CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 416

_id ijac20053404
id ijac20053404
authors Kwee, Verdy; Radford, Antony; Bruton, Dean
year 2005
title Hybrid Digital Media Architectural Visualisation Delivery - Murcutt, Lewin & Lark's The Arthur and Yvonne Boyd Education Centre on Digital Flatland
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 4, 487-502
summary This paper shares ongoing research explorations into visualising and representing architecture through the limited real-estate spaces of computer screens. It proposes greater access, 'interactivity' and clarity in digital representations for the study, analysis and/or digital record of existing architecture by drawing on concepts and strategies - within and outside the discipline - to arrive at hybrid visualisation techniques. To illustrate some of these techniques, the paper outlines several issues in the production of hybrid media representations of the Arthur and Yvonne Boyd Education Centre. This award-winning building was designed by the 2002 Pritzker Prize-winner, Glenn Murcutt in association with Wendy Lewin and Reg Lark. It is recognised as a landmark in Australian architecture and a worthy subject of our representation experiments.
series journal
email verdy.kwee@adelaide.edu.au
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000001/art00002
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id acadia05_254
id acadia05_254
authors Sheil, Bob and Leung, Chris
year 2005
title ‘Kielder Probes’ – bespoke tools for an indeterminate design process
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 254-259
summary Sixteen (makers) are a group of practicing architects, academics, designers and makers who assemble when key questions surrounding design, fabrication, use and adaptability in architecture emerge. Initially, the group was formed out of a motivation to engage as designers with the physical and tactile aspects of production without a dependency upon drawing. Now, in the post digital age, the age of digital fabrication, boundaries between drawing and making, between the designer and the maker, have dissolved. Consequently sixteen*(makers) work is now engaged with questions of knowledge transfer, expertise, and innovation where modes of investigation are equally embedded within in the analogue and the digital world. This article relates to our latest ongoing work which is due for completion in 2005/06. The work has been developed as a specific response to the award of an architectural residency by the Art and Architecture Partnership at Kielder Park, Northumbria, England. From the outset, it has not been a requirement of the residency that an outcome is identified early on. In fact, as I write, the outcome remains open. Presented with an extraordinary site and coinciding with a time of rapid change the work has begun by exploring a design process that is adaptable, indeterminate, and informed by site conditions. In October 2003, sixteen*(makers) were awarded an architecture residency by The Art and Architecture Programme at Kielder (AAPK) of Northumbria, UK. This organization is well known for commissioning works such as the ‘Belvedere’ by Softroom and the ‘Skyspace’ by James Turrell. Coordinated by Peter Sharp, AAPK consists of a number of large public bodies, including The Forestry Commission, Northumbrian Water and Tyndale District Council. Together they manage a land area of 62,000 ha’s centred on the UK’s largest reservoir and surrounded on all sides by one of Europe’s largest managed forests.
series ACADIA
email r.sheil@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id 2005_763
id 2005_763
authors Beilharz, Kirsty
year 2005
title Architecture as the Computer Interface: 4D Gestural Interaction with Socio-Spatial Sonification
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 763-770
summary Architecture today extends far beyond designing building shells and material, peripheral boundaries. Arguably, it has always been, and shifts increasingly in contemporary environments towards, designing space and interaction with space. Hence, the role of the designer includes integration of computing in architecture through ambient display and non-tactile interaction. This paper explores a framework in which the architecture is the computer interface to information sonification. (Sonification is automatically generated representation of information using sound). The examples in this paper are Emergent Energies, demonstrating a socio-spatially responsive generative design in a sensate environment enabled by pressure mats; Sensor-Cow using wireless gesture controllers to sonify motion; and Sonic Kung Fu which is an interactive sound sculpture facilitated by video colour-tracking. The method in this paper connects current information sonification methodologies with gesture controller capabilities to complete a cycle in which gestural, non-tactile control permutes and interacts with automatically-generated information sonification. Gestural pervasive computing negotiates space and computer interaction without conventional interfaces (keyboard/mouse) thus freeing the user to monitor or display information with full mobility, without fixed or expensive devices. Integral computing, a blurring of human-machine boundaries and embedding communication infrastructure, ambient display and interaction in the fabric of architecture are the objectives of this re-thinking.
keywords Interactive Sonification, Gesture Controllers, Responsive Spaces, SpatialSound
series eCAADe
email kirsty@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2005_416
id sigradi2005_416
authors Combes, Leonardo
year 2005
title The acts of showing and demonstrating and their connections with visual and quantitative facts in architecture
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 416-420
summary This paper attempts to clarify the limits between the act of conceiving architecture and the act of designing architecture. The main argument turns around the idea that the output of conception is just a definition used uncompromisingly as evidence, whereas the design tasks are directed to demonstrate the possibilities the defined ideas have to be actualized. Graphic expression is the vehicle used by conception to present ideas synthetically. On the other hand, design tasks are sustained by analytical and quantitative evaluations that validate the conceived proposal. Thus the final presentation of an architectural project is a mixture of written expressions (calculations, texts, figures) and graphic expressions. This paper has no intention of demonstrate but to show one of the possible approaches concerning the relations between conception, design and their respective means of expression. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email labsist@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id acadia05_078
id acadia05_078
authors Fox, Michael and Hu, Catherine
year 2005
title Starting From The Micro: A Pedagogical Approach to Designing Interactive Architecture
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 78-93
summary The paper outlines a pedagogical approach whereby a number of technology-intensive skills can be quickly learned to a level of useful practicality through a series of discrete, yet cumulative explorations with the design goal of creating intelligently responsive architectural systems. The culmination of such explorations in creating full-scale interactive architectural environments leads to a relatively unexplored area of negotiation whereby individual systems must necessarily manage environmental input to mediate a behavioural output. The emerging area of interactive architecture serves as a practical means for inventing entirely new ways of developing spaces, and the designing and building environments that address dynamic, flexible and constantly changing needs. Interactive architecture is defined here as spaces and objects that can physically re-configure themselves to meet changing needs. The central issues explored are human and environmental interaction and behaviours, embedded computational infrastructures, kinetic and mechanical systems and physical control mechanisms. Being both multidisciplinary and technology-intensive in nature, architects need to be equipped with at least a base foundational knowledge in a number of domains in order to be able to develop the skills necessary to explore, conceive, and design such systems. The teaching methods were carried out with a group of undergraduate design students who had no previous experience in mechanical engineering, electronics, programming, or kinetic design with the goal of creating a responsive kinetic system that can demonstrate physical interactive behaviours on an applicable architectural scale. We found the approach to be extremely successful in terms of psychologically demystifying unfamiliar and often daunting technologies, while simultaneously clarifying the larger architectural implications of the novel systems that had been created. The authors summarize the processes and tools that architects and designers can utilize in creating and demonstrating of such systems and the implications of adopting a more active role in directing the development of this new area of design.
series ACADIA
email mafox@foxlin.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id cf2011_p051
id cf2011_p051
authors Cote, Pierre; Mohamed-Ahmed Ashraf, Tremblay Sebastien
year 2011
title A Quantitative Method to Compare the Impact of Design Mediums on the Architectural Ideation Process.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 539-556.
summary If we compare the architectural design process to a black box system, we can assume that we now know quite well both inputs and outputs of the system. Indeed, everything about the early project either feasibility studies, programming, context integration, site analysis (urban, rural or natural), as well as the integration of participants in a collaborative process can all be considered to initiate and sustain the architectural design and ideation process. Similarly, outputs from that process are also, and to some extent, well known and identifiable. We are referring here, among others, to the project representations or even to the concrete building construction and its post-evaluation. But what about the black box itself that produces the ideation. This is the question that attempts to answer the research. Currently, very few research works linger to identify how the human brain accomplishes those tasks; how to identify the cognitive functions that are playing this role; to what extent they operate and complement each other, and among other things, whether there possibly a chain of causality between these functions. Therefore, this study proposes to define a model that reflects the activity of the black box based on the cognitive activity of the human brain. From an extensive literature review, two cognitive functions have been identified and are investigated to account for some of the complex cognitive activity that occurs during a design process, namely the mental workload and mental imagery. These two variables are measured quantitatively in the context of real design task. Essentially, the mental load is measured using a Bakan's test and the mental imagery with eyes tracking. The statistical software G-Power was used to identify the necessary subject number to obtain for significant variance and correlation result analysis. Thus, in the context of an exploratory research, to ensure effective sample of 0.25 and a statistical power of 0.80, 32 participants are needed. All these participants are students from 3rd, 4th or 5th grade in architecture. They are also very familiar with the architectural design process and the design mediums used, i.e., analog model, freehand drawing and CAD software, SketchUp. In three experimental sessions, participants were asked to design three different projects, namely, a bus shelter, a recycling station and a public toilet. These projects were selected and defined for their complexity similarity, taking into account the available time of 22 minutes, using all three mediums of design, and this in a randomly manner to avoid the order effect. To analyze the two cognitive functions (mental load and mental imagery), two instruments are used. Mental imagery is measured using eye movement tracking with monitoring and quantitative analysis of scan paths and the resulting number and duration of participant eye fixations (Johansson et al, 2005). The mental workload is measured using the performance of a modality hearing secondary task inspired by Bakan'sworks (Bakan et al.; 1963). Each of these three experimental sessions, lasting 90 minutes, was composed of two phases: 1. After calibrating the glasses for eye movement, the subject had to exercise freely for 3 minutes while wearing the glasses and headphones (Bakan task) to get use to the wearing hardware. Then, after reading the guidelines and criteria for the design project (± 5 minutes), he had 22 minutes to execute the design task on a drawing table allowing an upright posture. Once the task is completed, the subject had to take the NASA TLX Test, on the assessment of mental load (± 5 minutes) and a written post-experimental questionnaire on his impressions of the experiment (± 10 minutes). 2. After a break of 5-10 minutes, the participant answered a psychometric test, which is different for each session. These tests (± 20 minutes) are administered in the same order to each participant. Thus, in the first experimental session, the subject had to take the psychometric test from Ekstrom et al. (1978), on spatial performance (Factor-Referenced Cognitive Tests Kit). During the second session, the cognitive style is evaluated using Oltman's test (1971). Finally, in the third and final session, participant creativity is evaluated using Delis-Kaplan test (D-KEFS), Delis et al. (2001). Thus, this study will present the first results of quantitative measures to establish and validate the proposed model. Furthermore, the paper will also discuss the relevance of the proposed approach, considering that currently teaching of ideation in ours schools of architecture in North America is essentially done in a holistic manner through the architectural project.
keywords design, ideation process, mental workload, mental imagery, quantitative mesure
series CAAD Futures
email pierre.cote@arc.ulaval.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2005_a_7b_a
id caadria2005_a_7b_a
authors Abdullah, A.Q.M. ; Md. Emran Hossain, Md. Shabab Habib Khan
year 2005
title Digital Perception, Development and Presentation in Architecture: a study of Bangladesh with global context
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 255-267
summary In the recent past the computer has become an important tool in both the design and presentation media/method in architecture. In this paper digitalization in architectural practice and architectural education in both the global and Bangladesh contexts have been studied. A survey questionnaire was carried out to find how and to what extent available software are being used in Bangladesh for this purpose. Opinion, views, expectations of architects from leading architectural firms of Bangladesh were studied to understand the future prospect of this field in Bangladesh.
series CAADRIA
email abdullah@bracuniversity.ac.bd, emran@bracuniversity.ac.bd, jitul@vfemail.net
last changed 2007/07/23 05:08

_id ijac20053207
id ijac20053207
authors Achten, Henri
year 2005
title Digital Ground: Architecture, Pervasive Computing, and Environmental Knowledge by Malcolm McCullough
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 2, 255-258
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2005_083
id 2005_083
authors Agostinho, Francisco Santos
year 2005
title Architecture as Drawing, Perception and Cognition
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 83-90
summary This work is about realizing that human perception is inherent to architecture. It is an asset and a trait subject to training and development in an empirical way, involving physical and manual action. It cannot be taught literally through convention and logic reasoning. It is a human achievement of great significance built on intellectual and scientific knowledge. It is something, being physical and empirical, that is supported on instrumental procedure. The computer, as a machine and an instrument, does not shorten the empirical experience of manipulation; on the contrary, it enhances J.J. Gibson’s findings about the perception of space in relation to eye and body movement. Being a cybernetic machine the computer may, and shall, evolve, and become perceptive. In order for that to happen, it is important to keep in mind the mechanism of human perception. Through producing a computerized model of a major architectural work, we develop natural knowledge about its physical features and the thought that lies underneath. To be able to use the computer as an instrument provides a user with explicit knowledge about its ways and mechanism that has to be made available. It involves training, which is to a great extent self-explanatory, and also explicit knowledge about the conventions that are being used, such as programming, reasoning and trigonometry.
keywords Visualization; Environmental Simulation; Knowledge Modelling (KM); 3D Modeling
series eCAADe
email franc@fa.utl.pt
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_027
id 2005_027
authors Akin, Ömer and Özkaya, Ipek
year 2005
title Mixing Domains: Architecture plus Software Engineering
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 27-35
summary Software engineering is a multidisciplinary area of knowledge combining competence in computation with at least one other area of expertise, typically in the domain of the applications being created. A course offering for students of engineering, architecture and software engineering at Carnegie Mellon illustrates the challenges and opportunities of cross-domain instruction. These include ontology, problem taxonomies, and instruction strategies.
keywords Computing education in AEC; requirement engineering
series eCAADe
email iozka@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id ascaad2014_023
id ascaad2014_023
authors Al-Maiyah, Sura and Hisham Elkadi
year 2014
title Assessing the Use of Advanced Daylight Simulation Modelling Tools in Enhancing the Student Learning Experience
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 303-313
summary In architecture schools, where the ‘studio culture’ lies at the heart of students’ learning, taught courses, particularly technology ones, are often seen as secondary or supplementary units. Successful delivery of such courses, where students can act effectively, be motivated and engaged, is a rather demanding task requiring careful planning and the use of various teaching styles. A recent challenge that faces architecture education today, and subsequently influences the way technology courses are being designed, is the growing trend in practice towards environmentally responsive design and the need for graduates with new skills in sustainable construction and urban ecology (HEFCE’s consultation document, 2005). This article presents the role of innovative simulation modelling tools in the enhancement of the student learning experience and professional development. Reference is made to a teaching practice that has recently been applied at Portsmouth School of Architecture in the United Kingdom and piloted at Deakin University in Australia. The work focuses on the structure and delivery of one of the two main technology units in the second year architecture programme that underwent two main phases of revision during the academic years 2009/10 and 2010/11. The article examines the inclusion of advanced daylight simulation modelling tools in the unit programme, and measures the effectiveness of enhancing its delivery as a key component of the curriculum on the student learning experience. A main objective of the work was to explain whether or not the introduction of a simulation modelling component, and the later improvement of its integration with the course programme and assessment, has contributed to a better learning experience and level of engagement. Student feedback and the grade distribution pattern over the last three academic years were collected and analyzed. The analysis of student feedback on the revised modelling component showed a positive influence on the learning experience and level of satisfaction and engagement. An improvement in student performance was also recorded over the last two academic years and following the implementation of new assessment design.
series ASCAAD
email sura.almaiyah@port.ac.uk
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id ecaade2017_184
id ecaade2017_184
authors Almeida, Daniel and Sousa, José Pedro
year 2017
title Tradition and Innovation in Digital Architecture - Reviewing the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2005
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 267-276
summary Please write your aToday, in a moment when digital technologies are taking command of many architectural design and construction processes, it is important to examine the place and role of traditional ones. Designed by Álvaro Siza and Eduardo Souto de Moura in collaboration with Cecil Balmond, the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2005 reflects the potential of combining those two different approaches in the production of innovative buildings. For inquiring this argument, this paper investigates the development of this project from its conception to construction with a double goal: to uncover the relationship between analogical and digital processes, and to understand the architects' role in a geographically distributed workflow, which involved the use of computational design and robotic fabrication technologies. To support this examination, the authors designed and fabricated a 1:3 scale prototype of part of the Pavilion, which also served to check and reflect on the technological evolution since then, which is setting different conditions for design development and collaboration.bstract here by clicking this paragraph.
keywords Serpentine Gallery Pavilion; Computational Design; Digital Fabrication; Wooden Construction; Architectural Representation;
series eCAADe
email jsousa@arq.up.pt
last changed 2017/09/13 13:13

_id sigradi2005_400
id sigradi2005_400
authors Ambach, Barbara
year 2005
title Diagraphics: an exposé of visual expression
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 400-404
summary This exposé introduces preparations for a publication based on what I have found to be a ‘missing link’ in the library of educational source materials. The skills necessary to record and interpret the complexity of the architectural design process are often illusive. The sophistication of computer modeling and graphics applications only adds to the dilemma of making clear and concise decisions about how to communicate the essence of one’s design intent. The publication will define and illustrate five Diagraphic models of analysis. Each offers ways of seeing and understanding the idiosyncrasies of recording the design process. Gestures, Traces, Pulls, Morphs and Transits exemplify specific modes of visual expression and integrate both their diagrammatic and graphic nature. The distinctive aspects of each model enable the student of architecture to choose appropriate and meaningful techniques for visual expression. The publication will also illustrate current and historically relevant examples of diagrammatic expression. These examples show how diagrams have been flexible over time in adapting to the needs of newly forming conceptual models, spatial analysis and belief systems.
series SIGRADI
email Ambachb@aol.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id caadria2005_a_7c_a
id caadria2005_a_7c_a
authors Anandan Karunakaran
year 2005
title Organisation of Pedestrian Movements: an Agent-Based Approach
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 305-313
summary Cities are becoming more complex in this digital era due to technological changes. Thinking of cities without such technological changes is equivalent to an embryonic state in the morphology of city growth, that is, the growth seems less advanced. So it is appropriate to think of the non digital city digitally. Urban design is one state which establishes the perfect relationship between the street, people and building. The relationship of the people with the building and street is becoming one of the key factors in architecture. It has been observed that the design of a city has been influenced by the pedestrian movement. Many cities prior to the industrial era were largely determined by the social interactions based on walking. Thus the pedestrians play a key role in the formation of the city. They are a very important component in any representation of transport movements. They generally terminate or initiate a chain of linked activities, and if observed carefully, a single pedestrian movement is meant to include various sub journeys from one location to another. In order to organize pedestrians, we need to understand the pedestrian movement system. Though there is a lot of development of urban models in this aspect, it is still in a nascent state in comparison with the digital advancement. Thus much research work is carried out which can be applied to any given environmental setting, and as a result urban designers can respond to the changing socio-cultural technologies.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id acadia05_104
id acadia05_104
authors Anders, Peter and Lonsing, Werner
year 2005
title AmbiViewer: A Tool for Creating Architectural Mixed Reality
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 104-113
summary This paper presents a new mixed reality system for architecture, AmbiViewer. The system employs digital video, onboard modeler and global positioning to merge physical and simulated entities on the screen. The system can be used to model projects on-site, and in view of the project environs. The paper also discusses the use of AmbiViewer in creating cybrids, compositions of virtual and material reality. The paper concludes with a description of a small project undertaken with AmbiViewer and its implications for cybrid architecture.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id acadia05_012
id acadia05_012
authors Anshuman, Sachin
year 2005
title Responsiveness and Social Expression; Seeking Human Embodiment in Intelligent Façades
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 12-23
summary This paper is based on a comparative analysis of some twenty-six intelligent building facades and sixteen large media-facades from a socio-psychological perspective. It is not difficult to observe how deployment of computational technologies have engendered new possibilities for architectural production to which surface-centeredness lies at that heart of spatial production during design, fabrication and envelope automation processes. While surfaces play a critical role in contemporary social production (information display, communication and interaction), it is important to understand how the relationships between augmented building surfaces and its subjects unfold. We target double-skin automated facades as a distinct field within building-services and automation industry, and discuss how the developments within this area are over-occupied with seamless climate control and energy efficiency themes, resulting into socially inert mechanical membranes. Our thesis is that at the core of the development of automated façade lies the industrial automation attitude that renders the eventual product socially less engaging and machinic. We illustrate examples of interactive media-façades to demonstrate how architects and interaction designers have used similar technology to turn building surfaces into socially engaging architectural elements. We seek opportunities to extend performative aspects of otherwise function driven double-skin façades for public expression, informal social engagement and context embodiment. Towards the end of the paper, we propose a conceptual model as a possible method to address the emergent issues. Through this paper we intend to bring forth emergent concerns to designing building membrane where technology and performance are addressed through a broader cultural position, establishing a continual dialogue between the surface, function and its larger human context.
series ACADIA
email sanshuman@hotmail.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id ascaad2006_paper25
id ascaad2006_paper25
authors Artopoulos, Giorgos; Stanislav Roudavski and Francois Penz
year 2006
title Adaptive Generative Patterns: design and construction of Prague Biennale pavilion
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper describes an experimental practice-based research project that considered design process, implementation and construction of a pavilion built to be part of the Performative Space section of the International Biennale of Contemporary Art, Prague 2005. The project was conceptualized as a time-bound performative situation with a parasite-like relationship to its host environment. Its design has emerged through an innovative iterative process that utilized digital simulative and procedural techniques and was formed in response to place-specific behavioral challenges. This paper presents the project as an in-depth case-study of digital methods in design, mass customization and unified methods of production. In particular, it considers the use of Voronoi patterns for production of structural elements providing detail on programming and construction techniques in relationship to design aspirations and practical constraints.
series ASCAAD
email fp12@cam.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia05_000
id acadia05_000
authors Ataman, Osman (Ed.)
year 2005
title Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies
source Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8, ISavannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, 259 p.
summary Recent developments in digital technologies and smart materials have created new opportunities and are suggesting significant changes in the way we design and build architecture. Traditionally, however, there has always been a gap between the new technologies and their applications into other areas. Even though, most technological innovations hold the promise to transform the building industry and the architecture within, and although, there have been some limited attempts in this area recently; to date architecture has failed to utilize the vast amount of accumulated technological knowledge and innovations to significantly transform the industry. Consequently, the applications of new technologies to architecture remain remote and inadequate. Although, there have been some adaptations in this area recently, the improvements in architecture reflect only incremental progress, not the significant discoveries needed to transform the industry.
series ACADIA
email oataman@uiuc.edu
more http://www.acadia.org
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id sigradi2005_190
id sigradi2005_190
authors Ataman, Osman
year 2005
title The digital architecture of tomorrow
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 190-193
summary This paper presents an ongoing research project about the development of the materials and fabrication techniques for a fundamentally new class of architectural composite. This type of composite, which is a representative example of an even broader class of smart architectural material, has the potential to change the design and function of an architectural structure or living environment. As of today, this kind of composite does not exist. Once completed, this will be the first technology on its own. We believe this study will lay the fundamental groundwork for a new paradigm in surface engineering that may be of considerable significance in architecture, building and construction industry, and materials science.
series SIGRADI
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ijac20053202
id ijac20053202
authors Ataman, Osman
year 2005
title Integrating Digital and Building Technologies: Towards a New Architectural Composite
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 2, 181-190
summary This paper presents an ongoing research project about the development of the materials and fabrication techniques for a fundamentally new class of architectural composite. This type of composite, which is a representative example of an even broader class of smart architectural material, has the potential to change the design and function of an architectural structure or living environment. As of today, this kind of composite does not exist. Once completed, this will be the first technology on its own. We believe this study will lay the fundamental groundwork for a new paradigm in surface engineering that may be of considerable significance in architecture, building and construction industry, and materials science.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

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