CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 548

_id sigradi2005_144
id sigradi2005_144
authors Goldberg, Sergio Araya
year 2005
title ICHTYOMORPH - Design and development of a fish-skin double façade system for freeform super tall buildings using Parametric Design Tools
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 144-149
summary Parametric design implies a whole new paradigm of non standard design through the propagation of the difference, the repetition of variation. The ability to control variation and adaptation to local conditions allows more precise yet complex designs. This paper describes a research project designing double skin façade systems for tall buildings using a parametric approach. These designs are tested later through rapid prototyping techniques. This research aims its design towards an adjustable façade structure, articulated according to various complex geometrical conditions on the façade of a building. The skin is conceived as a light, flexible, reconfigurable composition responding to different criteria regarding the design, its environment or the program. It achieves this through different levels of control on different scales of the project, by embedding several layers of parametric features, which are nested one inside the other, in order to produce the overall rainscreen surface of the tower.
series SIGRADI
email sergio_a@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id cf2011_p170
id cf2011_p170
authors Barros, Mário; Duarte José, Chaparro Bruno
year 2011
title Thonet Chairs Design Grammar: a Step Towards the Mass Customization of Furniture
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 181-200.
summary The paper presents the first phase of research currently under development that is focused on encoding Thonet design style into a generative design system using a shape grammar. The ultimate goal of the work is the design and production of customizable chairs using computer assisted tools, establishing a feasible practical model of the paradigm of mass customization (Davis, 1987). The current research step encompasses the following three steps: (1) codification of the rules describing Thonet design style into a shape grammar; (2) implementing the grammar into a computer tool as parametric design; and (3) rapid prototyping of customized chair designs within the style. Future phases will address the transformation of the Thonet’s grammar to create a new style and the production of real chair designs in this style using computer aided manufacturing. Beginning in the 1830’s, Austrian furniture designer Michael Thonet began experimenting with forming steam beech, in order to produce lighter furniture using fewer components, when compared with the standards of the time. Using the same construction principles and standardized elements, Thonet produced different chairs designs with a strong formal resemblance, creating his own design language. The kit assembly principle, the reduced number of elements, industrial efficiency, and the modular approach to furniture design as a system of interchangeable elements that may be used to assemble different objects enable him to become a pioneer of mass production (Noblet, 1993). The most paradigmatic example of the described vision of furniture design is the chair No. 14 produced in 1858, composed of six structural elements. Due to its simplicity, lightness, ability to be stored in flat and cubic packaging for individual of collective transportation, respectively, No. 14 became one of the most sold chairs worldwide, and it is still in production nowadays. Iconic examples of mass production are formally studied to provide insights to mass customization studies. The study of the shape grammar for the generation of Thonet chairs aimed to ensure rules that would make possible the reproduction of the selected corpus, as well as allow for the generation of new chairs within the developed grammar. Due to the wide variety of Thonet chairs, six chairs were randomly chosen to infer the grammar and then this was fine tuned by checking whether it could account for the generation of other designs not in the original corpus. Shape grammars (Stiny and Gips, 1972) have been used with sucesss both in the analysis as in the synthesis of designs at different scales, from product design to building and urban design. In particular, the use of shape grammars has been efficient in the characterization of objects’ styles and in the generation of new designs within the analyzed style, and it makes design rules amenable to computers implementation (Duarte, 2005). The literature includes one other example of a grammar for chair design by Knight (1980). In the second step of the current research phase, the outlined shape grammar was implemented into a computer program, to assist the designer in conceiving and producing customized chairs using a digital design process. This implementation was developed in Catia by converting the grammar into an equivalent parametric design model. In the third phase, physical models of existing and new chair designs were produced using rapid prototyping. The paper describes the grammar, its computer implementation as a parametric model, and the rapid prototyping of physical models. The generative potential of the proposed digital process is discussed in the context of enabling the mass customization of furniture. The role of the furniture designer in the new paradigm and ideas for further work also are discussed.
keywords Thonet; furniture design; chair; digital design process; parametric design; shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email m.barros@ipt.pt
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ad19
id ad19
authors Calderon, C., and Noble, R
year 2005
title BEYOND MODELLING: AVANT-GARDE COMPUTER TECHNIQUES IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS.
source I Jornadas de Investigacion en Construccion, Madrid, 2-4 June, 2005.
summary If the result of computer innovations can be interpreted as an emerging “difference” in the quality of constructed space, then in order to truly understand what future applications may be regarding architecture at present, we should look at what advanced functions are available in the process of designing forms and space (DeLuca and Nardini, 2002). Recently the so called parametric approach, a technique for describing a large class of designs with a small description in programming code, has become a focus of attention in architectural computing. In this paper, we reflect on the current use of parametric tools using real case studies as well as our own proof of concept parametric programmes and report on how the avant-garde computer techniques may help to increase the quality of residential building.
keywords Building Quality, Parametric Design
series other
type normal paper
email carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/12/02 10:42

_id 2005_501
id 2005_501
authors Celani, Gabriela, Pupo, Regiane, Mendes, Gelly and Pinheiro, Érica
year 2005
title Generative Design Systems for Housing
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 501-506
summary The present paper describes an undergoing research that aims at developing a generative design computer implementation with an outside-in approach, OIDS. The system will allow developing and visualizing context-based housing development designs. This approach will include both natural characteristics of the site and the existing neighboring buildings. It is argued that certain common urban design practices are the result of a simplification due to difficulties in dealing with the irregularities of the natural environment, which often requires the use of time-consuming methods. The computer-based application will provide tools for dealing with such difficulties, allowing designers to describe their own design rules. In an initial phase of the project, a tool that can subdivide irregular land parcels into equally sized areas has been developed. In further stages, other environmental variables will be addressed, such as solar aspect and prevalent wind directions. Eventually, even the designs of interior layouts should result from exterior forces. The resulting generative system is expected to facilitate and encourage the use of a more organic approach to building siting and design, bringing about the important discussion about which should be the main forces in the generation of the built environment.
keywords Generative Design; Context-Based Design; Housing Design; Building Siting; Urban Space Simulation
series eCAADe
email celani@fec.unicamp.br
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2005_114
id sigradi2005_114
authors Goldberg, Sergio Araya
year 2005
title Designing Continuous ComplexCurved Structures to be Fabricated from Standard Flat Sheets
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 114-119
summary This paper explains how complex curved structures can be constructed from flat standard panels. The main objective is to link both design techniques and digital fabrication methods to solve a recurrent problem in contemporary architectural design, building double curved structures. Secondly, it achieves this by using regular fabrication methods and standard construction materials, available and affordable for Latin-American countries. It describes the processes of programming a set of computational tools to study and develop designs to fabricate continuous complex curved structures. I will describe this through a series of experiments, using parametric design environments and scripted routines for CAD software to implement certain techniques to fabricate these designs using rapid prototyping machines. I compare different fabrication methods using computer numerically controlled machines, used to process these flat panels to obtain certain properties, allowing them to bend, twist, fold or stretch achieving these complex forms.
series SIGRADI
email sergio_a@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id sigradi2005_150
id sigradi2005_150
authors Henriques, Gonçalo Castro; Carlos De La Barrera
year 2005
title Integral envelopes
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 150-154
summary The objective of this research is the artificial distinction between skin and structure through the development of an envelope System that integrates structural and Environmental performances. The envelope will be highlighted as a filter mediating micro and macro environmental conditions. The starting point will be the observation of a natural/ biological example in which the distinction between structure and skin is dissolved, using it in a new instrumental way. Furthermore, it will be developed a new generative System through the application of parametric design. The new design will be constructed through the use of CNC machinery (CAD-CAM). [Full paper in Portuguese]
series SIGRADI
email gch@x-ref.org
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id caadria2005_b_5a_c
id caadria2005_b_5a_c
authors Julie R. Jupp, Ricardo Sosa, John S. Gero
year 2005
title Generating Innovative Designs Using Qualitative Spatial Reasoning
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 300-311
summary In this paper we present a generative system supported by qualitative spatial reasoning. The approach incorporates qualitative modelling in an evolutionary system to automate the design of novel solutions assessed as compatible with a set of existing designs. The system is presented through an application of door design and demonstrates how development guidelines aimed at preserving a building or streetscape’s visual character can be met by novel designs. The results presented in this paper illustrate the generation of novel designs that intuitively capture key characteristics of the corpus of existing designs at a qualitative level. This approach provides the basis for new kinds of design tools.
series CAADRIA
email jupp_j@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id caadria2014_042
id caadria2014_042
authors Alam, Jack and Jeremy J. Ham
year 2014
title Towards a BIM-Based Energy Rating System
source Rethinking Comprehensive Design: Speculative Counterculture, Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA 2014) / Kyoto 14-16 May 2014, pp. 285–294
summary Governments in Australia are faced with policy implementation that mandates higher energy efficient housing (Foran, Lenzen & Dey 2005). To this effect, the National Construction Code (NCC) 2013 stipulates the minimum energy performance for residential buildings as 114MJ/m2 per annum or 6 stars on an energy rating scale. Compliance with this minimum is mandatory but there are several methods through which residential buildings can be rated to comply with the deemed to satisfy provisions outlined in the NCC. FirstRate5 is by far the most commonly used simulation software used in Victoria, Australia. Meanwhile, Building Information Modelling (BIM), using software such as ArchiCAD has gained a foothold in the industry. The energy simulation software within ArchiCAD, EcoDesigner, enables the reporting on the energy performance based on BIM elements that contain thermal information. This research is founded on a comparative study between FirstRate5 and EcoDesigner. Three building types were analysed and compared. The comparison finds significant differences between simulations, being, measured areas, thermal loads and potentially serious shortcomings within FirstRate5, that are discussed along with the future potential of a fully BIM-integrated model for energy rating certification in Victoria.
keywords Building Information Modelling, energy rating, FirstRate 5, ArchiCAD EcoDesigner, Building Energy Model
series CAADRIA
email Jack.alam@gmail.com
last changed 2014/04/22 08:23

_id ecaade2017_184
id ecaade2017_184
authors Almeida, Daniel and Sousa, José Pedro
year 2017
title Tradition and Innovation in Digital Architecture - Reviewing the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2005
source Fioravanti, A, Cursi, S, Elahmar, S, Gargaro, S, Loffreda, G, Novembri, G, Trento, A (eds.), ShoCK! - Sharing Computational Knowledge! - Proceedings of the 35th eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 20-22 September 2017, pp. 267-276
summary Please write your aToday, in a moment when digital technologies are taking command of many architectural design and construction processes, it is important to examine the place and role of traditional ones. Designed by Álvaro Siza and Eduardo Souto de Moura in collaboration with Cecil Balmond, the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2005 reflects the potential of combining those two different approaches in the production of innovative buildings. For inquiring this argument, this paper investigates the development of this project from its conception to construction with a double goal: to uncover the relationship between analogical and digital processes, and to understand the architects' role in a geographically distributed workflow, which involved the use of computational design and robotic fabrication technologies. To support this examination, the authors designed and fabricated a 1:3 scale prototype of part of the Pavilion, which also served to check and reflect on the technological evolution since then, which is setting different conditions for design development and collaboration.bstract here by clicking this paragraph.
keywords Serpentine Gallery Pavilion; Computational Design; Digital Fabrication; Wooden Construction; Architectural Representation;
series eCAADe
email jsousa@arq.up.pt
last changed 2017/09/13 13:13

_id acadia05_012
id acadia05_012
authors Anshuman, Sachin
year 2005
title Responsiveness and Social Expression; Seeking Human Embodiment in Intelligent Façades
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 12-23
summary This paper is based on a comparative analysis of some twenty-six intelligent building facades and sixteen large media-facades from a socio-psychological perspective. It is not difficult to observe how deployment of computational technologies have engendered new possibilities for architectural production to which surface-centeredness lies at that heart of spatial production during design, fabrication and envelope automation processes. While surfaces play a critical role in contemporary social production (information display, communication and interaction), it is important to understand how the relationships between augmented building surfaces and its subjects unfold. We target double-skin automated facades as a distinct field within building-services and automation industry, and discuss how the developments within this area are over-occupied with seamless climate control and energy efficiency themes, resulting into socially inert mechanical membranes. Our thesis is that at the core of the development of automated façade lies the industrial automation attitude that renders the eventual product socially less engaging and machinic. We illustrate examples of interactive media-façades to demonstrate how architects and interaction designers have used similar technology to turn building surfaces into socially engaging architectural elements. We seek opportunities to extend performative aspects of otherwise function driven double-skin façades for public expression, informal social engagement and context embodiment. Towards the end of the paper, we propose a conceptual model as a possible method to address the emergent issues. Through this paper we intend to bring forth emergent concerns to designing building membrane where technology and performance are addressed through a broader cultural position, establishing a continual dialogue between the surface, function and its larger human context.
series ACADIA
email sanshuman@hotmail.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id acadia05_156
id acadia05_156
authors Cabrinha, Mark
year 2005
title From Bézier to NURBS: Integrating Material and Digital Techniques through a Plywood Shell
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 156-169
summary The development of digital fabrication has reintroduced material processes with digital processes. There has been much discussion about the tool and the objects of the tool, but little discussion of the implication of the material process on the digital process. A brief historical review on the development of computer numerical control and the origins of the Bézier curve reveals an instrumental fact: computer numerical controlled tools necessitated advancements in computational surfaces which eventually led to NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) surfaces. In other words, the origins of NURBS surfaces resides in its relation to material processes, rather than many current approaches that develop free form surfaces and then force the tool onto the material without regard to the material properties. From this historical and mathematical review, this project develops toward more intelligent construction methods based on the integration of NURBS differential geometry paired with material qualities and processes. Specifically, a digital technique of developing conceptual NURBS geometry into piecewise surface patches are then flattened based on the material thickness and density. From these flattened patches, a material technique is developed to intelligently remove material to allow the rigid flat material to re-develop into physical surface patches. The goal of this research is to develop digital and material techniques toward intelligent construction based on the correspondence between digitally driven surface and digitally driven material processes. The application of this technique as a rational and flexible system is to support the dynamic response of form and material toward such performative aspects as structure, daylight, ventilation, and thermal properties.
series ACADIA
email cabrinharch@yahoo.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id ijac20053305
id ijac20053305
authors de Almeida, Clarissa Ribeiro Pereira; Pratschke, Anja; La Rocca, Renata
year 2005
title In-between and Through:Architecture and Complexity
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 3, 335-354
summary This paper draws on current research on complexity and design process in architecture and offers a proposal for how architects might bring complex thought to bear on the understanding of design process as a complex system, to understand architecture as a way of organizing events, and of organizing interaction. Our intention is to explore the hypothesis that the basic characteristics of complex systems – emergence, nonlinearity, self-organization, hologramaticity, and so forth – can function as effective tools for conceptualization that can usefully extend the understanding of the way architects think and act throughout the design process. To illustrate the discussions, we show how architects might bring complex thought inside a transdisciplinary design process by using models such as software engineering diagrams, and three-dimensional modeling network environments such as media to integrate, connect and 'trans–act'.
series journal
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/search/expand?pub=infobike://mscp/ijac/2005/00000003/00000003/art00006
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2005_000
id 2005_000
authors Duarte, José Pinto, Ducla-Soares, Gonçalo and Sampaio, A. Zita (Eds.)
year 2005
title Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms
source 23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 0-9541183-3-2], Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, 880 p.
summary As the field of computer-aided design evolved over the last thirty years or so, it has witnessed five changes of emphasis in research direction. In the first stage, the use of computers in architecture focused on the development of Computer Aided Design (CAD), that is, systems that simulated the use of drafting tools, and research was mainly concerned with the satisfaction of designers' ergonomic needs. In the second stage, there were efforts to use computer tools in non-graphical aspects of designing, such as the use of Data Base Management Systems (DBMS) in the quantity survey of buildings. The concern was to satisfy the cognitive needs of designers by focusing on the way information and knowledge were perceived, acquired, stored, and processed. In the third stage, the focus shifted to the development of realistic models of buildings to permit the assessment of design proposals. In the fourth stage, the focus was on studies concerned with the encoding of architectural knowledge into design tools (KBMS), and the discussion was whether to go towards design automation or design supporting tools. In the fifth stage, with the advent of the Internet and the development of communication tools, research became focused on the collaborative and social aspects of design activity. In recent years, research also became concerned with the exploration of the physical implications of digital media in the production of artefacts. Today, there is a vast range of research interests and approaches, but the quest for new, unifying paradigms continues.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email jduarte@civil.ist.utl.pt
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_805
id 2005_805
authors El-Khoury, Nada, De Paoli, Giovanni and Tidafi, Temy
year 2005
title Using Digital Devices to Find New Ways of Representing Audience Visibility in Theatrical Spaces
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 805-810
summary The following paper is in keeping with other pieces of research which tend to broaden the role of today’s computer tools so that they be seen as more than just representative. In fact, more and more studies focus on computer tools used as smart guides in the development stages of the preliminary concept. We therefore present a cognitive and interactive device with characteristics that address a theatre designer’s requirements. It provides information on the visual quality of seats and optimizes their location in order to improve audience visibility. The working method we introduce will serve as a basis for future implementations when designing theatrical facilities and providing for audience visibility.
keywords Visibility; CAD; Theatrical Facility; Digital Devices
series eCAADe
email giovanni.de.paoli@umontreal.ca
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id acadia05_078
id acadia05_078
authors Fox, Michael and Hu, Catherine
year 2005
title Starting From The Micro: A Pedagogical Approach to Designing Interactive Architecture
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 78-93
summary The paper outlines a pedagogical approach whereby a number of technology-intensive skills can be quickly learned to a level of useful practicality through a series of discrete, yet cumulative explorations with the design goal of creating intelligently responsive architectural systems. The culmination of such explorations in creating full-scale interactive architectural environments leads to a relatively unexplored area of negotiation whereby individual systems must necessarily manage environmental input to mediate a behavioural output. The emerging area of interactive architecture serves as a practical means for inventing entirely new ways of developing spaces, and the designing and building environments that address dynamic, flexible and constantly changing needs. Interactive architecture is defined here as spaces and objects that can physically re-configure themselves to meet changing needs. The central issues explored are human and environmental interaction and behaviours, embedded computational infrastructures, kinetic and mechanical systems and physical control mechanisms. Being both multidisciplinary and technology-intensive in nature, architects need to be equipped with at least a base foundational knowledge in a number of domains in order to be able to develop the skills necessary to explore, conceive, and design such systems. The teaching methods were carried out with a group of undergraduate design students who had no previous experience in mechanical engineering, electronics, programming, or kinetic design with the goal of creating a responsive kinetic system that can demonstrate physical interactive behaviours on an applicable architectural scale. We found the approach to be extremely successful in terms of psychologically demystifying unfamiliar and often daunting technologies, while simultaneously clarifying the larger architectural implications of the novel systems that had been created. The authors summarize the processes and tools that architects and designers can utilize in creating and demonstrating of such systems and the implications of adopting a more active role in directing the development of this new area of design.
series ACADIA
email mafox@foxlin.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id ascaad2016_002
id ascaad2016_002
authors Jabi, Wassim
year 2016
title Rigorous Creativity - Ubiquity, Parametrics, Tectonics
source Parametricism Vs. Materialism: Evolution of Digital Technologies for Development [8th ASCAAD Conference Proceedings ISBN 978-0-9955691-0-2] London (United Kingdom) 7-8 November 2016, pp. 3-6
summary Architects frequently understand and experience design and creativity as a personal and lonely activity. However, there is, increasingly, a need to collaborate with others in the design and construction of buildings. Digital technology is intricately intertwined with the creative and social aspects of the emerging practice world. A prime example is the use of digital fabrication technology and building information models to directly transfer information among architects, contractors, fabricators and consultants. At the same time, the discipline and practice of creative design is increasingly seen as a valuable cognitive skill, to be emulated, tapped, and understood by other disciplines in various settings. Fields outside of architecture and governmental granting agencies have shown strong interest in understanding, rationalizing and importing the creative design process that architects engage in. The obstacle, however, has been that architects and designers are rarely able to explain their processes in a manner understood by others. The advent of digital tools and social computing further complicates the issues of how designers design with such tools and how designers design with others (Lawson, 2005). Our aim should be to define a discipline of collaborative digital design with clear conceptual frameworks, methodologies, and epistemologies. The goal is two-fold: 1) to formulate a discipline of digital design based on sound theoretical and pragmatic underpinnings, and 2) to elucidate the processes of digital design so that we can better communicate them to other disciplines and thus engage more effectively in interdisciplinary research.
series ASCAAD
email jabiw@cardiff.ac.uk
last changed 2017/05/25 11:13

_id 2005_565
id 2005_565
authors Kabata, Michal and Koszewski, Krzysztof
year 2005
title A Model of Dispersed Historic Architectural Knowledge Base
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 565-572
summary This paper is based on the experience with creation of a small knowledge base about the between-war architecture of one of the Warsaw districts. Design, as a process of creation, combines processing of procedural and declarative knowledge. There is a vast amount of declarative knowledge of different kinds to be collected even before the design process starts. Advances in ICT (Information and Communications Technologies), particularly in such field as databases, data warehousing and knowledge engineering, make it a lot easier to design complex systems, which will allow to combine procedural and declarative knowledge. We used historic-architectural knowledge as an example of the second kind mentioned here. The sources of this kind of information are dispersed, the data is gathered in various formats, using different standards and for various purposes. Past experiences with creating detailed architectural heritage inventories in Poland led us to a conclusion that such a subject specific knowledge base may be a part of larger hierarchical structure, which still needs to be built. These are the reasons for adopting a data-warehouse-like structure, which responds with it’s tools to such needs. The assumptions for such system are presented and the context-based structure is discussed. During our work we also came for some more general conclusions. These concern a need for disseminating an OpenSource Society ideas through all the keepers of information related to architectural heritage.
keywords Information and Knowledge Management, Database Systems, Architectural Heritage, Data Warehouse Technology
series eCAADe
email xys@arch.pw.edu.pl
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_2_35_224
id cf2005_2_35_224
authors KOBAYASHI Yoshihiro and BATTINA Subhadha
year 2005
title Housing Layout Design Using Fractals
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 119-128
summary This paper introduces a computer-based tool for three dimensional (3D) landscape simulations of housing-layout-design using the concepts of fractals with Iterative Function System (IFS). Housing layout design is defined as a design to allocate many house-units in the undeveloped site. The tool generates a variety of layout designs consisting of multiple dwelling house-units from manual inputs or a template pattern defined as an XML file. Each unit can contain any detailed 3D components found in the residential development such as a house, roads, walls, trees etc. The template defines the transformation rules for IFS including the information of geometrical relationships between the stages in the iteration and of the components used in stop-conditions. The application tool is formulated, implemented and tested. The results in the case studies using several practical sites are demonstrated and evaluated based on the experiments in the design studio.
keywords fractal, housing layout, virtual reality, generative system, Java3D
series CAAD Futures
email ykobaya@asu.edu
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

_id cf2005_2_36_65
id cf2005_2_36_65
authors LIAO Kai and HAN Chia Y.
year 2005
title Collective Pavilions: A Generative Architectural Modelling for Traditional Chinese Pagoda
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 129-138
summary This paper investigates generative architectural modelling for traditional Chinese architecture and aims to explore and extend the potential of adaptive computing for architectural design methods. The design manners analysis of traditional pagodas architectures is made in a holistic view and under historical perspective. We propose a descriptive model and generative system for the design of traditional Chinese pagodas, by which each pagoda is defined as a collection of style-matched and form-coordinated pavilions and described by both topological graphs and variant geometrical units. Our approach models both of the building geometry and space organization/spatial patterns of pagodas separately. The generative mechanism consists of a framework of grammar-based design and parametric, recursive shape computation. Accordingly, the generative algorithm is also made of two levels, the topology of spatial patterns and the shape geometrical parameters that characterize pavilion variations. The algorithm for computing the former is based on GP (Genetic Programming) and the latter GA (Genetic Algorithms). To explore the collective behaviour of a group of pavilions, multi-agent modelling approach is incorporated in composition patterns search. A prototype system, 'glPagoda', using the OpenGL graphics library for rendering and visualization, has been developed and implemented on PC windows platform.
keywords pagoda, grammar-based design, multi-agent modelling, generative design system
series CAAD Futures
email liao_kai@yahoo.com, liaok@email.uc.edu
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

_id cdc2008_243
id cdc2008_243
authors Loukissas, Yanni
year 2008
title Keepers of the Geometry: Architects in a Culture of Simulation
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 243-244
summary “Why do we have to change? We’ve been building buildings for years without CATIA?” Roger Norfleet, a practicing architect in his thirties poses this question to Tim Quix, a generation older and an expert in CATIA, a computer-aided design tool developed by Dassault Systemes in the early 1980’s for use by aerospace engineers. It is 2005 and CATIA has just come into use at Paul Morris Associates, the thirty-person architecture firm where Norfleet works; he is struggling with what it will mean for him, for his firm, for his profession. Computer-aided design is about creativity, but also about jurisdiction, about who controls the design process. In Architecture: The Story of Practice, Architectural theorist Dana Cuff writes that each generation of architects is educated to understand what constitutes a creative act and who in the system of their profession is empowered to use it and at what time. Creativity is socially constructed and Norfleet is coming of age as an architect in a time of technological but also social transition. He must come to terms with the increasingly complex computeraided design tools that have changed both creativity and the rules by which it can operate. In today’s practices, architects use computer-aided design software to produce threedimensional geometric models. Sometimes they use off-the-shelf commercial software like CATIA, sometimes they customize this software through plug-ins and macros, sometimes they work with software that they have themselves programmed. And yet, conforming to Larson’s ideas that they claim the higher ground by identifying with art and not with science, contemporary architects do not often use the term “simulation.” Rather, they have held onto traditional terms such as “modeling” to describe the buzz of new activity with digital technology. But whether or not they use the term, simulation is creating new architectural identities and transforming relationships among a range of design collaborators: masters and apprentices, students and teachers, technical experts and virtuoso programmers. These days, constructing an identity as an architect requires that one define oneself in relation to simulation. Case studies, primarily from two architectural firms, illustrate the transformation of traditional relationships, in particular that of master and apprentice, and the emergence of new roles, including a new professional identity, “keeper of the geometry,” defined by the fusion of person and machine. Like any profession, architecture may be seen as a system in flux. However, with their new roles and relationships, architects are learning that the fight for professional jurisdiction is increasingly for jurisdiction over simulation. Computer-aided design is changing professional patterns of production in architecture, the very way in which professionals compete with each other by making new claims to knowledge. Even today, employees at Paul Morris squabble about the role that simulation software should play in the office. Among other things, they fight about the role it should play in promotion and firm hierarchy. They bicker about the selection of new simulation software, knowing that choosing software implies greater power for those who are expert in it. Architects and their collaborators are in a continual struggle to define the creative roles that can bring them professional acceptance and greater control over design. New technologies for computer-aided design do not change this reality, they become players in it.
email yanni@mit.edu
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

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