CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 41 to 60 of 550

_id caadria2005_a_7c_e
id caadria2005_a_7c_e
authors B. Kenzari
year 2005
title CRYSALLIZING DESIGN INTENTIONS, USING CNC, LASER AND RAPID PROTOTYPING TECHNOLOGIES
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 335-341
summary The advances made in the Rapid Prototyping and CAD/CAM (including CNC and Laser) Technologies are now offering designers the privilege of building physical realities, at whatever scale, directly and automatically from computer files, with the explicit implications of speed, precision and flexibility.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email b.kenzari@uaeu.ac.ae
last changed 2005/08/04 19:21

_id caadria2005_a_1a_b
id caadria2005_a_1a_b
authors B. Senyapili, I. Basa
year 2005
title RECONCILING COMPUTER AND HAND: THE CASE OF AUTHOR IDENTITY IN DESIGN PRESENTATIONS
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 13-22
summary As computers were newly emerging in the field of architectural design, it was claimed that the impact of computers would change the way architects design and present. However, within the course of computer use in design, although the field of architectural practice might have been altered extremely, in architectural education there still seems to be a bond to conventional mind-hand-paper relation. One of the reasons for that bond is the fact that although being r 1000 elated to many technologies, architecture essentially positions itself around an artistic core that is still fed with conventional modes of creation. Architectural education aims at adopting and working on this very core. One of the major contributors in the formation of this core is the presence of author identity. This paper makes a critical approach to computers in terms of expressing author identity in design presentations especially during design education. We believe that the author identity is important in design education in terms of identifying the potential and skills of the student. Especially in design education the final step of design process turns out to be the presentation, unlike architectural practice where the presented design is actually built. Within this conception, two different studies were held in an educational environment with 160 design students and 20 design instructors. The results of both studies pointed at the fact that the digital opportunities that exist for design education should evolve around preserving and underlining the author identity in design presentations.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email burcu@bilkent.edu.tr, basa@bilkent.edu.tr
last changed 2006/04/17 16:00

_id 2005_131
id 2005_131
authors Bailey, Rohan
year 2005
title Digital Tools for Design Learning
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 131-138
summary There is growing consensus among architectural critics and educators that there exists an increasing divide between the worlds of architectural education and practice. New social and cultural norms, new materials, and current global concerns, like sustainability, have largely influenced the need for an improved balance/integration between design theory and practice. This places schools of architecture around the world under pressure to provide their graduates with the requisite skills that support responsible design characterized by good design thinking strategies. The Caribbean School of Architecture, in addition to being affected by this predicament, has other pressures on its educational offerings. The region’s lack of resources and particular social issues mandates that graduates of the school adopt a responsible attitude towards design in the region. A positive attitude to such issues as sustainability, energy conservation and community will only come about through an effective transmission of particular architectural knowledge that is relevant to the region. The challenge (globally and in the Caribbean), therefore, is the provision of an innovative and effective way of supporting the student master dialogue in studio, facilitating the transfer of “practical, appropriate knowledge” needed by students to create safe, purposeful and responsible architecture. This paper exists within the research paradigm of providing digital teaching tools to beginning students of architecture. This digital research paradigm seeks to move digital technology (the computer) beyond functioning as an instrumental tool (in visualization, representation and fabrication) to becoming a “Socratic machine” that provides an appropriate environment for design learning. Research funds have been allocated to the author to research and develop the information component of the tool with special reference to the Caribbean. The paper will report on the results of prior investigations, describe the reaction and appreciation of the students and conclude with lessons learnt for the further development of the teaching tool.
keywords Design Education, Digital Design, Teaching Tools
series eCAADe
email rbailey@utech.edu.jm
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_163
id 2005_163
authors Balakrishnan, Bimal, Kalisperis, Loukas N. and Muramoto, Katsuhiko
year 2005
title Evaluating Workflow and Modeling Strategies of Pen Computing in the Beginning Architectural Design Studio
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 163-170
summary This paper investigates the impact of Tablet PCs on the workflow in an undergraduate design studio. We examined how well the students adapted the Tablet PC into their day-to-day design work and evaluated the appropriateness of the Tablet PC as a common digital tool used in an architectural design studio. This research involved observation of student behavior during the semester and the conducting of a survey measuring various aspects of the students’ use of the computers. A more specific goal was to compare the effectiveness of the pen versus the mouse as input devices for a three-dimensional modeling task in terms of both task time and strategies. Our assumption was that a change in input mode would affect the strategies and the performance. The results of a within-subjects, repeated-measures experiment carried out to elicit differences in input devices are discussed.
keywords Digital Design Education; Human-Computer Interaction; 3D Modeling; Pen Computing; Task Analysis
series eCAADe
email lnk@psu.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2005_783
id sigradi2005_783
authors Balmaceda, María Isabel; Alicia Violeta Malmod, María Fernanda Nafá
year 2005
title Information design, multimedia comunication and seismic prevention.
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 783-787
summary This Project Intends to promote preventive behavior in people who live in areas which pose seismic risk, though the development of multimedia systems which show the consequences of a destructive earthquake. The objective is to illustrate such effects, both rationally and emotionally, though an adequate combination of computing resources, so that our message can reach those people, independently from the strategy used to process the information. Communication through visualization doesn’t mean watching in the computer screen what has already been seen on paper. The information itself is not enough to promote preventive behavior. Before, it is necessary to contextualize that information into communication strategies oriented to specific groups so that this contribution can be culturally integrated. " [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email marbalma@farqui.unsj.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2005_557
id 2005_557
authors Barelkowski, Robert
year 2005
title Web-based Social Participation in the Process of Town Planning
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 557-564
summary The paper discusses the principles of using internet nested “Citizen” system that composes the platform to exchange information between different participants of planning procedure. As a part of P.R.S. method instrumentation, “Citizen” allows multidirectional interaction of planners, authorities and users of space. The paper shows various aspects of system structure, pointing out the most significant application abilities, the role different contents of the system play and services they provide to participants. The article summarizes the results of application, discusses the impact, web-based social participation has on efficiency of planning procedure, elimination of conflicts and understanding of planning problematics.
keywords Web-Based Planning Support, Programming Implementations for TownPlanning, User Participation
series eCAADe
email robert@armageddon.com.pl
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id acadia05_170
id acadia05_170
authors Barker, Daniel and Dong, Andy
year 2005
title A Representation Language for a Prototype CAD Tool for Intelligent Rooms
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 170-183
summary Intelligent rooms are a type of intelligent environment which enhance ordinary activities within the confines of a room by responding to human interaction using pervasive and ubiquitous computing. In the design of intelligent rooms, the specification of how the intelligent room enacts intelligent behavior through computational means is as integral as the geometric description. The self-aware and context-aware capabilities of intelligent rooms extend the requirements for computer-aided design tools beyond 3D modeling of objects. This article presents a Hardware as Agents Description Language for Intelligent Rooms (HADLIR) to model hardware in an intelligent room as “hardware agents” having sensor and/or effector modalities with rules and goals. End-users describe intelligent room hardware as agents based on the HADLIR representation and write agent rules and goals in Jess for each hardware component. This HADLIR agent description and the requisite software sensors/effectors constitute “hardware agents” which are instantiated into a multi-agent society software environment. The society is then bridged to either a virtual environment to prototype the intelligent room or to microelectronic controllers to implement a physical intelligent room. The integration illustrates how the HADLIR representation assists in the design, simulation and implementation of an intelligent room and provides a foundation technology for CAD tools for the creation of intelligent rooms.
series ACADIA
email adon3656@mail.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id cf2005_1_73_113
id cf2005_1_73_113
authors BARRIOS Carlos
year 2005
title Transformations on Parametric Design Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 393-400
summary This paper presents a research in progress in the development of parametric models for generation of complex shapes, and introduces a methodology for exploration of possible designs generated from a single model. The research presents a case study on the designs of the Spanish architect Antonio Gaudi, and takes on the fundamental rules of form generation of the lateral nave columns of the Sagrada Familia temple in Barcelona. A parameterization schema is presented as a fundamental tool for design exploration, which allows the reproduction of the original shapes designed by Gaudi, and the generation of a large set of new designs.
keywords parametric modeling, parametric design, design transformations
series CAAD Futures
email cabeto@mit.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id sigradi2005_126
id sigradi2005_126
authors Barrios Hernandez, Carlos Roberto
year 2005
title EVALUATION OF parametric models: TWO PROVISOS FOR THE SAGRADA FAMILIA COLUMNS
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 126-132
summary This paper presents a research in progress in the development of parametric models for geometric manipulation of complex shapes, and introduces a methodology for evaluation of the design instances of a parametric model. The research presents a case study on the designs of the Spanish architect Antonio Gaudi, and takes on the fundamental rules of the form generation of the nave columns of the Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona. The evaluation is done applying two provisos that determine if a shape is part of the design language and is an instance of the parametric model is a Gaudinian design.
series SIGRADI
email cabeto@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 2005_537
id 2005_537
authors Barrios, Carlos
year 2005
title Symmetry, Rules and Recursion
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 537-543
summary This paper presents a parametric shape grammar that explains the generation of the structural forms of the Spanish designer Santiago Calatrava. The shape grammar is divided into two separate grammars a lower level grammar and a higher level grammar. The lower level or first grammar is composed of rules to generate a “fundamental unit” design, which has the characteristic to be a single component with non-repetitive parts that becomes the primitive object of the design. The higher level or second grammar is composed of rules that generate the overall design by recursive application of Euclidean transformations to the fundamental unit. We concentrate our discussion on the higher level or second grammar to demonstrate the process of generating complex designs by application of simple rules.
keywords Shape Grammars, Parametric Design, Design Rules, Complex Structures
series eCAADe
email cabeto@mit.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2011_p170
id cf2011_p170
authors Barros, Mário; Duarte José, Chaparro Bruno
year 2011
title Thonet Chairs Design Grammar: a Step Towards the Mass Customization of Furniture
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 181-200.
summary The paper presents the first phase of research currently under development that is focused on encoding Thonet design style into a generative design system using a shape grammar. The ultimate goal of the work is the design and production of customizable chairs using computer assisted tools, establishing a feasible practical model of the paradigm of mass customization (Davis, 1987). The current research step encompasses the following three steps: (1) codification of the rules describing Thonet design style into a shape grammar; (2) implementing the grammar into a computer tool as parametric design; and (3) rapid prototyping of customized chair designs within the style. Future phases will address the transformation of the Thonet’s grammar to create a new style and the production of real chair designs in this style using computer aided manufacturing. Beginning in the 1830’s, Austrian furniture designer Michael Thonet began experimenting with forming steam beech, in order to produce lighter furniture using fewer components, when compared with the standards of the time. Using the same construction principles and standardized elements, Thonet produced different chairs designs with a strong formal resemblance, creating his own design language. The kit assembly principle, the reduced number of elements, industrial efficiency, and the modular approach to furniture design as a system of interchangeable elements that may be used to assemble different objects enable him to become a pioneer of mass production (Noblet, 1993). The most paradigmatic example of the described vision of furniture design is the chair No. 14 produced in 1858, composed of six structural elements. Due to its simplicity, lightness, ability to be stored in flat and cubic packaging for individual of collective transportation, respectively, No. 14 became one of the most sold chairs worldwide, and it is still in production nowadays. Iconic examples of mass production are formally studied to provide insights to mass customization studies. The study of the shape grammar for the generation of Thonet chairs aimed to ensure rules that would make possible the reproduction of the selected corpus, as well as allow for the generation of new chairs within the developed grammar. Due to the wide variety of Thonet chairs, six chairs were randomly chosen to infer the grammar and then this was fine tuned by checking whether it could account for the generation of other designs not in the original corpus. Shape grammars (Stiny and Gips, 1972) have been used with sucesss both in the analysis as in the synthesis of designs at different scales, from product design to building and urban design. In particular, the use of shape grammars has been efficient in the characterization of objects’ styles and in the generation of new designs within the analyzed style, and it makes design rules amenable to computers implementation (Duarte, 2005). The literature includes one other example of a grammar for chair design by Knight (1980). In the second step of the current research phase, the outlined shape grammar was implemented into a computer program, to assist the designer in conceiving and producing customized chairs using a digital design process. This implementation was developed in Catia by converting the grammar into an equivalent parametric design model. In the third phase, physical models of existing and new chair designs were produced using rapid prototyping. The paper describes the grammar, its computer implementation as a parametric model, and the rapid prototyping of physical models. The generative potential of the proposed digital process is discussed in the context of enabling the mass customization of furniture. The role of the furniture designer in the new paradigm and ideas for further work also are discussed.
keywords Thonet; furniture design; chair; digital design process; parametric design; shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email m.barros@ipt.pt
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id sigradi2005_511
id sigradi2005_511
authors Barrow, Larry R.
year 2005
title Man and machine: ideation and Making
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 511-516
summary The realization of architecture, that is the building of the physical artifact, requires numerous collaborative participates that requires a communication network in order to realize the vision. All efforts to communicate a design idea prior to physical realization, that is manufacturing or construction, are forms of visualization (i.e. representation). Herein lies the fundamental problem, the designer(s) must en-vision, and communicate that which is to BE ... physical, yet is NOT... physical. In this paper, we will review the emerging Human-Computer-Interface and technology influences on process and product; here we find the “humanistic” component is a critical factor in the success of “digital” strategies.
series SIGRADI
email lbarrow@coa.msstate.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id cf2005_1_69_73
id cf2005_1_69_73
authors BEILHARZ Kirsty
year 2005
title Responsive Sensate Environments: Past and Future Directions
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 361-370
summary This paper looks at ways in which recent developments in sensing technologies and gestural control of data in 3D space provide opportunities to interact with information. Social and spatial data, the utilisation of space, flows of people and dense abstract data lend themselves to visual and auditory representation to enhance our understanding of socio-spatial patterns. Mapping information to visualisation and sonification leads to gestural interaction with information representation, dissolving the visibility and tangibility of traditional computational interfaces and hardware. The purpose of this integration of new technologies is to blur boundaries between computational and spatial interaction and to transform building spaces into responsive, intelligent interfaces for display and information access.
keywords responsive environments, sensate space, sonification, visualisation, gestural controllers
series CAAD Futures
email kirsty@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id 2005_763
id 2005_763
authors Beilharz, Kirsty
year 2005
title Architecture as the Computer Interface: 4D Gestural Interaction with Socio-Spatial Sonification
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 763-770
summary Architecture today extends far beyond designing building shells and material, peripheral boundaries. Arguably, it has always been, and shifts increasingly in contemporary environments towards, designing space and interaction with space. Hence, the role of the designer includes integration of computing in architecture through ambient display and non-tactile interaction. This paper explores a framework in which the architecture is the computer interface to information sonification. (Sonification is automatically generated representation of information using sound). The examples in this paper are Emergent Energies, demonstrating a socio-spatially responsive generative design in a sensate environment enabled by pressure mats; Sensor-Cow using wireless gesture controllers to sonify motion; and Sonic Kung Fu which is an interactive sound sculpture facilitated by video colour-tracking. The method in this paper connects current information sonification methodologies with gesture controller capabilities to complete a cycle in which gestural, non-tactile control permutes and interacts with automatically-generated information sonification. Gestural pervasive computing negotiates space and computer interaction without conventional interfaces (keyboard/mouse) thus freeing the user to monitor or display information with full mobility, without fixed or expensive devices. Integral computing, a blurring of human-machine boundaries and embedding communication infrastructure, ambient display and interaction in the fabric of architecture are the objectives of this re-thinking.
keywords Interactive Sonification, Gesture Controllers, Responsive Spaces, SpatialSound
series eCAADe
email kirsty@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_491
id 2005_491
authors Beirão, José and Duarte, José
year 2005
title Urban Grammars: Towards Flexible Urban Design
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 491-500
summary Traditional urban plans have definitive design systems, without the flexibility required to deal with the complexity and change that characterise contemporary urban societies. To provide urban plans with increased flexibility, it is proposed a design methodology capable of producing various design solutions instead of a specific definitive design. The methodology uses shape grammars as a process for generating urban design. In this approach, design becomes a system of solutions rather than a specific one. Through the analyses of a group of urban plans, a design methodology was sketched in which rules are used to enable more flexibility. These plans where chosen for their perceived qualities in terms of language, planning efficiency, and latent flexibility. As a result, a four-phased methodology was identified and thus, proposed for designing urban plans. This methodology was then combined with shape grammars and tested in a design studio setting. Students were asked to use the methodology and shape grammars as auxiliary instruments in the design of a flexible plan for a new town. In the following year, to simulate real-world conditions and oblige students to consider urban ordering and scale, work was structured differently. First, students were asked to develop a rule-based urban plan as in the previous year. Second, they were asked to conceive a detail plan for a sector of an urban plan defined by another group of students following its rules. The plans were then analysed with the goal of refining the methodology. Results show that shape grammars produce urban plans with non-definitive formal solutions, while keeping a consistent spatial language. They also provide plans with explicit and implicit flexibility, thereby giving future designers a wider degree of freedom. Finally, they provide students with a concrete methodology for approaching urban design and foster the development of additional designing skills.
keywords Shape Grammars, Flexible Urban Design
series eCAADe
email josebeirao@netc.pt
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id ascaad2006_paper29
id ascaad2006_paper29
authors Bennadji, A. and A. Bellakha
year 2006
title Evaluation of a Higher Education Self-learning Interface
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper is a follow-up to a previous paper published in ASCAAD 2004 (A. Bennadji et al 2005). The latter reported on CASD (Computer Aided Sustainable Design) a self-learning educational interface which assists the various building’s actors in their design with a particular attention to the aspect of energy saving. This paper focuses on the importance of software evaluation and how the testing is done to achieve a better human-machine interaction. The paper will go through the summative evaluation of CASD, presents the output of this evaluation and addresses the challenge facing software developers: how to make an interface accessible to all users and specifically students in higher education.
series ASCAAD
email a.bennadji@rgu.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id sigradi2005_720
id sigradi2005_720
authors Bermudez, Julio; Jim Agutter
year 2005
title Data Architecture Studio: Premises, Pedagogy, and Results
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 720-724
summary Information Visualization (InfoVis) is the field devoted to the study of methods for displaying data in information-rich domains. Although most of the InfoVis solutions have been developed by scientists and engineers, artists and designers have began to bring in their expertise to advance the state of the art. The role that architects may play in this development could be substantial. Yet, participating in this new design frontier means to master skills and knowledge not necessarily covered by traditional architectural education. This paper presents a four-year effort devoted to develop such InfoVis curricula in an architectural context. The course encodes knowledge harvested over almost 10 year of InfoVis research bridging 5 disciplines and delivering many successful academic, technological, and commercial products. In particular, the class investigates the use of architecture as (1) a fundamental data organizational device and (2) a research method of examination, response, and communication for InfoVis problems.
series SIGRADI
email bermudez@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2005_438
id sigradi2005_438
authors Bessone, Miriam; Ricardo Pérez Miró, Isabel Molinas
year 2005
title Digital visualization and new intellectual associations among language - music - architecture
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 438-443
summary Throughout history, architecture has transposed contributions bound to structuralist focus or to musical composition. This is from linguistic and music respectively. New visualization systems show the possibility to give transpositions a new meaning, form the potentialities of hypermedia; locking for new projects parameters. This papers will show experimental workshop results developed within CI+D 2000 “New speeches and design process”. They study links and explore our work interrelating word – music and image. These processes are developed by people coming from literature, visual arts, music, and architecture areas. Lastly, the first results will be shown. Since parameters were transposed from music, by using NURBS forms, space prefiguration is tried out. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email mbessone@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2005_749
id sigradi2005_749
authors Bessone, Miriam; Susana Garramuño de Galuzzi
year 2005
title Design education, technology and visualization
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 749-754
summary University faculty -adult culture- work from the logic that goes through their speech, didactic model and strategies, providing special links with: the aim of knowledge, transmission mechanisms and technological medium. Students -young culture- receive and deal with knowledge mechanisms from a new logic. In a multimedia framework they establish interpretations using technological medium from semantic decodification. Young graduates, assistants, studio leaders -intermediate culture- coming from traditional learning models with acquired abilities in digital media, are a “potential interface” between both cultures. The impact between fields and cultures implies limitations and risks that may encourage change. A discourse about “new didactic configurations” from the point of view of these three cultures makes possible the exploration of other ways of teaching. Therefore the articulation of teacher-student interrelations and media promotes the development of teaching-learning techniques. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email mbessone@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2005_225
id sigradi2005_225
authors Bianchi, Alejandra S.
year 2005
title Education and innovation: present and future of teacher’s practice in digital graphic
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 225-229
summary This is a qualitative research about the “educative training process” of Digital Graphic students, in the Architectural Department of Nordeste University- Argentina. The specific aim is “to know in depth the elements that influence in the educative training process in digital graphics”, to guide the propose of new teaching strategies to make better the teaching- learning process. The studied universe includes two architecture -students groups that are coursing first and second year of the career, since 2004. The first analysis categories, allow us to find out the meaning that pupils give to the facts, to build the training process dialectic. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email abianchipianetti@yahoo.com.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1this is page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5show page 6show page 7... show page 27HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_910514 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002