CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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References

Hits 1 to 20 of 548

_id 2005_565
id 2005_565
authors Kabata, Michal and Koszewski, Krzysztof
year 2005
title A Model of Dispersed Historic Architectural Knowledge Base
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 565-572
summary This paper is based on the experience with creation of a small knowledge base about the between-war architecture of one of the Warsaw districts. Design, as a process of creation, combines processing of procedural and declarative knowledge. There is a vast amount of declarative knowledge of different kinds to be collected even before the design process starts. Advances in ICT (Information and Communications Technologies), particularly in such field as databases, data warehousing and knowledge engineering, make it a lot easier to design complex systems, which will allow to combine procedural and declarative knowledge. We used historic-architectural knowledge as an example of the second kind mentioned here. The sources of this kind of information are dispersed, the data is gathered in various formats, using different standards and for various purposes. Past experiences with creating detailed architectural heritage inventories in Poland led us to a conclusion that such a subject specific knowledge base may be a part of larger hierarchical structure, which still needs to be built. These are the reasons for adopting a data-warehouse-like structure, which responds with it’s tools to such needs. The assumptions for such system are presented and the context-based structure is discussed. During our work we also came for some more general conclusions. These concern a need for disseminating an OpenSource Society ideas through all the keepers of information related to architectural heritage.
keywords Information and Knowledge Management, Database Systems, Architectural Heritage, Data Warehouse Technology
series eCAADe
email xys@arch.pw.edu.pl
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id ascaad2012_003
id ascaad2012_003
authors Elseragy, Ahmed
year 2012
title Creative Design Between Representation and Simulation
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 11-12
summary Milestone figures of architecture all have their different views on what comes first, form or function. They also vary in their definitions of creativity. Apparently, creativity is very strongly related to ideas and how they can be generated. It is also correlated with the process of thinking and developing. Creative products, whether architectural or otherwise, and whether tangible or intangible, are originated from ‘good ideas’ (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). On one hand, not any idea, or any good idea, can be considered creative but, on the other hand, any creative result can be traced back to a good idea that initiated it in the beginning (Goldschmit and Tatsa, 2005). Creativity in literature, music and other forms of art is immeasurable and unbounded by constraints of physical reality. Musicians, painters and sculptors do not create within tight restrictions. They create what becomes their own mind’s intellectual property, and viewers or listeners are free to interpret these creations from whichever angle they choose. However, this is not the case with architects, whose creations and creative products are always bound with different physical constraints that may be related to the building location, social and cultural values related to the context, environmental performance and energy efficiency, and many more (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). Remarkably, over the last three decades computers have dominated in almost all areas of design, taking over the burden of repetitive tasks so that the designers and students can focus on the act of creation. Computer aided design has been used for a long time as a tool of drafting, however in this last decade this tool of representation is being replaced by simulation in different areas such as simulation of form, function and environment. Thus, the crafting of objects is moving towards the generation of forms and integrated systems through designer-authored computational processes. The emergence and adoption of computational technologies has significantly changed design and design education beyond the replacement of drawing boards with computers or pens and paper with computer-aided design (CAD) computer-aided engineering (CAE) applications. This paper highlights the influence of the evolving transformation from Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) and how this presents a profound shift in creative design thinking and education. Computational-based design and simulation represent new tools that encourage designers and artists to continue progression of novel modes of design thinking and creativity for the 21st century designers. Today computational design calls for new ideas that will transcend conventional boundaries and support creative insights through design and into design. However, it is still believed that in architecture education one should not replace the design process and creative thinking at early stages by software tools that shape both process and final product which may become a limitation for creative designs to adapt to the decisions and metaphors chosen by the simulation tool. This paper explores the development of Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) Tools and their impact on contemporary design education and creative design.
series ASCAAD
email ahmed.elseragy@aast.edu
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_003.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id 2005_547
id 2005_547
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2005
title Crisis? What Crisis?
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 547-556
summary The paper describes the current situation concerning career opportunities in the field of architecture in developed western countries. Several aspects that are almost universal mark this situation. Firstly, there are too many architects chasing traditional work in competition with structural (civil) engineers. This is not surprising in consideration of the fact, that the architectural education industry produces far too many new architects for the economy to absorb. In Germany, the number is almost three times too many. Secondly, the needs of the building industry have changed over the past twenty years so that the skills that architects want to offer are not necessarily those that are sought. Lastly, the constant specialisation of work has continued unabated. Architects, as generalists, have idly watched their areas of expertise be usurped from neighbouring fields like civil and structural engineering The reasons for this crisis are manifold. In the schools of architecture, the discussions often deal with form or formal arguments, which, in fact, have little or no relevance to the building industry. This position was tenable so long as the clients were willing to accept formal arguments in order to receive buildings of high quality or current social relevance (i.e. current architectural fashion). With the dual aspects of globalisation and a shift to maintaining building stocks rather than producing new buildings, the tolerance for “architectural” discussions has been reduced even further. Indeed, the monetary pressures overwhelm almost all other aspects, including so-called green issues. What is more, most of the monetary issues are time based. Time represents, perhaps, the largest pressure in any current planning project. The clients expect expedient, accurate and inexpensive solutions. If architects are not able to produce these, the clients will (and do) go elsewhere. The authors argue that there remain serious problems to be solved for architects and the metier in general. Ever cheaper, ever faster and ever encompassing information technologies offer the architectural community a chance to turn recent trends on their head. By using information technologies to their full potential, architects can reassert themselves as the coordinators of building information and processes. Simply put, this means less photorealistic rendering and more databases, which may be unappealing for those architects who have positioned themselves as “designers” and are able to talk long on form, but short on cost or logistics. Nonetheless, the situation is not lost, so long as architects are able to recognise what is desired from the point of view of the client and what is desired from the point of view of the architect. It is not a question of one or the other. Architects must be able to offer innovative design solutions that not only address the fiscal, legal and programmatic constraints, but also push the boundaries at to the position of architecture in the community at large. For educators, it must be made clear that the real potential architects possess is their encompassing knowledge of the building process including their expertise concerning questions of architectural form, function, history and art. Precisely while they are generalists are architects invaluable in a sea of specialists. The biggest hurdle to asserting this in the past has been the control of the vast amounts of information. This is no longer a problem and also no longer an excuse. In the education of architects, it must be made clear that their role dictates sovereignty over architectural information. Architectural Information Management is a necessary skill alongside the more traditional architectural skills. A brief outlook as to how this might come about is detailed in the paper. The authors propose didactic steps to achieve this. Primarily, the education of computer supported planning should not simply end with a series of lectures or seminars, but culminate in integrated Design Studios (which including Design-Build scenarios).
keywords Architectural Information Mangement, Computer Supported Design Studios, CSCW
series eCAADe
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_1_92_179
id cf2005_1_92_179
authors LAEPPLE Eberhard, CLAYTON Mark and JOHNSON Robert
year 2005
title Case Studies of Web-Based Collaborative Design
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 455-464
summary Data collected from real-world projects using Web-based communications and project management systems provide quantitative evidence for characterizing the design process. Tens of thousands of records have been analyzed from six cases. The cases are all high-end office and retail building projects, with about 50 members of the design team. The data supports the distinction of multiple stages in the design process as the patterns of usage of the software changes through time. Coordination activities are more frequent in early stages, while collaboration activities are more common in late stages. In planning and design stages, use of the software is focused upon accessing static information, while in construction documentation a relatively greater number of activities include generate and process operations.
keywords collaboration, communications, design management, design process, software
series CAAD Futures
email eberhard@tamu.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id sigradi2006_e034d
id sigradi2006_e034d
authors Ryan, Rachel and Donn, Michael
year 2006
title A 3D, interactive, multilayered, web-enabled model as a tool for multiple sets of end user groups: A case study and end user analysis
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 392-396
summary This research undertakes a case study involving focus groups of potential end users, to identify how a successful digital tool could be created using new and emerging technologies, to accommodate the multiple needs of these end users. 2005 saw the completion of a research paper, which proposed that a single, 3 dimensional digital model of a city forming a core for many different information systems, is a better approach to the needs of the city than many individual models optimised for each information system. The case for the single 3D model was evaluated through the research, development, delivery and analysis of a prototype 3 Dimensional model of Wellington City, New Zealand, presenting different ‘views’ of information in Wellington: a rendered visualisation in an animated “walkthrough”; the impact of planning constraints on daylight; interactive “plots” of property values. The development and delivery of the prototype model was analysed in regards to how complex, costly and time consuming it may be to exploit one base model for several purposes; and also therefore how beneficial, affordable and potentially successful a single model may be. The prototype model was created to test the idea, and therefore provided conclusions based on a limited feasibility analysis - with four potential information layers modelled and two potential delivery methods tested. The prototype model and user analysis results were presented in a research report that suggested further research and development of a single model could be very beneficial: Positive feedback from potential end users and data providers, and examples of potential data mining opportunities forming the basis of the need for continued research. 2006 sees the research continue as an 18 month research project in conjunction with an industry partner, Terralink International, (http://www.terralink.co.nz/). Terralink International Limited provides GIS and mapping solutions which according to their web site: “enable better business management.” The company maintains a national resource of “imagery, cartography, and spatial databases” and provides consultancy services linking these to company databases through GIS systems. The research investigates the potential for 3 dimensional, interactive, multilayered models to enhance delivery of information to multiple end user groups. The research method uses functional prototypes in end-user focus group workshops. These workshops, consisting of a combination of presentations, hands on interactive examples, group discussions, and individual feedback surveys, aim to establish how a tool might best be developed to communicate to a wide range of end users. The means of delivery whether a stand alone tool or web-based is a key element of the user group workshop assessment process. Note: The submission of the prototype tool (via video or interactive media) would greatly increase the effectiveness of the research presentation. Ability to include such media would be greatly appreciated.
keywords multilayered; 3D; end users; interactive; web-enabled
series SIGRADI
email Rachel.A.Ryan@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id 2005_373
id 2005_373
authors Ucelli, Giuliana, Conti, Giuseppe and De Amicis, Raffaele
year 2005
title Shape Knowledge Embedded in a Collaborative Virtual Design Environment for Architectural Design
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 373-381
summary VR-based design environment have been traditionally not connected to companies’ design repositories and knowledge management systems. Till now these tools are mainly used for the initial exploration of innovative and original three-dimensional spaces and curves. Our approach encourages the use of VRbased design environments as design tools from where to reuse design solutions and to access design information, which are stored in internal repositories. This vision goes towards the development of a VR-based integrated design platform. Further, today’s knowledge management systems show evident limitations when dealing with multimedia files and 3D models. In order to overcome this limitation a framework for embedding in our VR-based design environment a Knowledge Management system for multimedia content has been developed and it is here described. Our solution implies the use of annotation languages such as the recent MPEG7 ISO/IEC (Multimedia Content Description Interface) standard for metadata, which is based on the XML language. Data types handled in our system are multimedia formats including text, audio, video, images, and 3D models. The main contribution of our research activity is in providing an innovative and original approach for supporting the design process, which takes advantage both of the visualization and design capabilities of virtual reality technology and of the reuse of design solutions directly in VE, through the retrieval of 3D models and multimedia data from various sources.
keywords Virtual Reality, Collaborative Architectural Design, Design Reuse, Content Retrieval
series eCAADe
email giuliana.ucelli@graphitech.it
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id caadria2005_a_8a_b
id caadria2005_a_8a_b
authors Riken Homma, Kazuhisa Iki, Ryouichi Ise
year 2005
title Development of the knowledge-sharing sheet system for landscape design management
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 376-386
summary In a public design, such as a landscape, it is important that the information on the design process be shared among the planners, the administration, and the citizens, and to continue the design work with consensus. A landscape design proposal cannot be reasonably evaluated from only the result of a design since the decision making process would not be sufficiently explained. Therefore, designers are required to record and store several design documents during the design process. The development of a knowledge management technique is desirable in order to facilitate the sharing of the project information in the designer’s group. The authors have researched knowledge management in a landscape design process, developed a heuristic knowledge-sharing tool that aids decision-making by consensus in a design process. This tool is a sheet system based on XML (extensible markup language). It allows the user to retrieve knowledge from a similar design project, and to customize the formats of a sheet according to the design process.
series CAADRIA
email homma@ge.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id sigradi2005_300
id sigradi2005_300
authors Cavieres, Andrés P.; Marcelo Quezada G.
year 2005
title Analysis of the possibilities offered by the application of parametric modeling technologies in the design processes shared between architects and industrial designers: The prefabricated house case.
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 300-303
summary Traditionally, the teaching of digital design systems has been focused on the operative learning of software. However, this almost exclusively technical approach has leaded to a partial view of these systems, as well suited platforms to exploration of project’s possibilities. Consequently their relevance as a base for project representation and therefore as a useful instrument for conceptual exploration for design and experimental research of their processes have been undervalued. On the other hand, this restrictive perspective results in an important waste of the teaching possibilities lying in CAD software related with interdisciplinary teamwork. The following academic experience obeys to a new insight of how to teach these tools, based upon problem solving in Design by interdisciplinary students work teams from Architecture and Industrial Design. In this bet, the learning process is flexible, shared and collaborative, according to the requirements of each project, powered by the commitment of facing common goals. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email acaviere@uchile.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:48

_id 5b89
id 5b89
authors Sevaldson, Birger
year 2005
title Developing Digital Design Techniques Investigations on Creative Design Computing
source Oslo School of Architecture and Design, PHD-Thesis
summary 1.1. The themes in this theses 16 1.1.1. Mind the mind gap 16 1.1.2. Prologue: The World Center for Human Concerns 17 1.1.3. Creative computer use 26 1.1.4. Design strategies and techniques 31 1.2. Overview 33 1.2.1. Main issues 34 1.2.2. The material 36 1.2.3. The framework of this thesis 37 2. CURRENT STATE AND BACKGROUND 39 2.1. New tools, old thoughts. 39 2.1.1. A misuse strategy 44 2.1.2. Emergence in design 47 2.1.3. Programming and design 50 2.1.4. Artificial intelligence 53 2.1.5. Human intelligence and artificial representations 53 2.2. Electronic dreams 54 2.2.1. The dream of intuitive software 55 2.2.2. The dream of the designing machine 60 2.2.3. The dream of self-emerging architecture; genetic algorithms in design 61 2.2.4. A cultural lag 62 2.3. Ideas and ideology 64 2.3.1. A personal perspective on the theories of the 1990s 65 2.3.2. "The suffering of diagrams" 68 2.3.3. Architectural theory and design methodology 69 2.4. Ideas on creativity 72 2.4.1. What is creativity? 73 2.4.2. Creativity, a cultural phenomenon. 75 2.4.3. Creativity in the information age 79 2.4.4. Creativity-enhancing techniques 81 2.4.5. Crucial fiicro-cultures 82 2.4.6. A proposal for a practitioner approach to creativity 83 2.5. Summary and conclusion of part 2 84 3. NEW DESIGN TECHNIQUES 86 3.1. Introduction 86 3.2. New technology - new strategy 87 3.3. Thinking through design practice: the inspirational playful design approach 88 3.4. A Corner stone: emergence 89 3.4.1. The source material 94 3.5. Recoding, translation and interpretation 95 A case: Tidsrom 97 3.6. Reconfiguring schemata 109 3.7. Rules and games 113 3.8. Virtuality and virtual models 118 3.8.1. What is "The Virtual"? 118 3.8.2. Virtual reality 119 Investigating "the virtual" 120 3.8.3. Analysing the virtual 126 3.9. Visual thinking (diagrams and visual thinking) 130 3.9.1. Visual Thinking and Abstraction. 130 3.9.2. A heuristic process 132 3.9.3. Visual thinking, skills and tacit knowledge 132 3.9.4. Media for visual thinking 133 3.10. Diagrammatic thinking 138 3.10.1. Descriptive diagrams 142 3.10.2. Generative diagrams 144 3.10.3. Versioning 149 3.10.4. Finding 153 3.10.5. Translation and interpretation 158 3.10.6. From generative diagram to program 168 3.10.7. Dynamic generative diagrams 171 3.11. The question of selection 175 3.12. Summary and conclusion of part 3 178 4. WAYS OF WORKING: FROM DESIGN PRACTICE TOWARDS THEORY AND DIGITAL DESIGN METHODS 179 4.1. Introduction 179 4.1.1. Practice-based research 180 4.1.2. Visual material is central. 180 4.1.3. Two investigation paths 180 4.1.4. Achievements 180 4.2. Methods 181 4.2.1. Explorative and generative research 182 4.2.2. A first-person approach 183 4.2.3. Analysis 184 4.2.4. The Material 185 4.3. Systematising creative computer use. Ways of working; techniques in creative computer use. 186 4.3.1. Categorization 186 4.3.2. Mapping the field of design computing. 187 4.3.3. Generic techniques 190 4.3.4. Specific techniques 192 4.3.5. Table of techniques 193 4.3.6. Examples of techniques 200 4.3.7. Traces of technology. 213 4.4. The further use of the generated material 219 4.4.1. Realisation strategies 221 4.4.2. Templates and scaffolds 223 4.5. Summary of Part 4 240 PART 5. WAYS OF THINKING: INTENTIONS IN CREATIVE COMPUTER USE. 241 5.1. Intentions 241 5.1.1. Categorising intentions 242 5.2. Intention themes 243 5.2.1. Cases and samples from Group one: Formal, phenomenal, spatial and geometrical themes 244 5.2.2. Intentions of response to the complexity of urban systems 297 5.3. The Hybrid Process 317 5.3.1. Hybridization strategies 319 5.3.2. The hybrid process and its elements. 328 6. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 344 6.1. Principles, concepts and methods for creative design computing 344 6.2. A new type of creativity? 348 6.3. A practice as the field for an investigation 349 6.4. Suggestions for further studies 349
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
last changed 2007/04/08 14:11

_id 2005_269
id 2005_269
authors Caldas, Luisa and Duarte, José
year 2005
title Fabricating Ceramic Covers
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 269-276
summary This paper describes a studio experiment developed with the aim of exploring the design and fabrication of innovative roof systems based on ceramic tiles using digital technologies. History is rich in examples of the use of ceramic roof tiles since the ancient world. Today’s systems derive from such ancient systems and fall into several basic categories depending on the form of the tiles and how they interlock. These systems present acceptable functional performances due to centuries of refinement, but as they have suffered little formal evolution in recent centuries, to respond to modern needs they require complex layering and assemblies. Recent technological evolution has emphasized the optimization of the tile production process in terms of time saving and cost reduction, and the improvement of product quality in terms of material homogeneity and durability. Little attention has been paid to the tile form and the roof system as a whole, including the assembly process. As a result, despite the variety and performance of existing designs, they are often perceived as outdated by architects who refuse to use them following a stylistic trend in architectural design towards primary forms and flat roofs. The challenge of the experiment was to take advantage of digital design and fabrication technology to conceive systems with improved performance and contemporary designs. The hope was that this could lead architects to consider integrating roof tiles systems in their architectural proposals. Results yielded five different roof systems. These systems are innovative from a formal viewpoint both at the tile and roof level. In addition, they are easy to assemble and possess better thermal and water-proofing performance. Digital technologies were determinant to enable students to design the complex shape of the tiles, to manipulate them into assemblies, and to assess the shape of the roofs, as well as their thermal and structural performance in some cases.
keywords Design Education; Rapid Prototyping; Collaboration; Ceramics; Innovation; Tiles
series eCAADe
email jduarte@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_000
id 2005_000
authors Duarte, José Pinto, Ducla-Soares, Gonçalo and Sampaio, A. Zita (Eds.)
year 2005
title Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms
source 23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings [ISBN 0-9541183-3-2], Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, 880 p.
summary As the field of computer-aided design evolved over the last thirty years or so, it has witnessed five changes of emphasis in research direction. In the first stage, the use of computers in architecture focused on the development of Computer Aided Design (CAD), that is, systems that simulated the use of drafting tools, and research was mainly concerned with the satisfaction of designers' ergonomic needs. In the second stage, there were efforts to use computer tools in non-graphical aspects of designing, such as the use of Data Base Management Systems (DBMS) in the quantity survey of buildings. The concern was to satisfy the cognitive needs of designers by focusing on the way information and knowledge were perceived, acquired, stored, and processed. In the third stage, the focus shifted to the development of realistic models of buildings to permit the assessment of design proposals. In the fourth stage, the focus was on studies concerned with the encoding of architectural knowledge into design tools (KBMS), and the discussion was whether to go towards design automation or design supporting tools. In the fifth stage, with the advent of the Internet and the development of communication tools, research became focused on the collaborative and social aspects of design activity. In recent years, research also became concerned with the exploration of the physical implications of digital media in the production of artefacts. Today, there is a vast range of research interests and approaches, but the quest for new, unifying paradigms continues.
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email jduarte@civil.ist.utl.pt
more http://www.ecaade.org
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_107
id 2005_107
authors Fricker, Pia, Ochsendorf, Mathias and Strehlke, Kai
year 2005
title GENERATIVE INTERFACES AND SCENARIOS - INTERACTION IN INTELLIGENT ARCHITECTURE
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 107-113
summary New media and modern building automation have a strong impact on contemporary architecture. So far one could regard built architecture as static. These new technologies introduce a dynamic impulse to architecture. The objective of our research and teaching work is to demonstrate the impact of innovative systems on architecture in daily usage while providing building automation, multimedia integration and facility management services in intelligent networked buildings. These technologies, as described in this paper are integrated in our second year course for students of Architecture. By designing an interactive graphical interface for the lab they were asked to create a spatial scenario as a self running Flash animation. Thus real space is merged with virtual reality.
keywords CAAD Curriculum, Human-Computer Interaction, Web-Based Design, Building Automation, Generative Graphical Interfaces
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email ochsendorf@hbt.arch.ethz.ch, fricker@hbt.arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_1_33_194
id cf2005_1_33_194
authors HE Jie, TSOU Jin Yeu, XUE Yucai and CHOW Benny
year 2005
title A Visual Landscape Assessment Approach for High-density Urban Development
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 125-134
summary The rapid developments of economy and urbanization bring great pressure to natural environment and resources, which contribute big challenge to sustainable urban development in high-density urban areas like Hong Kong, China and many other Eastern Asia cities. In these areas, protecting natural landscape resources and enhancing visibility to urban spaces and residential zones has become significant in improving the livability of human settlement. This paper presents a new approach in assessing the visual quality in high-density urban environment. The principal methodology is to quantitatively integrate human visual perception parameters with the visible landscape resources' characteristics. GIS is employed as the database and technical platform. A residential development in Hong Kong was used as a case study. The approach provides decision making support to urban planning, site layout design, and estate management during the early stage of the schematic design/planning process.
keywords visual perception, visual quality assessment, urban planning, GIS
series CAAD Futures
email hejie@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id caadria2005_a_7b_d
id caadria2005_a_7b_d
authors Jane R. Burry, Andrew L. Burrow, Mark C. Burry
year 2005
title Upholding the Poetic in Design Collaboration
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 288-299
summary Design is a fundamentally collaborative activity. It commonly calls on a wide range of expertise and is arguably most effective when all contributions can be considered from an early and highly conceptual phase of the process. The sharing of information, particularly in a process that, at its best, involves collective conceptualisation is complicated by the very close and reciprocal relationship between the partial knowledge about the object of design and the mode of expression or representation of these ideas. As the design process and its numerous inputs, iterations and interrelationships become embedded in the communications; knowledge capture, management and access become central issues. This paper will selectively recount some of the substantive evidence for the characteristics of communication environments most supportive to design collaboration. In response to these findings it will introduce the use of wiki as the basis of an environment to provide this support, provide more detailed examples of the ways in which wiki has been adopted in early collaborative experiments and describe the developments currently being implemented, and how these are being tested in use.
series CAADRIA
email jane.burry@rmit.edu.au, andrew.burrow@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id caadria2017_062
id caadria2017_062
authors Ji, Seung Yeul, Kim, Mi Kyoung and Jun, Han Jong
year 2017
title Campus Space Management Using a Mobile BIM-based Augmented Reality System
source P. Janssen, P. Loh, A. Raonic, M. A. Schnabel (eds.), Protocols, Flows, and Glitches - Proceedings of the 22nd CAADRIA Conference, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou, China, 5-8 April 2017, pp. 105-114
summary In South Korea, the changing paradigm of family composition toward single-person households and nuclear families has caused the decrease in number of students, which has led to the need for change in the qualitative, rather than quantitative, management of spaces and facilities on university campuses. In particular, since 2005, the merging of universities have accelerated, which has brought up the need for a system that facilitates the management of integrated university systems. Accordingly, universities now require efficient system operation based on three-dimensional and data visualization, unlike the document-based management of facilities and spaces in the past. Users lack a sense of responsibility for public facilities, causing difficulties such as energy waste and frequent movement, as well as damage and theft of goods. This study aims to form an AR-based interface using the ANPR algorithm, a computer vision technique, and the position-based data of the GPS. It also aims to build a campus space management system to overcome the limitations of current systems and to effectively and systematically manage integrated building data. In addition, for module test verification, the prototype is applied to actual campus spaces, and additional demands for campus space management in the AR application are identified and organized.
keywords augmented reality; Campus space management; BIM; CAFM (computer-aided facilities management); user experience (UX)
series CAADRIA
email musicji83@hanyang.ac.kr
last changed 2017/05/09 08:05

_id caadria2005_b_5c_f
id caadria2005_b_5c_f
authors Jumphon Lertlakkhanakul, Ilju Lee, Miyun Kim, Jin Won Choi
year 2005
title Using the Mobile Augmented Reality Techniques for Construction Management
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 396-403
summary In this paper we attempt to develop a new system called “C-Navi” for construction site simulation and management system. By integrating AR technology with mobile computing, the new system will extend the abilities of AR systems to be implemented in large outdoor space. The concept of 4D CAD system is utilized by integrating related information and displaying them in the time-based visualization approach. Our system could help with decision making and also act as a tool for improved communications between project partners.
series CAADRIA
email jumphon@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id sigradi2005_765
id sigradi2005_765
authors Lagos, Rodrigo; Flavio Valassina, Rodrigo García, Nicolás Sáez, Marlene Muñoz, Margarita Gatica
year 2005
title Toward an autopoietical model of formation for analog digital competences in architecture
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 765-770
summary In the frame of the educational polities, the architecture renews your manners and methods of education, emphasizing a formation based more on competition that in knowledge. Our discipline possesses an important tradition in, your pedagogy based on the didactics of the project. The today challenge is your update, considering the incorporation, systematic and validated, of the tools Analogous Digital (AD), orientated - more than to the representation, to the action proyectual. Based on works of J. Bermúdez, and others presented by these researchers in other Sigradi’s versions, tries to demonstrate that the interactive analogous use of analog-digital tools in the education of the project stimulates the increase of information and the actions of communication that favor the quality of the learnings and the management of the information. Your impact will be studied, both in the Pedagogic Practices of the teachers and in the Processes of the students in the Action Proyectual (AP). [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email rlagos@biobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id acadia06_538
id acadia06_538
authors Senagala, Mahesh
year 2006
title Light Exchange
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 538-539
summary The notions of collaborative exchanges, leadership, and entrepreneurialism that cross disciplinary boundaries were promoted in a digital design-build studio taught in spring 2005. With the starting funds of one dollar, the studio took up the challenge of building two full-scale tensile fabric structures that mark the entrances to a downtown San Antonio building. Structures of 1200 square feet total surface area were successfully designed, engineered, and executed within a semester framework at a final cost of $102,490. Collaborations were fostered with 24 industry partners from Asia, Europe, Australia, and USA, including four structural engineers. Innovative pedagogical, collaborative and project management methods were employed. The studio was structured as a self-organized design “firm.” Positions were created and students were “hired” into the firm to play different roles. The studio utilized web-based communication and project management tools. After a four-week warm-up project that established an innovative studio culture, professional schedules were prepared and the engineers were engaged in the collaborative process of designing the anchors, cables, connections and PTFE/PVC membranes. The peculiarities of digitally designing, fabricating and erecting tensile fabric structures were comprehensively explored. The studio completed all the CNC fabrication, concrete footings and membrane fabrication at local workshops through special partnerships.
series ACADIA
email mahesh@mahesh.org
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 2005_581
id 2005_581
authors Wender, Katrin, Willenbacher, Heiko, Hübler, Reinhard and Donath, Dirk
year 2005
title A Modular Navigation Layer for Information Retrieval in the Building Life Cycle
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 581-588
summary One cause for the mostly inconsistent and incomplete transfer of data within the building life-cycle is the insular nature of currently available software solutions for building planning / facility management. An IT-supported integrative platform could ensure the integration not only of all planning participants and their respective tasks but also all phases of the building life-cycle. A platform of this kind must provide flexibility on several levels: modelling / administration, model integration and of course data navigation and information retrieval. Because of the uniqueness and long lifetime of buildings it is impossible to develop a comprehensive and generically applicable building model as well as information requirements occurring during the life-cycle cannot be precisely defined in advance. A basic feature of the proposed approach is the ability to modify the building model (i.e. data structure) at run-time of the system. As a fundamental requirement the navigation layer of the integrative platform must support a variety of search strategies and be open for the integration of new modules. We describe an approach for an integrated platform for information retrieval across the entire life cycle of a building using a digital building model as a basis. The system architecture developed for the data and integration layers is described and problems associated with information provision for supporting decisions are examined. Based on the demands identified, an approach for a navigation and online search layer is formulated.
keywords Information Retrieval: Building Life Cycle, Building Model, Planning Process, Decision Process
series eCAADe
email katrin.wender@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id acadia05_246
id acadia05_246
authors Wierzbicki-Neagu, Madalina
year 2005
title Unfolding Architecture – Study, Development and Application of New Kinetic Structure Topologies
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 246-253
summary Advances in design tools and material engineering open new possibilities for architectural structures that may respond better to the demands of the increasing density of development, better space management and lesser environmental impact. Folding structures that provide adjustable on demand configurations can be effectively conceptualized if appropriate interdisciplinary expertise is brought together. Kinematic chain geometries borrowed from traditional mechanics can be developed into a variety of topologies suitable for architectural structures. Rectilinear deformable grids can provide the functionality of expanding and collapsing as well as the ability to be infinitely arrayed. Converging grids allow for circular arrays and fan like folding. The challenge is to translate a two-dimensional chain concept into a three-dimensional array of interleaved frames that form a stable structure and can bear the necessary loads. In order to complement the folding structure with the corresponding foldable shell, the algebra of rigid folds can be adapted to develop viable geometrical concepts. The demands of the design process needed to develop kinetic structures will expand the traditional architectural workflow to include parametric modeling tools that are common in mechanical engineering. Folding architectural structures require, besides traditional architectural layout development, parametric assembly capabilities and motion analysis typical for mechanical design. Potential application development, marketing, building code changes and effective multidisciplinary collaboration must take place for kinetic structures to enter the architectural mainstream.
series ACADIA
email madalina@interchange.ubc.ca
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

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