CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 565

_id ascaad2004_paper1
id ascaad2004_paper1
authors Eldin, Neil N. and K.A. Eldrandaly
year 2004
title A Computer-Aided System for Site Selection of Major Capital Investments
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary Site selection for capital investments is a crucial complex decision for owners and analysts. Difficulties are caused by the inclusion of the numerous possible sites that may qualify, multiple objectives that could also contradict each other, intangible objectives that are difficult to quantify, diversity of interest groups, uncertainties regarding external factors such as government legislations, uncertainties regarding the timing required for permitting the sites in question, and unknown construction challenges for the different sites. As such, these exercises are multi-facetted and necessitate the employment of analysts who possess in-depth knowledge in a number of fields. More importantly, a solution must satisfy a number of physical suitability criteria, as well as, meeting a number of social, economical, environmental and political requirements. Consequently, a number of specialized tools is frequently utilized to ensure reaching an optimal decision. This paper presents a new system that integrates Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) operations within a Geographic Information System (GIS) application to determine the optimum site for a specified facility. The system was validated through a facility for a selected metropolitan area.
series ASCAAD
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id 2004_184
id 2004_184
authors Fatah gen. Schieck, Ava
year 2004
title Using Multiple Input Devices
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 184-194
summary The field of computer graphics has developed significantly over the last decade. However, most current CAD systems support only the two most common input devices: a mouse and a keyboard. In addition to that few, if any, systems make it easy for the user or the programmer to add and use new input devices. People tend to use both hands to manipulate 3D real world objects; one hand is used to orient the object while the other hand is used to perform some operation on it. The same thing could be applied to computer modelling in the conceptual phase of the design process. Accordingly, the 3D object can be easily and intuitively changed through interactive manipulation of both hands. This paper investigates the manipulation and creation of free form geometries through the use of interactive interfaces with multiple input devices. It demonstrates that using multiple input devices can offer many opportunities for form generation resulting in visually rich forms. However, the experimental results demonstrated that regulations are needed to avoid developing inefficient two-handed interfaces.
keywords Modelling Interactively, Architectural Design Tools at the Conceptual Phase, Affordable Low-Cost Solution, Multiple Input Devices MID
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id 2004_558
id 2004_558
authors Gatermann, Harald
year 2004
title The Didactic Triangle - Using CAD, Photography and Descriptive Geometry as Educating Tools with Mutual Influence
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 558-562
summary Teaching of architectural photography is still not very popular at universities. We developed a didactic concept of teaching architectural photography in response to caad and to descriptive geometry. The first edge of the triangle (descriptive geometry): By having knowledge in descriptive geometry, students will be more aware of geometrical context in caad and in photography. On the other hand the teaching and understanding of descriptive geometry is much easier, when students have already a basic knowledge of photography. The second edge of the triangle (caad, animation): This kind of teaching architectural photography is not only necessary to open the eyes for „young“ student to learn photography - it also helps to understand the basics of constructing perspectives in descriptive geometry or computer aided design up to different kinds of visualisation. The third edge of the triangle (photography): In the age of non-slr-cameras students are no longer used to take sophisticated photographs. They are mostly only able to take snapsshots (even in the time of digital cameras). One of our main methods is to make them acquainted to slrcameras (analog and digital), to tripods and spirit levels as essential tools and to teach the basic geometrical context. The didactic concept is continued by teaching knowledge about colours, light, different points of view etc. Our didactical concept („Didactic Triangle“) is based on teaching all three elements (photography, caad, descr. geometry) by the same teacher in the same semester to the same students. This guarantees the mutual understanding of the three disciplines. Interactive, digital teaching elements (virtual „mock-up-studio“) support the acceptance.
keywords Descriptive Geometry, Photography, CAD
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id ijac20032107
id ijac20032107
authors Halin, Gilles; Hanser, Damien; Bignon, Jean-Claude
year 2004
title User Adaptive Visualization of Cooperative Architectural Design
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 2 - no. 1
summary A cooperative design is a social activity inside a group. In this kind of activity, each actor plays a specific role. If each actor wants to realize the actions corresponding to his role, he needs some adaptive information about the cooperation context. The cooperation context of design project is a relational organization where each actor maintains specific relations with other people (designers, project managers, etc.) but also with documents and activities. Such a cooperation context exists in architectural cooperative design which is distinguished by a "mutual prescription" between actors. In architectural design we are in a network model of actors, instead of the hierarchical model that we can find in classical workflow tools. This organization has to be represented in the project management tool to give each user an adaptive vision of the project organization and evolution. The representation and the visualization of such a network, which characterizes each project, is the main objective of the "Relational Model of Cooperation" and the hypermedia view presented in this paper.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2004_500
id 2004_500
authors Hanzl, Malgorzata and Wrona, Stefan
year 2004
title Visual Simulation as a Tool for Planning Education - Computer Aided Participation Support
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 500-507
summary Contemporary computer techniques offer many new opportunities to engage citizens into the planning process. There are new possibilities of interaction, introducing an observer into the “game”. The research project presented in the paper assumes the use of a visual 3D language which consists of a series of schematic types of buildings. They form a language which is easy to understand both by professionals and by laymen. Understanding is the very first step towards getting convinced by the ideas presented. The next step is interaction - the user’s action induces the response of the system. The solution proposed by the user meets an evaluation from the part of the system which evokes the user’s interest - in the case presented here the evaluation introduces the simulation of future state of the site. The problem posed is to find out the best way to convince people that some places are less or more suitable for settlement, depending on the media present there, distance from the urban areas and the environment protection. The attempt to create a tool which could be helpful in an educational process is described in the paper. The idea is to prepare a form of a master plan record which uses the visual 3D language and may be accessed via World Wide Web pages. The paper formulates the assessments for the software described above and examines the possibility to create an application. The trial to prepare a web based service using the flash and shockwave technology is presented.
series eCAADe
email skwrona@astercity.net
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id da71
id da71
authors Horne, Margaret
year 2004
title Visualisation of Martyr’s Square, Beirut
source CONVR2005 5th Conference of Construction Applications of Virtual Reality, ADETTI/ISCTE, Durham, UK, 12-13 September 2005
summary Solidere, a Lebanese joint-stock company, was created by government decree in 1994 to reconstruct Beirut city-centre. The company, a form of public-private partnership, has a majority share holding of former owners and tenants of city-centre property. Several projects are underway, including the redevelopment of Place des Martyrs, once the bustling heart of Beirut but badly damaged during the war. Urban planners in Beirut have recently developed a 3D computer model to visually describe the spatial characteristics of Martyr’s Square and its context, prior to inviting design proposals for an international competition. This paper describes issues pertaining to the development of the model to meet the needs of urban designers and town planners. It also considers potential future uses of the simulation, outlining areas for further research and development.
keywords Beirut, 3D Modelling, Visual Simulation, Town Planning
series other
type normal paper
email m.horne@unn.ac.uk
last changed 2006/06/08 20:10

_id 2004_610
id 2004_610
authors Ibrahim, M., Krawczyk, R. and Schipporeit, G.
year 2004
title Two Approaches to BIM: A Comparative Study
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 610-616
summary The ultimate goal of the BIM concept is to create a complete digital model of the building to insure the generation of an accurate bill of material and cost estimate along with coordinated drawings and details. This goal might need the contribution of various disciplines to provide the needed level of information. The development of capable specialized systems to model specific building elements will definitely challenge the all-purpose architectural CAD. The specificity of these systems will enable fulfilling the needs than a general purpose architectural BIM system. This will lead the industry into creating either a powerful fully integrated BIM system that can handle all required information, or a referential BIM system that depends on passing the information to other programs (and other people) that are capable of handling specific tasks more efficiently.
keywords Building Information Modeling; CAD; Internet; Smart Objects
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

_id avocaad_2003_01
id avocaad_2003_01
authors Jack Breen
year 2003
title VISTA VERSA – Critical Considerations on the Evolvement of Designerly Attitudes, Instruments and Networks in Design Driven Studies
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary Keynote Paper - We are all involved in design.Besides being the (sub)conscious recipients of all sorts of design driven activities, we are professionally concerned with products of design and acts of designing, either as practitioners or as academics, in some cases as both… As someone who was trained as a designer, drifted into design teaching and presently attempts to combine composition research with design practice, I feel there is a need to bridge the cultural gap between design and design research. I intend to put forward the case for more designerly approaches in the study of design. In this context I would like to discuss perspectives for design driven studies by considering the following ensemble of aspects:- the matter of shifting attitudes to design in a scientific context; - the necessity of expanding the scope of instruments of design in relation to methods and insights. - the furthering of opportunities for networks aimed at bringing out and communicating findings concerning different aspects of design.It is on the topic of interaction, between the targeted creativity of designing on the one hand and the open minded search for relevant knowledge, insights and applications on the other, that I would like to dwell. Furthermore, I hope to provoke some thoughts – and hopefully responses – concerning the roles of computer based applications in such studies. What kinds of impulses have computer technologies offered, should they perhaps have offered and indeed might they still be able to offer in this field? I would like to by take a critical look back and try to turn things around, towards a possible view forward…
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design
series AVOCAAD
email J.L.H.Breen@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id 41f0
id 41f0
authors Janusz Rebielak
year 2004
title NUMERICAL MODELS OF CHOSEN TYPES OF DOME STRUCTURES
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Special Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 239-249.
summary The paper presents basic description of shaping processes of tension-strut structures developed by the author and proposed as lightweight structural systems for large span dome covers. In the paper are presented two basic types of the systems, which are built mainly by means of tetrahedral and octahedral modules with the V-shaped bar sets. For all the offered types of structures there are prepared suitable numerical models defined in the programming language Formian. Application of these numerical models considerably accelerates design process of these complex forms of spatial structures and makes possible an easier co-operation between all designers involved in this process.
series other
type normal paper
email janusz.rebielak@pwr.wroc.pl
last changed 2005/04/08 15:17

_id 503caadria2004
id 503caadria2004
authors Jin Kook Lee, Hyun-Soo Lee
year 2004
title HCIS: the Housing Context Inference System Model for Smart Space
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 759-776
summary This research is about the basic methods in making computers understand human behavior in an architectural space in regards to reaction to interaction between the machine and human. Its ultimate objective is to analyze the related technology making this series of works possible synthetically on the basis of information system within architectural territoriality. In the end it is expected to offer a theoretical basis to embody smart space, up-to-date and intelligent architectural space. There are two issues that motivate this research: what are the Housing Context and its Inference System, and how smart space can infer the Housing Context and react with proper response. The Husing Context consists of 1) state of user, 2) state of physical environment, 3) state of computational environment, 4) history of user-environment interaction and 5) architectural territoriality. Especially, spatial information of architectural territoriality is a significant key of HCIS. Spatial divisions and boundaries made of architectural elements or facilities determinate their own micro-territorialities. Ontologies are used to describe the Housing Context predicate. In this paper, we can say that the Housing Context and the Housing Log(history of user-environment interaction, a set of the Housing Context) written by ontologies can be a beneficial model of HCIS. Furthermore, we can develop the Housing Log Databases and its variable applications that have enabled to make simulating and analyzing tool of design, the Augmented Web Presence and the other helpful applications.
series CAADRIA
email scout@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2004/05/20 17:43

_id avocaad_2003_13
id avocaad_2003_13
authors John L. Heintz
year 2003
title Communication and Value in Networked Design Coalitions
source LOCAL VALUES in a NETWORKED DESIGN WORLD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Stellingwerff, Martijn and Verbeke, Johan (Eds.), (2004) DUP Science - Delft University Press, ISBN 90-407-2507-1.
summary The advent of the Internet has led us to believe that we live in an era of unprecedented globalization. In the field of building design, we now expect both that the local market for design services will be altered, and that many firms will take up the opportunity to pursue commissions beyond their local market. To some extent this is true, but it is instructive to recall that in the 19th century London based architectural firms and public works designers designed buildings throughout the Empire. Designing for projects beyond the local market is not new, what is new is our expectation that such a task is now fundamentally altered, made easier and more transparent, by the abundance of new communications technologies.It remains the case that working outside one’s local context is difficult and that when doing so, problems are likely to arise out of cultural differences. Distance too imposes its burdens, as the possibility to meet other members of the team face to face is reduced as the travel costs increase. This breaks down the possibilities of building informal networks among the individual designers working for the firms that are members of the design team. A re-instantiation of this informal network can only be done on the basis of a model of formal and informal communication in the design team. Many of the difficulties of collaborative work outside one’s local market are problems that have already been with us a long time. These problems arise out of the fact that buildings are designed by heterogeneous groups of people. The members of such groups must communicate with each other to share information and coordinate decisions and actions. Yet they are in different relations to the project at hand and have differing values arising out of their different backgrounds. This leads inevitably to conflict. Therefore, if we are to discuss communication and value then we must devote our attentions to conflict.
keywords Architecture, Local values, Globalisation, Computer Aided Architectural Design, Communication, values, informal communication, value resolution, design team, design coalition.
series AVOCAAD
email J.L.Heintz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2006/01/16 20:38

_id acadia04_230
id acadia04_230
authors Johnson, Scott
year 2004
title Linking Analysis and Architectural Data: Why It's Harder than We Thought
source Fabrication: Examining the Digital Practice of Architecture [Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture and the 2004 Conference of the AIA Technology in Architectural Practice Knowledge Community / ISBN 0-9696665-2-7] Cambridge (Ontario) 8-14 November, 2004, 230-243
summary This paper considers high-level, architecturally oriented repre­sentations, like Building Information Models (BIMs), and examines the difficulty of integrating analyses with such representations. Structural analysis is selected as a sample analysis domain, and is examined by integrating a structural analysis into the test implementation of a program that utilizes architecturally oriented elements. A fundamental problem is found to be that architecturally oriented elements are inappropriate for structural analysis. Methods for sequentially analyzing architectural elements are discussed, but are found to be inadequate. Accurate analysis requires analyzing the entire structure at once using a representation specific to structural analysis. A method for generating a structural representation based on the architectural representation is discussed, but the process is not simple. The process is complicated by the fact that architectural elements and structural elements do not correspond in a one-to-one or even a one-to-many manner. An accurate structural representation may even require semi-fictitious elements not corresponding to actual physical components. These findings are believed to be true for other analysis domains, as well.
keywords Representations, Building Information Models, Proteus, structural analysis, finite elements
series ACADIA
email sven@umich.edu
last changed 2010/05/16 07:09

_id sigradi2004_442
id sigradi2004_442
authors José Ripper Kós
year 2004
title A organização do "habitar a cidade": O exame de um exercício de projeto colaborativo [The Organization of "Dweling in the City": The Examination of a Collaborative Design Course]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This communication is part of six other contributions from different authors, which aim to provide an overall discussion of a Brazilian Virtual Design Studio. This paper focuses the tools applied in a VDS within a Latin-American context of public universities with limited budget and its organization. The tools are discussed in three main phases of the exercise: the group formation, the design process, and the debates and crits. Despite the limited resources, we conclude and suggest that such experience should be pursued by other schools in similar conditions.
series SIGRADI
email josekos@ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id caadria2004_k-1
id caadria2004_k-1
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 2004
title CONTEXTUALIZATION AND EMBODIMENT IN CYBERSPACE
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 5-14
summary The introduction of VRML (Virtual Reality Markup Language) in 1994, and other similar web-enabled dynamic modeling software (such as SGI’s Open Inventor and WebSpace), have created a rush to develop on-line 3D virtual environments, with purposes ranging from art, to entertainment, to shopping, to culture and education. Some developers took their cues from the science fiction literature of Gibson (1984), Stephenson (1992), and others. Many were web-extensions to single-player video games. But most were created as a direct extension to our new-found ability to digitally model 3D spaces and to endow them with interactive control and pseudo-inhabitation. Surprisingly, this technologically-driven stampede paid little attention to the core principles of place-making and presence, derived from architecture and cognitive science, respectively: two principles that could and should inform the essence of the virtual place experience and help steer its development. Why are the principles of place-making and presence important for the development of virtual environments? Why not simply be content with our ability to create realistically-looking 3D worlds that we can visit remotely? What could we possibly learn about making these worlds better, had we understood the essence of place and presence? To answer these questions we cannot look at place-making (both physical and virtual) from a 3D space-making point of view alone, because places are not an end unto themselves. Rather, places must be considered a locus of contextualization and embodiment that ground human activities and give them meaning. In doing so, places acquire a meaning of their own, which facilitates, improves, and enriches many aspects of our lives. They provide us with a means to interpret the activities of others and to direct our own actions. Such meaning is comprised of the social and cultural conceptions and behaviors imprinted on the environment by the presence and activities of its inhabitants, who in turn, ‘read’ by them through their own corporeal embodiment of the same environment. This transactional relationship between the physical aspects of an environment, its social/cultural context, and our own embodiment of it, combine to create what is known as a sense of place: the psychological, physical, social, and cultural framework that helps us interpret the world around us, and directs our own behavior in it. In turn, it is our own (as well as others’) presence in that environment that gives it meaning, and shapes its social/cultural character. By understanding the essence of place-ness in general, and in cyberspace in particular, we can create virtual places that can better support Internet-based activities, and make them equal to, in some cases even better than their physical counterparts. One of the activities that stands to benefit most from understanding the concept of cyber-places is learning—an interpersonal activity that requires the co-presence of others (a teacher and/or fellow learners), who can point out the difference between what matters and what does not, and produce an emotional involvement that helps students learn. Thus, while many administrators and educators rush to develop webbased remote learning sites, to leverage the economic advantages of one-tomany learning modalities, these sites deprive learners of the contextualization and embodiment inherent in brick-and-mortar learning institutions, and which are needed to support the activity of learning. Can these qualities be achieved in virtual learning environments? If so, how? These are some of the questions this talk will try to answer by presenting a virtual place-making methodology and its experimental implementation, intended to create a sense of place through contextualization and embodiment in virtual learning environments.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
last changed 2004/05/20 16:37

_id ascaad2004_paper10
id ascaad2004_paper10
authors Khaled, Sherbini and Krawczyk, Robert
year 2004
title Overview of Intelligent Architecture
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary The concept of intelligent architecture started as an interest in the latest integrated building systems operating a single building or facility, so that systems can communicate and exchange information. The communication among these systems allows the right responses and decisions to operate buildings in a productive, economical and convenient way. Communication and information sharing prevents decisions from interfering with other systems’ responses or operation. Systems’ decisions and responses form the responsive architecture that is represented by systems outputs. If intelligent buildings need to receive, analyze, and react according to such processes, responsive ones are required only to receive and react to only one input parameter. Technology and communication systems make it possible to combine several parameters by using system integration and computerization. Technology and computerized systems have enhanced and changed the manner of responses and provided a variety of decisions according to different sources of information. Receiving, analyzing, and reacting are the key criteria of intelligent building that this paper will explore. The input (reception) category covers information detection devices such as temperature sensors. The second category will be the category of analysing devices. The third category, decisions and outputs, will cover both output of sensory devices and forms of reaction and response that emanate from these systems. As a result of the third category, this paper will survey the forms of responses to determine whether or not the kinetic response is a viable choice. The paper will discuss if these three criteria are the only criteria creating intelligent building or if there are others. The paper will give an overview on intelligent architecture and explore in the main criteria determining intelligent building. The paper will then discuss when “responsive” and "kinetic" architecture becomes “intelligent”. The paper will also redefine the intelligent architecture in the light of available technology.
series ASCAAD
email krawczyk@iit.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id 999e
id 999e
authors KOUZELEAS Stelios
year 2004
title APPLICATIONS OF ACOUSTIC AND GEOMETRIC SIMULATION OF HALLS WITH THE AID OF WITH THE AID OF ACOUSTIC SIMULATION PLATE-FORM ADAPTABLE IN A CAD SYSTEM. - (EFARMOGES AKOUSTIKHS KAI GEWMETRIKHS PROSOMOIOSHS AITHOUSWN ME TH BOHTHEIA PLATFORMAS AKOYSTIKHS PROSOMOIOSHS PROSARMOSMENHS SE SYSTHMA CAD)
source Acoustics 2004, Hellenic Institute of Acoustics (HELINA), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 27-28 September 2004, Greece
summary (pdf file in greek)- With the aid of the acoustic simulation plate-form named « CAD-Acoustic » which is developed in the context of PhD and adapted on the AutoCAD system, this paper presents the halls acoustic results (RT60) of Elmia (Sweden) and Opera of Bordeaux (France) in relation to acoustic measurements and results of other acoustic simulation software (Odeon, Epidaure). In parallel, it presents geometrical simulations of the modelised halls’ acoustic behavior, such as the 3D reflections of the acoustic rays from selected surface, the 3D view of the materials’ arrangements through surfaces’ coloring, the measurement of the selected absorbing / reflecting surfaces in m2 and the individual or massive absorption coefficients’ assignment to the surfaces. Finally, with the aid of « CAD-Acoustic » the acoustic results are compared in a graphic manner in relation to the ideal acoustic rates, a presentation which is a kind of an “ architectural translation of the acoustic results” taking into account several architectural elements.
keywords CAD modeling, "CAD-Acoustic" software developement, Architectural acoustic simulation
series other
type normal paper
email stelios_kouzeleas@yahoo.fr
more http://www.helina.gr/
last changed 2005/10/25 09:22

_id 2961
id 2961
authors KOUZELEAS Stelios
year 2004
title COMPUTATIONAL PROCESSES OF A HALL CAD MODELISATION FOR ACOUSTIC SIMULATION ACCORDING TO ACCEPTED GEOMETRY FORMAT VIA ACOUSTIC SOFTWARE
source 1st International Conference “From Scientific Computing to Computational Engineering” (IC-SCCE), 8-10 September 2004, Athens, Greece
summary The acoustic computational simulation presents many advantages but at the same time there are some limits corresponding, among others, to the modelisation of the hall geometry. The integrated modelers of geometry of the halls in the acoustic simulation software are based especially on the programming code modelisation via text editors of coordinate points and not on the graphical modelisation, as the CAD software is. In cases of complex architectural shapes of halls, the majority of the acoustic simulation software imperatively needs to import a model from a CAD software. However, the modelisation of the geometry of the hall must take into account several criteria in order to run in an acoustic simulation software, and optimize the calculation results, such as the plane surfaces, the limited number of surfaces in some cases, the elimination of the unnecessary elements, the accepted geometry model format, etc. This paper explains the description and the particularities of three different modelisation processes of the Architectural School Amphitheater of Bordeaux in a CAD system in order to be adequate for acoustic simulation via acoustic software, such as ASCII, dxf and normals orientation model formats. It also presents computer automatization aspects of these processes integrated in a plate-form adaptable to a CAD system named “CAD-Acoustic.” These modelisation processes can also be a helpful tool during the architectural conception of the acoustic hall.
keywords CAD modelisation process, Architectural acoustics, Acoustic simulation
series other
type normal paper
email stelios_kouzeleas@yahoo.fr
more http://ic-scce.upatras.gr/
last changed 2005/10/25 07:47

_id 2206
id 2206
authors Kvan, Thomas
year 2004
title REASONS TO STOP TEACHING CAAD
source Mao-Lin Chiu (ed), Digital design education, Garden City Publishing, Taipei 2003, ISBN 9867705203
summary Computers are a problem. They are expensive, even if the prices have dropped dramatically and promise to continue dropping. They do not look after themselves but demand considerable attention – we have to hire computer specialists to ensure they talk to each other, staff are required to make sure software is installed and to fix things when it no longer works. Learning to use them is tedious; skills have to be developed to master several idiosyncratic software systems. The hardware and software regularly malfunction. It is faster to draw a line by hand than with software. Students already have enough trouble learning how to stop a window leaking or ensure a fire escape route will protect people in time of trouble, why make them learn all these other things. We should stop teaching CAAD. Although technological and economic issues are very real and not to be dismissed lightly, the real problems of teaching CAAD are not these. The real issues we need to address is how we teach and, behind that, why we teach. This paper explores the what and why.
keywords pedagogy
series other
type normal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2004/09/27 05:10

_id ijac20032110
id ijac20032110
authors Kvan, Thomas
year 2004
title The Dual Heritage of CAAD Research
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 2 - no. 1
summary The development of research in computer aided architectural design has evolved in the context of architectural design. A review of Tom Maver's work is undertaken from the perspective of his shortest paper, CAAD's Seven Deadly Sins. In that paper cautions were given to researchers. Here these cautions are interpreted in the context of the dual heritage of our field in science and creative arts. An examination of Tom Maver's own work suggests that these sins are counterbalanced by a like number of virtues and it is suggested that these are demonstrated in the corpus of his work and the community he has fostered.
series journal
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ddss2004_d-225
id ddss2004_d-225
authors Lai, I.-C.
year 2004
title Dynamic Linkages between Ideas and Cases
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) Developments in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN 90-6814-155-4, p. 225-238
summary This research makes use of a cognitive study to explore a mechanism for associating ideas in a brainstorming session. Firstly, we propose a linking model integrating three principles of idea association (similarity, contrast and contiguity) with two processes of case-based reasoning (retrieval and adaptation). For identifying the types and mechanisms of linkages within the linking model, a design experiment and its protocol analysis was conducted. Finally, a framework for case-based reasoning to support idea association called Dynamic Idea-Maps (DIM) is proposed, and its components and mechanisms are elucidated.
keywords Idea Association, Case-Based Reasoning, Retrieval, Adaptation, Protocol Analysis
series DDSS
last changed 2004/07/03 20:13

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