CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 61 to 80 of 563

_id ddss2004_ra-247
id ddss2004_ra-247
authors Bi, G. and B. Medjdoub
year 2004
title Hybrid Approach to Solve Space Planning Problems in Building Services
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) Recent Advances in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, ISBN: 1-4020-2408-8, p. 247-261
summary In this paper an object-based CAD programming is used to take advantage of standardization to handle the schematic design, sizing, layout for services in a building ceiling void. From the specification of the building 3D model, our software proceeds through different steps; from the determination of the standard number and size of fan coils to the generation of 3D solutions. In order to deal with more complex geometry and larger problems, we have used a hybrid approach: Case Based Reasoning (CBR) within Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP) approaches. In practice, engineers in building services use previous solutions and adapt them to new problems. CBR mirrors this practical approach and does help us to deal with increasingly complex geometry effectively, and meanwhile CSP has been used for layout adaptation. The results have shown that it is possible to define and implement standard solutions to produce designs comparable with current practice. The benchmarking exercise has underlined many advantages and made some suggestions for further development. This project is funded by The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) in UK.
keywords Case-Based Reasoning, Constraint Satisfaction Problem, Ceiling Voids Layout, Complex Geometry, Large Problem
series DDSS
last changed 2004/07/03 20:13

_id sigradi2005_225
id sigradi2005_225
authors Bianchi, Alejandra S.
year 2005
title Education and innovation: present and future of teacher’s practice in digital graphic
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 225-229
summary This is a qualitative research about the “educative training process” of Digital Graphic students, in the Architectural Department of Nordeste University- Argentina. The specific aim is “to know in depth the elements that influence in the educative training process in digital graphics”, to guide the propose of new teaching strategies to make better the teaching- learning process. The studied universe includes two architecture -students groups that are coursing first and second year of the career, since 2004. The first analysis categories, allow us to find out the meaning that pupils give to the facts, to build the training process dialectic. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email abianchipianetti@yahoo.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2004_489
id 2004_489
authors Bille, Pia
year 2004
title CityScape - Analysing Modern Urbanism
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 489-494
summary Understanding scale is a major concern and a condition of working in the field of architecture and urban design. The project described in this case origins from Blauwe Koffer, a method developed in the 80’s by the Dutch architects Dolf Dobbelaar and Paul de Vroom. The method is devoted to analysis of form and function of important architectural and urban design projects in the last century and is a flexible model for searching architectural solutions at an early stage of a project. In the paper I will describe how a group of faculty transformed the Blauwe Koffer into a digital method serving as an introduction to urban design in the second year curriculum. The project introduced topics of modern urbanism defined as cityscapes. Through a series of mapping analysis the students studied variations of scale, extension, volume, density, borders, overlaps, bricollage, diversity etc. The students were required to do analysis in the form of a matrix of 6 x 7 cells. Categories in the analysis were three scales of figure / ground studies, bricollage and studies of the urban raster. DataTown was a particular category inspired by MVRDV. The project data derived from digital maps, and project presentations in books and magazines. At second year the students are assigned to do digital projects as a part of the curriculum and the students are required to have their own computer. The project was the first digital assignment in studio and previous computer courses and skills were limited to a one-week course in desktop publishing. The CityScape project was a successful experience in integrating computation in studio, in group work and in analysis of modern urbanism. The paper will show some of the projects and discuss the assignment as a part of the implementation of an IT-strategy.
keywords CAAD-Curriculum; Urban Morphology; Mapping; Education and Practise
series eCAADe
email pia.bille@aarch.dk
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id sigradi2004_487
id sigradi2004_487
authors Bob Martens
year 2004
title Cumincad Hacks
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary CUMINCAD (CUMulative INdex of papers on CAD) was created in 1998 and since then hundreds of users working in the field of CAAD have been taken advantage of this Digital Library. The number of recorded entries is currently over 6.600, from which a substantial part also provide a full paper in PDF-format. The effort is part of a portal solution: for example CUMINCAD archives English CAAD-related publications; CUMINCAD.ES focuses on publications in Spanish. A search in these Digital Libraries is as simple as in Google, but with the help of the following instructions, more valuable information could potentially be retrieved and this defines the goal of this paper. In other words: How to get more out of CUMINCAD and CUMINCAD.ES?
series SIGRADI
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia07_174
id acadia07_174
authors Bontemps, Arnaud; Potvin, André; Demers, Claude
year 2007
title The Dynamics of Physical Ambiences
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 174-181
summary This research proposes to support the reading of physical ambiences by the development of a representational technique which compiles, in a numerical interface, two types of data: sensory and filmic. These data are recorded through the use of a portable array equipped with sensors (Potvin 1997, 2002, 2004) as well as the acquisition of Video information of the moving environment. The compilation of information is carried out through a multi-media approach, by means of a program converting the environmental data into dynamic diagrams, as well as the creation of an interactive interface allowing a possible diffusion on the Web. This technique, named APMAP/Video, makes it possible to read out simultaneously spatial and environmental diversity. It is demonstrated through surveys taken at various seasons and time of the day at the new Caisse de dépôt et de placement headquarters in Montreal which is also the corpus for a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) research grant on Environmental Adaptability in Architecture (Potvin et al. 2003-2007). This case study shows that the technique can prove of great relevance for POEs (Post Occupancy Evaluation) as well as for assistance in a new design project.
series ACADIA
email arnaudbontemps@hotmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id cf2011_p157
id cf2011_p157
authors Boton, Conrad; Kubicki Sylvain, Halin Gilles
year 2011
title Understanding Pre-Construction Simulation Activities to Adapt Visualization in 4D CAD Collaborative Tools
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 477-492.
summary Increasing productivity and efficiency is an important issue in the AEC field. This area is mainly characterized by fragmentation, heterogeneous teams with low lifetimes and many uncertainties. 4D CAD is one of the greatest innovations in recent years. It consists in linking a 3D model of the building with the works planning in order to simulate the construction evolution over time. 4D CAD can fill several needs from design to project management through constructivity analysis and tasks planning (Tommelein 2003). The literature shows that several applications have been proposed to improve the 4D CAD use (Chau et al. 2004; Lu et al. 2007; Seok & al. 2009). In addition, studies have shown the real impact of 4D CAD use in construction projects (Staub-French & Khanzode 2007; Dawood & Sika 2007). More recently, Mahalingam et al. (2010) showed that the collaborative use of 4D CAD is particularly useful during the pre-construction phase for comparing the constructability of working methods, for visually identifying conflicts and clashes (overlaps), and as visual tool for practitioners to discuss and to plan project progress. So the advantage of the 4D CAD collaborative use is demonstrated. Moreover, several studies have been conducted both in the scientific community and in the industrial world to improve it (Zhou et al. 2009; Kang et al. 2007). But an important need that remains in collaborative 4D CAD use in construction projects is about the adaptation of visualization to the users business needs. Indeed, construction projects have very specific characteristics (fragmentation, variable team, different roles from one project to another). Moreover, in the AEC field several visualization techniques can represent the same concept and actors choose one or another of these techniques according to their specific needs related to the task they have to perform. For example, the tasks planning may be represented by a Gantt chart or by a PERT network and the building elements can be depicted with a 3D model or a 2D plan. The classical view (3D + Gantt) proposed to all practitioners in the available 4D tools seems therefore not suiting the needs of all. So, our research is based on the hypothesis that adapting the visualization to individual business needs could significantly improve the collaboration. This work relies on previous ones and aim to develop a method 1) to choose the best suited views for performed tasks and 2) to compose adapted multiple views for each actor, that we call “business views”. We propose a 4 steps-method to compose business views. The first step identifies the users’ business needs, defining the individual practices performed by each actor, identifying his business tasks and his information needs. The second step identifies the visualization needs related to the identified business needs. For this purpose, the user’s interactions and visualization tasks are described. This enables choosing the most appropriate visualization techniques for each need (step 3). At this step, it is important to describe the visualization techniques and to be able to compare them. Therefore, we proposed a business view metamodel. The final step (step 4) selects the adapted views, defines the coordination mechanisms and the interaction principles in order to compose coordinated visualizations. A final step consists in a validation work to ensure that the composed views really match to the described business needs. This paper presents the latest version of the method and especially presents our latest works about its first and second steps. These include making more generic the business tasks description in order to be applicable within most of construction projects and enabling to make correspondence with visualization tasks.
keywords Pre-construction, Simulation, 4D CAD, Collaboration, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interface, Information visualization, Business view, Model driven engineering
series CAAD Futures
email conrad.boton@tudor.lu
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 2004_601
id 2004_601
authors Bourdakis, Vassilis
year 2004
title Developing VR Tools for an Urban Planning Public Participation ICT Curriculum; The PICT Approach
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 601-607
summary This paper is a work in progress report on the Planning Inclusion of Clients through e-Training (PICT) Leonardo funded project. The aim of the paper is to present the issues related to the development of appropriate Information Communication Technologies (ICT) material enabling Virtual Reality (VR) technologies in this particular context. The tools developed are organised in three distinct parts: the common core part, the public oriented and the planner oriented. The curriculum structure is analysed, the methods employed in developing the VR tools are presented and the initial experiments are discussed.
keywords Public Participation, ICT Curriculum, Urban Planning, VR
series eCAADe
email V.Bourdakis@prd.uth.gr
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id eaea2003_15-breen
id eaea2003_15-breen
authors Breen, J. and Giro, H.
year 2004
title The DXI Experience. Ten Years of Design Visualization Developments in an Educational Laboratory Context
source Spatial Simulation and Evaluation - New Tools in Architectural and Urban Design [Proceedings of the 6th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 80-227-2088-7], pp. 71-77
summary Design visualisation is an essential aspect of virtually every form of design enquiry. The effects of potential environmental interventions may be simulated in order to gain the types of insights, which cannot be acquired easily from two-dimensional notations. Three-dimensional representations may be generated for very different reasons. The most direct form of design imaging is traditionally for the benefit of the designer him/herself, in order to test whether the working concepts offer fitting solutions to the complex array of design conditions such as context, programme and feasibility. Alternately, images may be generated for the benefit of communication, in order to offer insights into the expected workings of a particular proposal (possibly including alternatives). This may lead to greater understanding and possibly to reaching consensus amongst different ‘actors’ involved in the design and realisation process. In many cases the results of such visualisation studies contribute to ‘bridging the gap’ between the professionals and other parties involved more indirectly in design decision-making or the appraisal of the proposals. Designers can use distinctly different methods when going about such imaging procedures. Their choices for particular techniques may depend on their familiarity or the availability of certain media devices. Being confronted with new modelling and/or visualisation instruments can stimulate the interest in fresh approaches. In this respect, the design education environment can play an important role in not only teaching ‘proven’ applications to future designers, but also in creating a platform for the active development of innovative approaches to the design visualisation practices: education as a ‘laboratory’ for new insights and potentially a ‘breeding ground’ for the extension of the designer’s instrumentation. This contribution documents the experiences gained in some ten years within an educational application, involving active use of design driven media applications. The emphasis lies on the evolvement of techniques for eye-level imaging, whereby use can be made of different types of models: physical scale models as well as digital, virtual models. Changing attitudes towards dynamic and serial vision are considered, whereby storyboard approaches on the level of integral presentation are considered. By analysing a selection of cases and their underlying approaches an indication is given of the changing attitudes and combinations of multimedia techniques, which offer opportunities to design visualisation and communication.
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id eaea2003_25-ws-breen
id eaea2003_25-ws-breen
authors Breen, J.
year 2004
title Towards a Virtual Design Media Museum. Identifying, Structuring and Presenting Design and (Re) Presentation Media Artifacts
source Spatial Simulation and Evaluation - New Tools in Architectural and Urban Design [Proceedings of the 6th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 80-227-2088-7], pp. 122-132
summary Designing is largely a process of (inter)active imaging. The evolvement of a design concept from preliminary design proposal towards spatial and material environment generally follows an uncertain path through uncharted landscape; a journey of exploration which requires both rational and creative consideration, frequently involving the interchange of information within a design team and collaboration with representatives from different contributing disciplines. Designs are conceived, worked out and specified step by step (roughly speaking from ‘rough to fine’) in iterative design ‘loops’. All the time the designer tries to determine which ‘course’ should be taken, by considering reference material, by reflecting on conceptions developed previously and by generating specific options aimed at furthering the ‘concretisation’ of the end product. In the course of such a trajectory, visual information is continually being developed, selected, tested, and subsequently either discarded or perfected. From early times architects have been considered not only as knowledgeable ‘experts’ in the field of building as a craft, but also as ‘creative directors’ of such development processes. The architect should be capable of not only conjuring up visions of the future spatial and material form of the building, but also of conveying these to the other ‘actors’ involved in the initiation and building process. Such ‘sharing’ of information is necessary in order to generate sufficient understanding, consensus, enthusiasm, as well as means. To become more than ‘figments of the imagination’, the designer’s ideas need to be ‘pinned down’ (even if they are not yet entirely finished) and communicated by using some form of reliable – and preferably readable – ‘language’ for design development and communication.
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 2004_530
id 2004_530
authors Breen, Jack
year 2004
title Changing Roles for (Multi)Media Tools in Design - Assessing Developments and Applications of (Multi)Media Techniques in Design Education, Practice and Research
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 530-539
summary This contribution explores the continued evolvement of the instruments of design in relation to practice and education (and potentially: research) and attempts to characterize the effects brought about by recent media ‘shifts’. For this purpose a framework has been established to identify and ‘map’ relevant design media. The relationships between various ‘traditional’ media and computer based applications are scrutinized and characterized and the opportunities which they offer are compared. The underlying conceptual framework was recently put before a group of professionals in the in the course of an experimental workshop concerning the potentials of a virtual design media ‘museum’. In the following step an attempt is made to identify changing media roles, whereby the opportunities of the educational environment – as a ‘laboratory’ for emerging developments – is stressed. Some specific tendencies are identified, notably: the combined application of different sorts of design media; the surfacing of imaginative new working methods inspired by ‘classic’ media techniques and various new ways of escaping the serious limitations of traditional computer interfaces. These developments, making use of various types of computer platforms, may be expected to contribute to more structured – and imaginative – approaches to professional design as well as to architectural education and research.
keywords Computer Support For Learning; The Changing Role of the Design Studio; Educational Methodologies
series eCAADe
email j.l.h.breen@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id eaea2003_11-bremer-sander
id eaea2003_11-bremer-sander
authors Bremer, S. and Sander, H.
year 2004
title View from the Road: Environmental Simulation for the Fractal City of Rhine Ruhr
source Spatial Simulation and Evaluation - New Tools in Architectural and Urban Design [Proceedings of the 6th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 80-227-2088-7], pp. 43-47
summary Highway seems to be more an issue of traffic planning than of urban design. But the highway can be a very important factor for the modern city pattern. Highways shape the spatial form of the fractal city. The modern highway can define new cores outside and “interior edges” within the city. Seen as a planning tool, highways are the great neglected opportunity in city and regional design. The 1st Architecture Biennial, 1ab, taking place from May 2003 to July 2003 in Rotterdam, explores the creative potentials of modern highways worldwide. An international research team discovered the spatial functions of highways in modern agglomerations. This lecture will give an overview of the results of the worldwide analyses and the design projects that had been undertaken. Both authors are members of the German research team. The German team examined the A 42 running through the Ruhrgebiet, a former coal and steal area in western Germany. The Ruhr Area is converting from an industrially orientated region to an agglomeration of high technology and science. But the regional image remains the same due to the fact that the changes cannot be seen, neither physically, nor from the road. Here, the highway could be used as a catalyst supporting and structuring the spatial changes to make them more legible for the people of Rhine-Ruhr. The nature becomes the most important tool of highway design. Landscape forms a linkage between the different cities of the region. Together with the A 40 and other local highways the region becomes the most important (and largest) public space of the new Rhine-Ruhr. The highway seen as a work of urban art can be designed only from the perspective of the driving car.
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id avocaad_2003_02
id avocaad_2003_02
authors Brian M. Evans
year 2003
title Binary Winds: Identity in the Digital Age
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary no summary available
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email evans@arch.chalmers.se
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id sigradi2004_286
id sigradi2004_286
authors Bruno Massara Rocha
year 2004
title Diagramas e cidades: Tecnologia digital aplicada na construção de interfaces gráficas e diagramas de análise para dinâmicas territoriais em grande escala [Diagrams and Cities: Digital Technology Applied to the Construction of Graphic Interfaces and Diagrams for the Analysis for Large-Scale Territorial Dynamics]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This research has a goal to verify the applicability of the new multimídia authoring tool as a usefull resource for architects and urban planners in analyzing large virtual processes that intervene in the production of the urban space. The Macromedia Director has shown an important device for crossing informationg and processes visualization. As a digital interactive interface the software Macromedia Director offers possibilities to particular accesses of the most various kinds of files and formats, and has great potential for architecture as an agent discipline.
keywords Interactive Digital Interface, Territorial Urban Dynamics
series SIGRADI
email bmassara@uai.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2005_679
id sigradi2005_679
authors Bruscato Portella, Underléa; Juan Puebla Pons
year 2005
title On the ways of expression in present architecture
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 679-683
summary This paper aims at introducing the main aspects of a research on architectural representation and the usage of new technologies in the process of development of an architectural project, which has been conducted at a department of Graphical Expression. The authors of this paper would like to outline the most excellent and innovating aspects introduced by a number of architectural proposals which involve actively the application of these techniques. The chosen case studies for this paper are among the European contemporary architectural panorama. The authors will analyze some projects of architectural studios which were involved in the urban transformation brought about by celebration of the Forum of the Cultures 2004. These new ways of architectural representation have had, in this specific case, a significant effect within the context of a technological revolution that allows the conception of new forms and textures and the reflection on the increasingly complex processes to generate architectural space. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email underlea.bruscato@upc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia11_138
id acadia11_138
authors Buell, Samantha; Shaban, Ryan; Corte, Daniel; Beorkrem, Christopher
year 2011
title Zero-waste, Flat Pack Truss Work: An Investigation of Responsive Structuralism
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 138-143
summary The direct and rapid connections between scripting, modeling and prototyping allow for investigations of computation in fabrication. The manipulation of planar materials with two-dimensional CNC cuts can easily create complex and varied forms, volumes, and surfaces. However, the bulk of research on folding using CNC fabrication tools is focused upon surfaces, self-supporting walls and shell structures, which do not integrate well into more conventional building construction models.This paper attempts to explain the potential for using folding methodologies to develop structural members through a design-build process. Conventional building practice consists of the assembly of off-the-shelf parts. Many times, the plinth, skeleton, and skin are independently designed and fabricated, integrating multiple industries. Using this method of construction as an operative status quo, this investigation focused on a single structural component: the truss. A truss is defined as: “A triangulated arrangement of structural members that reduces nonaxial external forces to a set of axial forces in its members.” (Allen and Iano 2004)Using folding methodologies and sheet steel to create a truss, this design investigation employed a recyclable and prolific building material to redefine the fabrication of a conventional structural member. The potential for using digital design and two-dimensional CNC fabrication tools in the design of a foldable truss from sheet steel is viable in the creation of a flat-packed, minimal waste structural member that can adapt to a variety of aesthetic and structural conditions. Applying new methods to a component of the conventional ‘kit of parts’ allowed for a novel investigation that recombines zero waste goals, flat-packing potential, structural expression and computational processes.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email srbuell2@gmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id ddss2004_d-193
id ddss2004_d-193
authors Burkhard, R.
year 2004
title Visual Knowledge Transfer between Planners and Business Decision Makers
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) Developments in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN 90-6814-155-4, p. 193-208
summary The transfer of knowledge between planners and business decision makers can be improved when planners combine traditional visualizations with business knowledge visualizations. Today architects and urban planners use visualization methods such as sketches, diagrams, drawings, renderings, models and animations to illustrate their projects. While spending an enormous amount of time to illustrate a project, almost no time is used to illustrate business relevant information that decision makers need (i.e., revenue models, risks, return on investments, project phases). Consequences are information overload, misinterpretation or even misuse of information. Juxtaposing the visualizations that planners and decision makers use reveals a major gap: Both groups use different visualization types and are not familiar with the visualization types of each other. This paper stresses the importance to expand the visualization types of planners with business knowledge visualizations. First, it discusses the functioning of visual representations for the transfer of knowledge. Second, it introduces a general knowledge visualization framework. Third, it illustrates examples from an innovative office that improved knowledge transfer with decision makers in urban planning projects. We found that combining traditional visualizations with business knowledge visualizations reduces the information overload, prevents misinterpretation, increases the information quality, improves communication and as a consequence improves decision making. We found that decision makers pay extra for these visualization types, which therefore is a new source of income for planners. The results have implications for the education of future architects.
keywords Decision Making, Knowledge Transfer, Visualization Types, Interfunctional Communication, Business Knowledge Visualization, Information Visualization
series DDSS
last changed 2004/07/03 20:13

_id 2004_312
id 2004_312
authors Burry, J., Felicetti, P., Tang, J., Burry, M. and Xie, M.
year 2004
title Dynamical Structural Modeling - A Collaborative Design Exploration
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 312-317
summary This paper will report on a generative performative modeling approach that engages architects and structural engineers in close dialog. We focus on knowledge shared between architects and engineers to apply the Finite Element Analysis based structural design technique Evolutionary Structural Optimization [ESO] as a way to understand or corroborate the performance factors that are significant in determining architectural form. ESO is very close conceptually to the dynamical system of matter and forces of growth itself. It has parallels both mathematical and metaphorical with natural evolution and morphogenesis so it has been poignant to apply the approach to a formal architectural case study in which the generative influence of these processes is inherent.
keywords Evolutionary Structural Optimization; Finite Element Analysis; Architect Engineer Collaboration; Performance-Based Design; Form Finding
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id ijac20075402
id ijac20075402
authors Burry, Jane R.
year 2007
title Mindful Spaces: Computational Geometry and the Conceptual Spaces in which Designers Operate
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 5 - no. 4, pp. 611-624
summary Combinatorial computational geometry, while dealing with geometric objects as discrete entities, provides the means both to analyse and to construct relationships between these objects and relate them to other non-geometrical entities. This paper explores some ways in which this may be used in design through a review of six, one-semester-long design explorations by undergraduate and postgraduate students in the Flexible Modeling for Design and Prototyping course between 2004 and 2007. The course focuses on using computational geometry firstly to construct topologically defined design models based on graphs of relationships between objects (parametric design,) and concurrently to output physical prototypes from these "flexible models"(an application of numerical computational geometry). It supports students to make early design explorations. Many have built flexible models to explore design iterations for a static spatial outcome. Some have built models of real time responsive dynamic systems. In this educational context, computational geometry has enabled a range of design iterations that would have been challenging to uncover through physical analogue means alone. It has, perhaps more significantly, extended the students' own concept of the space in which they design.
series journal
email jane.burry@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2008/02/25 19:30

_id acadia04_014
id acadia04_014
authors Burry, Mark
year 2004
title THE SAGRADA FAMíLIA - WEST TRANSEPT ROSE WINDOW, A RAPID PROTOTYPE
source Fabrication: Examining the Digital Practice of Architecture [Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture and the 2004 Conference of the AIA Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community / ISBN 0-9696665-2-7] Cambridge (Ontario) 8-14 November, 2004, 14-19
summary The recently completed design and construction in a little over twelve months of the west transept rose window (Passion Façade) of Antoni Gaudí’s unfinished major work and Barcelona icon, the Sagrada Família church, is a notable example of ‘lean construction’. The processes involved include traditional stone masonry, actual employment of the traits discussed in Evan’s ‘The Projective Cast’, and semi-automated construction methods.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
last changed 2010/05/16 07:09

_id sigradi2004_357
id sigradi2004_357
authors Carlos Calderon and Nicholas Worley
year 2004
title An automatic real-time camera control engine for the exploration of architectural designs
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This paper is concerned with the use of real-time camera engines in architectural virtual environments as a method of enhancing the user.s experience and as a way of facilitating the understanding of architectural concepts. This paper reports on an initial prototype of a real-time cinematic control camera engine for dynamic virtual environments in the architectural domain. The paper discusses the potential of the system to convey architectural concepts using well known architectural concepts such as rhythm and proposes a series of future improvements to address those limitations. Keywords: virtual environments, camera control, design process, filmaking.
series SIGRADI
email carlos.calderon@newcastle.ac.uk, n.j.worley@newcastle.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

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