Soo Lee
year 2004
title Developing a Color Adaptive VR Interior Design System Based on Psychophsiological Responses
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 857-870
summary This research utilizes vision-based affective recognition and sensing technologies, which are tested in order to interpret what emotional moods people experience with visual spatial images; these tests help to automatically provide feedback on the natural ways to manipulate affective intelligent communication. That is, the primary objective of this research is to realize an adaptable architectural virtual reality (VR) model whose color attributes can be changed dynamically according to the identified emotional state of the user. Eventually, this research addresses how to capture a specific user’s emotional states through the system and use it for modifying an architectural VR model, mainly for its color adaptation. In the applicability process, this system proposes towards user oriented smart environment such as the colors of an interior space are dynamically changed according to a characteristic affective response of a user.
series CAADRIA
email juri88@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2004/05/20 17:43

_id eaea2003_0
id eaea2003_0
authors Kardos, P. and Urland, U. (Eds.)
year 2004
title SPATIAL SIMULATION AND EVALUATION - NEW TOOLS IN ARCHITECTURAL AND URBAN DESIGN
source Proceedings of the 6th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 80-227-2088-7, 144 p.
summary The 5th eaea Conference in Essen yielded four principal findings: • After having been limited to endoscopic picture and film renderings of analog scaled models, the european architectural endoscopy association (eaea) first bridged the gap to digital environmental simulations at this conference. It is not about a better or correct method, but a suitable method of representing the planned reality of a particular project using ways that make sense. The combination of digital and analog simulation media is a source of impetus to the user of both methods. The future belongs to the casespecific application and the numerous integration possibilities of the two different media. • In investigating the perception of pictures produced in both analog and digital form, it was ascertained that it was only after greater effort that the same level of pleasing qualities were achieved in the digital world, compared to pictures of analog scaled models. It seems that for many planning phases model-based pictures are superior to digital photos – with regards to economy, quality of representation and imaginative attributes. This last point seems to be especially important in the draft planning stages: the less sharp a picture is, the more remaining room for viewer interpretation there is. In particular, the high degree of precision characteristic of digital simulations no longer allows room for imagination in the individual viewer. • 3D environmental simulations will increasingly be incorporated with success in architecture and urban design courses at universities and colleges both here in Germany as well as abroad. The further spread of these techniques to other universities and colleges is desirable. Over and above application as a pedagogic tool, the use of these simulations by architects and city planners, private planning agencies and municipal planning administrators will also be in evidence in the future – for checking designs, for informing the involved parties, for establishing the decisions of government bodies, for marketing the project. • Also, the interactive use of endoscopic simulation facilities continually opens new fields of research – whether it be for registering subjective distance perception, whether it be for determining orientation possibilities in open spaces.
series EAEA
type normal paper
email a_urland@yahoo.com
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id acadia04_110
id acadia04_110
authors Kilian, Axel
year 2004
title Linking Digital Hanging Chain Models to Fabrication
source Fabrication: Examining the Digital Practice of Architecture [Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture and the 2004 Conference of the AIA Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community / ISBN 0-9696665-2-7] Cambridge (Ontario) 8-14 November, 2004, 110-125
summary The paper traces the development of a digital hanging chain modeler in Java inspired by Antonio Gaudi’s physical hanging chain models. More importantly, it demonstrates how fabrication schemas for physical mockups of the digitally simulated hanging chain can be linked to the real time form finding simulation. Fabrication output is an integral part of the iterative process and not a post-design process. The current implementation is still limited and currently requires programming for reconfiguration. The paper proposes the link of form-finding and fabrication finding and lays out several examples and first steps of how to do so.
keywords form finding, simulation, fabrication
series ACADIA
email akilian@mit.edu
last changed 2010/05/16 07:09

_id 502caadria2004
id 502caadria2004
authors Kirsty A. Beilharz
year 2004
title Designing Generative Sound for Responsive 3D Digital Environment Interaction
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 741-758
summary This paper examines three key areas of responsive sound interaction in 3D Digital Environments: designing generative sound that derives its composition and relevance from social and physical human interaction within a digital environment; the relation of sonic structure to the digital visual and spatial experience; and responsive, reactive real time sound generation activated by environmental conditions and human behaviours. The primary purposes for responsive sound design are: (1) to provide navigational cues supporting way-finding and spatial orientation; and (2) to provide realtime generative environmental sound that reflects social behaviour in a way that is meaningful and recognisable. The applied contexts for navigational cues and environmental generative sound include online (multi-user), synchronous Virtual Environments and Digital Installation Spaces (e.g. intelligent rooms, virtual reality and immersive environments). Outcomes of responsive sound design include: a trigger system of aural alerts, warnings and guidance; a computational system for generating sound in real time activated by spatial location and social interaction; and an audio (non-visual) tool aiding spatial orientation and way-finding interaction in 3D immersive Digital Environments.
series CAADRIA
email kirsty@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2004/05/20 17:43

_id sigradi2004_420
id sigradi2004_420
authors Leandro do Nascimento Vieira; Patrick Goltsman Moreno; Míriam Struchiner; Blanche Christine Bitner-Mathé
year 2004
title Inovações gráficas para um sistema interativo de aprendizagem em genética clássica [Graphical Innovations for an Interactive Learning System in Classic Genetics]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary With the continuous advancement of scientific knowledge more attention has been paid to the accuracy and consistency of graphic representation in Science Education. In addition, the dissemination of web based distance education has increased the development of new educational material and tools; nevertheless many of them have poor efficacy due to the lack of a design that integrates the interdisciplinary needs of the educational project into product planning and development. This paper presents the results of the design of a constructivist computer based learning environment (WEB based or CD-ROM) aimed at the teaching and learning of Classic Genetics. The analyses of results revealed that the prototype design was approved by specialists in the fields of Genetics, Educational Technology, and Informatics; it was also perceived as a powerful learning tool by students.
keywords Layout, Design, Genetics, E-learning
series SIGRADI
email leandroufrj@yahoo.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id acadia04_100
id acadia04_100
authors Liapi, Katherine
year 2004
title A computer Based System for the Design and Fabrication of Tensegrity Structures
source Fabrication: Examining the Digital Practice of Architecture [Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture and the 2004 Conference of the AIA Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community / ISBN 0-9696665-2-7] Cambridge (Ontario) 8-14 November, 2004, 100-109
summary Tensegrity structures are composed of tension compression com­ponents, where the compression components (bars) are discontinu­ously enclosed within continuous tensile components (cables). From an engineering point of view, a tensegrity structure is characterized by geometric non-linearity and large displacements under loading. Therefore, its prestressed shape and deformation under loading are the result of the combined effect of the geometric parameters that determine the initial configuration of the structure, the level of pre­stress applied to cables, and the material properties of the compo­nent members of the structure. A method for generating the initial geometric configuration of tensegrity structures composed of tenseg­rity units and a parametric expression of this geometry have already been developed. A novel technology that makes possible the construction of tensegrity structures from the on-site assembly of deployable tensegrity units, which are fur­nished with a simple mechanism that permits bar-elongation, and, as a result, an increase of the prestress applied to the cables of each unit, is also under development. Also under development is a static analysis method that takes into account the above method for prestressing cables. This paper discusses the features of a system that supports the combined geometric and structural design of tensegrity structures, and integrates a graphical interface to display: a) models of initial geometry, b) geometry of the structure after prestress and loading are applied, and c) magnitude of forces applied to the structure’s component members (bars and cables). The system also provides numerical data to be used in component fabrication, and is therefore expected to become a very valuable tool for the design and construction of tensegrity structures.
series ACADIA
last changed 2010/05/16 07:09

_id 2004_044
id 2004_044
authors M. Saleh Uddin and Tutar, Mustafa
year 2004
title 3D Digital Space and People: Extents and Limitations of Integrating Human Figures in Architectural Animation
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 44-49
summary It is people that make architecture alive. It is motion that captures our attention. Together they make our architectural environment believable. Besides portraying a friendly environment, digital people can portray the best reference for scale, time, location and character of an environment. Representing architecture along with human figures has always been an integral aspect of architectural representation in traditional media. As we moved from traditional representation to animated 3D digital modeling, representation of people lost its spirit. Perhaps the reason for this is that a great deal of time and energy needed to be dedicated to the development of human figures. In addition, defining movements and poses for each figure requires additional skills. The aim of this paper is to explore the options of simulating people in the context of environmental design as well as to provide simplified techniques for representations of people in 3D digital animation.
keywords 3D Computer Animation, Human Figure, Representation
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id 518caadria2004
id 518caadria2004
authors Mary Lou Maher and Mijeong Kim
year 2004
title Supporting Design Using Self-Organizing Design Knowledge
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 957-968
summary This paper presents the potential of swarm intelligence models as an alternative to cognitive models in the representation of design knowledge to develop a model of a self-organizing design environment. The presented framework for design knowledge provides the basis for an incremental development of swarm intelligence models for responding to design changes.
series CAADRIA
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2004/05/20 17:43

_id 409caadria2004
id 409caadria2004
authors Masayuki Okada, Kazuhisa Iki, Sadayuki Shimoda
year 2004
title Development of CAFM System for LCM on Building Maintenance and Management
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 681-692
summary The purpose of this study is to develop a Computer Aided Facility Management (CAFM) system to assist the optimal Life Cycle Management (LCM) business, especially in the repair and renewal planning works of the inhabited building Life Cycle Cost (LCC). This system is also useful for annual, mid and long term facility maintenance budget planning. Major steps of this study are as follows: (1) A Study on the actual process of the LCM business was undertaken to determine the required functions of the CAFM system. (2) We surveyed the calculation process of the LCC and examined the data processing method in order to determine an efficient LCC calculation method for the CAFM system. (3) Based on the above result, we developed each function required for the CAFM system. (4) The CAFM system was developed by unifying the above functions in a network browser environment such as data transaction management between database, LCC calculation and graphical representation applications. (5) We evaluate the CAFM system by using case studies of LCM works on actual buildings. This system contributes to the efficient maintenance works of the LCC, and is able to support the appropriate scheduling of LCM works.
series CAADRIA
email okada@mil.arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2004/05/20 17:41

_id eaea2003_12-matalasov
id eaea2003_12-matalasov
authors Matalasov, M. and Matalasov, E.
year 2004
title Our Views on Actual Researches of 3D-modelling in Architecture
source Spatial Simulation and Evaluation - New Tools in Architectural and Urban Design [Proceedings of the 6th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 80-227-2088-7], pp. 48-58
summary This contribution is devoted to the brief description of the basic directions and tendencies of researches of the laboratory of video systems MARCHI. In connection with development of hardware-software computer means and their practically absolute, not alternative application in the practice of architectural designing, nowadays (not always is proved) the sphere of application of the former traditional methods of physical modeling and their connection to the endoscopic methods has been narrowed. We consider some new probable directions of development of scientific and educational work within the framework of activity of our laboratory, allowing a more balanced approach to these problems. As we have discussed, our theoretical researches and practical works must reassume an existing non-standard and controversial situation in Russia, such as established substantial intellectual potentials in scientific- and methodological researches within study processes. In addition to that, what we can use are affordable and limited physical and financial recourses and capability for technical development of works for modeling perception in designing architectural and town planning space. These initiated searches in the field of non-standard thinking, derive from our contacts with EAEA colleagues. Below we will try briefly to explain our basic principles of work development. (To be clear, some time we dismiss references and notes into exact reports from our conferences supposing that interested colleagues may get further and detailed information from already published past events).
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id acadia04_202
id acadia04_202
authors Matsushima, Shiro
year 2004
title Technology-mediated process: case study--MIT Stata Center
source Fabrication: Examining the Digital Practice of Architecture [Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture and the 2004 Conference of the AIA Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community / ISBN 0-9696665-2-7] Cambridge (Ontario) 8-14 November, 2004, 202-219
summary Gehry Partners’ (GP) sculptural approach to tectonic form, with its dramatic curves, complex geometry, and idiosyncratic application of materials, seems to have redefined the limits of architecture. The development of a strong formal vocabulary has been achieved by advanced use of information technologies, including CATIA, which allows translation among various tectonic representations, both in physical and digital forms. In addition, the nature of the office has much to do with other changes in the project delivery system, such as the relationships with associate architect, manufacturers, and subcontractors. This paper discusses how new technology changes the design and fabrication process, which has evolved from GP’s milestone project, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, and how organizational efforts to involve the industry in the design process facilitate the project. Unlike at Bilbao, in the newly-completed Stata Center GP produced all the construction documents. This shift coincided with a gradual change in which GP was becoming involved in the technical aspects of their projects much earlier in the design process. Therefore they had to invest in new working relationships with the construction team, including fabricators, manufacturers, and contractors. The approach of Gehry and his team suggests that architectural practice can be liberated from its conventional arrangements. Although it is still evolving, Gehry has achieved a holistically integrated organizational system where the architect has far more direct interaction with all aspects of design and fabrication.
keywords design technology, fabrication process, communication protocol
series ACADIA
email shirom@post.harvard.edu
last changed 2010/05/16 07:09

_id 2004_119
id 2004_119
authors McGill, Miranda and Knight, Terry
year 2004
title Designing Design-Mediating Software - The Development Of Shaper2D
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 119-127
summary This work examines the means by which design software is created, from a designer’s - rather than a programmer’s - viewpoint, through the specific example of Shaper2D. Shaper2D employs an intuitive, visual interface that encourages a „learning by designing“ approach to shape grammar education.
keywords Computational Design; CAD; Design Education; Shape Grammars; User Interface Design
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id 107caadria2004
id 107caadria2004
authors Monchai Bunyavipakul, Raktum Sallakachat and Ekasidh Charoensilp
year 2004
title Integrating 3D Game Engine to Online Interactive Presentation for Collaborative Design Work On Pda - Collaborative Works Anytime, Anywhere
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 107-116
summary In this research, Quake Engine on PDA (Pocket Quake) is modified and developed to make an appropriate environment for collaborative design work in the representation phase for the architectural design teams. The system is being designed for working in the centralized environment by using central server, such as when the designing team has changed 3D Model Information and uploaded to the server then the PDA client will change the same 3D Model automatically. Game Engine will be used to develop this presentation’s tool by designing new user interface and functions for working in PDA. The trial project, The Victory Monument’s Area Development Project, will make the Online Interactive Presentation by using 3D Game Engine on PDA to reconstruct around The Victory Monument in Bangkok. Hopefully, this will make the Virtual World Online anywhere, anytime being more available and give the comparison between the site existing and the new architectural form which designed on the site for good understanding about what the design answers.
series CAADRIA
email ekasidh@rangsit.rsu.ac.th
last changed 2004/05/20 16:37

_id 2004_210
id 2004_210
authors More, Gregory, Yuille, Jeremy and Burry, Mark
year 2004
title Designing Spatial Sounds for Spatial Information Environments
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 210-217
summary This paper reports on the design of spatial sounds for information environments. This research primarily relates to developing the sound component for a software prototype of a presentation environment that integrates realtime three-dimensional graphics with user interaction. For this project sound designers were engaged to examine the design of spatial sounds to examine the issues of dimensionality within presentation environments. The sound design work utilised a range of sound techniques: real world recording and modulation, static sound collections and DSP (Digital Signal Processing). The two main themes for the research were exploring sound as both thematic and navigational tools, utilising concepts that address the issues of multi-dimensionality within a time based presentation environment.
keywords Spatial Visualisation, Spatial Sound, Information Architecture, Sonification
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id 1410
id 1410
authors Muñoz, Patricia; López Coronel, Juan
year 2004
title CONTINUITY IN SPATIAL SURFACES FOR INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Special Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 97-104.
summary The purpose of this enquiry was to verify the way in which CAD systems and their tools for visual surfaces analysis interact with morphological knowledge in the determination of continuity in products of industrial design. We acknowledge that geometrical knowledge is necessary but not enough for working with this attribute of form in everyday objects, where cultural factors are involved. Geometry establishes a progressive range of continuity of surfaces that involves the concepts of position, tangency and curvature. In product design we find different degrees of continuity that not necessarily follow this idea of increment. What is understood as discontinuous in products in most cases is geometrically continuous. The control of smoothness in the shape of objects, is influenced by the way in which the form was created and by the different communicational, functional and technological elements that identify a product of industrial design. Subtlety in the suggestion of form, by means of the regulation its continuity, is what turns it suggestive through design. We consider that the development of the geometry of digital drawing systems in three dimensions should be an integrating process, where CAD developers and designers work closer in order to potentiate both activities.
series other
type normal paper
email info@jlopezcoronel.com.ar
last changed 2005/04/07 10:50

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id 2004_318
id 2004_318
authors Ng, Edward
year 2004
title Optimise Urban Daylight Design Using Computational Simulations
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 318-324
summary Urban design is about providing an infrastructure for its inhabitants. An important consideration of design is to provide natural outdoor conditions that are pleasant and conductive to human activities. A well designed outdoor urban environment will also make the design of individual buildings within it easier. There are many design parameters, for example: Development Density, Plot ratio, Site Coverage, Skyline, Building to Space Ratio, Permeability, Building Shapes and so on. This paper reports a study based on „skylines“ as a design parameter, and how it affects daylight and natural ventilation provisions and performance. Experiments are conducted with physical models in artificial sky, as well as using computational lighting simulations. The study establishes that by varying the skylines of the city, the overall daylight performances could be improved when compared to a city with a uniform skyline - given the same density. The message of the paper is that: through better understanding and design, high density cities could be planned and optimised without losing the development efficacy of the land.
keywords Daylight; Parametric Study; Urban Design; Density
series eCAADe
email edwardng@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id 2004_012
id 2004_012
authors O’ Coill, Carl and Doughty, Mark
year 2004
title Computer Game Technology as a Tool for Participatory Design
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 12-23
summary This paper reviews existing research into real-time visualization in architecture, urban design and landscape architecture and describes a University of Lincoln project exploring the application of this technology to participatory design. Staff at the School of Architecture have used 'Virtools Development', a computer game prototyping package, to help residents in Hull, UK, to visualize and interact with a design proposal for a 'home zone' in their neighbourhood, arrived at as part of a wider participatory process. This paper evaluates computer game technology in relation to more conventional participatory tools. It is difficult to justify using the technology to create simple 'walk-through' simulations of design proposals, it argues. In such cases, the benefits real-time visualization offers over non-interactive video are largely outweighed by the technical difficulties involved in the production and use of real-time environments.
keywords Computer Games; Real-Time Visualization; Landscape Architecture; Public Participation
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id sigradi2004_216
id sigradi2004_216
authors Pablo C. Grazziotin; Benamy Turkienicz; Luciano Sclovsky; Carla M. D. S. Freitas
year 2004
title Cityzoom - A tool for the visualization of the impact of urban regulations
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary Visualization has been used for many years as an important way of presenting architectural design and projects. However, beyond design, planning urban areas requires the analysis of different factors. Urban regulations are planning tools used to control and/or stimulate changes in the urban structure and to reproduce a certain level of quality of the urban milieu. Land area, built area, plot rate, average building height, and other important attributes can be easily obtained from the geometric objects in the city model or explicitly associated to them. This paper presents a system, CityZoom, which integrates several performance tools that allow the simulation of different attributes related to a planned or existing city. These attributes are shown in different ways either as tables of attribute values estimated from model evaluation, or 3D scenarios where the user can navigate and observe realistic shadows and daylighting estimation based on the concept of solar envelope.
series SIGRADI
email pablo@grazziotin.com, benamy@portoweb.com.br, lsclovsky@inf.ufrgs.br, carla@inf.ufrgs.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id ddss2004_d-33
id ddss2004_d-33
authors Pelizaro, C., T.A. Arentze, and H.J.P. Timmermans
year 2004
title A Spatial Decision Support System for Provision and Monitoring of Urban Green Space
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) Developments in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN 90-6814-155-4, p. 33-48
summary A spatial decision support system for the planning, design and maintenance of urban green space is presented. The objective of the system under development is to assist local authorities and green space administrators to strategically enhance the supply of urban greening with the right type and variety of green space that maximizes public welfare. The system is being developed starting from a modelling perspective and GIS functionalities are added conform the needed analysis and subroutines within the system. The system has been written in the C++ Borland Builder 5 programming environment. GIS capabilities and dynamic mapping are added using MapObjects 2.0.
keywords Design & Decision Support Systems, Integrated Urban Models, Urban Planning, Urban Green Space
series DDSS
last changed 2004/07/03 20:13

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