CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 548

_id acadia05_226
id acadia05_226
authors Biloria, N., Oosterhuis, K. and Aalbers, C.
year 2005
title Design Informatics
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 226-235
summary The research paper exemplifies a novel information integrated design technique developed at ONL (Oosterhuis and Lenard), Netherlands, specifically appropriated for envisaging complex geometric forms. The ‘informed design technique’, apart from being highly instrumental in conceptualizing and generating the geometric component constituting architectural form in a parametric manner, is also efficiently utilized for precise computer aided manufacturing and construction of the speculated form. Geometric complexities inherent in contemporary architectural constructs and the time spent in appropriation of such topologies, fueled the ‘informed design’ approach, which caters to issues of timely construction, precision oriented design and production (visual and material) and parametric modeling attuned to budgetary fluctuations. This design-research approach has been tested and deployed by ONL, for conceiving ‘the Acoustic Barrier’ project, Utrecht Leidsche Rijn in the Netherlands and is treated as a generic case for exemplifying the ‘informed design’ technique in this research paper. The design methodology encourages visualizing architectural substantiations from a systems perspective and envisages upon a rule based adaptive systems approach involving extrapolation of contextual dynamics/ground data in terms of logical ‘rules’. These rules/conditionalities form the basis for spawning parametric logistics to be mapped upon geometric counterparts exemplifying the conception. The simulated parametric relations bind dimensional aspects (length, width, height etc.) of the geometric construct in a relational manner, eventually culminating in a 3D spatial envelope. This evolved envelope is subsequently intersected with a ‘parametric spatio-constructive grid’, creating specific intersecting points between the two. The hence extorted ‘point cloud’ configuration serves as a generic information field concerning highly specific coordinates, parameters and values for each individual point/constructive node it embodies. The relations between these points are directly linked with precise displacements of structural profiles and related scaling factors of cladding materials. Parallel to this object oriented modeling approach, a detailed database (soft/information component) is also maintained to administer the relations between the obtained points. To be able to derive constructible structural and cladding components from the point cloud configuration customized Scripts (combination of Lisp and Max scripts) process the point cloud database. The programmed script-routines, iteratively run calculations to generate steel-wireframes, steel lattice-structure and cladding panels along with their dimensions and execution drawing data. Optimization-routines are also programmed to make rectifications and small adjustments in the calculated data. This precise information is further communicated with CNC milling machines to manifest complex sectional profiles formulating the construct hence enabling timely and effective construction of the conceptualized form.
series ACADIA
email n.biloria@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id ijac20053204
id ijac20053204
authors Han, Seung-Hoon
year 2005
title ARCH:DMUVR - A Working Prototype of a Distributed Collaborative Design System
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 2, 203-226
summary This paper outlines a working prototype which suggests a distributed Computer-Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) system to promote a new model of collaborative design. Recently, there has been a growing interest in distributed CAAD integration due to the needs of direct collaboration among project participants. The potential for the integration of information is expected to have a tremendous impact on architecture and the construction industry. The aim of this research is to provide a new paradigm for a CAAD system by combining research on integrated CAAD applications with recent collaboration technologies. The proposed system has been designed and a prototype implemented to produce enough guidelines to foster interest in the development of future CAAD systems on the Internet. To this end, two different scopes of implementation are evaluated: first, global architecture and the functionality of a distributed CAAD system; and, second, the association of an architectural application to the system.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2005_399
id 2005_399
authors Johansson, Mikael and Roupé, Mattias
year 2005
title From CAD to VR – Implementations for Urban Planning and Building Design
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 399-405
summary At present time, three-dimensional objects are often represented with 2D-data in urban planning and building design. In order to get all the involved parties to fully understand a certain project, this may not be enough. More and more projects therefore take use of the Virtual Reality (VR) technique as a complement to traditional 2D drawings and sketches. All the involved parties can then share a common frame of reference for all discussions regarding a certain project. Unfortunately, the technique is not yet adapted to fit the current building design process. In this paper, we present a solution for semi-automatic generation of a VR-model based on 3D CAD information and aerial photos obtained from the City Planning Authorities in Sweden. The data is imported to support real-time editing of terrain, roads and buildings. We also present a framework for importing 3D-models created in Autodesk Revit which enables a seamless integration of modern 3D CAD and VR-models. The features are implemented in a software developed at Chalmers Visualization studio (Gothenburg, Sweden) and technical details about terrain handling and speed-up techniques will be given.
keywords Virtual Reality; 3D City modeling; Urban planning; Terrain; Visualization
series eCAADe
email jomi@chl.chalmers.se
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2006_e034d
id sigradi2006_e034d
authors Ryan, Rachel and Donn, Michael
year 2006
title A 3D, interactive, multilayered, web-enabled model as a tool for multiple sets of end user groups: A case study and end user analysis
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 392-396
summary This research undertakes a case study involving focus groups of potential end users, to identify how a successful digital tool could be created using new and emerging technologies, to accommodate the multiple needs of these end users. 2005 saw the completion of a research paper, which proposed that a single, 3 dimensional digital model of a city forming a core for many different information systems, is a better approach to the needs of the city than many individual models optimised for each information system. The case for the single 3D model was evaluated through the research, development, delivery and analysis of a prototype 3 Dimensional model of Wellington City, New Zealand, presenting different ‘views’ of information in Wellington: a rendered visualisation in an animated “walkthrough”; the impact of planning constraints on daylight; interactive “plots” of property values. The development and delivery of the prototype model was analysed in regards to how complex, costly and time consuming it may be to exploit one base model for several purposes; and also therefore how beneficial, affordable and potentially successful a single model may be. The prototype model was created to test the idea, and therefore provided conclusions based on a limited feasibility analysis - with four potential information layers modelled and two potential delivery methods tested. The prototype model and user analysis results were presented in a research report that suggested further research and development of a single model could be very beneficial: Positive feedback from potential end users and data providers, and examples of potential data mining opportunities forming the basis of the need for continued research. 2006 sees the research continue as an 18 month research project in conjunction with an industry partner, Terralink International, (http://www.terralink.co.nz/). Terralink International Limited provides GIS and mapping solutions which according to their web site: “enable better business management.” The company maintains a national resource of “imagery, cartography, and spatial databases” and provides consultancy services linking these to company databases through GIS systems. The research investigates the potential for 3 dimensional, interactive, multilayered models to enhance delivery of information to multiple end user groups. The research method uses functional prototypes in end-user focus group workshops. These workshops, consisting of a combination of presentations, hands on interactive examples, group discussions, and individual feedback surveys, aim to establish how a tool might best be developed to communicate to a wide range of end users. The means of delivery whether a stand alone tool or web-based is a key element of the user group workshop assessment process. Note: The submission of the prototype tool (via video or interactive media) would greatly increase the effectiveness of the research presentation. Ability to include such media would be greatly appreciated.
keywords multilayered; 3D; end users; interactive; web-enabled
series SIGRADI
email Rachel.A.Ryan@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id caadria2005_b_5b_a
id caadria2005_b_5b_a
authors Mao-Lin Chiu, Ju-Hung Lan, Kou-Wei Sun
year 2005
title City modeling for large scale urban redevelopment - Methodology and implementation
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 317-327
summary The paper reviews the development of city modeling and depicts the city modeling process for large scale urban redevelopment. From an information mining viewpoint, the city model built has various levels of details and it consists of street and building tags for identification, and the web-based interface is built for retrieving information and better understanding of the environmental changes as well as the progress of urban development. The demonstration and discussion are presented.
series CAADRIA
email mc2p@mail.ncku.edu.tw, jhlan@cc.kyit.edu.tw
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id 5b89
id 5b89
authors Sevaldson, Birger
year 2005
title Developing Digital Design Techniques Investigations on Creative Design Computing
source Oslo School of Architecture and Design, PHD-Thesis
summary 1.1. The themes in this theses 16 1.1.1. Mind the mind gap 16 1.1.2. Prologue: The World Center for Human Concerns 17 1.1.3. Creative computer use 26 1.1.4. Design strategies and techniques 31 1.2. Overview 33 1.2.1. Main issues 34 1.2.2. The material 36 1.2.3. The framework of this thesis 37 2. CURRENT STATE AND BACKGROUND 39 2.1. New tools, old thoughts. 39 2.1.1. A misuse strategy 44 2.1.2. Emergence in design 47 2.1.3. Programming and design 50 2.1.4. Artificial intelligence 53 2.1.5. Human intelligence and artificial representations 53 2.2. Electronic dreams 54 2.2.1. The dream of intuitive software 55 2.2.2. The dream of the designing machine 60 2.2.3. The dream of self-emerging architecture; genetic algorithms in design 61 2.2.4. A cultural lag 62 2.3. Ideas and ideology 64 2.3.1. A personal perspective on the theories of the 1990s 65 2.3.2. "The suffering of diagrams" 68 2.3.3. Architectural theory and design methodology 69 2.4. Ideas on creativity 72 2.4.1. What is creativity? 73 2.4.2. Creativity, a cultural phenomenon. 75 2.4.3. Creativity in the information age 79 2.4.4. Creativity-enhancing techniques 81 2.4.5. Crucial fiicro-cultures 82 2.4.6. A proposal for a practitioner approach to creativity 83 2.5. Summary and conclusion of part 2 84 3. NEW DESIGN TECHNIQUES 86 3.1. Introduction 86 3.2. New technology - new strategy 87 3.3. Thinking through design practice: the inspirational playful design approach 88 3.4. A Corner stone: emergence 89 3.4.1. The source material 94 3.5. Recoding, translation and interpretation 95 A case: Tidsrom 97 3.6. Reconfiguring schemata 109 3.7. Rules and games 113 3.8. Virtuality and virtual models 118 3.8.1. What is "The Virtual"? 118 3.8.2. Virtual reality 119 Investigating "the virtual" 120 3.8.3. Analysing the virtual 126 3.9. Visual thinking (diagrams and visual thinking) 130 3.9.1. Visual Thinking and Abstraction. 130 3.9.2. A heuristic process 132 3.9.3. Visual thinking, skills and tacit knowledge 132 3.9.4. Media for visual thinking 133 3.10. Diagrammatic thinking 138 3.10.1. Descriptive diagrams 142 3.10.2. Generative diagrams 144 3.10.3. Versioning 149 3.10.4. Finding 153 3.10.5. Translation and interpretation 158 3.10.6. From generative diagram to program 168 3.10.7. Dynamic generative diagrams 171 3.11. The question of selection 175 3.12. Summary and conclusion of part 3 178 4. WAYS OF WORKING: FROM DESIGN PRACTICE TOWARDS THEORY AND DIGITAL DESIGN METHODS 179 4.1. Introduction 179 4.1.1. Practice-based research 180 4.1.2. Visual material is central. 180 4.1.3. Two investigation paths 180 4.1.4. Achievements 180 4.2. Methods 181 4.2.1. Explorative and generative research 182 4.2.2. A first-person approach 183 4.2.3. Analysis 184 4.2.4. The Material 185 4.3. Systematising creative computer use. Ways of working; techniques in creative computer use. 186 4.3.1. Categorization 186 4.3.2. Mapping the field of design computing. 187 4.3.3. Generic techniques 190 4.3.4. Specific techniques 192 4.3.5. Table of techniques 193 4.3.6. Examples of techniques 200 4.3.7. Traces of technology. 213 4.4. The further use of the generated material 219 4.4.1. Realisation strategies 221 4.4.2. Templates and scaffolds 223 4.5. Summary of Part 4 240 PART 5. WAYS OF THINKING: INTENTIONS IN CREATIVE COMPUTER USE. 241 5.1. Intentions 241 5.1.1. Categorising intentions 242 5.2. Intention themes 243 5.2.1. Cases and samples from Group one: Formal, phenomenal, spatial and geometrical themes 244 5.2.2. Intentions of response to the complexity of urban systems 297 5.3. The Hybrid Process 317 5.3.1. Hybridization strategies 319 5.3.2. The hybrid process and its elements. 328 6. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 344 6.1. Principles, concepts and methods for creative design computing 344 6.2. A new type of creativity? 348 6.3. A practice as the field for an investigation 349 6.4. Suggestions for further studies 349
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
last changed 2007/04/08 14:11

_id cf2011_p018
id cf2011_p018
authors Sokmenoglu, Ahu; Cagdas Gulen, Sariyildiz Sevil
year 2011
title A Multi-dimensional Exploration of Urban Attributes by Data Mining
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 333-350.
summary The paper which is proposed here will introduce an ongoing research project aiming to research data mining as a methodology of knowledge discovery in urban feature analysis. To address the increasing multi-dimensional and relational complexity of urban environments requires a multidisciplinary approach to urban analysis. This research is an attempt to establish a link between knowledge discovery methodologies and automated urban feature analysis. Therefore, in the scope of this research we apply data mining methodologies for urban analysis. Data mining is defined as to extract important patterns and trends from raw data (Witten and Frank, 2005). When applied to discover relationships between urban attributes, data mining can constitute a methodology for the analysis of multi-dimensional relational complexity of urban environments (Gil, Montenegro, Beirao and Duarte, 2009) The theoretical motivation of the research is derived by the lack of explanatory urban knowledge which is an issue since 1970’s in the area of urban research. This situation is mostly associated with deductive methods of analysis. The analysis of urban system from the perspective of few interrelated factors, without considering the multi-dimensionality of the system in a deductive fashion was not been explanatory enough. (Jacobs, 1961, Lefebvre, 1970 Harvey, 1973) To address the multi-dimensional and relational complexity of urban environments requires the consideration of diverse spatial, social, economic, cultural, morphological, environmental, political etc. features of urban entities. The main claim is that, in urban analysis, there is a need to advance from traditional one dimensional (Marshall, 2004) description and classification of urban forms (e.g. Land-use maps, Density maps) to the consideration of the simultaneous multi-dimensionality of urban systems. For this purpose, this research proposes a methodology consisting of the application of data mining as a knowledge discovery method into a GIS based conceptual urban database built out of official real data of Beyoglu. Generally, the proposed methodology is a framework for representing and analyzing urban entities represented as objects with properties (attributes). It concerns the formulation of an urban entity’s database based on both available and non-available (constructed from available data) data, and then data mining of spatial and non-spatial attributes of the urban entities. Location or position is the primary reference basis for the data that is describing urban entities. Urban entities are; building floors, buildings, building blocks, streets, geographically defined districts and neighborhoods etc. Urban attributes are district properties of locations (such as land-use, land value, slope, view and so forth) that change from one location to another. Every basic urban entity is unique in terms of its attributes. All the available qualitative and quantitative attributes that is relavant (in the mind of the analyst) and appropriate for encoding, can be coded inside the computer representation of the basic urban entity. Our methodology is applied by using the real and official, the most complex, complete and up-to-dataset of Beyoglu (a historical neighborhood of Istanbul) that is provided by the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality (IBB). Basically, in our research, data mining in the context of urban data is introduced as a computer based, data-driven, context-specific approach for supporting analysis of urban systems without relying on any existing theories. Data mining in the context of urban data; • Can help in the design process by providing site-specific insight through deeper understanding of urban data. • Can produce results that can assist architects and urban planners at design, policy and strategy levels. • Can constitute a robust scientific base for rule definition in urban simulation applications such as urban growth prediction systems, land-use simulation models etc. In the paper, firstly we will present the framework of our research with an emphasis on its theoretical background. Afterwards we will introduce our methodology in detail and finally we will present some of important results of data mining analysis processed in Rapid Miner open-source software. Specifically, our research define a general framework for knowledge discovery in urban feature analysis and enable the usage of GIS and data mining as complementary applications in urban feature analysis. Acknowledgments I would like to thank to Nuffic, the Netherlands Organization for International Cooperation in Higher Education, for funding of this research. I would like to thank Ceyhun Burak Akgul for his support in Data Mining and to H. Serdar Kaya for his support in GIS.
keywords urban feature analysis, data mining, urban database, urban complexity, GIS
series CAAD Futures
email ahusokmenoglu@yahoo.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id acadia05_012
id acadia05_012
authors Anshuman, Sachin
year 2005
title Responsiveness and Social Expression; Seeking Human Embodiment in Intelligent Façades
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 12-23
summary This paper is based on a comparative analysis of some twenty-six intelligent building facades and sixteen large media-facades from a socio-psychological perspective. It is not difficult to observe how deployment of computational technologies have engendered new possibilities for architectural production to which surface-centeredness lies at that heart of spatial production during design, fabrication and envelope automation processes. While surfaces play a critical role in contemporary social production (information display, communication and interaction), it is important to understand how the relationships between augmented building surfaces and its subjects unfold. We target double-skin automated facades as a distinct field within building-services and automation industry, and discuss how the developments within this area are over-occupied with seamless climate control and energy efficiency themes, resulting into socially inert mechanical membranes. Our thesis is that at the core of the development of automated façade lies the industrial automation attitude that renders the eventual product socially less engaging and machinic. We illustrate examples of interactive media-façades to demonstrate how architects and interaction designers have used similar technology to turn building surfaces into socially engaging architectural elements. We seek opportunities to extend performative aspects of otherwise function driven double-skin façades for public expression, informal social engagement and context embodiment. Towards the end of the paper, we propose a conceptual model as a possible method to address the emergent issues. Through this paper we intend to bring forth emergent concerns to designing building membrane where technology and performance are addressed through a broader cultural position, establishing a continual dialogue between the surface, function and its larger human context.
series ACADIA
email sanshuman@hotmail.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id cf2011_p051
id cf2011_p051
authors Cote, Pierre; Mohamed-Ahmed Ashraf, Tremblay Sebastien
year 2011
title A Quantitative Method to Compare the Impact of Design Mediums on the Architectural Ideation Process.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 539-556.
summary If we compare the architectural design process to a black box system, we can assume that we now know quite well both inputs and outputs of the system. Indeed, everything about the early project either feasibility studies, programming, context integration, site analysis (urban, rural or natural), as well as the integration of participants in a collaborative process can all be considered to initiate and sustain the architectural design and ideation process. Similarly, outputs from that process are also, and to some extent, well known and identifiable. We are referring here, among others, to the project representations or even to the concrete building construction and its post-evaluation. But what about the black box itself that produces the ideation. This is the question that attempts to answer the research. Currently, very few research works linger to identify how the human brain accomplishes those tasks; how to identify the cognitive functions that are playing this role; to what extent they operate and complement each other, and among other things, whether there possibly a chain of causality between these functions. Therefore, this study proposes to define a model that reflects the activity of the black box based on the cognitive activity of the human brain. From an extensive literature review, two cognitive functions have been identified and are investigated to account for some of the complex cognitive activity that occurs during a design process, namely the mental workload and mental imagery. These two variables are measured quantitatively in the context of real design task. Essentially, the mental load is measured using a Bakan's test and the mental imagery with eyes tracking. The statistical software G-Power was used to identify the necessary subject number to obtain for significant variance and correlation result analysis. Thus, in the context of an exploratory research, to ensure effective sample of 0.25 and a statistical power of 0.80, 32 participants are needed. All these participants are students from 3rd, 4th or 5th grade in architecture. They are also very familiar with the architectural design process and the design mediums used, i.e., analog model, freehand drawing and CAD software, SketchUp. In three experimental sessions, participants were asked to design three different projects, namely, a bus shelter, a recycling station and a public toilet. These projects were selected and defined for their complexity similarity, taking into account the available time of 22 minutes, using all three mediums of design, and this in a randomly manner to avoid the order effect. To analyze the two cognitive functions (mental load and mental imagery), two instruments are used. Mental imagery is measured using eye movement tracking with monitoring and quantitative analysis of scan paths and the resulting number and duration of participant eye fixations (Johansson et al, 2005). The mental workload is measured using the performance of a modality hearing secondary task inspired by Bakan'sworks (Bakan et al.; 1963). Each of these three experimental sessions, lasting 90 minutes, was composed of two phases: 1. After calibrating the glasses for eye movement, the subject had to exercise freely for 3 minutes while wearing the glasses and headphones (Bakan task) to get use to the wearing hardware. Then, after reading the guidelines and criteria for the design project (± 5 minutes), he had 22 minutes to execute the design task on a drawing table allowing an upright posture. Once the task is completed, the subject had to take the NASA TLX Test, on the assessment of mental load (± 5 minutes) and a written post-experimental questionnaire on his impressions of the experiment (± 10 minutes). 2. After a break of 5-10 minutes, the participant answered a psychometric test, which is different for each session. These tests (± 20 minutes) are administered in the same order to each participant. Thus, in the first experimental session, the subject had to take the psychometric test from Ekstrom et al. (1978), on spatial performance (Factor-Referenced Cognitive Tests Kit). During the second session, the cognitive style is evaluated using Oltman's test (1971). Finally, in the third and final session, participant creativity is evaluated using Delis-Kaplan test (D-KEFS), Delis et al. (2001). Thus, this study will present the first results of quantitative measures to establish and validate the proposed model. Furthermore, the paper will also discuss the relevance of the proposed approach, considering that currently teaching of ideation in ours schools of architecture in North America is essentially done in a holistic manner through the architectural project.
keywords design, ideation process, mental workload, mental imagery, quantitative mesure
series CAAD Futures
email pierre.cote@arc.ulaval.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 2005_383
id 2005_383
authors Ebert, Oliver, Schoenemann, Patrick and Lenhart, Michael
year 2005
title Cityscape Computing System
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 383-389
summary The central feature of the project is the development of a computer and its interfaces to simulate urban space and, in the context of an intermedia city tour, to allow citizens to creatively influence their urban space by manipulating media structures at chosen points throughout the city. A master plan is set up to re-cultivate public spaces and points of architectural focus. The city reacts interactively to the commands. A dialog is created between user and public space. The tour route is an open structure which can be expanded at any time. Via interfaces the user activates a reaction in the real city by making changes to the virtual model. This results in a dynamic space, a communication based on the results of this transformation. The user interface allows an information transfer between real people and virtual space. Virtual reality then reacts to the input by transferring that information back to reality. The direct influence on the architecture is effected by a media-transformer. It projects an additional perception level on to reality while monitoring the data via various analysis interfaces.
keywords Interactive Urbanism; Media Installation; Human-Computer-Interaction
series eCAADe
email lenhart@architektur.uni-siegen.de
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_467
id 2005_467
authors Guéna, François
year 2005
title Assisting 3D Modeling from Documents
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 467-476
summary This paper presents research in computer modeling that ARIAM team of the school of architecture of Paris La Villette has been developing for several years. One of the aims of this research group is to develop computer systems that assist architects in modeling existing buildings or monuments from heterogeneous documents or data as drawings plans, sections, photos, measures taken on site etc. In spite of advances in computer recognition it’s a long way to have a system that could automatically recognize, from any bitmap document or photo, relevant architectural objects and automatically build the model these documents represent. However, if we could define a knowledge base about a particular domain, it would be possible to develop a system that could interpret specific documents that represent some kind of building or monuments. But, even in such limited domain, it is difficult to build an exhaustive knowledge base and user-interactions are generally required. We argue that a user could mark relevant information on the documents and thus facilitate the process of interpreting. The system we propose has three components: a graphical user interaction tool, an analyzer of documents and user interactions, and a generative tool that produces the required model. As an illustration, the paper presents a system we have developed which assists an architect in modeling a 3D mesh of gothic vaults for a finite elements analysis.
keywords 3D Modeling; Restitution; Knowledge Base System; Meshing; Gothic Vaults
series eCAADe
email fguena@paris-lavillette.archi.fr
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2d39
id 2d39
authors Heylighen A, Heylighen F, Bollen J, Casaer M
year 2005
title A DISTRIBUTED MODEL FOR TACIT DESIGN KNOWLEDGE EXCHANGE
source SID 2005, Proceedings of the 4th Social Intelligence Design Workshop, Stanford University, March 2005 (CD Rom)
summary The distributed cognition approach, and by extension the domain of social intelligence design, attempts to integrate three until recently separate realms: mind, society, and matter. The field offers a heterogeneous collection of ideas, observations, and case studies, yet lacks a coherent theoretical framework for building models of concrete systems and processes. Despite the intrinsic complexity of integrating individual, social and technologically-supported intelligence, the paper proposes a relatively simple ‘connectionist’ framework for conceptualizing a distributed cognitive system. This framework represents shared information sources (documents) as nodes connected by links of variable strength, which increases interactively with the number of co-occurrences of documents in the patterns of their usage. This connectionist learning procedure captures and uses the implicit knowledge of its community of users to help them find relevant information, thus supporting an unconscious form of exchange. The principles are illustrated by an envisaged application to a concrete problem domain: the dynamic sharing of design knowledge among a multitude of architects through a database of associatively connected building projects.
keywords connectionism, distributed cognition, tacit knowledge, architectural design
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2005/04/01 11:24

_id caadria2005_b_5c_f
id caadria2005_b_5c_f
authors Jumphon Lertlakkhanakul, Ilju Lee, Miyun Kim, Jin Won Choi
year 2005
title Using the Mobile Augmented Reality Techniques for Construction Management
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 396-403
summary In this paper we attempt to develop a new system called “C-Navi” for construction site simulation and management system. By integrating AR technology with mobile computing, the new system will extend the abilities of AR systems to be implemented in large outdoor space. The concept of 4D CAD system is utilized by integrating related information and displaying them in the time-based visualization approach. Our system could help with decision making and also act as a tool for improved communications between project partners.
series CAADRIA
email jumphon@yonsei.ac.kr
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id 2005_565
id 2005_565
authors Kabata, Michal and Koszewski, Krzysztof
year 2005
title A Model of Dispersed Historic Architectural Knowledge Base
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 565-572
summary This paper is based on the experience with creation of a small knowledge base about the between-war architecture of one of the Warsaw districts. Design, as a process of creation, combines processing of procedural and declarative knowledge. There is a vast amount of declarative knowledge of different kinds to be collected even before the design process starts. Advances in ICT (Information and Communications Technologies), particularly in such field as databases, data warehousing and knowledge engineering, make it a lot easier to design complex systems, which will allow to combine procedural and declarative knowledge. We used historic-architectural knowledge as an example of the second kind mentioned here. The sources of this kind of information are dispersed, the data is gathered in various formats, using different standards and for various purposes. Past experiences with creating detailed architectural heritage inventories in Poland led us to a conclusion that such a subject specific knowledge base may be a part of larger hierarchical structure, which still needs to be built. These are the reasons for adopting a data-warehouse-like structure, which responds with it’s tools to such needs. The assumptions for such system are presented and the context-based structure is discussed. During our work we also came for some more general conclusions. These concern a need for disseminating an OpenSource Society ideas through all the keepers of information related to architectural heritage.
keywords Information and Knowledge Management, Database Systems, Architectural Heritage, Data Warehouse Technology
series eCAADe
email xys@arch.pw.edu.pl
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_1_92_179
id cf2005_1_92_179
authors LAEPPLE Eberhard, CLAYTON Mark and JOHNSON Robert
year 2005
title Case Studies of Web-Based Collaborative Design
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 455-464
summary Data collected from real-world projects using Web-based communications and project management systems provide quantitative evidence for characterizing the design process. Tens of thousands of records have been analyzed from six cases. The cases are all high-end office and retail building projects, with about 50 members of the design team. The data supports the distinction of multiple stages in the design process as the patterns of usage of the software changes through time. Coordination activities are more frequent in early stages, while collaboration activities are more common in late stages. In planning and design stages, use of the software is focused upon accessing static information, while in construction documentation a relatively greater number of activities include generate and process operations.
keywords collaboration, communications, design management, design process, software
series CAAD Futures
email eberhard@tamu.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id sigradi2005_765
id sigradi2005_765
authors Lagos, Rodrigo; Flavio Valassina, Rodrigo García, Nicolás Sáez, Marlene Muñoz, Margarita Gatica
year 2005
title Toward an autopoietical model of formation for analog digital competences in architecture
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 765-770
summary In the frame of the educational polities, the architecture renews your manners and methods of education, emphasizing a formation based more on competition that in knowledge. Our discipline possesses an important tradition in, your pedagogy based on the didactics of the project. The today challenge is your update, considering the incorporation, systematic and validated, of the tools Analogous Digital (AD), orientated - more than to the representation, to the action proyectual. Based on works of J. Bermúdez, and others presented by these researchers in other Sigradi’s versions, tries to demonstrate that the interactive analogous use of analog-digital tools in the education of the project stimulates the increase of information and the actions of communication that favor the quality of the learnings and the management of the information. Your impact will be studied, both in the Pedagogic Practices of the teachers and in the Processes of the students in the Action Proyectual (AP). [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email rlagos@biobio.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:54

_id cf2005_1_61_209
id cf2005_1_61_209
authors LEE Chia-Hsun, HU Yuchang and SELKER Ted
year 2005
title iSphere: A Proximity-based 3D Input Interface
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 281-290
summary This paper presents a 24 degree of freedom input device for 3D modeling. iSphere uses the proximity information of pulling-out and pressing-in capacitive sensors to manipulate 12 control points of a 3D surface simultaneously . The iSphere dodecahedron is demonstrated manipulating an analog parametric model with high-level modeling concepts like push or pull the 3D surfaces. Our pilot experiment shows that iSphere saved many steps of selecting the control point and going through menus. Experts were used to those extra steps and still found themselves doing them but novices saved significant time for surface shaping tasks. 3D systems are benefited to execute high-level modeling commands, but lacking of fidelity is a great issue of analog input device.
keywords 3D input device, proximity sensing, parametric modeling, human-computer interaction
series CAAD Futures
email jackylee@media.mit.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id caadria2005_a_1b_d
id caadria2005_a_1b_d
authors M. Bouattour, G.Halin, Jc. Bignon, P. Triboulot
year 2005
title A cooperative model using semantic works dedicated to architectural design
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 94-104
summary Architectural cooperative design as well as information modeling have been active research areas for several decades. The use of systems adapted to the cooperative design assistance for the building domain is complex. This results from the complexity of the cooperative work (difficulties in tracking actor’s work, lack of most of the required information, coordination problems, implicit nature of most of the construction activities, etc.) The main objective of our research in these domains is to develop a tool that helps the management of a building project and aids cooperative design. So, in the first part of this article, we propose to view the exchanging data mode and cooperation tools in the building domain. The second part of this article illustrates the existing cooperative design models. Then we justify the interest shown in a new model of cooperative design where the relational organization of the project and the semantic meaning of works are taken into account. Finally, we use this new model for defining a design-aided tool, to deduce advantages and limits of the “Virtual Cooperative Project”.
series CAADRIA
email bouattou@crai.archi.fr
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id cf2005_1_68_34
id cf2005_1_68_34
authors PETZOLD Frank and BÜRGY, Christian
year 2005
title Hands Free: A Wearable Surveying System for Building Surveying
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 351-360
summary Activities in the building industry in Europe concentrate increasingly on a combination of renovation and new-building. A prerequisite for comprehensive IT supported design and planning in the context of existing buildings is both the use of on-site computer- aided surveying techniques and the integration of all professional disciplines in an integrated information and communication system. The starting point is often the building survey on site. An examination of currently available IT tools and hardware shows insufficient support for planning within existing built contexts. Surveying equipment has been derived from other disciplines without being modified to cater for the specific needs of building surveying. This paper describes a concept for computer-aided digital building surveying equipment based upon a wearable computer and AR to close the gap between specialist equipment adapted for use in building surveying and the need for simple straightforward surveying equipment for architects and engineers.
keywords building surveying, wearable computing, HCI, industrial design, systems engineering
series CAAD Futures
email petzold@fossi.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id 2005_357
id 2005_357
authors Pita, Javier
year 2005
title Analogous Models and Architecture
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 357-364
summary Among the many possible ways of classifying the concept of “modelling”, Maldonado refers to “homologies” when structure but not shape and function are similar; “analogies” when structure and function are similar, but not shape; and “isomorphisms” when structure and shape are similar, but function may or may not be similar. Traditional artistic representation would basically fall into the category of isomorphisms, whilst analogous models are to be found mainly in activities such as magic, play or industry. Other ways of representing reality, such as architectural models or drawings, are also traditionally regarded as isomorphisms. In the course of the last century, this panorama has been altered somewhat by the post-industrial or second industrial revolution in computing and communications. Using mathematical algorithms, the computing tool has an enormous capacity to describe things of extremely diverse nature: from the shape of everyday objects to relatively complex human behaviours, these can all be described using the common language of bits. Alongside developments in computing, the world of communications has been providing us with increasingly advanced means of transmitting information, including sophisticated systems capable of emulating our own perceptions. This paper is intended as a contribution to the theoretical debate conducted over recent years on the considerable shift that has occurred in architectural representation techniques. The analysis that follows highlights a two-fold change in traditional representation techniques: on the one hand, a change in the nature of the model (as is discussed in this paper); and on the other, a modification of the interfaces or communication and perception mechanisms of the model. The conjunction of these two factors has led to the emergence of representation modes that can no longer be regarded simply as isomorphisms of reality. Insofar as virtual spaces have the capacity for us to move, to interact, in short to inhabit them, they should be regarded as “analogous models” of architectural space. In other words, there has been a shift away from representation modes based on illusion in favour of those based on simulation.
keywords Representation, Models, Virtual Space, Virtual Reality
series eCAADe
email jpita@infonegocio.com
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 27HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_417385 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002