CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 541

_id 2004_444
id 2004_444
authors Ham, Jeremy J. and Dawson, Anthony
year 2004
title Managing Digital Resources for Design Education
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 444-450
summary This paper outlines the evolution of digital management systems used in the School of Architecture and building at Deakin University from 2001 to the present. These systems have been implemented to support a curriculum development programme in the design, construction and computing units. Two school-based information management systems are discussed in depth: low-tech network submission system and Bentley Systems Inc’s ProjectWise. Early experiences in using a universitybased system are also reported on. Lessons learnt from three years experience in managing digital resources for design education have informed the development of a growing digital culture in the architectural and construction management curricula. Whilst digital curriculum design and management systems supporting this curriculum have been developed effectively in this school, full optimization of IT to enhance design education is reliant on fundamental changes within traditional academic culture.
keywords Digital Management, Digital Curriculum, Design Education
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id ijac20032204
id ijac20032204
authors Harfmann, Anton C.; Bauser, Paul J.
year 2004
title Component-Based Design: A Summary and Scheme for Implementation
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 2 - no. 2
summary This paper summarizes the major advantages ofcomponent-based design as a paradigm for handling alldesign and construction information about a buildingat every stage of design. The paper reviews some ofthe current issues that plague the building design andconstruction industry. The component-based paradigmis reviewed as a model that reunites the fragmentedbuilding industry and as a solution for dealing withvast amounts of information that accretes during thedesign-construction process. Based on interviews witharchitects, engineers, contractors and fabricators aswell as on-site documentation of construction wefeature the design and construction of the main stairin the Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Artdesigned by Zaha Hadid as a specific case study toillustrate the viability of component-based design andto highlight the obstacles challenging itsimplementation.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id acadia04_220
id acadia04_220
authors Harfmann, Anton
year 2004
title Implementation of Component Based Design: A Pedagogical and Actual Case Study
source Fabrication: Examining the Digital Practice of Architecture [Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture and the 2004 Conference of the AIA Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community / ISBN 0-9696665-2-7] Cambridge (Ontario) 8-14 November, 2004, 220-229
summary This paper explores pedagogical and practical ramifications of implementing the component-based design paradigm through the actual construction process of a simple wood frame house for Habitat for Humanity. The house was digitally-modeled as part of an elective construction class, then physically constructed by students and faculty of the College of DAAP at the University of Cincinnati as part of a community service exercise. The digital model and a detailed database of individual components were mined in order to explore and exploit the complete and accurate electronic modeling of building, prior to actual construction.
keywords Product Design, Component Design, Single Model, Virtual Construction
series ACADIA
email anton.harfmann@uc.edu
last changed 2010/05/16 07:09

_id avocaad_2003_18
id avocaad_2003_18
authors Henri Achten, Jos van Leeuwen and Sverker Fridqvist
year 2003
title Communicating Concepts for Shared Understanding: A Multi-Agent Approach
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary Capturing and sharing design concepts is necessary if we want to support the design process by means of Information & Communication Technology (ICT). Standardized concepts are important for support at the end of the design process when designs need to conform to set standards and norms, and in order to enable communication, but are less useful in the early design stages. We propose an approach that takes into account a more developmental attitude that will be better suited for design support and the sharing of design concepts. In this approach, design concepts are formalised by means of a technology called concept modelling. Capturing and exchange of concepts are based on a multi-agent approach. The whole of concepts that are used in a domain or for a design task can be considered a design ontology. In this paper we outline the motivations for the research, outline the basic approach in the research work, and identify the major challenges and research problems that need to be tackled.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id 1959
id 1959
authors Heylighen, Ann; Martin, W Mike; Cavallin, Humberto
year 2004
title FROM REPOSITORY TO RESOURCE -- EXCHANGING STORIES OF AND FOR ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE
source Journal of Design Research, Volume 4, Issue 1, 2004 [ISSN 1569-1551]
summary Central to Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is the claim that knowledge in human memory takes the form of cases, i.e. interpreted representations of concrete experiences. The intimate relationship between knowledge and experience in design has inspired CBR researchers to develop various Case-Based Design tools, which try to support architects (and designers in general) in capitalizing on previous design experience. Typically, these tools is built around a case base, an indexed collection of concrete cases labeled by a set of characteristic features. In general, cases document buildings, i.e. design products. By contrast, Building Stories has chosen to complement product data by stories about the process that generated the product. Previous papers have documented and illustrated the ideas underlying Building Stories and situated the methodology with regard to other case study approaches. The present paper focuses on establishing the growing repository of building stories into a valuable resource of and for the profession.
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://jdr.tudelft.nl/articles/issue2004.01/Art3.html
last changed 2005/01/26 21:50

_id 4b2a
id 4b2a
authors Jabi, Wassim
year 2004
title A FRAMEWORK FOR COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COLLABORATION IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
source University of Michigan
summary The development of appropriate research frameworks and guidelines for the construction of software aids in the area of architectural design can lead to a better understanding of designing and computer support for designing (Gero and Maher 1997). The field of research and development in computer-supported collaborative architectural design reflects that of the early period in the development of the field of computersupported cooperative work (CSCW). In the early 1990s, the field of CSCW relied on unsystematic attempts to generate software that increases the productivity of people working together (Robinson 1992). Furthermore, a shift is taking place by which researchers in the field of architecture are increasingly becoming consumers of rather than innovators of technology (Gero and Maher . In particular, the field of architecture is rapidly becoming dependent on commercial software implementations that are slow to respond to new research or to user demands. Additionally, these commercial systems force a particular view of the domain they serve and as such might hinder rather than help its development. The aim of this dissertation is to provide information to architects and others to help them build their own tools or, at a minimum, be critical of commercial solutions.
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2004/10/24 20:35

_id 916b
id 916b
authors Janusz Rebielak
year 2004
title SHAPING OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS OF HIGH-RISE BUILDINGS
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Special Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 341-350.
summary Design of an efficient and suitably rigid support structure of a tall building is constantly a challenge for architects and engineers. Recently this challenge is enormously increased by the safety requirements conditioned by numerous emergency reasons. Among others one should mention here about effects of fire or a terrorist attack. The complex forms of structural systems have to be examined in many ways. Comprehensive analyses of these systems are carried out by application of suitable numerical models of these systems. The paper contains examples of shapes of structural systems proposed by the author together with definitions of their numerical models prepared in the programming language Formian.
series other
type normal paper
email janusz.rebielak@pwr.wroc.pl
last changed 2005/04/07 13:47

_id avocaad_2003_13
id avocaad_2003_13
authors John L. Heintz
year 2003
title Communication and Value in Networked Design Coalitions
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary The advent of the Internet has led us to believe that we live in an era of unprecedented globalization. In the field of building design, we now expect both that the local market for design services will be altered, and that many firms will take up the opportunity to pursue commissions beyond their local market. To some extent this is true, but it is instructive to recall that in the 19th century London based architectural firms and public works designers designed buildings throughout the Empire. Designing for projects beyond the local market is not new, what is new is our expectation that such a task is now fundamentally altered, made easier and more transparent, by the abundance of new communications technologies.It remains the case that working outside one’s local context is difficult and that when doing so, problems are likely to arise out of cultural differences. Distance too imposes its burdens, as the possibility to meet other members of the team face to face is reduced as the travel costs increase. This breaks down the possibilities of building informal networks among the individual designers working for the firms that are members of the design team. A re-instantiation of this informal network can only be done on the basis of a model of formal and informal communication in the design team. Many of the difficulties of collaborative work outside one’s local market are problems that have already been with us a long time. These problems arise out of the fact that buildings are designed by heterogeneous groups of people. The members of such groups must communicate with each other to share information and coordinate decisions and actions. Yet they are in different relations to the project at hand and have differing values arising out of their different backgrounds. This leads inevitably to conflict. Therefore, if we are to discuss communication and value then we must devote our attentions to conflict.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design, Communication, values, informal communication, value resolution, design team, design coalition.
series AVOCAAD
email J.L.Heintz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id 212caadria2004
id 212caadria2004
authors John S. Gero and Jerry Jen-Hung Tsai
year 2004
title Application of Bond Graph Models to the Representation of Buildings and Their Use
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 373-385
summary This paper presents some early research on developing a representation for buildings that has the capacity to integrate a number of disparate design domains. This representation is developed based on bond graphs. Its goal is to represent not only steady state topologies of spaces in buildings, but also building dynamics, people and other flows within those spaces.
series CAADRIA
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2004/05/20 16:46

_id acadia04_230
id acadia04_230
authors Johnson, Scott
year 2004
title Linking Analysis and Architectural Data: Why It's Harder than We Thought
source Fabrication: Examining the Digital Practice of Architecture [Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture and the 2004 Conference of the AIA Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community / ISBN 0-9696665-2-7] Cambridge (Ontario) 8-14 November, 2004, 230-243
summary This paper considers high-level, architecturally oriented repre­sentations, like Building Information Models (BIMs), and examines the difficulty of integrating analyses with such representations. Structural analysis is selected as a sample analysis domain, and is examined by integrating a structural analysis into the test implementation of a program that utilizes architecturally oriented elements. A fundamental problem is found to be that architecturally oriented elements are inappropriate for structural analysis. Methods for sequentially analyzing architectural elements are discussed, but are found to be inadequate. Accurate analysis requires analyzing the entire structure at once using a representation specific to structural analysis. A method for generating a structural representation based on the architectural representation is discussed, but the process is not simple. The process is complicated by the fact that architectural elements and structural elements do not correspond in a one-to-one or even a one-to-many manner. An accurate structural representation may even require semi-fictitious elements not corresponding to actual physical components. These findings are believed to be true for other analysis domains, as well.
keywords Representations, Building Information Models, Proteus, structural analysis, finite elements
series ACADIA
email sven@umich.edu
last changed 2010/05/16 07:09

_id caadria2004_k-1
id caadria2004_k-1
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 2004
title CONTEXTUALIZATION AND EMBODIMENT IN CYBERSPACE
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 5-14
summary The introduction of VRML (Virtual Reality Markup Language) in 1994, and other similar web-enabled dynamic modeling software (such as SGI’s Open Inventor and WebSpace), have created a rush to develop on-line 3D virtual environments, with purposes ranging from art, to entertainment, to shopping, to culture and education. Some developers took their cues from the science fiction literature of Gibson (1984), Stephenson (1992), and others. Many were web-extensions to single-player video games. But most were created as a direct extension to our new-found ability to digitally model 3D spaces and to endow them with interactive control and pseudo-inhabitation. Surprisingly, this technologically-driven stampede paid little attention to the core principles of place-making and presence, derived from architecture and cognitive science, respectively: two principles that could and should inform the essence of the virtual place experience and help steer its development. Why are the principles of place-making and presence important for the development of virtual environments? Why not simply be content with our ability to create realistically-looking 3D worlds that we can visit remotely? What could we possibly learn about making these worlds better, had we understood the essence of place and presence? To answer these questions we cannot look at place-making (both physical and virtual) from a 3D space-making point of view alone, because places are not an end unto themselves. Rather, places must be considered a locus of contextualization and embodiment that ground human activities and give them meaning. In doing so, places acquire a meaning of their own, which facilitates, improves, and enriches many aspects of our lives. They provide us with a means to interpret the activities of others and to direct our own actions. Such meaning is comprised of the social and cultural conceptions and behaviors imprinted on the environment by the presence and activities of its inhabitants, who in turn, ‘read’ by them through their own corporeal embodiment of the same environment. This transactional relationship between the physical aspects of an environment, its social/cultural context, and our own embodiment of it, combine to create what is known as a sense of place: the psychological, physical, social, and cultural framework that helps us interpret the world around us, and directs our own behavior in it. In turn, it is our own (as well as others’) presence in that environment that gives it meaning, and shapes its social/cultural character. By understanding the essence of place-ness in general, and in cyberspace in particular, we can create virtual places that can better support Internet-based activities, and make them equal to, in some cases even better than their physical counterparts. One of the activities that stands to benefit most from understanding the concept of cyber-places is learning—an interpersonal activity that requires the co-presence of others (a teacher and/or fellow learners), who can point out the difference between what matters and what does not, and produce an emotional involvement that helps students learn. Thus, while many administrators and educators rush to develop webbased remote learning sites, to leverage the economic advantages of one-tomany learning modalities, these sites deprive learners of the contextualization and embodiment inherent in brick-and-mortar learning institutions, and which are needed to support the activity of learning. Can these qualities be achieved in virtual learning environments? If so, how? These are some of the questions this talk will try to answer by presenting a virtual place-making methodology and its experimental implementation, intended to create a sense of place through contextualization and embodiment in virtual learning environments.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
last changed 2004/05/20 16:37

_id 315caadria2004
id 315caadria2004
authors Kuo-Chung Wen, Wei-Lung Chen
year 2004
title Application of Genetic Algorithms to Establish Flooding Evacuation Path Model in Metropolitan Area
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 557-570
summary This research has shown the difficulties associated with the GIS and the flooding evacuation path search through the huge searching space generated during the network analysis process. This research also presents an approach to these problems by utilizing a search process whose concept is derived from natural genetics. Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been introduced in the optimization problem solving area by Holland (1975) and Goldberg (1989) and have shown their usefulness through numerous applications. We apply GA and GIS to choice flooding evacuation path in metropolitan area in this study. We take the region of Shiji city in Taiwan for case. That could be divided into four parts. First, is to set the population of GA operation. Second, is to choose crossover and mutation. Third, is to calculate the fitness function of each generation and to select the better gene arrangement. Fourth, is to reproduce, after evolution, we can establish Flooding Evacuation Path that more reflect really human action and choice when flood takes place. However we can apply GA to calculate different evacuation path in different time series. Final, we compare and establish real model of evacuation path model to choosing flooding evacuation path.
series CAADRIA
email wenkc@ms1.hinet.net
last changed 2004/05/20 17:39

_id 407caadria2004
id 407caadria2004
authors Larry Sass
year 2004
title Rapid Prototyping Techniques for Building Program Study
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 655-670
summary This paper is original research that demonstrates new design possibilities for evaluation in the schematic phase of design through the use rapid prototyping as a tool of representation verses 2D drawing. These program shapes are created from CAD files using a threedimensional printing and laser cutting CAM tools. This way of working is in response to two dimensional plan representation and evaluation (Mitchell 1976). This research combines the best of the visual aspects of plan representation and the formal representation of solid block modeling. The models in this paper demonstrate the building’s physical scale of spaces, building use and overall form. Resulting models will demonstrate a new way of designing in CAD one that combined physical and visual ways or representation.
series CAADRIA
email lsass@mit.edu
last changed 2004/05/20 17:41

_id ddss2004_ra-263
id ddss2004_ra-263
authors Lindekens, J.
year 2004
title REDUCTION MECHANISMS EXPLORED IN ARCHITECTURAL RE-DESIGN
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) Recent Advances in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, ISBN: 1-4020-2408-8, p. 263-278
summary Observation of the design process of an architect shows that, while building up an argumentation for taking a design decision, different mechanisms of data transformation are used. The paper argues that this transformation is a key element in understanding architectural design processes. A theoretical description of these mechanisms forms the framework to discus a sequence of design decisions derived from a real-world design situation. After outlining how this can be implemented in a case-based design supporting tool, the paper concludes with a discussion of advantages and downsides the use of the tool might entail.
keywords Architectural Re-Design, Design Process, Case-Based Design, Reduction Mechanisms
series DDSS
type normal paper
last changed 2004/07/03 21:20

_id 403caadria2004
id 403caadria2004
authors Magdy M. Ibrahim, Robert J. Krawczyk & George Schipporiet
year 2004
title A Web-Based Approach to Transferring Architectural Information to the Construction Site Based on the Bim Object Concept
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 613-622
summary The current means of transferring architectural data to the construction site depends mainly on the drawing either manually or electronically drafted both in physical or digital formats. The printed or manually drafted drawing is being replaced with the digital version that can be accessed with a PDA. There are many benefits of the digital form over the physical form. However the full potential of this medium has not yet been fully exploited. The new CAD paradigm, BIM (Building Information Modeling), suggests that all the building information can be represented as a digital database that constitutes the information about the building elements as three-dimensional geometry, as well as, properties and specifications in the form of objects. This paper describes the process to convey the information about the CAD objects to the construction site through the web by extracting the properties of the objects into an XML file which can be queried for the needed data.
series CAADRIA
email ibramag@iit.edu
last changed 2004/05/20 17:41

_id ascaad2004_paper15
id ascaad2004_paper15
authors Mallasi, Z.
year 2004
title Identification and Visualisation of Construction Activities’ Workspace Conflicts Utilising 4D CAD/VR Tools
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary This work addresses the problem arising on all construction sites: the occurrence of workspace interference between construction activities. From a site space planning context, this problem can lead to an inevitable roadblock to the progress of the scheduled construction operations. In real situations, when the spatial congestions occur, they could reduce productivity of workers sharing the same workspace and may cause health and safety hazard issues. The aim of this paper is on presenting a computer-based method and developed tool to assist site managers in the assignment and identification of workspace conflicts. The author focuses on the concept of ‘visualising space competition’ between the construction activities. The concept is based on a unique representation of the dynamic behaviour of activity workspace in 3D space and time. An innovative computer-based tool dubbed PECASO (Patterns Execution and Critical Analysis of Site-space Organisation) has been developed. The emerging technique of 4D (3D + time) visualisation has been chosen to yield an interesting 4D space planning and visualisation tool. A multi-criteria function for measuring the severity of the workspace congestions is designed, embedding the spatial and schedule related criteria. The paper evaluates the PECASO approach in order to minimise the workspace congestions, using a real case study. The paper concludes that the PECASO approach reduces the number of competing workspaces and the conflicting volumes between occupied workspace, which in turn produces better assessment to the execution strategy for a given project schedule. The system proves to be a promising tool for 4D space planning; in that it introduces a new way of communicating the programme of work.
series ASCAAD
email z.mallasi@tees.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id 201caadria2004
id 201caadria2004
authors Marc Aurel Schnabel, Steve K S Kuan and Weidong Li
year 2004
title 3D Transformations - 3D Scanning, Digital Modelling, Rapid Prototyping and Physical Depiction
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 227-238
summary We investigate the creation and reinterpretation of an architectural design process using a variety of digital and physical media. We study how tools for design influence perception, comprehension and creation of spatial volumes within both Virtual Environments (VE) and physical realms. We explain how designers translate spatial volumes and communicate architectural design ideas by using VE and conventional models. In a series of reinterpretation of architectural meanings we examine the translation of threedimensional design from virtual to tangible depictions and vice versa. We conduct a design-studio in order to explore issues of quality, understanding, communication and building of architectural compositions. VE can be an environment for design distinguishable and facilitating reality. We test this statement by interchanging both realms to that extent that the boundaries of each one are nearly dismantled. Virtuality and reality are both used in alternative formand design-finding exercises in order to gain an overall conclusive design.
series CAADRIA
email marcaurel@hku.hk
last changed 2004/05/20 16:46

_id 876d
id 876d
authors Martin, W Mike; Heylighen, Ann; Cavallin, Humberto
year 2004
title THE RIGHT STORY AT THE RIGHT TIME -- TOWARDS A TACIT KNOWLEDGE RESOURCE FOR (STUDENT) DESIGNERS
source AI & Society, Issue: Online First, July 2004 [ISSN: 1435-5655 (Online)]
summary In response to the lack of systematic study of architectural practice, the Building Stories methodology propounds storytelling as a vehicle for studying active cases, i.e., projects that are in the process of being designed and built. The story format provides a dense, compact way to deal with and communicate the complex reality of a real-world project, while respecting the interrelated nature of events, people and circumstances that shape its conception. With an eye to establishing a valuable knowledge resource of and for the profession, the paper explores how stories can be stored, organized and accessed so as to turn the growing story repository into a convenient instrument for students, educators and practitioners.
keywords architectural practice, storytelling, knowledge exchange, design experience
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
more http://www.springerlink.com/media/BEC67X4BWR6KXLBDVKWP/Contributions/W/K/G/X/WKGXJ3QQ6TQ4WQRY_html/fulltext.html
last changed 2005/01/26 22:02

_id 409caadria2004
id 409caadria2004
authors Masayuki Okada, Kazuhisa Iki, Sadayuki Shimoda
year 2004
title Development of CAFM System for LCM on Building Maintenance and Management
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 681-692
summary The purpose of this study is to develop a Computer Aided Facility Management (CAFM) system to assist the optimal Life Cycle Management (LCM) business, especially in the repair and renewal planning works of the inhabited building Life Cycle Cost (LCC). This system is also useful for annual, mid and long term facility maintenance budget planning. Major steps of this study are as follows: (1) A Study on the actual process of the LCM business was undertaken to determine the required functions of the CAFM system. (2) We surveyed the calculation process of the LCC and examined the data processing method in order to determine an efficient LCC calculation method for the CAFM system. (3) Based on the above result, we developed each function required for the CAFM system. (4) The CAFM system was developed by unifying the above functions in a network browser environment such as data transaction management between database, LCC calculation and graphical representation applications. (5) We evaluate the CAFM system by using case studies of LCM works on actual buildings. This system contributes to the efficient maintenance works of the LCC, and is able to support the appropriate scheduling of LCM works.
series CAADRIA
email okada@mil.arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2004/05/20 17:41

_id acadia05_024
id acadia05_024
authors Mathew, Anijo
year 2005
title Smart Homes for the Rural Population: New Challenges and Opportunities
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 24-35
summary “Smart” Homes (domestic environments in which we are surrounded by interconnected technologies that are more or less responsive to our presence and actions) seem increasingly plausible with the emergence of powerful mobile computing devices and real time context aware computing (Edwards and Grinter, 2001). Research at premier technology universities have given birth to home “labs” that experiment with sensors, cameras and monitors to study physical, behavioral and social consequences of such technologies on occupants of such homes. One of the most important problems that “smart” homes will eventually help to address is that of spiraling costs of healthcare. Using ubiquitous technologies to motivate healthy decisions can help prevent the onset of myriad medical problems (Intille, 2004). Moving the focus of attention from the health centers and hospitals to the working home through such technology interventions would eventually lead to decreased financial pressure on the traditional healthcare system. This paper examines the challenges and opportunities in the design of “smart” technologies for preventive healthcare in rural homes. It summarizes findings from current ethnographic and demographic studies; and examines other contemporary research in the field of ubiquitous computing and “smart” homes. With the help of these studies, the paper lists different technical, social and functional challenges that we as designers may have to consider before designing “smart” homes for rural populations.
series ACADIA
email amathew@coa.msstate.edu
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

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