CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 545

_id acadia05_104
id acadia05_104
authors Anders, Peter and Lonsing, Werner
year 2005
title AmbiViewer: A Tool for Creating Architectural Mixed Reality
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 104-113
summary This paper presents a new mixed reality system for architecture, AmbiViewer. The system employs digital video, onboard modeler and global positioning to merge physical and simulated entities on the screen. The system can be used to model projects on-site, and in view of the project environs. The paper also discusses the use of AmbiViewer in creating cybrids, compositions of virtual and material reality. The paper concludes with a description of a small project undertaken with AmbiViewer and its implications for cybrid architecture.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id cf2011_p135
id cf2011_p135
authors Chen Rui, Irene; Schnabel Marc Aurel
year 2011
title Multi-touch - the future of design interaction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 557-572.
summary The next major revolution for design is to bring the natural user interaction into design activities. Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) brought a new approach that was more effective compared to their conventional predecessors. In recent years, Natural User Interfaces (NUI) have advanced user experiences and multi-touch and gesture technologies provide new opportunities for a variety of potential uses in design. Much attention has been paid to leverage in the design of interactive interfaces. The mouse input and desktop screen metaphors limit the information sharing for multiple users and also delayed the direct interaction for communication between each other. This paper proposes the innovative method by integrating game engine ‘Unity3D’ with multi-touch tangible interfaces. Unity3D provides a game development tool as part of its application package that has been designed to let users to focus on creating new games. However, it does not limit the usage of area to design additional game scenarios since the benefits of Unity3D is allowing users to build 3D environments with its customizable and easy to use editor, graphical pipelines to openGL (http://unity3d.com/, 2010 ). It creates Virtual Reality (VR) environments which can simulates places in the real world, as well as the virtual environments helping architects and designers to vividly represent their design concepts through 3D visualizations, and interactive media installations in a detailed multi-sensory experience. Stereoscopic displays advanced their spatial ability while solving issues to design e.g. urban spaces. The paper presents how a multi-touch tabletop can be used for these design collaboration and communication tasks. By using natural gestures, designers can now communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the same reference simultaneously using their own input simultaneously. Further studies showed that 3Dl forms are perceived and understood more readily through haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations than through visual representation alone (Gillet et al, 2005). Based on the authors’ framework presented at the last CAADFutures, the benefits of integrating 3D visualization and tactile sensory can be illustrated in this platform (Chen and Wang, 2009), For instance, more than one designer can manipulate the 3D geometry objects on tabletop directly and can communicate successfully their ideas freely without having to waiting for the next person response. It made the work more effective which increases the overall efficiency. Designers can also collect the real-time data by any change they make instantly. The possibilities of Uniy3D make designing very flexible and fun, it is deeply engaging and expressive. Furthermore, the unity3D is revolutionizing the game development industry, its breakthrough development platform for creating highly interactive 3D content on the web (http://unity3d.com/ , 2010) or similar to the interface of modern multimedia devices such as the iPhone, therefore it allows the designers to work remotely in a collaborative way to integrate the design process by using the individual mobile devices while interacting design in a common platform. In design activities, people create an external representation of a domain, often of their own ideas and understanding. This platform helps learners to make their ideas concrete and explicit, and once externalized, subsequently they reflect upon their work how well it sits the real situation. The paper demonstrates how this tabletop innovatively replaces the typical desktop metaphor. In summary, the paper addresses two major issues through samples of collaborative design: firstly presenting aspects of learners’ interactions with physical objects, whereby tangible interfaces enables them constructing expressive representations passively (Marshall, 2007), while focussing on other tasks; and secondly showing how this novel design tool allows designers to actively create constructions that might not be possible with conventional media.
keywords Multi-touch tabletop, Tangible User Interface
series CAAD Futures
email rui.chen@sydney.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id cdc2008_243
id cdc2008_243
authors Loukissas, Yanni
year 2008
title Keepers of the Geometry: Architects in a Culture of Simulation
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 243-244
summary “Why do we have to change? We’ve been building buildings for years without CATIA?” Roger Norfleet, a practicing architect in his thirties poses this question to Tim Quix, a generation older and an expert in CATIA, a computer-aided design tool developed by Dassault Systemes in the early 1980’s for use by aerospace engineers. It is 2005 and CATIA has just come into use at Paul Morris Associates, the thirty-person architecture firm where Norfleet works; he is struggling with what it will mean for him, for his firm, for his profession. Computer-aided design is about creativity, but also about jurisdiction, about who controls the design process. In Architecture: The Story of Practice, Architectural theorist Dana Cuff writes that each generation of architects is educated to understand what constitutes a creative act and who in the system of their profession is empowered to use it and at what time. Creativity is socially constructed and Norfleet is coming of age as an architect in a time of technological but also social transition. He must come to terms with the increasingly complex computeraided design tools that have changed both creativity and the rules by which it can operate. In today’s practices, architects use computer-aided design software to produce threedimensional geometric models. Sometimes they use off-the-shelf commercial software like CATIA, sometimes they customize this software through plug-ins and macros, sometimes they work with software that they have themselves programmed. And yet, conforming to Larson’s ideas that they claim the higher ground by identifying with art and not with science, contemporary architects do not often use the term “simulation.” Rather, they have held onto traditional terms such as “modeling” to describe the buzz of new activity with digital technology. But whether or not they use the term, simulation is creating new architectural identities and transforming relationships among a range of design collaborators: masters and apprentices, students and teachers, technical experts and virtuoso programmers. These days, constructing an identity as an architect requires that one define oneself in relation to simulation. Case studies, primarily from two architectural firms, illustrate the transformation of traditional relationships, in particular that of master and apprentice, and the emergence of new roles, including a new professional identity, “keeper of the geometry,” defined by the fusion of person and machine. Like any profession, architecture may be seen as a system in flux. However, with their new roles and relationships, architects are learning that the fight for professional jurisdiction is increasingly for jurisdiction over simulation. Computer-aided design is changing professional patterns of production in architecture, the very way in which professionals compete with each other by making new claims to knowledge. Even today, employees at Paul Morris squabble about the role that simulation software should play in the office. Among other things, they fight about the role it should play in promotion and firm hierarchy. They bicker about the selection of new simulation software, knowing that choosing software implies greater power for those who are expert in it. Architects and their collaborators are in a continual struggle to define the creative roles that can bring them professional acceptance and greater control over design. New technologies for computer-aided design do not change this reality, they become players in it.
email yanni@mit.edu
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id 2005_477
id 2005_477
authors Lonsing, Werner
year 2005
title Viewing Ambispace
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 477-482
summary AmbiSpace is introduced to describe the dual nature of composite image as perceived reception rather than claiming it as reality. AmbiViewer is the tool to create architectural composite images and is technically described as prototype.
keywords Ambispace, Design Methodology, 3D-Modeling, Animation, Visualization
series eCAADe
email lonsing@mac.com
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2011_p170
id cf2011_p170
authors Barros, Mário; Duarte José, Chaparro Bruno
year 2011
title Thonet Chairs Design Grammar: a Step Towards the Mass Customization of Furniture
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 181-200.
summary The paper presents the first phase of research currently under development that is focused on encoding Thonet design style into a generative design system using a shape grammar. The ultimate goal of the work is the design and production of customizable chairs using computer assisted tools, establishing a feasible practical model of the paradigm of mass customization (Davis, 1987). The current research step encompasses the following three steps: (1) codification of the rules describing Thonet design style into a shape grammar; (2) implementing the grammar into a computer tool as parametric design; and (3) rapid prototyping of customized chair designs within the style. Future phases will address the transformation of the Thonet’s grammar to create a new style and the production of real chair designs in this style using computer aided manufacturing. Beginning in the 1830’s, Austrian furniture designer Michael Thonet began experimenting with forming steam beech, in order to produce lighter furniture using fewer components, when compared with the standards of the time. Using the same construction principles and standardized elements, Thonet produced different chairs designs with a strong formal resemblance, creating his own design language. The kit assembly principle, the reduced number of elements, industrial efficiency, and the modular approach to furniture design as a system of interchangeable elements that may be used to assemble different objects enable him to become a pioneer of mass production (Noblet, 1993). The most paradigmatic example of the described vision of furniture design is the chair No. 14 produced in 1858, composed of six structural elements. Due to its simplicity, lightness, ability to be stored in flat and cubic packaging for individual of collective transportation, respectively, No. 14 became one of the most sold chairs worldwide, and it is still in production nowadays. Iconic examples of mass production are formally studied to provide insights to mass customization studies. The study of the shape grammar for the generation of Thonet chairs aimed to ensure rules that would make possible the reproduction of the selected corpus, as well as allow for the generation of new chairs within the developed grammar. Due to the wide variety of Thonet chairs, six chairs were randomly chosen to infer the grammar and then this was fine tuned by checking whether it could account for the generation of other designs not in the original corpus. Shape grammars (Stiny and Gips, 1972) have been used with sucesss both in the analysis as in the synthesis of designs at different scales, from product design to building and urban design. In particular, the use of shape grammars has been efficient in the characterization of objects’ styles and in the generation of new designs within the analyzed style, and it makes design rules amenable to computers implementation (Duarte, 2005). The literature includes one other example of a grammar for chair design by Knight (1980). In the second step of the current research phase, the outlined shape grammar was implemented into a computer program, to assist the designer in conceiving and producing customized chairs using a digital design process. This implementation was developed in Catia by converting the grammar into an equivalent parametric design model. In the third phase, physical models of existing and new chair designs were produced using rapid prototyping. The paper describes the grammar, its computer implementation as a parametric model, and the rapid prototyping of physical models. The generative potential of the proposed digital process is discussed in the context of enabling the mass customization of furniture. The role of the furniture designer in the new paradigm and ideas for further work also are discussed.
keywords Thonet; furniture design; chair; digital design process; parametric design; shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email m.barros@ipt.pt
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 2005_665
id 2005_665
authors Brito, Tiago, Fonseca, Manuel J. and Jorge, Joaquim A.
year 2005
title DecoSketch – Towards Calligraphic Approaches to Interior Design
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 665-670
summary Computer-Aided Design tools have long played an important role in architecture design. However, we need to go beyond direct manipulation to devise new tools that will expedite the interior design and decoration. Indeed, conventional CAD systems, while providing ever increasing functionality, do not provide equal support to the drafting and drawing tasks. This makes even the simplest drawings a complicated endeavor. Draftspeople struggle with different concepts that those learnt from their earlier days in school and have to think long and hard to translate familiar sequences of operations to commands which require navigating a dense jungle of menus. The term calligraphic interfaces was coined by us to designate a large family of applications organized around the drawing paradigm, using a digital stylus and a tablet-and-screen combination as seen most recently in Tablet PCs®. Using these, users can enter drawings in a natural manner, largely evocative of drafting techniques that were perfected for pencil-and-paper media. This paper presents a simple calligraphic interface to explore interior design literally from the ground up. The Decosketch application is a modeling and visualization tool structured around 2 _D architectural plants. Its purpose is to help architects or customers easily creating and navigating through house designs starting from the floorplan and moving to their three-dimensional representation. Moreover, both 2D and 3D representations can be independently edited, providing a natural interface that tries to adhere to well-known representations and idioms used by architects when drafting using pencil and paper.
series eCAADe
email jorgej@acm.org
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id ascaad2012_003
id ascaad2012_003
authors Elseragy, Ahmed
year 2012
title Creative Design Between Representation and Simulation
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 11-12
summary Milestone figures of architecture all have their different views on what comes first, form or function. They also vary in their definitions of creativity. Apparently, creativity is very strongly related to ideas and how they can be generated. It is also correlated with the process of thinking and developing. Creative products, whether architectural or otherwise, and whether tangible or intangible, are originated from ‘good ideas’ (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). On one hand, not any idea, or any good idea, can be considered creative but, on the other hand, any creative result can be traced back to a good idea that initiated it in the beginning (Goldschmit and Tatsa, 2005). Creativity in literature, music and other forms of art is immeasurable and unbounded by constraints of physical reality. Musicians, painters and sculptors do not create within tight restrictions. They create what becomes their own mind’s intellectual property, and viewers or listeners are free to interpret these creations from whichever angle they choose. However, this is not the case with architects, whose creations and creative products are always bound with different physical constraints that may be related to the building location, social and cultural values related to the context, environmental performance and energy efficiency, and many more (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). Remarkably, over the last three decades computers have dominated in almost all areas of design, taking over the burden of repetitive tasks so that the designers and students can focus on the act of creation. Computer aided design has been used for a long time as a tool of drafting, however in this last decade this tool of representation is being replaced by simulation in different areas such as simulation of form, function and environment. Thus, the crafting of objects is moving towards the generation of forms and integrated systems through designer-authored computational processes. The emergence and adoption of computational technologies has significantly changed design and design education beyond the replacement of drawing boards with computers or pens and paper with computer-aided design (CAD) computer-aided engineering (CAE) applications. This paper highlights the influence of the evolving transformation from Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) and how this presents a profound shift in creative design thinking and education. Computational-based design and simulation represent new tools that encourage designers and artists to continue progression of novel modes of design thinking and creativity for the 21st century designers. Today computational design calls for new ideas that will transcend conventional boundaries and support creative insights through design and into design. However, it is still believed that in architecture education one should not replace the design process and creative thinking at early stages by software tools that shape both process and final product which may become a limitation for creative designs to adapt to the decisions and metaphors chosen by the simulation tool. This paper explores the development of Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) Tools and their impact on contemporary design education and creative design.
series ASCAAD
email ahmed.elseragy@aast.edu
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_003.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id caadria2005_b_5c_f
id caadria2005_b_5c_f
authors Jumphon Lertlakkhanakul, Ilju Lee, Miyun Kim, Jin Won Choi
year 2005
title Using the Mobile Augmented Reality Techniques for Construction Management
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 396-403
summary In this paper we attempt to develop a new system called “C-Navi” for construction site simulation and management system. By integrating AR technology with mobile computing, the new system will extend the abilities of AR systems to be implemented in large outdoor space. The concept of 4D CAD system is utilized by integrating related information and displaying them in the time-based visualization approach. Our system could help with decision making and also act as a tool for improved communications between project partners.
series CAADRIA
email jumphon@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id caadria2005_a_7c_f
id caadria2005_a_7c_f
authors M.N.H. Siddique, Qazi A. Mowla, Mohammad A. Al Masum
year 2005
title VIRTUALITY IN ARCHITECTURE: A DESIGN METAPHOR
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 342-350
summary Traditionally, architecture in its design process employs physical matter, requires physical presence and relies on real world environment using conventional methods of 2D depictions such as paper and pen or 3D representations such as physical models and communicates design ideas in verbal or text-based form. The conventional design process, for example an interior design, a residential house, a commercial complex or even urban design projects, follows the same hierarchy of activities. Efforts are made to the satisfaction of both parties to give the ideas of a physical shape through sketches, drafts and models which may take weeks even months. Finally the project gets its final shape in a working drawing, 3D visualisation or model making. This process is time consuming and somewhat redundant. In recent years technology has offered architects a new tool - the virtual environment. Architects use virtual environment increasingly as device of communication and presentation of design intensions. Virtual environment enables users to interact in real-time with design but unfortunately have not been used widely in the process of design development. The aim of this paper is to investigates the relationship between present design process and the emerging technology of virtual reality, establish a relationship between the two and its influence on architecture to form a new translated design process and communication, an interface between architect and client.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email NH.Siddique@ulster.ac.uk, qamawla@arch.buet.ac.bd, aalmasum@ntlworld.com
last changed 2005/04/30 01:46

_id cf2005_1_35_162
id cf2005_1_35_162
authors PALMON Orit, OXMAN Rivka, SHAHAR Meir and WEISS Patrice L.
year 2005
title Virtual Environments in Design and Evaluation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 145-154
summary One of the major challenges facing the professionals involved in the home modification process is to succeed in adapting the environments in a way that enables an optimal fit between the individual and the setting in which he or she operates. The challenge originates primarily from the fundamental characteristic of design - one can see and test the final result of home modifications only after they have been completed. The goal of this study was to address this problem by developing and evaluating an interactive living environments model, HabiTest, which will facilitate the planning, design and assessment of optimal home and work settings for people with physical disabilities. This paper describes the HabiTest tool, an interactive model that has been implemented via an immersive virtual reality system which displays three-dimensional renderings of specific environments, and which responds to user-driven manipulations such as navigation within the environment and alteration of its design. Initial results of a usability evaluation of this interactive environment by users are described.
keywords accessibility, environmental-modifications, 3D simulation, barrier-free design
series CAAD Futures
email rivkao@tx.technion.ac.il
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id 2005_357
id 2005_357
authors Pita, Javier
year 2005
title Analogous Models and Architecture
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 357-364
summary Among the many possible ways of classifying the concept of “modelling”, Maldonado refers to “homologies” when structure but not shape and function are similar; “analogies” when structure and function are similar, but not shape; and “isomorphisms” when structure and shape are similar, but function may or may not be similar. Traditional artistic representation would basically fall into the category of isomorphisms, whilst analogous models are to be found mainly in activities such as magic, play or industry. Other ways of representing reality, such as architectural models or drawings, are also traditionally regarded as isomorphisms. In the course of the last century, this panorama has been altered somewhat by the post-industrial or second industrial revolution in computing and communications. Using mathematical algorithms, the computing tool has an enormous capacity to describe things of extremely diverse nature: from the shape of everyday objects to relatively complex human behaviours, these can all be described using the common language of bits. Alongside developments in computing, the world of communications has been providing us with increasingly advanced means of transmitting information, including sophisticated systems capable of emulating our own perceptions. This paper is intended as a contribution to the theoretical debate conducted over recent years on the considerable shift that has occurred in architectural representation techniques. The analysis that follows highlights a two-fold change in traditional representation techniques: on the one hand, a change in the nature of the model (as is discussed in this paper); and on the other, a modification of the interfaces or communication and perception mechanisms of the model. The conjunction of these two factors has led to the emergence of representation modes that can no longer be regarded simply as isomorphisms of reality. Insofar as virtual spaces have the capacity for us to move, to interact, in short to inhabit them, they should be regarded as “analogous models” of architectural space. In other words, there has been a shift away from representation modes based on illusion in favour of those based on simulation.
keywords Representation, Models, Virtual Space, Virtual Reality
series eCAADe
email jpita@infonegocio.com
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_1_32_69
id cf2005_1_32_69
authors TAHRANI Souha, JALLOULI Jihen, MOREAU Guillaume and WOLOSZYN Philippe
year 2005
title Towards a Virtual Reality Tool for Lighting Communication and Analysis in Urban Environments
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 115-124
summary The objective of this paper is to evaluate the use of virtual reality as a potential decision-making tool to cognitively evaluate urban daylighting ambiences. This paper evaluates the solar effects visual perception in a real urban path in comparison to a virtual urban path in order to extract the characteristics of these effects and use them to figure out the necessary conditions for generating a physical and sensitive phenomena simulation. The comparison is based on questionnaires and interviews with participants on their judgements on sunlight during their walk through the chosen path. Our results highlight the relation between perception and the context of the urban environment, and prove that -in spite of its limits- virtual reality is able to simulate a large part of real solar effects.
keywords virtual reality, 3D city modelling, environmental simulation, visual perception
series CAAD Futures
email souha.tahrani@cerma.archi.fr
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id ijac20053106
id ijac20053106
authors özener, Ozan önder; Akleman, Ergun; Srinivasan, Vinod
year 2005
title Interactive Rind Modeling for Architectural Design
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 1, 93-106
summary The paper presents a new modeling technique for architectural design. Rind modeling provides for the easy creation of surfaces resembling peeled and punctured rinds. We show how the method's two main steps of creation of a shell or crust and then opening holes in the crust by punching or peeling can be encapsulated into a real time semi-automatic interactive algorithm.The rind modeling method allows us to develop a user-friendly tool for designers and architects. The new tool extends the abilities of polygonal modeling and allows designers to work on structured and consistent models for architectural design purposes. Rind modeling gives architects and designers a processing flexibility. It can be used in conceptual modeling during the early design phase. It can also be efficiently used for creating variety of shell structures for architectural design.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2005_a_7b_a
id caadria2005_a_7b_a
authors Abdullah, A.Q.M. ; Md. Emran Hossain, Md. Shabab Habib Khan
year 2005
title Digital Perception, Development and Presentation in Architecture: a study of Bangladesh with global context
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 255-267
summary In the recent past the computer has become an important tool in both the design and presentation media/method in architecture. In this paper digitalization in architectural practice and architectural education in both the global and Bangladesh contexts have been studied. A survey questionnaire was carried out to find how and to what extent available software are being used in Bangladesh for this purpose. Opinion, views, expectations of architects from leading architectural firms of Bangladesh were studied to understand the future prospect of this field in Bangladesh.
series CAADRIA
email abdullah@bracuniversity.ac.bd, emran@bracuniversity.ac.bd, jitul@vfemail.net
last changed 2007/07/23 05:08

_id ijac20053201
id ijac20053201
authors Aitcheson, Robert; Friedman, Jonathan; Seebohm, Thomas
year 2005
title 3-Axis CNC Milling in Architectural Design
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 2, 161-180
summary Physical scale models still have a role in architectural design. 3-axis CNC milling provides one way of making scale models both for study purposes and for presentation in durable materials such as wood. We present some types of scale models, the methods for creating them and the place in the design process that scale models occupy. We provide an overview of CNC milling procedures and issues and we describe the process of how one can creatively develop appropriate methods for milling different types of scale models and materials. Two case studies are presented with which we hope to convey not only the range of possible models that can be machined but also the way one creatively explores to arrive at appropriate milling strategies. Where apposite, we compare 3-axis CNC milling to newer technologies used for rapid prototyping but rapid prototyping is not a primary focus.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2005_729
id 2005_729
authors Asanowicz, Alexander
year 2005
title Computer Renderings – „Reality is Overrated”
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 729-735
summary In this paper, two problems concerning truthfulness of computer-generated visualization are considered. The first one concerns relationships between reality and its representation by computer renderings. The second problem concerns the kind of representations people need. These problems are analyzed for static perception of architectural forms based on computer visualization, and for dynamic walk-through perception of urban space. The thesis of the paper is that many photorealistic renderings are excessively realistic and thus not true. In this context, a new question arises: do we need the true representation of an object? The author claims that we need “adequate” pictures. Adequate means a picture that is satisfactory in particular situation. The problem of equivalence of media (renderings and animations) and reality is not that important here. Much research is concerned with the truthfulness and falsity of information. However, they do not take into consideration that frequently what seems to be real exerts bigger influence on people than what is in fact real. Understanding this problem may help us in producing images that better correspond to people’s expectations.
keywords Perception, Rendering, Non-Photorealistic Rendering
series eCAADe
email asan@pb.bialystok.pl
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_131
id 2005_131
authors Bailey, Rohan
year 2005
title Digital Tools for Design Learning
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 131-138
summary There is growing consensus among architectural critics and educators that there exists an increasing divide between the worlds of architectural education and practice. New social and cultural norms, new materials, and current global concerns, like sustainability, have largely influenced the need for an improved balance/integration between design theory and practice. This places schools of architecture around the world under pressure to provide their graduates with the requisite skills that support responsible design characterized by good design thinking strategies. The Caribbean School of Architecture, in addition to being affected by this predicament, has other pressures on its educational offerings. The region’s lack of resources and particular social issues mandates that graduates of the school adopt a responsible attitude towards design in the region. A positive attitude to such issues as sustainability, energy conservation and community will only come about through an effective transmission of particular architectural knowledge that is relevant to the region. The challenge (globally and in the Caribbean), therefore, is the provision of an innovative and effective way of supporting the student master dialogue in studio, facilitating the transfer of “practical, appropriate knowledge” needed by students to create safe, purposeful and responsible architecture. This paper exists within the research paradigm of providing digital teaching tools to beginning students of architecture. This digital research paradigm seeks to move digital technology (the computer) beyond functioning as an instrumental tool (in visualization, representation and fabrication) to becoming a “Socratic machine” that provides an appropriate environment for design learning. Research funds have been allocated to the author to research and develop the information component of the tool with special reference to the Caribbean. The paper will report on the results of prior investigations, describe the reaction and appreciation of the students and conclude with lessons learnt for the further development of the teaching tool.
keywords Design Education, Digital Design, Teaching Tools
series eCAADe
email rbailey@utech.edu.jm
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_163
id 2005_163
authors Balakrishnan, Bimal, Kalisperis, Loukas N. and Muramoto, Katsuhiko
year 2005
title Evaluating Workflow and Modeling Strategies of Pen Computing in the Beginning Architectural Design Studio
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 163-170
summary This paper investigates the impact of Tablet PCs on the workflow in an undergraduate design studio. We examined how well the students adapted the Tablet PC into their day-to-day design work and evaluated the appropriateness of the Tablet PC as a common digital tool used in an architectural design studio. This research involved observation of student behavior during the semester and the conducting of a survey measuring various aspects of the students’ use of the computers. A more specific goal was to compare the effectiveness of the pen versus the mouse as input devices for a three-dimensional modeling task in terms of both task time and strategies. Our assumption was that a change in input mode would affect the strategies and the performance. The results of a within-subjects, repeated-measures experiment carried out to elicit differences in input devices are discussed.
keywords Digital Design Education; Human-Computer Interaction; 3D Modeling; Pen Computing; Task Analysis
series eCAADe
email lnk@psu.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_1_73_113
id cf2005_1_73_113
authors BARRIOS Carlos
year 2005
title Transformations on Parametric Design Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 393-400
summary This paper presents a research in progress in the development of parametric models for generation of complex shapes, and introduces a methodology for exploration of possible designs generated from a single model. The research presents a case study on the designs of the Spanish architect Antonio Gaudi, and takes on the fundamental rules of form generation of the lateral nave columns of the Sagrada Familia temple in Barcelona. A parameterization schema is presented as a fundamental tool for design exploration, which allows the reproduction of the original shapes designed by Gaudi, and the generation of a large set of new designs.
keywords parametric modeling, parametric design, design transformations
series CAAD Futures
email cabeto@mit.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id cf2005_1_36_100
id cf2005_1_36_100
authors BILDA Zafer and GERO John S.
year 2005
title Do We Need CAD during Conceptual Design?
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 155-164
summary This paper presents the results of experiments to test whether a designer necessarily needs to produce and utilize external representations in the very early phases of conceptual design. Three architects are engaged in two separate design processes, one is the experiment condition where they were not allowed sketch, and the other, the control condition where they were allowed to sketch. In the experiment condition, architects were required to put on a blindfold and think aloud while designing. The results show that in both conditions the design outcomes fit in the given dimensions of the site, accommodate the space requirements and allow an effective use for the clients. Thus, when the participants were blindfolded, they were able to produce designs by using their cognitive resources to create and hold an internal representation of the design rather than by sketching, or using a CAD tool. We finally raise the question: do architects need CAD representations during the conceptual phase of the design activity?
keywords representations, protocol studies, conceptual design
series CAAD Futures
email zafer@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

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