CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 524

_id 2206
id 2206
authors Kvan, Thomas
year 2004
title REASONS TO STOP TEACHING CAAD
source Mao-Lin Chiu (ed), Digital design education, Garden City Publishing, Taipei 2003, ISBN 9867705203
summary Computers are a problem. They are expensive, even if the prices have dropped dramatically and promise to continue dropping. They do not look after themselves but demand considerable attention – we have to hire computer specialists to ensure they talk to each other, staff are required to make sure software is installed and to fix things when it no longer works. Learning to use them is tedious; skills have to be developed to master several idiosyncratic software systems. The hardware and software regularly malfunction. It is faster to draw a line by hand than with software. Students already have enough trouble learning how to stop a window leaking or ensure a fire escape route will protect people in time of trouble, why make them learn all these other things. We should stop teaching CAAD. Although technological and economic issues are very real and not to be dismissed lightly, the real problems of teaching CAAD are not these. The real issues we need to address is how we teach and, behind that, why we teach. This paper explores the what and why.
keywords pedagogy
series other
type normal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2004/09/27 05:10

_id 303caadria2004
id 303caadria2004
authors Shang-Yuan Chen, Mao-Lin Chiu
year 2004
title Friendly Aliens Encountered: Major Problems and Principles in Digital Design Teaching
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 419-432
summary Because of the recent opening of the Kunsthaus Graz and the later coming digital design projects, those so-called friendly aliens brought more concerns on the prospects of digital design and especially the impact on architectural education. Should we stop to teach CAAD or to reconcile ourselves to the status quo in schools? This paper proposes a more compatible and feasible “Design-Oriented CAAD teaching Class (DOCC)” to transform the function of CAAD in design studios. We surveyed various CAAD teaching pedagogies in the past and also observed the status quo in Taiwan in order to develop an analytic framework for DOCC. Those investigations help us to decide strategies and understand their constraints, when CAAD is taught as a foreign language. The teaching principle and process is introduced in the undergraduate courses at NCKU. The design cycle, in which a design methodology engaged, is divided into tree stages: prototype, transformation and adaptation. A design project is implemented to demonstrate the rationale and raise later discussion.
series CAADRIA
email shangyuanc@pchome.com.tw
last changed 2004/05/20 17:39

_id eaea2003_15-breen
id eaea2003_15-breen
authors Breen, J. and Giro, H.
year 2004
title The DXI Experience. Ten Years of Design Visualization Developments in an Educational Laboratory Context
source Spatial Simulation and Evaluation - New Tools in Architectural and Urban Design [Proceedings of the 6th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 80-227-2088-7], pp. 71-77
summary Design visualisation is an essential aspect of virtually every form of design enquiry. The effects of potential environmental interventions may be simulated in order to gain the types of insights, which cannot be acquired easily from two-dimensional notations. Three-dimensional representations may be generated for very different reasons. The most direct form of design imaging is traditionally for the benefit of the designer him/herself, in order to test whether the working concepts offer fitting solutions to the complex array of design conditions such as context, programme and feasibility. Alternately, images may be generated for the benefit of communication, in order to offer insights into the expected workings of a particular proposal (possibly including alternatives). This may lead to greater understanding and possibly to reaching consensus amongst different ‘actors’ involved in the design and realisation process. In many cases the results of such visualisation studies contribute to ‘bridging the gap’ between the professionals and other parties involved more indirectly in design decision-making or the appraisal of the proposals. Designers can use distinctly different methods when going about such imaging procedures. Their choices for particular techniques may depend on their familiarity or the availability of certain media devices. Being confronted with new modelling and/or visualisation instruments can stimulate the interest in fresh approaches. In this respect, the design education environment can play an important role in not only teaching ‘proven’ applications to future designers, but also in creating a platform for the active development of innovative approaches to the design visualisation practices: education as a ‘laboratory’ for new insights and potentially a ‘breeding ground’ for the extension of the designer’s instrumentation. This contribution documents the experiences gained in some ten years within an educational application, involving active use of design driven media applications. The emphasis lies on the evolvement of techniques for eye-level imaging, whereby use can be made of different types of models: physical scale models as well as digital, virtual models. Changing attitudes towards dynamic and serial vision are considered, whereby storyboard approaches on the level of integral presentation are considered. By analysing a selection of cases and their underlying approaches an indication is given of the changing attitudes and combinations of multimedia techniques, which offer opportunities to design visualisation and communication.
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id ijac20032103
id ijac20032103
authors de Vries, Bauke
year 2004
title A Nobel Prize for CAAD
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 2 - no. 1
summary Fundamental questions about the status of CAAD research arise regularly on different levels and under different circumstances. Apparently there is no common understanding about this, causing confusion, which in itself is already bad for the status of CAAD research. In this article I will discuss the CAAD research approach as I find it at most architecture and engineering groups, by comparing it to research in the traditional science domain. Some differences can be explained from the nature of design, but others' have more historical reasons. To conclude I propose a long-term strategy for scientific CAAD research, namely: (i) Build your own community, (ii) Establish prestigious journals and prizes and (iii) Improve quality by natural selection. Eventually this will bring us the recognition for CAAD research that it deserves.
series journal
email b.d.vries@bwk.tue.nl
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2004_459
id 2004_459
authors Cinelis, Gintaris and Scevinskas, Kestutis
year 2004
title Education of Professional Computing Competence in University
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 459-465
summary Developments in the field of computer science and architecture are leading to the new relationships between these two areas, which influence architectural education, and practice. The contemporary architectural design process in its individuality and uncertainty is characterized by the integration of different media and design instruments. There is an urgent need for architecture schools to recognize the value and use of the computer as an essential tool in the teaching and practicing architects’ activities. This paper describes the results of experiment, which concerns new policy and objectives for teaching CAAD. The experiment also outlines relationship between the lecturing in CAAD and the use of CAAD in architectural projects. We discuss the problems and opportunities in teaching architecture students the CAAD and with the CAAD.
keywords Computer Aided Architectural Design, Architectural Education, Professional Computing Competence
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id 2004_558
id 2004_558
authors Gatermann, Harald
year 2004
title The Didactic Triangle - Using CAD, Photography and Descriptive Geometry as Educating Tools with Mutual Influence
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 558-562
summary Teaching of architectural photography is still not very popular at universities. We developed a didactic concept of teaching architectural photography in response to caad and to descriptive geometry. The first edge of the triangle (descriptive geometry): By having knowledge in descriptive geometry, students will be more aware of geometrical context in caad and in photography. On the other hand the teaching and understanding of descriptive geometry is much easier, when students have already a basic knowledge of photography. The second edge of the triangle (caad, animation): This kind of teaching architectural photography is not only necessary to open the eyes for „young“ student to learn photography - it also helps to understand the basics of constructing perspectives in descriptive geometry or computer aided design up to different kinds of visualisation. The third edge of the triangle (photography): In the age of non-slr-cameras students are no longer used to take sophisticated photographs. They are mostly only able to take snapsshots (even in the time of digital cameras). One of our main methods is to make them acquainted to slrcameras (analog and digital), to tripods and spirit levels as essential tools and to teach the basic geometrical context. The didactic concept is continued by teaching knowledge about colours, light, different points of view etc. Our didactical concept („Didactic Triangle“) is based on teaching all three elements (photography, caad, descr. geometry) by the same teacher in the same semester to the same students. This guarantees the mutual understanding of the three disciplines. Interactive, digital teaching elements (virtual „mock-up-studio“) support the acceptance.
keywords Descriptive Geometry, Photography, CAD
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id ddss2004_d-177
id ddss2004_d-177
authors Rafi, A., T. Hoai Nam, K. Jin Woo, and W. Lau
year 2004
title InnotiveBrowser
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) Developments in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN 90-6814-155-4, p. 177-191
summary This paper explains the results of a collaborative research project between Multimedia University (Malaysia) and Innotive Corporation (Korea) to manage, design a multimedia archiving system and visualising knowledge for the students or the users in the Faculty of Creative Multimedia, Multimedia University. This research introduces InnotiveBrowser technology, a high performance multimedia display software that enhances the ability of user to search and discover digital content. The unique result of this method is that the images to be viewed are not limited to available RAM, instead the content utilises the available storage directly from the disk (hard drives). In other words, the larger the size of the hard disk, the greater the number of content information can be stored and displayed. This system is employed with Virtual Reality (VR) techniques particularly imparting viewing technology (pixel-ondemand) and navigation strategy to increase the viewing speed of multimedia information in real-time over the Internet, broadband and even via PDA platforms. This research hopes to set the benchmark for multimedia archiving system that can be applied in other CAD, CAAD or most of the design or production-based teaching and learning environment. The early findings of this research have been patented and this paper will demonstrate the research ideas and explain how we implement and customise the technology and content development in the Faculty of Creative Multimedia, Multimedia University.
keywords InnotiveBrowser, Digital Asset Management, Multimedia Archiving, VR Technology
series DDSS
last changed 2004/07/03 20:13

_id ijac20032106
id ijac20032106
authors Schmitt, Gerhard
year 2004
title The Impact of Computer Aided Architectural Design on Physical Reality
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 2 - no. 1
summary Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) has produced three types and three generations of CAAD researchers, teachers and practitioners. The three types - CAAD inventors, implementers and users - benefit from the constantly improving computer technology. The three generations - CAAD pioneers, trendsetters and educators are in a more difficult situation as the attitude towards, and the knowledge about, Computer Aided Architectural Design in the general public and in the professional community is unstable. To explore the impact of CAAD on physical reality and to discover future challenges, it is useful to look at the pioneers of CAAD, as they often combine in one person the characteristics of the development that occurred afterwards. Tom Maver is one of the premier examples. The paper presents thoughts on CAAD teaching and research and contrasts them with the professional reality at ETH, in order to explore the impact of CAAD on the physical reality.
series journal
email gerhard.schmitt@sl.ethz.ch
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id sigradi2004_098
id sigradi2004_098
authors Wolfgang Dokonal; Michael W Knight; Andre GP Brown
year 2004
title To CAAD or not to CAAD?
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This paper reports a design experiment with first year.s students in two European countries .It reviews the role that computers can play in the early design stages and considers how far recent developments in commercial software have enabled designers to improve their design performance using CAAD systems. The authors are teaching architectural design in first and forth year in two European countries and are also involved in teaching Computer Aided Architectural Design. The starting point for our experiment was the fact that we realized that most of the students in our faculties still start their design with pen and paper. Although they introduce the computer quite early in the design process now their first design ideas were mainly visualized in sketches. Is this because of the often stated limitations of hard and software or because we start to teach them to sketch when we do design? This paper attempts to address some of the issues and find some answers.
series SIGRADI
email dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at, M.W.Knight@liverpool.ac.uk, andygpb@liverpool.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 09:03

_id 2004_142
id 2004_142
authors Achten, Henri, Jessurun, Joran and de Vries, Bauke
year 2004
title The Desk-Cave - A Low-Cost Versatile Virtual Reality Design and Research Setup Between Desktop and CAVE
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 142-147
summary Virtual Reality has become an almost ubiquitous technology in many applications, but it has seen limited success in design support. Reasons for this seem to lie in lack of easily available tools, high threshold for non-programmers, and high cost of equipment. In this paper we describe a Virtual Reality environment that is developed at Design Systems called the Desk-Cave. The Desk-Cave is a low-cost VR setup that combines principles of a CAVE system with a work desk. Architecture students with no specific training in VR technology use the Desk-Cave in design projects both in the early stage and the final presentation stage. The system allows quick transfer to the Desk-Cave and architectural evaluation of design proposals.
keywords Virtual Reality, Architectural Design, Design Process, Cel Shading
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id avocaad_2003_09
id avocaad_2003_09
authors Alexander Asanowicz
year 2003
title Form Follows Media - Experiences of Bialystok School of Architectural Composition
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary This paper considers transition from physical modelling to digital methods of the creation of architectural forms. Every type of creation has constructed the proper means of expression and its own methodology. The main thesis of this paper is that a specific character of the composition activity of an architect is determined by the modelling methods. As the research on architectural modelling, the two methods of creating spatial architectural forms (cardboard model and computer model) have been compared. Research has been done on the basis of the same exercise for both media. The process of creation proceeded in the same way, too. As the start point students have found the inspiration. Each student presented photos of existing architectural objects and a text, which explained the reasons of the choice. Next steps were sketches of the idea and realisation of the model. The achieved results of creative activity fully confirm the thesis of the research.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id sigradi2006_e131c
id sigradi2006_e131c
authors Ataman, Osman
year 2006
title Toward New Wall Systems: Lighter, Stronger, Versatile
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 248-253
summary Recent developments in digital technologies and smart materials have created new opportunities and are suggesting significant changes in the way we design and build architecture. Traditionally, however, there has always been a gap between the new technologies and their applications into other areas. Even though, most technological innovations hold the promise to transform the building industry and the architecture within, and although, there have been some limited attempts in this area recently; to date architecture has failed to utilize the vast amount of accumulated technological knowledge and innovations to significantly transform the industry. Consequently, the applications of new technologies to architecture remain remote and inadequate. One of the main reasons of this problem is economical. Architecture is still seen and operated as a sub-service to the Construction industry and it does not seem to be feasible to apply recent innovations in Building Technology area. Another reason lies at the heart of architectural education. Architectural education does not follow technological innovations (Watson 1997), and that “design and technology issues are trivialized by their segregation from one another” (Fernandez 2004). The final reason is practicality and this one is partially related to the previous reasons. The history of architecture is full of visions for revolutionizing building technology, ideas that failed to achieve commercial practicality. Although, there have been some adaptations in this area recently, the improvements in architecture reflect only incremental progress, not the significant discoveries needed to transform the industry. However, architectural innovations and movements have often been generated by the advances of building materials, such as the impact of steel in the last and reinforced concrete in this century. There have been some scattered attempts of the creation of new materials and systems but currently they are mainly used for limited remote applications and mostly for aesthetic purposes. We believe a new architectural material class is needed which will merge digital and material technologies, embedded in architectural spaces and play a significant role in the way we use and experience architecture. As a principle element of architecture, technology has allowed for the wall to become an increasingly dynamic component of the built environment. The traditional connotations and objectives related to the wall are being redefined: static becomes fluid, opaque becomes transparent, barrier becomes filter and boundary becomes borderless. Combining smart materials, intelligent systems, engineering, and art can create a component that does not just support and define but significantly enhances the architectural space. This paper presents an ongoing research project about the development of new class of architectural wall system by incorporating distributed sensors and macroelectronics directly into the building environment. This type of composite, which is a representative example of an even broader class of smart architectural material, has the potential to change the design and function of an architectural structure or living environment. As of today, this kind of composite does not exist. Once completed, this will be the first technology on its own. We believe this study will lay the fundamental groundwork for a new paradigm in surface engineering that may be of considerable significance in architecture, building and construction industry, and materials science.
keywords Digital; Material; Wall; Electronics
series SIGRADI
email oataman@uiuc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 916b
id 916b
authors Janusz Rebielak
year 2004
title SHAPING OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS OF HIGH-RISE BUILDINGS
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Special Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 341-350.
summary Design of an efficient and suitably rigid support structure of a tall building is constantly a challenge for architects and engineers. Recently this challenge is enormously increased by the safety requirements conditioned by numerous emergency reasons. Among others one should mention here about effects of fire or a terrorist attack. The complex forms of structural systems have to be examined in many ways. Comprehensive analyses of these systems are carried out by application of suitable numerical models of these systems. The paper contains examples of shapes of structural systems proposed by the author together with definitions of their numerical models prepared in the programming language Formian.
series other
type normal paper
email janusz.rebielak@pwr.wroc.pl
last changed 2005/04/07 13:47

_id 050225_kapellos-a
id 050225_kapellos-a
authors Kapellos, Alexandre
year 2004
title Lightscape - an exploration in interactive lighting
source ETH postgraduate studies final thesis, Zurich
summary The aim was to provide a theoretical approach to the lighting project undertaken for the xCube group work. The nds2004 students had decided to build an interactive, computeroptimised structure as their final project, where lights, sensors and textured surfaces were to create an interactive experience for the visitor. For various reasons the interactive aspect was abandoned. The idea to work on a light(-ing) object came up when I discovered a little device called the Barionet™. This device allows you to control an on/off switch remotely, through a web interface or through programming. That was it! The ip_lamp (…its first name): a small object that has its own IP address, and therefore can be accessed via the internet. Turn it on or off… This evolved into the _lightscape where 2 interacting lights send each other data about the other (distance from a wall or number of people for example). The atmosphere of a room becomes dependant of what is going on in another… This work is also an attempt to develop a pluridisciplinary approach to an architectural project by making use of the many tools available to the postgraduate students: programming a simulation in Flash, experimenting with different hardware interfaces or rapidly manufacturing a light box on the 3-axis mill. A cross-over project in a (modest) way.
series thesis:MSc
last changed 2005/09/09 10:58

_id 2004_410
id 2004_410
authors Kvan, Thomas and Gao, Song
year 2004
title Frames, Knowledge and Media - An investigative Study of Frame Systems within Computer and Paper Supported Collaborative Design Process
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 410-417
summary Can media foster better performance of problem framing? Problem framing contributes to successful design learning. Minsky classified this activity into four types of frames. In collaborative design, media as external representation assist designers to converse their ideas with others and themselves. This paper explores the effects of rich and lean media on the context of frame systems within computer supported and paper supported collaborative design environments. Through conducting laboratory experiment we find that different media indeed can influence the distribution of frames along the whole design sessions. To investigate this phenomenon some possible reasons related to theory are explored, shedding light on our future study on design education.
keywords Collaborative Design; Design Media; Design Cognition; Design Knowledge; Frame Systems
series eCAADe
email tkvan@hku.hk
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id sigradi2004_435
id sigradi2004_435
authors Marcelo Tramontano
year 2004
title Habitar a cidade: Exercício de projeto à distância [Dwelling in the City: The Exercise of a Long-Distance Project]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This paper targets to report the experience of a virtual design studio called Habitar a Cidade, or Living within the City. From march to july 2004, six brazillian universities. teachers and students groups in Architecture, living in five different brazillian states, were gathered by internet-based communication, and all of their design products have been displayed in specially designed websites. Furthermore, different ways of communicating have been used: messenger chats, e-mails, newsgroups, including the exchange of graphic files. The challenge of this experience was to put in relation schools with inequal levels both in computer equipments and computing design capacities. This paper aims at reading in a very preliminary way the relationship between the use of internet means and the studio.s activities . main goals. As a major conclusion, and despite some organization difficulties, the low cost of the experience and the relative easyness of its development are great reasons to redo it.
keywords Virtual design studio, internet, architectural design
series SIGRADI
email tramont@sc.usp.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 179e
id 179e
authors Schnabel, Marc Aurel
year 2004
title ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS: EXPLORING COGNITION AND COMMUNICATION IN IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS
source Department of Architecture, The University of Hong Kong
summary There is a distance between the idea in the imagination of a design and its representation, communication and realisation. Architects use a variety of tools to bridge this gap. Each tool places different demands on the designer and each, through inherent characteristics and affordances, introduces reinterpretations of the design idea, thus imposing a divergence between the idea and the expression of the idea. Design is an activity that is greatly complex, influenced by numerous factors. The process may follow rules or established proceedings and traditions. Alternatively, the designer may choose to explore freely with no need to conventions. In all instances, the medium in which the exploration takes place will affect the act of designing to some degree. Tools are chosen, in part, to facilitate the chosen design process. Most researches on Virtual Environments (VE) have focused on their use as presentation or simulation environments. There has been inadequate research in the use of VE for designing. It has been suggested that this tool can empower designers to express, explore and convey their imagination more easily. For these reasons the very different nature of VE may allow architects to create designs that make use of the properties of VE that other tools do not offer in that way. As yet, barely any basic research has examined the use of VE to support the acts of designing. This thesis examines the implications of architectural design within VE. Perception and comprehension of spatial volumes within VE is examined by the comparison of representations using conventional architectural design method. A series of experiments was conducted to investigate the relative effectiveness of both immersive and non-immersive VE by looking at the creation, interpretation and communication of architectural design. The findings suggest why form comprehension and finding may be enhanced within VE activity. The thesis draws conclusions by comparing the results with conventional methods of two-dimensional depictions as they appear on paper or three-dimensional representations such as physical models.
keywords Virtual Environments; Virtual Environment Design Studio; VeDS; Collaborative Design; Cognition; Communication
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email marcaurel@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2005/11/15 04:53

_id sigradi2004_081
id sigradi2004_081
authors Adriane Borda Almeida da Silva; Paula Roberta Silveira; Cristina Wildt Torrezan
year 2004
title Materiais didáticos paraoensino presencial e não presencial de perspectiva [Pedagogic Materials for Distance and Face-to-face Teaching of Perspective]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary The didactic activity related to the teaching of Perspective has been revised considering the possibility offered by the computing tools. This review must evaluate the potentialities of concepts and procedures related to the traditional techniques as sources for architectural graphics expression, before suggesting its suppression. It is possible to improve the accuracy and quickness controlling the visualization parameters of three-dimensional models. On the other hand, it is necessary to explore the development of the ability to construct quick hand made perspectives (sketches). This work searches for the development of a structure to the teaching process, which emphasizes the potentiality of both ways, traditional and computerized. It explores the flexibility of teaching, from face to face to distance learning, and introduces an enlarged structure of knowledge able to support the traditional and also a computerized process of representation.
series SIGRADI
email adribord@ufpel.tche.br, paula41@bol.com.br, crisaaw@yahoo.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ascaad2004_paper12
id ascaad2004_paper12
authors Al-Qawasmi, Jamal
year 2004
title Reflections on e-Design: The e-Studio Experience
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary The influence of digital media and information technology on architectural design education and practice is increasingly evident. The practice and learning of architecture is increasingly aided by and dependant on digital media. Digital technologies not only provide new production methods, but also expand our abilities to create, explore, manipulate and compose space. In contemporary design education, there is a continuous demand to deliver new skills in digital media and to rethink architectural design education in the light of the new developments in digital technology. During the academic years 2001-2003, I had the chance to lead the efforts to promote an effective use of digital media for design education at Department of Architecture, Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST). Architectural curriculum at JUST dedicated much time for teaching computing skills. However, in this curriculum, digital media was taught in the form of "software use" education. In this context, digital media is perceived and used mainly as a presentation tool. Furthermore, Computer Aided Architectural Design and architectural design are taught in separate courses without interactions between the two.
series ASCAAD
email jamalq@kfupm.edu.sa
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2004_146
id sigradi2004_146
authors Alejandra Silvina Bianchi
year 2004
title Herramientas digitales en el proceso de diseño en el taller de arquitectura [Digital Tools in the Design Process within the Design Studio]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary In the knowledge of previous discussions and academic experiences with the uses of digital tools in design process, some data has been collected among teachers and students to determine: .The nowadays role of digital graphic procedures in design for architectural works.. The study has been performed through exploratory research using: interviews, questionnaires and data analysis. The results shows the advantages and disadvantages of this type of design as well as allowed to come to conclusions and recommendations about pedagogical aspects in the teaching of this subject at this educational level.
keywords Architectural design process, digital technology
series SIGRADI
email abianchi@arq.unne.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

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