CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 543

_id sigradi2005_108
id sigradi2005_108
authors Martens, Bob; Martijn Stellingwerff
year 2005
title Creating Physical Models Using Virtual Reconstructions: Mixed CAM-techniques for a Viennese Synagogue Scale-model
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 108-113
summary In the framework of a preceding SiGraDi-conference the virtual reconstruction work of Viennese Synagogues was elaborated. The focus of this continued research project is laid on historic/reconstructive modeling, which has specific requirements towards the modeling and subsequent production of scale models. In this paper, the prerequisites of 3D-printing and lasercutting technology for model making will be presented. This includes aspects of scale and handling of individual building elements regarding the possibilities and limitations for each specific CAM-technique. Compared to the rendering models, the modeling procedures for scale-model fabrication had to be adjusted. For example, certain dimensions for details and the structural strength of 3D-printed parts have to be taken into account. Due to economical and constructional reasons as well the printing time involved, a scale-model should be created by means of mixed CAM-techniques; building components have to be split up and assigned accordingly.
keywords Virtual heritage, Rapid Prototyping, 3D-printing (3DP), Lasercutting
series SIGRADI
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id 791f
id 791f
authors Stellingwerff, M. C.
year 2005
title VIRTUAL CONTEXT - INVESTIGATING THE CHARACTERISTICS AND OPPORTUNITIES OF DIGITAL VISUALISATION MEDIA FOR SITUATED APPROACHES TO ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IN AN URBAN ENVIRONMENT
source Delft University Press
summary This research initiative addresses the issue of Design in relation to Virtual Context.

Central to this study are the innovative potentials and instrumental opportunities of computer based media techniques, capable of generating interactive models and changing perspectives for the benefit of urban and architectural design.

The ambition was to not only make a contribution to the existing body of knowledge concerning digital technologies and their applications, but explore theoretical conditions which might help define and stimulate further study.

From the outset, the focus was on furthering the opportunities for computer based representation media in creative design. On the basis of a series of explorative studies the subject of this research was targeted: the issue of Design in Context, or more specifically: Design(ing) in a Virtual Context.

During the process there was a marked shift in the conception of the subject from – more or less immersive – VR technologies in the direction of approaches which might be expected to become readily available in practice and education and could be effective in actual design processes. This insight also brought about a shift in emphasis from realism per-se towards creating a sense of situatedness.

The design representation system which was developed was intended to not just allow for one type of model view, but to afford an array of different views, from which the designer would be able to choose freely, depending on the phase and focus of design as well as personal preferences. A series of interface prototypes and support tools were developed especially and successively tested experimentally. 

For the intended final design driven experimental study, different virtual context models were considered. Eventually, an integral –  purely fictitious – design ‘environment’ was constructed in the computer, so that the workings of the proposed system and its components would be tested systematically.

A conscious choice was made for an in depth study, on a relatively modest scale, which would a certain amount of mutual involvement between designer and researcher, to confront the participants with the finer aspects of the proposed system in a relatively short time and to gather detailed data. A half dozen design professionals were invited to participate in a closely monitored experimental exercise.

The results of this study therefore do not offer straightforward, indisputable facts, to be considered representative for the design community as a whole, but indicate that the working methods of the individual designers – when discovering aspects of the site, developing and presenting proposals and reflecting on the qualities of represented designs – tend to vary considerably. For this reason the interactive representation system proved to be of value. Participants could express different view preferences, with more or less realistic image modes being used in different phases of their design developments, with varying experiences of situatedness. Some of the design professionals participants were very appreciative of the system’s opportunities, others tended to be more ‘set in their ways’.

The results of this experimental study indicate that there may particularly be opportunities for interface applications which are able to function interactively, offering individual designers –  as well as others involved in evaluating design proposals – a variety of tools with which to approach specific design artefacts in their changing contexts. Virtual models can play not only an important role as a ‘reminder’ for the designer but also to other parties playing an active role in the design and implementation processes. Interactive environment models are not only promising as exploration tools for existing sites, but could be valuable to test the impact of a design on its location. This could be especially interesting if the site is difficult or impossible to visit or as yet a virtual construction. In addition such an approach might be beneficial for objective comparison and evaluation of design proposals in competitions and in education as well as in on-line collaborative design projects where the context is still in the process of being developed.  

series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email m.c.stellingwerff@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://www.bk.tudelft.nl/users/stelling/internet/
last changed 2005/03/02 21:40

_id acadia05_104
id acadia05_104
authors Anders, Peter and Lonsing, Werner
year 2005
title AmbiViewer: A Tool for Creating Architectural Mixed Reality
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 104-113
summary This paper presents a new mixed reality system for architecture, AmbiViewer. The system employs digital video, onboard modeler and global positioning to merge physical and simulated entities on the screen. The system can be used to model projects on-site, and in view of the project environs. The paper also discusses the use of AmbiViewer in creating cybrids, compositions of virtual and material reality. The paper concludes with a description of a small project undertaken with AmbiViewer and its implications for cybrid architecture.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id cf2011_p170
id cf2011_p170
authors Barros, Mário; Duarte José, Chaparro Bruno
year 2011
title Thonet Chairs Design Grammar: a Step Towards the Mass Customization of Furniture
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 181-200.
summary The paper presents the first phase of research currently under development that is focused on encoding Thonet design style into a generative design system using a shape grammar. The ultimate goal of the work is the design and production of customizable chairs using computer assisted tools, establishing a feasible practical model of the paradigm of mass customization (Davis, 1987). The current research step encompasses the following three steps: (1) codification of the rules describing Thonet design style into a shape grammar; (2) implementing the grammar into a computer tool as parametric design; and (3) rapid prototyping of customized chair designs within the style. Future phases will address the transformation of the Thonet’s grammar to create a new style and the production of real chair designs in this style using computer aided manufacturing. Beginning in the 1830’s, Austrian furniture designer Michael Thonet began experimenting with forming steam beech, in order to produce lighter furniture using fewer components, when compared with the standards of the time. Using the same construction principles and standardized elements, Thonet produced different chairs designs with a strong formal resemblance, creating his own design language. The kit assembly principle, the reduced number of elements, industrial efficiency, and the modular approach to furniture design as a system of interchangeable elements that may be used to assemble different objects enable him to become a pioneer of mass production (Noblet, 1993). The most paradigmatic example of the described vision of furniture design is the chair No. 14 produced in 1858, composed of six structural elements. Due to its simplicity, lightness, ability to be stored in flat and cubic packaging for individual of collective transportation, respectively, No. 14 became one of the most sold chairs worldwide, and it is still in production nowadays. Iconic examples of mass production are formally studied to provide insights to mass customization studies. The study of the shape grammar for the generation of Thonet chairs aimed to ensure rules that would make possible the reproduction of the selected corpus, as well as allow for the generation of new chairs within the developed grammar. Due to the wide variety of Thonet chairs, six chairs were randomly chosen to infer the grammar and then this was fine tuned by checking whether it could account for the generation of other designs not in the original corpus. Shape grammars (Stiny and Gips, 1972) have been used with sucesss both in the analysis as in the synthesis of designs at different scales, from product design to building and urban design. In particular, the use of shape grammars has been efficient in the characterization of objects’ styles and in the generation of new designs within the analyzed style, and it makes design rules amenable to computers implementation (Duarte, 2005). The literature includes one other example of a grammar for chair design by Knight (1980). In the second step of the current research phase, the outlined shape grammar was implemented into a computer program, to assist the designer in conceiving and producing customized chairs using a digital design process. This implementation was developed in Catia by converting the grammar into an equivalent parametric design model. In the third phase, physical models of existing and new chair designs were produced using rapid prototyping. The paper describes the grammar, its computer implementation as a parametric model, and the rapid prototyping of physical models. The generative potential of the proposed digital process is discussed in the context of enabling the mass customization of furniture. The role of the furniture designer in the new paradigm and ideas for further work also are discussed.
keywords Thonet; furniture design; chair; digital design process; parametric design; shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email m.barros@ipt.pt
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id sigradi2205_725
id sigradi2205_725
authors Haque, Mohammed E.
year 2005
title DESKTOP VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS IN CONSTRUCTION EDUCATION
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 725-730
summary In construction science, classroom oriented education remains the preferred mode of teaching. Alternative methods such as field trips, use of 3D drawings, and physical models often supplement and enhance the understanding of students. In addition to the risks involved with field trips, designated sites may not be at the particular stage of construction during the academic semester, or the construction sequence may not be fast enough to demonstrate the multiple facets during field visits. Considerable pedagogical advantages can be achieved by the integration of IT and visualization tools in teaching construction engineering/technology. The objective of this research was to develop a desktop virtual environment using 3D, animations, virtual reality and walkthrough of construction processes of steel, concrete, and lightwood structures. These visualization techniques can be valuable aids not only in teaching in the classroom but also an effective self-directed tool for open learning via the web.
series SIGRADI
type normal paper
email mhaque@tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id caadria2005_a_7c_f
id caadria2005_a_7c_f
authors M.N.H. Siddique, Qazi A. Mowla, Mohammad A. Al Masum
year 2005
title VIRTUALITY IN ARCHITECTURE: A DESIGN METAPHOR
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 342-350
summary Traditionally, architecture in its design process employs physical matter, requires physical presence and relies on real world environment using conventional methods of 2D depictions such as paper and pen or 3D representations such as physical models and communicates design ideas in verbal or text-based form. The conventional design process, for example an interior design, a residential house, a commercial complex or even urban design projects, follows the same hierarchy of activities. Efforts are made to the satisfaction of both parties to give the ideas of a physical shape through sketches, drafts and models which may take weeks even months. Finally the project gets its final shape in a working drawing, 3D visualisation or model making. This process is time consuming and somewhat redundant. In recent years technology has offered architects a new tool - the virtual environment. Architects use virtual environment increasingly as device of communication and presentation of design intensions. Virtual environment enables users to interact in real-time with design but unfortunately have not been used widely in the process of design development. The aim of this paper is to investigates the relationship between present design process and the emerging technology of virtual reality, establish a relationship between the two and its influence on architecture to form a new translated design process and communication, an interface between architect and client.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email NH.Siddique@ulster.ac.uk, qamawla@arch.buet.ac.bd, aalmasum@ntlworld.com
last changed 2005/04/30 01:46

_id 2005_357
id 2005_357
authors Pita, Javier
year 2005
title Analogous Models and Architecture
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 357-364
summary Among the many possible ways of classifying the concept of “modelling”, Maldonado refers to “homologies” when structure but not shape and function are similar; “analogies” when structure and function are similar, but not shape; and “isomorphisms” when structure and shape are similar, but function may or may not be similar. Traditional artistic representation would basically fall into the category of isomorphisms, whilst analogous models are to be found mainly in activities such as magic, play or industry. Other ways of representing reality, such as architectural models or drawings, are also traditionally regarded as isomorphisms. In the course of the last century, this panorama has been altered somewhat by the post-industrial or second industrial revolution in computing and communications. Using mathematical algorithms, the computing tool has an enormous capacity to describe things of extremely diverse nature: from the shape of everyday objects to relatively complex human behaviours, these can all be described using the common language of bits. Alongside developments in computing, the world of communications has been providing us with increasingly advanced means of transmitting information, including sophisticated systems capable of emulating our own perceptions. This paper is intended as a contribution to the theoretical debate conducted over recent years on the considerable shift that has occurred in architectural representation techniques. The analysis that follows highlights a two-fold change in traditional representation techniques: on the one hand, a change in the nature of the model (as is discussed in this paper); and on the other, a modification of the interfaces or communication and perception mechanisms of the model. The conjunction of these two factors has led to the emergence of representation modes that can no longer be regarded simply as isomorphisms of reality. Insofar as virtual spaces have the capacity for us to move, to interact, in short to inhabit them, they should be regarded as “analogous models” of architectural space. In other words, there has been a shift away from representation modes based on illusion in favour of those based on simulation.
keywords Representation, Models, Virtual Space, Virtual Reality
series eCAADe
email jpita@infonegocio.com
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2006_566
id 2006_566
authors Rafi, Ahmad; Mohamad Izani Zainal Abidin; Avijit Paul and Aishah Abdul Razak
year 2006
title Simulation of architectural lighting in a virtual environment - A case study on real and fake High Dynamic Range Images (HDRI)
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 566-572
summary The early findings of this research were presented in eCAADe 2005 International Conference, Lisbon primarily to highlight the concept of High Dynamic Range Images (HDRI) when representing architectural spaces in the form of still images. An experiment had been carried out to compare the results between HDRI rendering and ‘conventional’ lighting simulation algorithms namely ray tracing and radiosity. The results were based on static and using the same exposure factors, when capturing HDRI. This project, funded by Intensification Research Priority Area (IRPA) grant continues to present and report HDRI results in a simulation environment. In this paper, we first briefly explain on the concept of real and fake HDRI. Then a comparison experiment is conducted to compare these two methods and discuss the impact and effectiveness of the illumination computation in architectural simulation environment. In order to carry out the experiment, a few models of the architectural scenes were developed. These models were then textured with real photos and manipulated with ‘shaders’, and further rendered using fake and real HDRI techniques. As for the fake HDRI, two methods were developed. The first was using an image as the ambient map and different exposures were created by increasing the value of Hue, V of HSV and saturation. The second involved a series of digital photos with the selection of the brightest and darkest area using Adobe Photoshop to establish the scale of luminosity. A few camera movements were triggered and position for ‘real-time’ rendering simulation. The result of the experiment has shown a significant improvement on the rendering time and quality of the rendering. Finally this paper suggests the selection criteria for choosing real and fake HDRI, and how each technique can be best utilized for architectural representations in a simulation environment.
keywords HDRI; simulation; Real HDRI;Fake HDRI; illumination computation
series eCAADe
email ahmadrafi.eshaq@mmu.edu.my
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2005_391
id 2005_391
authors Suneson, Kaj, Wernemyr, Claes, Westerdahl, Börje and Allwood, Carl Martin
year 2005
title The Effect of Stereovision on the Experience of VR Models of the External Surroundings and the Interior of a Building
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 391-398
summary Virtual reality offers considerable promise with regard to facilitating the building process. A good example is the facilitation of communication between architects and building companies, sellers and buyers or between community planners and the general public. It is often thought that in order to utilise the potential of VR in, for example, the above-mentioned contexts, it is necessary to use fully fledged versions of VR, including stereovision and the possibility of controlling the VR show. However, if a model can also be presented on less advanced equipment and still interpreted in a way that is useful to the viewer it will be possible to distribute the model simply and effectively. This would make it easier to create a more democratic urban planning process compared with if specialised equipment needed to be used and special shows needed to be arranged. In this study we compared the experience of two VR models (a large indoor exhibition hall and an outdoor street in Gothenburg, Sweden) when presented with and without stereovision. When the experience was measured using the Semantic Environmental Scale (the SMB scale, developed by Küller, 1975, 1991), questions on the experience of presence and six other questions on the experience of the models, the results only revealed one indication that stereovision made a difference. This indication was the result for the SMB factor Enclosedness. Suggestions are presented for future research in this area.
keywords Design Process; Virtual Environments; Human-Computer Interaction; 3D City Modelling; Environmental Simulation
series eCAADe
email borge@chl.chalmers.se
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id ijac20053201
id ijac20053201
authors Aitcheson, Robert; Friedman, Jonathan; Seebohm, Thomas
year 2005
title 3-Axis CNC Milling in Architectural Design
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 2, 161-180
summary Physical scale models still have a role in architectural design. 3-axis CNC milling provides one way of making scale models both for study purposes and for presentation in durable materials such as wood. We present some types of scale models, the methods for creating them and the place in the design process that scale models occupy. We provide an overview of CNC milling procedures and issues and we describe the process of how one can creatively develop appropriate methods for milling different types of scale models and materials. Two case studies are presented with which we hope to convey not only the range of possible models that can be machined but also the way one creatively explores to arrive at appropriate milling strategies. Where apposite, we compare 3-axis CNC milling to newer technologies used for rapid prototyping but rapid prototyping is not a primary focus.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id cf2005_1_22_147
id cf2005_1_22_147
authors CHAN Chiu-Shui, DANG Anrong and TONG Ziyu
year 2005
title A 3D Model of the Inner City of Beijing
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 63-72
summary This study has two major concentrations: 1) exploring methods of creating a digital city model, and 2) applying the model to study urban spatial structure, an issue of particular interest and importance to urban planners. Based on existing studies that primarily address two-dimensional (2D) urban structure, this paper focuses on the three-dimensional (3D) structure relating to the 3D urban form. Given their greater clarity and possibilities for quantitative analysis, both 3D digital urban models and GIS spatial overlay analysis methods hold tremendous potential for analysing and predicting future urban form. In this project, the Xidan Business District in Beijing's Inner City was the area selected to implement the digital-city application. Under the hypothesis that the existing urban spatial structure is determined by the city's urban planning scheme and current urban marketing forces, it is found that actual urban development does not follow the planning restrictions on zoning and building height regulations. Some contradictions and conflicts, such as building location and height, appeared in the studied district. The specific reasons for the discrepancies need to be further studied.
keywords 3D city modeling, GIS, remote sensing, virtual environments
series CAAD Futures
email cschan@iastate.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id cf2011_p135
id cf2011_p135
authors Chen Rui, Irene; Schnabel Marc Aurel
year 2011
title Multi-touch - the future of design interaction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 557-572.
summary The next major revolution for design is to bring the natural user interaction into design activities. Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) brought a new approach that was more effective compared to their conventional predecessors. In recent years, Natural User Interfaces (NUI) have advanced user experiences and multi-touch and gesture technologies provide new opportunities for a variety of potential uses in design. Much attention has been paid to leverage in the design of interactive interfaces. The mouse input and desktop screen metaphors limit the information sharing for multiple users and also delayed the direct interaction for communication between each other. This paper proposes the innovative method by integrating game engine ‘Unity3D’ with multi-touch tangible interfaces. Unity3D provides a game development tool as part of its application package that has been designed to let users to focus on creating new games. However, it does not limit the usage of area to design additional game scenarios since the benefits of Unity3D is allowing users to build 3D environments with its customizable and easy to use editor, graphical pipelines to openGL (http://unity3d.com/, 2010 ). It creates Virtual Reality (VR) environments which can simulates places in the real world, as well as the virtual environments helping architects and designers to vividly represent their design concepts through 3D visualizations, and interactive media installations in a detailed multi-sensory experience. Stereoscopic displays advanced their spatial ability while solving issues to design e.g. urban spaces. The paper presents how a multi-touch tabletop can be used for these design collaboration and communication tasks. By using natural gestures, designers can now communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the same reference simultaneously using their own input simultaneously. Further studies showed that 3Dl forms are perceived and understood more readily through haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations than through visual representation alone (Gillet et al, 2005). Based on the authors’ framework presented at the last CAADFutures, the benefits of integrating 3D visualization and tactile sensory can be illustrated in this platform (Chen and Wang, 2009), For instance, more than one designer can manipulate the 3D geometry objects on tabletop directly and can communicate successfully their ideas freely without having to waiting for the next person response. It made the work more effective which increases the overall efficiency. Designers can also collect the real-time data by any change they make instantly. The possibilities of Uniy3D make designing very flexible and fun, it is deeply engaging and expressive. Furthermore, the unity3D is revolutionizing the game development industry, its breakthrough development platform for creating highly interactive 3D content on the web (http://unity3d.com/ , 2010) or similar to the interface of modern multimedia devices such as the iPhone, therefore it allows the designers to work remotely in a collaborative way to integrate the design process by using the individual mobile devices while interacting design in a common platform. In design activities, people create an external representation of a domain, often of their own ideas and understanding. This platform helps learners to make their ideas concrete and explicit, and once externalized, subsequently they reflect upon their work how well it sits the real situation. The paper demonstrates how this tabletop innovatively replaces the typical desktop metaphor. In summary, the paper addresses two major issues through samples of collaborative design: firstly presenting aspects of learners’ interactions with physical objects, whereby tangible interfaces enables them constructing expressive representations passively (Marshall, 2007), while focussing on other tasks; and secondly showing how this novel design tool allows designers to actively create constructions that might not be possible with conventional media.
keywords Multi-touch tabletop, Tangible User Interface
series CAAD Futures
email rui.chen@sydney.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id cf2005_1_52_176
id cf2005_1_52_176
authors GU Ning and MAHER Mary Lou
year 2005
title Dynamic Designs of 3D Virtual Worlds Using Generative Design Agents
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 239-248
summary 3D virtual worlds are networked environments designed using the metaphor of architecture. Recent developments in 3D virtual worlds focus on interactivity, flexibility and adaptability. Rather than creating virtual environments in which the objects have intelligent behaviours, our research takes a different approach to develop an agent model that is associated with an individual person in the 3D virtual world as a personal design agent. This paper presents a Generative Design Agent (GDA), a kind of rational agent capable of representing a person in a virtual world and designing, implementing and demolishing 3D virtual places based on the occupants' current needs in the virtual world. The core of a GDA's design component is a generative design grammar that is able to capture a style of 3D virtual worlds. 3D virtual worlds designed using the GDA model is another kind of architecture for the "moment".
keywords virtual environments, generative design, interactive design, shape grammars
series CAAD Futures
email ning@design-ning.net
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id 2005_427
id 2005_427
authors Jakovich, Joanne and Beilharz, Kirsty
year 2005
title Multimodal Spatial Emergence in the Design of Sensate Spaces
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 427-432
summary Design of reactive, intelligent and sensate spaces is a form of spatial design that demands creating thinking in terms of non-permanent, non-tactile and sometimes non-visual media. This implies spatial conceptualization using sensory modalities that are ordinarily of secondary importance to vision in design, such as proprioception and hearing. This paper explores these alternative modalities for both spatial perception and spatial expression with a view to developing innovative interfaces for spatial design. Computer games and installation art environments are analyzed for use of alternative spatial immersion techniques. This informs a physical spatial interaction environment. Motion-capture input and digital auditory output provide real-time, intuitive feedback to the user. Useful interaction strategies are acquired that can be used in a non-intrusive manner in sensate spaces for communal, commercial, or public contexts.
keywords Spatial Emergence; Multimodal Perception; Computer Games; Installation Art; Auditory Feedback
series eCAADe
email joanne@jakovich.net
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2005_097
id sigradi2005_097
authors Luhan, Gregory A.
year 2005
title At Full-Scale | From Installation to Inhabitation
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 97-102
summary In 1999, the University of Kentucky (then the College of Architecture, now the College of Design-School of Architecture) established a Digital Design Studio to combine the strong tradition of handcrafting in the existing design program with those technologically sophisticated tools shaping the profession for the 21st century. Over a six-year period, this all-digital design studio has developed from a pedagogical model for developing new different ways of seeing and making architecture to a proof-of-concept real-world experience to coalesce state-of-the-art visualization techniques with current expectations of practice. Creating dynamic links between students, industry, and the profession has enabled the School of Architecture to provide leadership for practicing architects, to create an effective dialogue between industrial and design professionals, and to incorporate successfully leading-edge design pedagogy with the more technological applications that will shape the future of architecture practice. The materials presented here reflect a sequence of comprehensive digital projects produced under my direction from 1999 through 2005.
series SIGRADI
email galuhan@uky.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id acadia05_170
id acadia05_170
authors Barker, Daniel and Dong, Andy
year 2005
title A Representation Language for a Prototype CAD Tool for Intelligent Rooms
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 170-183
summary Intelligent rooms are a type of intelligent environment which enhance ordinary activities within the confines of a room by responding to human interaction using pervasive and ubiquitous computing. In the design of intelligent rooms, the specification of how the intelligent room enacts intelligent behavior through computational means is as integral as the geometric description. The self-aware and context-aware capabilities of intelligent rooms extend the requirements for computer-aided design tools beyond 3D modeling of objects. This article presents a Hardware as Agents Description Language for Intelligent Rooms (HADLIR) to model hardware in an intelligent room as “hardware agents” having sensor and/or effector modalities with rules and goals. End-users describe intelligent room hardware as agents based on the HADLIR representation and write agent rules and goals in Jess for each hardware component. This HADLIR agent description and the requisite software sensors/effectors constitute “hardware agents” which are instantiated into a multi-agent society software environment. The society is then bridged to either a virtual environment to prototype the intelligent room or to microelectronic controllers to implement a physical intelligent room. The integration illustrates how the HADLIR representation assists in the design, simulation and implementation of an intelligent room and provides a foundation technology for CAD tools for the creation of intelligent rooms.
series ACADIA
email adon3656@mail.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id ijac20053104
id ijac20053104
authors Fischer, Thomas
year 2005
title Teaching Programming for and with Microcontroller-Enhanced Physical Models
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 1, 57-74
summary As processes of use, interaction and transformation take center stage in various fields of design, electronic sensors, controllers, displays and actuators can significantly enhance the value of physical models. These technologies allow the development of novel computer interfaces for new kinds of interaction with virtual models, and in the future they can be expected to play an important role in the development of new types of active building components and materials for automated construction and dynamic runtime adaptations of inhabitable environments. However, embedding programmed logic into physical objects involves skills outside the traditional domains of expertise of designers and model makers and confronts them with a steep learning curve. The wide variety of alternative technologies and development tools available in this area has a particularly disorienting effect on novices. However, some early experiences suggest that mastery of this learning curve is easily within reach, given some basic introduction, guidance and support. To assist design students in acquiring a basic level of programming knowledge, better educational programming tools are still required. It is the intent of this paper to provide designers and educators with a starting point for explorations into this area as well as to report on the development of an educational approach to electronics programming called haptic programming.
series journal
email sdtom@polyu.edu.hk
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2005_091
id 2005_091
authors Kirschner, Ursula and Kirschner, Nauka
year 2005
title E-learning in Creative Planning Processes
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 91-97
summary This conference paper examines experimental design exercises on a simulated model in relation to designing on a physical model. In the initial design phases, the process of designing on both a haptic and digital model is analysed with regard to the didactic objectives. In this context, only form-related aesthetic aspects are discussed. The starting point is the didactic necessity of imparting to students the process of designing on spatial models. Reduced to form determination, the question examined is for which aspects of design theory the potentials of real and virtual models, as well as of the interaction of both types, can be exploited.
keywords Design methods; Digital and Physical Models; 3D-Digizer; Design Education
series eCAADe
email kirschner@uni-lueneburg.de
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_147
id 2005_147
authors Lai, Ih-Cheng
year 2005
title Infilling Time into Space - A Pedagogical Approach for Evolving Space Using Digital Media
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 147-154
summary This paper presents a pedagogical approach to explore the relationships between time and space by using digital media. Based on a pedagogical model called e-Space proposed by Lai (2004), we apply motion as a spatial issue to approach this study. Through integrating with the characteristics of digital media, students are encouraged to evolve architectural space and form by decomposing, re-organizing, interpreting and realizing the spatial composition. Simultaneously, diverse digital media applications integrated with design thinking in a design process enables students to bridge two design spaces - physical and virtual. This process introduces the students to a new approach of design-creation and form finding. Finally, we use an advanced digital media course as an example to understand the impacts of the pedagogical approach. The students’ outcomes are also reported in this paper
keywords Digital Media, Pedagogy, Motion, Design Space, Design Learning
series eCAADe
email ihcheng@ms32.hinet.net
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id acadia05_212
id acadia05_212
authors Luhan, Gregory A.
year 2005
title Modern Translations, Contemporary Methods: DL-1_Resonance House®
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 212-225
summary As the first design-build-fabricate-assemble experiment at our school, the intent of the studio was to design a framework from which to examine a “lived space” through digital-to-digital processes. Moving from digital models and physical stereo lithographic models to hand-fabrication and digital assembly allowed the students to move from creation to completion. As part of our holistic design process, the studio fabricated almost all components for the project. These elements include the wood flooring, the copper and wood skins, the building’s structural panels, and the two-story light vortex. This single-family, in-fill house is located within an historic downtown neighborhood and is subject to historic district zoning regulations, design guidelines, and Board of Architecture Review approvals. The project is analogous to design challenges presenting themselves in historic districts throughout the United States including the Savannah, Georgia site for the 2005 ACADIA Conference. The scale of the project relates well to the horizontal nature of this context and after a formal, televised review process with the local Board of Architecture Review, the project represents a dynamic, yet sympathetic architectural dialogue with the surrounding buildings. The project develops simultaneously from the exterior and interior resulting in two courtyards that mediate the urban “front door” and the private “terrace.” The students designed these areas through a series of two-dimensional axonometric drawings, three-dimensional physical and digital models, and four-dimensional time-based animations. The building massing separates into two core elements: gabled copper volume and wood screen volume. These elements maintain their conceptual purity by using the same types of modulations on their skins. The copper form with its deep-cut reveals and proportionally placed light scoring patterns reflects the horizontal datum lines of the floor, sill, threshold, and ceiling. In contrast, the wood volume reflects these same lines as applied “shadow screens” which create depths that seamlessly tie together the side, rear, and front facades.The hinge point of the house is the light vortex. Designed in Rhino, translated in Catia, fabricated out of aluminum, and clad in stainless steel, this two-story sculptural element will literally wrap light around its surfaces. Like a sunflower, the light vortex, with its angel hair stainless steel finish, responds to the incremental differentiation of light throughout the day. Photosensitive floor-mounted lights designed to augment the volume of natural light will provide a continuous light rendition on the sculpture. The project, scheduled for completion at the end of the 2005 summer session, is at the time of this submission about 60% complete.
series ACADIA
email galuhan@uky.edu
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 27HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_642921 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002