CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 548

_id acadia05_012
id acadia05_012
authors Anshuman, Sachin
year 2005
title Responsiveness and Social Expression; Seeking Human Embodiment in Intelligent Façades
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 12-23
summary This paper is based on a comparative analysis of some twenty-six intelligent building facades and sixteen large media-facades from a socio-psychological perspective. It is not difficult to observe how deployment of computational technologies have engendered new possibilities for architectural production to which surface-centeredness lies at that heart of spatial production during design, fabrication and envelope automation processes. While surfaces play a critical role in contemporary social production (information display, communication and interaction), it is important to understand how the relationships between augmented building surfaces and its subjects unfold. We target double-skin automated facades as a distinct field within building-services and automation industry, and discuss how the developments within this area are over-occupied with seamless climate control and energy efficiency themes, resulting into socially inert mechanical membranes. Our thesis is that at the core of the development of automated façade lies the industrial automation attitude that renders the eventual product socially less engaging and machinic. We illustrate examples of interactive media-façades to demonstrate how architects and interaction designers have used similar technology to turn building surfaces into socially engaging architectural elements. We seek opportunities to extend performative aspects of otherwise function driven double-skin façades for public expression, informal social engagement and context embodiment. Towards the end of the paper, we propose a conceptual model as a possible method to address the emergent issues. Through this paper we intend to bring forth emergent concerns to designing building membrane where technology and performance are addressed through a broader cultural position, establishing a continual dialogue between the surface, function and its larger human context.
series ACADIA
email sanshuman@hotmail.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id 2005_211
id 2005_211
authors Carrara, Gianfranco and Fioravanti, Antonio
year 2005
title The Quest for the Holy Grail – Holistic Collaborative Design
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 211-218
summary Architectural design, due to phenomena such as globalisation of the construction process, delocalisation of professional and industrial activities, spread of new construction materials and components, and the challenges of environmental sustainability, has become so comlex that traditional ways of managing the process are no longer sufficient. What is more, architectural works are required to be ever more performing and integrated - holistic. The paradigm of collaborative design is gaining ground as a way of dealing with these problems. Various process/ product models have been proposed over the years, making more or less use of advanced tools. In this field this study proposes a model in which operators from various cultural contexts are each supported by Intelligent Assistants (agents). The model simulates the design of works of architecture to the best professional practice. Exchange of information and knowledge between the operators is essential to enhance the design process. From this follows the need to interface not just data, but also meanings. This article shows how to improve communications between different applications, used by different operators, so as to integrate information and knowledge, whether formalised or not, in a project managed collaboratively by means of XML.
keywords Collaborative Design; Design Process Model; Distributed Knowledge Bases; Semantic Interfaces; aecXML
series eCAADe
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2005_300
id sigradi2005_300
authors Cavieres, Andrés P.; Marcelo Quezada G.
year 2005
title Analysis of the possibilities offered by the application of parametric modeling technologies in the design processes shared between architects and industrial designers: The prefabricated house case.
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 300-303
summary Traditionally, the teaching of digital design systems has been focused on the operative learning of software. However, this almost exclusively technical approach has leaded to a partial view of these systems, as well suited platforms to exploration of project’s possibilities. Consequently their relevance as a base for project representation and therefore as a useful instrument for conceptual exploration for design and experimental research of their processes have been undervalued. On the other hand, this restrictive perspective results in an important waste of the teaching possibilities lying in CAD software related with interdisciplinary teamwork. The following academic experience obeys to a new insight of how to teach these tools, based upon problem solving in Design by interdisciplinary students work teams from Architecture and Industrial Design. In this bet, the learning process is flexible, shared and collaborative, according to the requirements of each project, powered by the commitment of facing common goals. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email acaviere@uchile.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id caadria2005_b_3c_a
id caadria2005_b_3c_a
authors Christopher Lowry
year 2005
title Making Understanding: Research in the application of virtual environments in the teaching of architectural design and technology
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 93-101
summary This paper describes how the application of interactive three dimensional computer modelling enables students of architecture to gain a comprehensive insight into how buildings are made. An intimate exploration of what can be, in the student’s perception, a lacklustre subject area is revitalized through the use of virtual building models and introduces the student to the potentials of this medium in communicating their own design work. In addition the published case studies are navigated as one would a web site which is a familiar and comfortable format for the student. Original working drawings and specification provided by architects are utilised in generating detailed three dimensional virtual models of the complete building along with larger scale detail studies of particular building components. The models are then animated or transferred to VRML format for publication within interactive case studies. The case studies may be accessed via the department server for use by staff during lectures and seminars or informally by the individual student.
series CAADRIA
email c.lowry@dundee.ac.uk
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id 2005_037
id 2005_037
authors Côté, Pierre, Léglise, Michel and Estévez, Daniel
year 2005
title Virtual Architecture as Representation for Creative Design Process - Through a Collaborative eDesign Studio
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 37-45
summary Using Virtual Architecture (VA) as a general scheme for representations to sustain the reflection activities involved in the design process can help students to initiate creative design ideas. Because of its implicit abstract nature, VA can be used, to represent original ideas or processes, or well-known architectural theories to articulate design ideas. Furthermore, VA as a mean of expression, turn out to be a source of inspiration for students who perceive it as medium with very few limits with which to develop, explore and express their design intuitions. A recent collaborative edesign studio experience is reported to illustrate the benefit observed. Using three examples out of ten student projects, we show how designs and design process have been characterized by those virtual representations. In fall semester 2004, the edesign studio took place between the Schools of Architecture of Toulouse and Université Laval in Québec. VA was both an academic and a studio topic at Laval while the other school students had a traditional design task to tackle, namely the rehabilitation of Chapou University Residences for students in Toulouse. Students from both schools composed each edesign team. In addition, three common architectural themes were web-documented and introduced to both classes: room, as defined by Louis Kahn: “a space which knows what it wants to be is a room”; color, as an architectural medium in dialectic with structure; and body-space relationships, as articulated by Gilles Deleuze and its projection to cyberspace. From the edesign studio results, we are arguing that virtual architecture should be looked at not only as new domain to be investigated by architects and taught in academic studios but also as a new medium of design to develop and explore design intuitions through virtual representations.
keywords Virtual Architecture; Virtual Representations; Medium; eDesign; Design by Collaboration
series eCAADe
email pierre.cote@arc.ulaval.ca
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_819
id 2005_819
authors Dorta, Tomás
year 2005
title HYBRID MODELING: MANUAL AND DIGITAL MEDIA IN THE FIRST STEPS OF THE DESIGN PROCESS
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 819-827
summary This paper proposes a new paradigm in computer-aided design: hybrid modeling. Considering, on one hand the traditional sketches and mock-ups, and digital techniques on the other, this paradigm fuses the two and proposes a new technique that uses the performance of the digital with the capacities of the analog without replacing or imitating one or the other. In the development of design computer solutions, it is important to know the user well. However, most researchers propose systems that do not consider how designers actually work. Furthermore, two principal elements must be considered in the design process: shape and space. These aspects need to be approached with convenient tools that are adapted to the designers. This new paradigm is presented through two new innovative techniques: the hybrid mock-up (for shape) and drafted virtual reality (for space). A review of the implications of this paradigm on the design process is presented. Not only are the techniques fast and easy to learn and execute, but the results demonstrate that the designers can express both their individuality and the idiosyncrasies of their personal representations; important elements that are difficult to achieve with conventional 3D modeling techniques, especially during the primary stages of the design process.
keywords Manual Media, Design Process, Rapid Prototyping, Sketches, 3D Modeling
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email tomas.dorta@umontreal.ca
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id acadia05_114
id acadia05_114
authors Due Schmidt, Anne Marie
year 2005
title Navigating towards digital tectonic tools
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 114-127
summary The computer holds a great potential to break down the barriers between architecture and the technical aspects relating to architecture, thus supporting innovative architecture with an inner correspondence between form and technique. While the differing values in architecture and technique can seem like opposites, the term tectonics deals with creating a meaningful relationship between the two. The aim of this paper is to investigate what a digital tectonic tool could be and what relationship with technology it should represent. An understanding of this relationship can help us not only to understand the conflicts in architecture and the building industry but also bring us further into a discussion of how architecture can use digital tools. The investigation is carried out firstly by approaching the subject theoretically through the term tectonics and by setting up a model of the values a tectonic tool should encompass. Secondly the ability and validity of the model are shown by applying it to a case study of Jørn Utzon’s work on Minor Hall in Sydney Opera House - for the sake of exemplification the technical field focused on in this paper is room acoustics. Thirdly the relationship between the model of tectonics and the case will be compared and lastly a discussion about the characteristics of a tectonic tool and its implications on digital tectonic tools will be carried out.
series ACADIA
email amds@aod.aau.dk
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id 2005_547
id 2005_547
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2005
title Crisis? What Crisis?
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 547-556
summary The paper describes the current situation concerning career opportunities in the field of architecture in developed western countries. Several aspects that are almost universal mark this situation. Firstly, there are too many architects chasing traditional work in competition with structural (civil) engineers. This is not surprising in consideration of the fact, that the architectural education industry produces far too many new architects for the economy to absorb. In Germany, the number is almost three times too many. Secondly, the needs of the building industry have changed over the past twenty years so that the skills that architects want to offer are not necessarily those that are sought. Lastly, the constant specialisation of work has continued unabated. Architects, as generalists, have idly watched their areas of expertise be usurped from neighbouring fields like civil and structural engineering The reasons for this crisis are manifold. In the schools of architecture, the discussions often deal with form or formal arguments, which, in fact, have little or no relevance to the building industry. This position was tenable so long as the clients were willing to accept formal arguments in order to receive buildings of high quality or current social relevance (i.e. current architectural fashion). With the dual aspects of globalisation and a shift to maintaining building stocks rather than producing new buildings, the tolerance for “architectural” discussions has been reduced even further. Indeed, the monetary pressures overwhelm almost all other aspects, including so-called green issues. What is more, most of the monetary issues are time based. Time represents, perhaps, the largest pressure in any current planning project. The clients expect expedient, accurate and inexpensive solutions. If architects are not able to produce these, the clients will (and do) go elsewhere. The authors argue that there remain serious problems to be solved for architects and the metier in general. Ever cheaper, ever faster and ever encompassing information technologies offer the architectural community a chance to turn recent trends on their head. By using information technologies to their full potential, architects can reassert themselves as the coordinators of building information and processes. Simply put, this means less photorealistic rendering and more databases, which may be unappealing for those architects who have positioned themselves as “designers” and are able to talk long on form, but short on cost or logistics. Nonetheless, the situation is not lost, so long as architects are able to recognise what is desired from the point of view of the client and what is desired from the point of view of the architect. It is not a question of one or the other. Architects must be able to offer innovative design solutions that not only address the fiscal, legal and programmatic constraints, but also push the boundaries at to the position of architecture in the community at large. For educators, it must be made clear that the real potential architects possess is their encompassing knowledge of the building process including their expertise concerning questions of architectural form, function, history and art. Precisely while they are generalists are architects invaluable in a sea of specialists. The biggest hurdle to asserting this in the past has been the control of the vast amounts of information. This is no longer a problem and also no longer an excuse. In the education of architects, it must be made clear that their role dictates sovereignty over architectural information. Architectural Information Management is a necessary skill alongside the more traditional architectural skills. A brief outlook as to how this might come about is detailed in the paper. The authors propose didactic steps to achieve this. Primarily, the education of computer supported planning should not simply end with a series of lectures or seminars, but culminate in integrated Design Studios (which including Design-Build scenarios).
keywords Architectural Information Mangement, Computer Supported Design Studios, CSCW
series eCAADe
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id ascaad2012_003
id ascaad2012_003
authors Elseragy, Ahmed
year 2012
title Creative Design Between Representation and Simulation
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 11-12
summary Milestone figures of architecture all have their different views on what comes first, form or function. They also vary in their definitions of creativity. Apparently, creativity is very strongly related to ideas and how they can be generated. It is also correlated with the process of thinking and developing. Creative products, whether architectural or otherwise, and whether tangible or intangible, are originated from ‘good ideas’ (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). On one hand, not any idea, or any good idea, can be considered creative but, on the other hand, any creative result can be traced back to a good idea that initiated it in the beginning (Goldschmit and Tatsa, 2005). Creativity in literature, music and other forms of art is immeasurable and unbounded by constraints of physical reality. Musicians, painters and sculptors do not create within tight restrictions. They create what becomes their own mind’s intellectual property, and viewers or listeners are free to interpret these creations from whichever angle they choose. However, this is not the case with architects, whose creations and creative products are always bound with different physical constraints that may be related to the building location, social and cultural values related to the context, environmental performance and energy efficiency, and many more (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). Remarkably, over the last three decades computers have dominated in almost all areas of design, taking over the burden of repetitive tasks so that the designers and students can focus on the act of creation. Computer aided design has been used for a long time as a tool of drafting, however in this last decade this tool of representation is being replaced by simulation in different areas such as simulation of form, function and environment. Thus, the crafting of objects is moving towards the generation of forms and integrated systems through designer-authored computational processes. The emergence and adoption of computational technologies has significantly changed design and design education beyond the replacement of drawing boards with computers or pens and paper with computer-aided design (CAD) computer-aided engineering (CAE) applications. This paper highlights the influence of the evolving transformation from Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) and how this presents a profound shift in creative design thinking and education. Computational-based design and simulation represent new tools that encourage designers and artists to continue progression of novel modes of design thinking and creativity for the 21st century designers. Today computational design calls for new ideas that will transcend conventional boundaries and support creative insights through design and into design. However, it is still believed that in architecture education one should not replace the design process and creative thinking at early stages by software tools that shape both process and final product which may become a limitation for creative designs to adapt to the decisions and metaphors chosen by the simulation tool. This paper explores the development of Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) Tools and their impact on contemporary design education and creative design.
series ASCAAD
email ahmed.elseragy@aast.edu
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_003.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id acadia05_184
id acadia05_184
authors Fineout, Matthew G.
year 2005
title The Tower of Babel: Bridging Diverse Languages with Information Technologies
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 184-191
summary New digital tools or information technologies are providing the means for architects to realize unprecedented architectural creations. Unfortunately, the promise these technologies hold is far from their potential expression in the built physical environment. A contributing cause to this disjunctive state is the multiplicity of languages and knowledge sets employed by the various team members or actors engaged in a building project. From the cost models of the owners to the shop drawings of the fabricators, each actor views the project in terms specific to their individual discipline. In order to successfully engage the building process, these new technologies must account for this condition and develop means in which to span across traditional boundaries. This paper will examine the disjointed and fractured nature of the building project and identify opportunities for the deployment of information technologies to bridge boundaries, ultimately providing for and delivering architectural projects of unparalleled precedence. Specific aspects inherent to these technologies will be examined to understand where their application may benefit the building process. The key attributes this paper will focus on include: visualization tools, centralized database, cross discipline platform tools and novel forms of information representation. A case study of an architectural project will serve as the means in which to study the successful implementation of these attributes and their resulting impact on the design process and building project. This study will demonstrate how information technologies can be implemented within the multifaceted framework of conventional building projects to yield a project of unprecedented form.
series ACADIA
email matt@edge-studio.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id 2005_771
id 2005_771
authors Gavrilou, Evelyn, Bourdakis, Vassilis and Charitos, Dimitris
year 2005
title Documenting the Spatial Design of an Interactive Multisensory Urban Installation
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 771-778
summary The paper documents the design and implementation of an interactive multi-sensory environment (DETOUR) created by the interdisciplinary group VE_Design for an international open-air exhibition in Athens, Greece during the summer of 2004. The paper describes the creative process followed throughout the project and registers how computers, sensors and effectors have been utilised to either facilitate the creation of electronically mediated experiences or support the design. The architectural concept of the multi-sensory installation is analyzed in relation to its potential for creating communicative experiences as well as addressing physical form simulations. Notions such as ephemeral structures, parasites, social space, game as art and communication are discussed. The body – space interaction is investigated, enabling the team to elaborate on a modular construction. Finally, the impact of the work is discussed on the basis of recorded observations by visitors.
keywords Interactive Multi-Sensory Environment; Ephemeral Space; Public Art;Embodied Spatial Experience; Simulation of Physical Form.
series eCAADe
email V.Bourdakis@uth.gr
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id caadria2005_a_7b_d
id caadria2005_a_7b_d
authors Jane R. Burry, Andrew L. Burrow, Mark C. Burry
year 2005
title Upholding the Poetic in Design Collaboration
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 288-299
summary Design is a fundamentally collaborative activity. It commonly calls on a wide range of expertise and is arguably most effective when all contributions can be considered from an early and highly conceptual phase of the process. The sharing of information, particularly in a process that, at its best, involves collective conceptualisation is complicated by the very close and reciprocal relationship between the partial knowledge about the object of design and the mode of expression or representation of these ideas. As the design process and its numerous inputs, iterations and interrelationships become embedded in the communications; knowledge capture, management and access become central issues. This paper will selectively recount some of the substantive evidence for the characteristics of communication environments most supportive to design collaboration. In response to these findings it will introduce the use of wiki as the basis of an environment to provide this support, provide more detailed examples of the ways in which wiki has been adopted in early collaborative experiments and describe the developments currently being implemented, and how these are being tested in use.
series CAADRIA
email jane.burry@rmit.edu.au, andrew.burrow@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id 2005_067
id 2005_067
authors Pellitteri, Giuseppe, Colajanni Benedetto and Concialdi, Salvatore
year 2005
title Distance Collaboration. A Comparative Analysis of Tools and Procedures
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 67-73
summary Besides design theory and practice, curricula of architectural students should include some experiences referring to professional situations. Among these experiences, Collaborative Design is nowadays somewhat frequent. It is normally practised by large professional studios, using expansive software which is beyond what they can afford on average. Much academic research on the topic has also been carried out often resulting in the proposition of new and too complex description models of the building object. We think that students should instead get acquainted with such a design process: an experience has been planned and carried out in our Department for the purpose of practising the possible paradigm in a more ordinary context. Its purpose was threefold. First, making the students grasp the method’s potentialities and learn the right approach. Second, testing the practical suitability of the most widely used software. Third, comparing their relative efficiency. The software we used was: Architectural Desktop, AutoCad Revit, ArchiCad for Teamwork. We focused special attention on how representing and managing restraints, since they are the main source of conflicts. This was the hardest topic to manage. The results were partly positive inasmuch as the experience showed that it could be possible to adopt the Collaborative Design paradigm which is also used in the AEC field. The drawbacks emerged from the analysis of non-dedicated software are: a relative slow process for the lack of certain specific tools; a subsequent necessity of integrating them with different communication software; the difficulty of managing hard and soft restraints. However, in the final analysis, the experience can be considered as positive.
keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural teaching
series eCAADe
email pellitt@www.unipa.it
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2011_p115
id cf2011_p115
authors Pohl, Ingrid; Hirschberg Urs
year 2011
title Sensitive Voxel - A reactive tangible surface
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 525-538.
summary Haptic and tactile sensations, the active or passive exploration of our built surroundings through our sense of touch, give us a direct feeling and detailed information of space, a sense of architecture (Pallasmaa 2005). This paper presents the prototype of a reactive surface system, which focuses its output on the sense of touch. It explains how touch sensations influence the perception of architecture and discusses potential applications that might arise from such systems in the future. A growing number of projects demonstrate the strong impact of interaction design on the human senses and perception. They offer new ways of sensing and experiencing architectural space. But the majority of these interaction concepts focus on visual and auditory output-effects. The sense of touch is typically used as an input generator, but neglected as as a potential receiver of stimuli. With all the possibilities of sensors and micro-devices available nowadays, there is no longer a technical reason for this. It is possible to explore a much wider range of sense responding projects, to broaden the horizon of sensitive interaction concepts (Bullivant 2006). What if the surfaces of our surroundings can actively change the way it feels to touch them? What if things like walls and furniture get the ability to interactively respond to our touch? What new dimensions of communication and esthetic experience will open up when we conceive of tangibility in this bi-directional way? This paper presents a prototype system aimed at exploring these very questions. The prototype consists of a grid of tangible embedded cells, each one combining three kinds of actuators to produce divergent touch stimuli. All cells can be individually controlled from an interactive computer program. By providing a layering of different combinations and impulse intensities, the grid structure enables altering patterns of actuation. Thus it can be employed to explore a sort of individual touch aesthetic, for which - in order to differentiate it from established types of aesthetic experiences - we have created the term 'Euhaptics' (from the Greek ευ = good and άπτω = touch, finger). The possibility to mix a wide range of actuators leads to blending options of touch stimuli. The sense of touch has an expanded perception- spectrum, which can be exploited by this technically embedded superposition. The juxtaposed arrangement of identical multilayered cell-units offers blending and pattern effects of different touch-stimuli. It reveals an augmented form of interaction with surfaces and interactive material structures. The combination of impulses does not need to be fixed a priori; it can be adjusted during the process of use. Thus the sensation of touch can be made personally unique in its qualities. The application on architectural shapes and surfaces allows the user to feel the sensations in a holistic manner – potentially on the entire body. Hence the various dimensions of touch phenomena on the skin can be explored through empirical investigations by the prototype construction. The prototype system presented in the paper is limited in size and resolution, but its functionality suggests various directions of further development. In architectural applications, this new form of overlay may lead to create augmented environments that let inhabitants experience multimodal touch sensations. By interactively controlling the sensual patterns, such environments could get a unique “touch” for every person that inhabit them. But there may be further applications that go beyond the interactive configuration of comfort, possibly opening up new forms of communication for handicapped people or applications in medical and therapeutic fields (Grunwald 2001). The well-known influence of touch- sensations on human psychological processes and moreover their bodily implications suggest that there is a wide scope of beneficial utilisations yet to be investigated.
keywords Sensitive Voxel- A reactive tangible surface
series CAAD Futures
email inge@sbox.tugraz.at
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ijac20053105
id ijac20053105
authors Pranovich, Slava; Achten, Henri; de Vries, Bauke; van Wijk, Jack
year 2005
title Structural Sketcher: Representing and applying well-structured graphic representations in early design
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 1, 75-92
summary Computational drawing support has the potential to improve design support in the early phase. Much work in this area is devoted to input of design information, manipulation, and presentation. Based on a review of current work, we note that among other things, digital drawing tools should be close to the conventions and techniques already used by architects. This is, in principle, possible by processing strokes in a more or less traditional sketch approach, or by offering specialised commands that provide a direct implementation of such conventions. The latter approach is covered by Structural Sketcher. A subset of drawing conventions developed earlier, called graphic units, is adopted within the system. In order to contribute to design support, the application of such graphic units should be fast and intuitive, and the definition of internal relationships should be quick and straightforward. For intuitive manipulation, Structural Sketcher incorporates the "paper and scissors" metaphor, and introduces a novel UI-concept called the KITE. To achieve an easy and fast maintenance of relationships, a graph based on anchor-points is built-up on the fly. Performance of the system has been tested on a quantitative and qualitative basis. The system shows the benefit that graphic units can bring to drawing support, and how these can be implemented. To conclude, limitations and further work are discussed.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id cf2005_2_41_104
id cf2005_2_41_104
authors SEICHTER Hartmut
year 2005
title Assessing Virtual Tangibility
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 151-160
summary Design technology simulates a variety of senses but on the other hand restricts them to audio and visual responses. What happens if technology can accommodate more senses in the creation process and how does it affect the way we approach design? This paper investigates the implication of tangible interfaces in design computing. The focal point is to assess the factors of perception and cooperative working by employing an Augmented Reality (AR) setup with tangible interfaces in a design studio. A concept of usability evaluation is discussed with the focus on core theories and resulting methodology.
keywords augmented reality, urban design, usability evaluation, tangible interface, CSCW
series CAAD Futures
email seichter@hku.hk
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

_id cf2005_1_81_52
id cf2005_1_81_52
authors SUTER Georg, BRUNNER Klaus and MAHDAVI Ardeshir
year 2005
title Spatial Reasoning for Building Model Reconstruction Based on Sensed Object Location Information
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 403-412
summary The continuous collection of data on the state of facilities appears increasingly feasible due to advances in sensing technologies. In this context, we explore the application of tag-based location-sensing to reconstruct models of existing buildings. We describe tag-based building representations, which are complete under certain conditions for the automated conversion to boundary-based building representations. The latter have a rich structure and are useful for various construction-related applications. We describe and demonstrate with a system prototype how spatial reasoning methods facilitate the conversion process.
keywords location-sensing, spatial reasoning, building information modeling
series CAAD Futures
email georg.suter@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id 2005_415
id 2005_415
authors Tramontano, Marcelo and Mônaco dos Santos, Denise
year 2005
title Online_communities
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 415-423
summary Research on contemporary habitation spaces is directly related to the study of the relationship between new media and everyday life. This paper presents ongoing in-depth research which intends to discuss these relationships in different ways on a conceptual basis. A collaborative multi-users interface is being specially designed, supported by different kinds of electronic equipment. Furthermore, the project’s objective is to analyze how these information and communication technologies are to be used, as well as their impact on poor communities. As a hypothesis, our intention is to verify if the access to information will be able to broaden social interactions and improve new services which have been set up, in order to guarantee a better quality of life. Beyond being a conceptual approach, the study intends to present and examine facts obtained from intervening in a poor district in São Paulo city, Brazil. Using an existing public telecenter as an access provider to the internet, individual TV-connected set-top boxes in 220 apartments in a local social housing complex are being installed, enabling users to communicate through a collaborative multiusers digital interface. Adding a virtual instance to a geographically-based community, the aim of the project is to provide new possibilities to improve dialogue and debates, to encourage more income and cultural activities. It also intends to evaluate the effects of the technological mediation of social relationships, both inside and outside the community, as well as within the physical urban space such as in the dwellings. The results of this study will be useful in defining public policies to be implemented by the Sao Paulo Local Government. The work is being sponsored by FAPESP, which is the Sao Paulo State Funding Agencie, but also by public institutions, private partners and universities. Researchers involved belong to complementary fields such as architecture, urbanism, computer sciences, social sciences, psychology and electronic engineering.
keywords Virtual Communities, Collaborative Networks, Digital Inclusion
series eCAADe
email tramont@sc.usp.br
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_279
id 2005_279
authors Walz, Steffen P., Schoch, Odilo, Ochsendorf, Mathias and Spindler, Torsten
year 2005
title Serious Fun: Pervasive game design as a CAAD teaching and research method
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 279-286
summary Today and in the future, architectural students must be prepared for designing both physical and adaptive, computer-integrated spaces. The question is: How do we easily and effectively convey architecturally relevant theories and practices of pervasive computing in teaching? In this paper, we present a didactic model that has proved to be a possible answer. During a semester long design class, we supervised an interdisciplinary group of architecture and computer science students who teamworked on an early so called serious pervasive game prototype, entitled “ETHGame”. The class culminated in a two week compact phase and a presentation before ETH representatives involved in e-learning projects. The resulting interactive prototype takes advantage of our campus’s extensive wireless local area network infrastructure, allowing for user positioning and location based learning, servicing, and peer-to-peer communication. The game mutates the whole of the ETH Zurich campus into a knowledge space, issuing position dependent and position relevant questions to players. The ETHGame forces participants to engage with a given space in the form of a quiz and rewards them for collaborating both face-to-face and facelessly. The game helps them build a collective academic and space aware identity whilst being immersed in a sentient environment. Thus, in this paper we are introducing serious pervasive game design as a novel design research and teaching paradigm for CAAD, as well as a e-learning design strategy.
keywords Pervasive Computing; Pervasive Game Design; Serious Games; LocationBased Learning; Knowledge Space
series eCAADe
email spindler@hbt.arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2011_p170
id cf2011_p170
authors Barros, Mário; Duarte José, Chaparro Bruno
year 2011
title Thonet Chairs Design Grammar: a Step Towards the Mass Customization of Furniture
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 181-200.
summary The paper presents the first phase of research currently under development that is focused on encoding Thonet design style into a generative design system using a shape grammar. The ultimate goal of the work is the design and production of customizable chairs using computer assisted tools, establishing a feasible practical model of the paradigm of mass customization (Davis, 1987). The current research step encompasses the following three steps: (1) codification of the rules describing Thonet design style into a shape grammar; (2) implementing the grammar into a computer tool as parametric design; and (3) rapid prototyping of customized chair designs within the style. Future phases will address the transformation of the Thonet’s grammar to create a new style and the production of real chair designs in this style using computer aided manufacturing. Beginning in the 1830’s, Austrian furniture designer Michael Thonet began experimenting with forming steam beech, in order to produce lighter furniture using fewer components, when compared with the standards of the time. Using the same construction principles and standardized elements, Thonet produced different chairs designs with a strong formal resemblance, creating his own design language. The kit assembly principle, the reduced number of elements, industrial efficiency, and the modular approach to furniture design as a system of interchangeable elements that may be used to assemble different objects enable him to become a pioneer of mass production (Noblet, 1993). The most paradigmatic example of the described vision of furniture design is the chair No. 14 produced in 1858, composed of six structural elements. Due to its simplicity, lightness, ability to be stored in flat and cubic packaging for individual of collective transportation, respectively, No. 14 became one of the most sold chairs worldwide, and it is still in production nowadays. Iconic examples of mass production are formally studied to provide insights to mass customization studies. The study of the shape grammar for the generation of Thonet chairs aimed to ensure rules that would make possible the reproduction of the selected corpus, as well as allow for the generation of new chairs within the developed grammar. Due to the wide variety of Thonet chairs, six chairs were randomly chosen to infer the grammar and then this was fine tuned by checking whether it could account for the generation of other designs not in the original corpus. Shape grammars (Stiny and Gips, 1972) have been used with sucesss both in the analysis as in the synthesis of designs at different scales, from product design to building and urban design. In particular, the use of shape grammars has been efficient in the characterization of objects’ styles and in the generation of new designs within the analyzed style, and it makes design rules amenable to computers implementation (Duarte, 2005). The literature includes one other example of a grammar for chair design by Knight (1980). In the second step of the current research phase, the outlined shape grammar was implemented into a computer program, to assist the designer in conceiving and producing customized chairs using a digital design process. This implementation was developed in Catia by converting the grammar into an equivalent parametric design model. In the third phase, physical models of existing and new chair designs were produced using rapid prototyping. The paper describes the grammar, its computer implementation as a parametric model, and the rapid prototyping of physical models. The generative potential of the proposed digital process is discussed in the context of enabling the mass customization of furniture. The role of the furniture designer in the new paradigm and ideas for further work also are discussed.
keywords Thonet; furniture design; chair; digital design process; parametric design; shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email m.barros@ipt.pt
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

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