CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 541

_id sigradi2004_333
id sigradi2004_333
authors Andrés S. Rodríguez
year 2004
title Exploración de relaciones entre analogías y bocetos durante la generación de ideas en diseño industrial como elicitación de requerimientos para CAD [Exploration of Relations between Analogies and Sketches During the Generation of Ideas in Industrial Design for Eliciting CAD Requirements]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary An exploration on the analogy-based idea generation process in industrial design is reported. In particular we try to identify relationships between the sketching process and the analogy building in order to elicit requirements for a supporting software. We use concurrent think aloud protocols to obtain experimental data and an extension of a proved content oriented schema to analyze them. Statistical analysis on segments containing .analogical chains. found relations between analogical and design actions that allow us to support the hypothesis that the sketch seems to be more useful for helping the analytical aspects of the analogical making (i.e. to code a situation in terms of higher order relations) than the synthetic ones (i.e. to identify an analogy source). Results were interpreted as software requirements for a Computer Aided Design Application.
keywords Sketching, Analogy, CAD, Industrial design, Protocol analysis
series SIGRADI
email arodrig@netverk.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2006_e131c
id sigradi2006_e131c
authors Ataman, Osman
year 2006
title Toward New Wall Systems: Lighter, Stronger, Versatile
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 248-253
summary Recent developments in digital technologies and smart materials have created new opportunities and are suggesting significant changes in the way we design and build architecture. Traditionally, however, there has always been a gap between the new technologies and their applications into other areas. Even though, most technological innovations hold the promise to transform the building industry and the architecture within, and although, there have been some limited attempts in this area recently; to date architecture has failed to utilize the vast amount of accumulated technological knowledge and innovations to significantly transform the industry. Consequently, the applications of new technologies to architecture remain remote and inadequate. One of the main reasons of this problem is economical. Architecture is still seen and operated as a sub-service to the Construction industry and it does not seem to be feasible to apply recent innovations in Building Technology area. Another reason lies at the heart of architectural education. Architectural education does not follow technological innovations (Watson 1997), and that “design and technology issues are trivialized by their segregation from one another” (Fernandez 2004). The final reason is practicality and this one is partially related to the previous reasons. The history of architecture is full of visions for revolutionizing building technology, ideas that failed to achieve commercial practicality. Although, there have been some adaptations in this area recently, the improvements in architecture reflect only incremental progress, not the significant discoveries needed to transform the industry. However, architectural innovations and movements have often been generated by the advances of building materials, such as the impact of steel in the last and reinforced concrete in this century. There have been some scattered attempts of the creation of new materials and systems but currently they are mainly used for limited remote applications and mostly for aesthetic purposes. We believe a new architectural material class is needed which will merge digital and material technologies, embedded in architectural spaces and play a significant role in the way we use and experience architecture. As a principle element of architecture, technology has allowed for the wall to become an increasingly dynamic component of the built environment. The traditional connotations and objectives related to the wall are being redefined: static becomes fluid, opaque becomes transparent, barrier becomes filter and boundary becomes borderless. Combining smart materials, intelligent systems, engineering, and art can create a component that does not just support and define but significantly enhances the architectural space. This paper presents an ongoing research project about the development of new class of architectural wall system by incorporating distributed sensors and macroelectronics directly into the building environment. This type of composite, which is a representative example of an even broader class of smart architectural material, has the potential to change the design and function of an architectural structure or living environment. As of today, this kind of composite does not exist. Once completed, this will be the first technology on its own. We believe this study will lay the fundamental groundwork for a new paradigm in surface engineering that may be of considerable significance in architecture, building and construction industry, and materials science.
keywords Digital; Material; Wall; Electronics
series SIGRADI
email oataman@uiuc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ddss2004_ra-69
id ddss2004_ra-69
authors Barton, J., B. Parolin, and V. Weiley
year 2004
title A Spatial Decision Support System for the Management of Public Housing
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) Recent Advances in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, ISBN: 1-4020-2408-8, p. 69-84
summary This paper is reporting on a research project undertaken jointly between the University of New South Wales (UNSW) and the NSW Department of Housing (DoH) to develop a Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) to assist planning, management and evaluation in areas of high public housing concentration. In the paper we will describe the development of the SDSS, the specific spatial problems challenging the DoH and the potential for the system to incorporate a range of social, financial and physical data, both internal and from other sources, for interaction and presentation in a three dimensional environment. The prototype SDSS attempts to address the specific challenges of providing better service for clients of the DoH. An information audit and survey has been conducted of the department’s resources and needs. Issues identified include the management of high-rise and superlot areas, crime mapping, community interactivity, internal and intergovernmental information sharing, interoperability and maintaining confidentiality and security of data. Interactive 3D visualisation of the model is facilitated by use of the 3map free geospace platform. Use of open source code and open standards such as X3D for 3D graphics interchange allow the project to explore advanced visualisation techniques while ensuring interoperability and data longevity.
keywords Spatial Decision Support System, Public Housing, Community Renewal, Security, Open Source, Interoperability, Visualisation, 3D GIS, PPGIS, X3D
series DDSS
last changed 2004/07/03 20:13

_id 304caadria2004
id 304caadria2004
authors Beng-Kiang Tan
year 2004
title Integrating Digital Modeling and Full-Scale Construction in Design Studio
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 433-442
summary This paper presents the observations of a design studio for undergraduates that adopted a hands-on, experiential approach where students combined both digital modeling and full-scale construction in their design process. The studio was designed as team-based to encourage peer learning and collaboration in design. The students used multiple media and engaged in tactile experience and through the process discovered by themselves the issues of translating digital design into full-scale construction and achieved a better understanding of construction, scale and materiality.
series CAADRIA
email akitanbk@nus.edu.sg
last changed 2004/05/20 17:39

_id ascaad2004_paper9
id ascaad2004_paper9
authors Bennadji, A.; H. Ahriz, and P. Alastair
year 2004
title Computer Aided Sustainable Design
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary One of the most important aspects architects need to consider fairly early on is that of energy saving, cost, thermal comfort and the effect on the environment in terms of CO2 emissions. At present, during the early design stage of a building, different options are assessed using simple tools (tables, graphs and software) that contain a large number of assumptions the very nature of which can bias choice or possibly lead to an inappropriate solution. It can be argued that the only way to provide a rational assessment of options is to use calculation methods that represent in detail the physical processes involved; this usually involves the use of dynamic thermal models. Furthermore if this tool is also used during detailed design it would introduce a consistency that is normally absent from the analytical design process. Many designers are of the opinion that, because not all details are known, then such tools are not suitable for application at early stages in the design. This view can be challenged because, even at the concept stage, a great deal is known about a building. This paper aims to show that a general description of a building can be used to generate sufficient data to drive a valid analysis using a detailed thermal model at the early sketch stage of the design process. The paper describes the philosophy, methodology and the interface developed to achieve this aim. The interface guides the user through the input process using a series of screens giving options for keywords used to describe the building; comprehensive default data built into the software are then attached to these keywords. The resulting data file is a building description that is the best possible interpretation of the design intent. This can then be used to assess options and guide towards a final design.
series ASCAAD
email a.bennadji@rgu.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ddss2004_ra-247
id ddss2004_ra-247
authors Bi, G. and B. Medjdoub
year 2004
title Hybrid Approach to Solve Space Planning Problems in Building Services
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) Recent Advances in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, ISBN: 1-4020-2408-8, p. 247-261
summary In this paper an object-based CAD programming is used to take advantage of standardization to handle the schematic design, sizing, layout for services in a building ceiling void. From the specification of the building 3D model, our software proceeds through different steps; from the determination of the standard number and size of fan coils to the generation of 3D solutions. In order to deal with more complex geometry and larger problems, we have used a hybrid approach: Case Based Reasoning (CBR) within Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP) approaches. In practice, engineers in building services use previous solutions and adapt them to new problems. CBR mirrors this practical approach and does help us to deal with increasingly complex geometry effectively, and meanwhile CSP has been used for layout adaptation. The results have shown that it is possible to define and implement standard solutions to produce designs comparable with current practice. The benchmarking exercise has underlined many advantages and made some suggestions for further development. This project is funded by The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) in UK.
keywords Case-Based Reasoning, Constraint Satisfaction Problem, Ceiling Voids Layout, Complex Geometry, Large Problem
series DDSS
last changed 2004/07/03 20:13

_id acadia11_138
id acadia11_138
authors Buell, Samantha; Shaban, Ryan; Corte, Daniel; Beorkrem, Christopher
year 2011
title Zero-waste, Flat Pack Truss Work: An Investigation of Responsive Structuralism
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 138-143
summary The direct and rapid connections between scripting, modeling and prototyping allow for investigations of computation in fabrication. The manipulation of planar materials with two-dimensional CNC cuts can easily create complex and varied forms, volumes, and surfaces. However, the bulk of research on folding using CNC fabrication tools is focused upon surfaces, self-supporting walls and shell structures, which do not integrate well into more conventional building construction models.This paper attempts to explain the potential for using folding methodologies to develop structural members through a design-build process. Conventional building practice consists of the assembly of off-the-shelf parts. Many times, the plinth, skeleton, and skin are independently designed and fabricated, integrating multiple industries. Using this method of construction as an operative status quo, this investigation focused on a single structural component: the truss. A truss is defined as: “A triangulated arrangement of structural members that reduces nonaxial external forces to a set of axial forces in its members.” (Allen and Iano 2004)Using folding methodologies and sheet steel to create a truss, this design investigation employed a recyclable and prolific building material to redefine the fabrication of a conventional structural member. The potential for using digital design and two-dimensional CNC fabrication tools in the design of a foldable truss from sheet steel is viable in the creation of a flat-packed, minimal waste structural member that can adapt to a variety of aesthetic and structural conditions. Applying new methods to a component of the conventional ‘kit of parts’ allowed for a novel investigation that recombines zero waste goals, flat-packing potential, structural expression and computational processes.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email srbuell2@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id 301caadria2004
id 301caadria2004
authors Chia-Yu Wang, Teng-Wen Chang
year 2004
title Information Sharing for Small Design Studios - Ubiquitous Information Flow Approaches
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 391-404
summary While balancing the feasibility of management as well as design quality, design offices with strong focus on design are getting smaller and more compact. Mobility and dynamic information flow are two key issues for information sharing in design studio. In this research, we discussions about these concepts of ubiquitous computing, workflow and information model on small design studio. The goal of this research is trying to use available digital equipments as a ubiquitous device for sharing information dynamically no matter where and when they are. Use such digital equipments as well as server to store information and improve human interaction to achieve better interaction between human and technology. For these issues, we analyze three components of our system—the types of information, the interactive behaviors using roles as a metaphor, and ubiquitous devices that are available for small design studio. Within this research, we propose a system call Ubiquitous Information Flow Tool (UIFO) based on Java and Web technology for testing and reifying the concepts of ubiquitous information flow.
series CAADRIA
email g9134708@yuntech.edu.tw
last changed 2004/05/20 17:39

_id 410caadria2004
id 410caadria2004
authors Chiung-Hui Chen, Hui-Tin Lin, Mao-Lin Chiu
year 2004
title A Scenario-Based Agent System for Digital City Interaction
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 693-706
summary Urban design involves coordination and communication for collecting consensus among citizens and developing the design strategy and spatial program. While these are web-based systems for representing the real world actions, there is lack of human interaction for receiving feedbacks during the process. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to introduce the agents into the participatory design process (PDP) based on scenarios. This paper has developed a webbased system prototype to demonstrate how the agent can interact with users and how the interface facilitates incremental design. We present a participatory design project in an old street to illustrate how the Scenario-Based Agent System (SBAS) model functions in a real application. Meanwhile, four issues will be discussed in regarding with building a learning interaction agent as an actor.
series CAADRIA
email 7451616@ms94.url.com.tw
last changed 2004/05/20 17:41

_id disschoo
id disschoo
authors Choo, Seung Yeon
year 2004
title STUDY ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN SUPPORT OF TRADITIONAL ARCHITECTURAL THEORIES
source Technische Universität München
summary The research presented in this thesis describes a computer-aided design support of traditional architectural theories. Traditional architectural theories in western architecture have been considered as a basis for answering the fundamental questions of architecture: proportion, symmetry, colour, harmony and so on. In particular, the aesthetic aspect of these theories has been one of many important architectural aspects, and which is concerned with the field of architecture in determining the beauty of architectural form. The most significant role of the traditional theories in architecture is to maintain unity, to avoid chaos and then to achieve harmony in a design, using some specific design principles. However, current technology-guided constructions tend to neglect often the importance of these theories due to the standardization of building elements, due to mechanically-prepared construction and the reducing completion costs, etc. Thus, this research proposes a design support system as a design assistant that gives an intelligent advice on architectural design, using analytical design- and ordering- principles of traditional theories for the optimization of the architectural design from the aesthetic perspective. To evaluate the aesthetic quality of an architectural design, this system is implemented in the AutoCAD environment, using the AutoLISP. It is applied so as to explain and develop aesthetic qualities of a design. Designs proposed by this system include optimum designs, which are based on the traditional architectural theories, and new ones which can be in future connected to information models. To do this, the definition of information about building elements is accomplished by using the neutral format EXPRESS and EXPRESS-G for such application systems. The results of the application system are presented, such as the easily generating and quickly conceptualising of an object model, the checking of the aesthetic value of the design during the various design phases, the helping to find direction during rational searching for a solution. The user can easily appreciate the usefulness of the proposed system as a set of tools for searching for rational architectural aesthetics and formal solutions at different design-stages. It is to be hoped that a new "traditional" fundamental of architecture, such as the proposed system, incorporating CAAD systems, will find its place among new technological methods in the AEC industry and so help to bridge the gap between the value of traditional architecture and CAAD systems.
keywords Aesthetics, Design Theory, Order Principle, Product Model, IFC, AutoCAD/AutoLISP
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email skkaa2000@yahoo.de
more http://tumb1.biblio.tu-muenchen.de/publ/diss/ar/2004/choo.html
last changed 2004/05/23 05:05

_id acadia04_150
id acadia04_150
authors Clarke, Cory
year 2004
title The Siren's Call
source Fabrication: Examining the Digital Practice of Architecture [Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture and the 2004 Conference of the AIA Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community / ISBN 0-9696665-2-7] Cambridge (Ontario) 8-14 November, 2004, 150-161
summary This paper presents an account of our research and development of processes providing seamless transition from design to fabrication. The narrative of our design, development, and prototyping experi¬ments spans seven years, including our current project, the Trusset software/structural system. Trusset is a combined building system and agent-based software design tool. The building system is based on a differential space-truss designed for fabrication entirely with computer numerically controlled (CNC) linear cutting devices, such as laser cut¬ters or three-axis mills. The software component is a set of agent-based design tools for developing surfaces and envelopes formally suitable to be built using the space-truss structure. Developed in parallel, the soft¬ware and building components combine within the Trusset system to provide a seamless pipeline from design to fabrication and assembly. The story of the development of software components and structural system, leading to the Trusset, act as a means of discussing the larger issues framing the research: the potential pitfalls and benefits of design and fabrication integration via the computer.
keywords Fabrication, Space-truss, Structure
series ACADIA
email cory@arch.columbia.edu
last changed 2010/05/16 07:09

_id ijac20032206
id ijac20032206
authors Cory Clarke; Phillip Anzalone
year 2004
title Trusset: Parallel Development of Software and Construction Systems for Space-Truss Structures
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 2 - no. 2
summary This paper documents our current progress on theparallel development of a building system andcorresponding agent-based software design tools;together the two produce a seamless pipeline fromdesign to fabrication and assembly. The building systemis a clad differential space-truss designed forfabrication entirely with computer numericallycontrolled (CNC) linear cutting devices such as CNClaser cutters or two-axis mills. The softwarecomponent is a set of agent-based design tools fordeveloping surfaces and envelopes formally suitable tobe built using our space-truss system.
series journal
email cory@nthdimensional.com
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 20ff
id 20ff
authors Derix, Christian
year 2004
title Building a Synthetic Cognizer
source Design Computation Cognition conference 2004, MIT
summary Understanding ‘space’ as a structured and dynamic system can provide us with insight into the central concept in the architectural discourse that so far has proven to withstand theoretical framing (McLuhan 1964). The basis for this theoretical assumption is that space is not a void left by solid matter but instead an emergent quality of action and interaction between individuals and groups with a physical environment (Hillier 1996). In this way it can be described as a parallel distributed system, a self-organising entity. Extrapolating from Luhmann’s theory of social systems (Luhmann 1984), a spatial system is autonomous from its progenitors, people, but remains intangible to a human observer due to its abstract nature and therefore has to be analysed by computed entities, synthetic cognisers, with the capacity to perceive. This poster shows an attempt to use another complex system, a distributed connected algorithm based on Kohonen’s self-organising feature maps – SOM (Kohonen 1997), as a “perceptual aid” for creating geometric mappings of these spatial systems that will shed light on our understanding of space by not representing space through our usual mechanics but by constructing artificial spatial cognisers with abilities to make spatial representations of their own. This allows us to be shown novel representations that can help us to see new differences and similarities in spatial configurations.
keywords architectural design, neural networks, cognition, representation
series other
type poster
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.springer.com/computer/ai/book/978-1-4020-2392-7
last changed 2012/09/17 19:13

_id 2004_333
id 2004_333
authors Donath, Dirk and Tonn, Christian
year 2004
title How to Design Colour Schemes? Conceptual Tools for the Architectural Design
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 333-341
summary The paper describes the concept and development of software to support the architectural design and planning of colour schemes for interiors and buildings. “Coloured Architecture” is a plausibility instrument for the formulation of colour scheme proposals for building interiors and elevations. In practice colours schemes are arrived at through the production of many different colour design studies before a final colour scheme is decided upon. With the help of intuitively usable light simulations, colour, material and spatial concepts can be assessed realistically. The development concept incorporates numerous aspects which must be considered in the selection of a colour scheme: colour schemes for built environments must be realisable . This initial development prototype already demonstrates the added value possible through the consequent use of CAAD: function, construction and not least design aspects have equal status and can be worked upon in direct relation with one another.
keywords CAAD, Colour Schemes, Architecture, Planning Process, Plausibility, Added Value, On Site Support
series eCAADe
email donath@architektur.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id ascaad2004_paper19
id ascaad2004_paper19
authors Donath, Dirk; Christian Tonn
year 2004
title Plausibility in Architectural Design: Software Support for the Architect-Oriented Design of Colour Schemes for Interiors and Buildings
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary The approach discussed here is part of research into an overall concept for digital instruments which support the entire planning process and help in enabling planning decisions to be based upon clear reasoning and plausible arguments. The paper describes a plausibility instrument for the formulation of colour scheme proposals for building interiors and elevations. With the help of intuitively usable light simulations, colour, material and spatial concepts can be assessed realistically. The software prototype “Coloured Architecture” is conceived as a professional extension to conventional design tools for the modelling of buildings. As such it can be used by the architect in the earliest design phases of the planning process as well as for colour implementation on location.
series ASCAAD
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia04_020
id acadia04_020
authors Eastman, Charles
year 2004
title New Methods of Architecture and Building
source Fabrication: Examining the Digital Practice of Architecture [Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture and the 2004 Conference of the AIA Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community / ISBN 0-9696665-2-7] Cambridge (Ontario) 8-14 November, 2004, 20-27
summary Three conditions exist that are likely to lead to significant restructuringof the construction industry. These are (1): the recognition that traditional contracting practices are inefficient and costly to the client, (2) the growing availability of information-rich 3D parametric modeling, and (3) the strong interest in integrating the issues of design and fabrication. Some aspects of these conditions are examined using two examples: parametric design and integration in steel structural design, and in fabrication-level modeling of precast concrete. The implications of these changes are explored.
series ACADIA
last changed 2010/05/16 07:09

_id sigradi2004_206
id sigradi2004_206
authors Felipe Carrara Moura Pussente
year 2004
title Interfaces digitais para processo de projeto participativo: Estudo de caso com mutirões [Digital Interfaces for a Participatory Project: The Case Study of mutirões]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This research is applied to self-managed building, objecting housing construction projects and identifying the self-managed particularities to achieve a better quality in the architectural project and a better quality of life for its users. The digital training of a group of homeless people can expanded through the distribution of interfaces over the internet, developing methodological procedures at the process of conception, implementation and enlargement of housing construction in self-managed building. The making of interactive interface is analyzed through experimentation and workshops done with homeless people having the goal to be totally friendly to its user, not letting him become confused or bored.
series SIGRADI
email fcarrara01@yahoo.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id 2004_396
id 2004_396
authors Fischer, Thomas
year 2004
title Microcontroller - Enhanced Physical Models for Architectural and Product Design
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 396-403
summary Electronic sensors, controllers, displays and actuators can significantly enhance the value of physical models as processes of use, interaction and transformation take center stage in various fields of design. These technologies allow the development of novel computer interfaces for new kinds of interaction with virtual models, and in the future they will allow new types of active building components and materials for automated construction and dynamic runtime adaptations of inhabitable environments. However, embedding programmed logic into physical objects seems to confront designers and model makers with a steep learning curve outside the domains of their traditional expertise. The variety of alternative technologies and development tools in this area has a particularly disorienting effect on novices. Some early experiences however suggest that mastery of this learning curve is easily within reach, given some basic introduction, guidance and support. It is the purpose of this paper to provide designers with a starting point for explorations into this area, to give orientation and to demonstrate some possible development approaches and results.
keywords Interaction, Process, High-Fidelity Models, Microcontrollers, Electronics
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id sigradi2004_021
id sigradi2004_021
authors Frank Petzold; Dirk Donath; Christian Bürgy
year 2004
title Computer-supported Building Surveying - The Basis for Planning in Existing Built Contexts
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary In view of declining populations and adequate housing provision in the western world, building in existing built contexts is becoming increasingly relevant. The conservation and use of existing buildings stock is not only ecologically sound but also an economic imperative. A prerequisite for computer-aided planning for existing buildings is both the use of on-site computer-aided surveying and the integration of all participants and disciplines in the planning process using integrated information and communication systems. The aim of this research project is twofold: to design a practice-relevant software concept for the support of the entire building surveying process embedded in the planning process, and to develop a practice-oriented mobile, digitally supported equipment and system environment for the digital architectural surveying of buildings. This paper will discuss the IT concept of a building surveying system, the software and hardware prototypes developed as well as usability aspects of wearable computers.
series SIGRADI
email petzold@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

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