CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 366

_id ijac20053201
id ijac20053201
authors Aitcheson, Robert; Friedman, Jonathan; Seebohm, Thomas
year 2005
title 3-Axis CNC Milling in Architectural Design
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 2, 161-180
summary Physical scale models still have a role in architectural design. 3-axis CNC milling provides one way of making scale models both for study purposes and for presentation in durable materials such as wood. We present some types of scale models, the methods for creating them and the place in the design process that scale models occupy. We provide an overview of CNC milling procedures and issues and we describe the process of how one can creatively develop appropriate methods for milling different types of scale models and materials. Two case studies are presented with which we hope to convey not only the range of possible models that can be machined but also the way one creatively explores to arrive at appropriate milling strategies. Where apposite, we compare 3-axis CNC milling to newer technologies used for rapid prototyping but rapid prototyping is not a primary focus.
series journal
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id acadia05_012
id acadia05_012
authors Anshuman, Sachin
year 2005
title Responsiveness and Social Expression; Seeking Human Embodiment in Intelligent Façades
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 12-23
summary This paper is based on a comparative analysis of some twenty-six intelligent building facades and sixteen large media-facades from a socio-psychological perspective. It is not difficult to observe how deployment of computational technologies have engendered new possibilities for architectural production to which surface-centeredness lies at that heart of spatial production during design, fabrication and envelope automation processes. While surfaces play a critical role in contemporary social production (information display, communication and interaction), it is important to understand how the relationships between augmented building surfaces and its subjects unfold. We target double-skin automated facades as a distinct field within building-services and automation industry, and discuss how the developments within this area are over-occupied with seamless climate control and energy efficiency themes, resulting into socially inert mechanical membranes. Our thesis is that at the core of the development of automated façade lies the industrial automation attitude that renders the eventual product socially less engaging and machinic. We illustrate examples of interactive media-façades to demonstrate how architects and interaction designers have used similar technology to turn building surfaces into socially engaging architectural elements. We seek opportunities to extend performative aspects of otherwise function driven double-skin façades for public expression, informal social engagement and context embodiment. Towards the end of the paper, we propose a conceptual model as a possible method to address the emergent issues. Through this paper we intend to bring forth emergent concerns to designing building membrane where technology and performance are addressed through a broader cultural position, establishing a continual dialogue between the surface, function and its larger human context.
series ACADIA
email sanshuman@hotmail.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id cf2005_1_36_100
id cf2005_1_36_100
authors BILDA Zafer and GERO John S.
year 2005
title Do We Need CAD during Conceptual Design?
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 155-164
summary This paper presents the results of experiments to test whether a designer necessarily needs to produce and utilize external representations in the very early phases of conceptual design. Three architects are engaged in two separate design processes, one is the experiment condition where they were not allowed sketch, and the other, the control condition where they were allowed to sketch. In the experiment condition, architects were required to put on a blindfold and think aloud while designing. The results show that in both conditions the design outcomes fit in the given dimensions of the site, accommodate the space requirements and allow an effective use for the clients. Thus, when the participants were blindfolded, they were able to produce designs by using their cognitive resources to create and hold an internal representation of the design rather than by sketching, or using a CAD tool. We finally raise the question: do architects need CAD representations during the conceptual phase of the design activity?
keywords representations, protocol studies, conceptual design
series CAAD Futures
email zafer@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id 9c37
id 9c37
authors Coates P, Derix C, Krakhofer S and Karanouh A
year 2005
title Generating Architectural Spatial Configurations: two approaches using voronoi tessellations and particle systems
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2005
summary It was one of the primary goals of the original Master’s programme in Computing and design at UEL in 1991 that we should work towards defining morphological generative processes for the conceptual design of architectural objects. These two papers offer a range of techniques which have been developed by two of this years MSc students (04-05) which show that we are getting close to this. The approaches range from computational geometric approaches (3d parametrics and voronoi diagrams) to emergent spatial organisation using agent based modelling. In many cases the resultant geometry is defined to the point where it can be transferred to advanced evaluation and fabrication systems, thus making this work sufficiently developed to begin to form a useful part in practical design processes.
keywords morphology, computational geometry, particle systems, physical simulation, voronoi diagrams
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 16:39

_id caadria2005_b_6a_a
id caadria2005_b_6a_a
authors José R. Kós, Tereza C. Malveira Araujo, José S. Cabral Filho, Eduardo Mascarenhas Santos, Marcelo Tramontano
year 2005
title Low-tech remote collaborative design studios
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 415-425
summary This paper aims to analyze Virtual Design Studios in big countries such as India, China and Brazil with great disparities between the schools of architecture and cultural diversity within their territories. Two VDS experiences with Brazilian institutions based the paper’s arguments. Limitation of equipment, bandwidth or available tools should not impede the organization of collaborative experiences. Instead, they should ground the strategies for the implementation of those experiences. Several free tools that are available on the Internet and which the students were used to, where chosen for the communication between the participants. Limited resources were not an obstacle to gain what we have considered the most important benefit of our experience: the exchange between students and faculty towards the recognition of the other participants’ different cultures, traditions and knowledge, allowing a better understanding of their own context.
series CAADRIA
email josekos@ufrj.br
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id cdc2008_243
id cdc2008_243
authors Loukissas, Yanni
year 2008
title Keepers of the Geometry: Architects in a Culture of Simulation
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 243-244
summary “Why do we have to change? We’ve been building buildings for years without CATIA?” Roger Norfleet, a practicing architect in his thirties poses this question to Tim Quix, a generation older and an expert in CATIA, a computer-aided design tool developed by Dassault Systemes in the early 1980’s for use by aerospace engineers. It is 2005 and CATIA has just come into use at Paul Morris Associates, the thirty-person architecture firm where Norfleet works; he is struggling with what it will mean for him, for his firm, for his profession. Computer-aided design is about creativity, but also about jurisdiction, about who controls the design process. In Architecture: The Story of Practice, Architectural theorist Dana Cuff writes that each generation of architects is educated to understand what constitutes a creative act and who in the system of their profession is empowered to use it and at what time. Creativity is socially constructed and Norfleet is coming of age as an architect in a time of technological but also social transition. He must come to terms with the increasingly complex computeraided design tools that have changed both creativity and the rules by which it can operate. In today’s practices, architects use computer-aided design software to produce threedimensional geometric models. Sometimes they use off-the-shelf commercial software like CATIA, sometimes they customize this software through plug-ins and macros, sometimes they work with software that they have themselves programmed. And yet, conforming to Larson’s ideas that they claim the higher ground by identifying with art and not with science, contemporary architects do not often use the term “simulation.” Rather, they have held onto traditional terms such as “modeling” to describe the buzz of new activity with digital technology. But whether or not they use the term, simulation is creating new architectural identities and transforming relationships among a range of design collaborators: masters and apprentices, students and teachers, technical experts and virtuoso programmers. These days, constructing an identity as an architect requires that one define oneself in relation to simulation. Case studies, primarily from two architectural firms, illustrate the transformation of traditional relationships, in particular that of master and apprentice, and the emergence of new roles, including a new professional identity, “keeper of the geometry,” defined by the fusion of person and machine. Like any profession, architecture may be seen as a system in flux. However, with their new roles and relationships, architects are learning that the fight for professional jurisdiction is increasingly for jurisdiction over simulation. Computer-aided design is changing professional patterns of production in architecture, the very way in which professionals compete with each other by making new claims to knowledge. Even today, employees at Paul Morris squabble about the role that simulation software should play in the office. Among other things, they fight about the role it should play in promotion and firm hierarchy. They bicker about the selection of new simulation software, knowing that choosing software implies greater power for those who are expert in it. Architects and their collaborators are in a continual struggle to define the creative roles that can bring them professional acceptance and greater control over design. New technologies for computer-aided design do not change this reality, they become players in it.
email yanni@mit.edu
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id caadria2005_a_1b_d
id caadria2005_a_1b_d
authors M. Bouattour, G.Halin, Jc. Bignon, P. Triboulot
year 2005
title A cooperative model using semantic works dedicated to architectural design
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 94-104
summary Architectural cooperative design as well as information modeling have been active research areas for several decades. The use of systems adapted to the cooperative design assistance for the building domain is complex. This results from the complexity of the cooperative work (difficulties in tracking actor’s work, lack of most of the required information, coordination problems, implicit nature of most of the construction activities, etc.) The main objective of our research in these domains is to develop a tool that helps the management of a building project and aids cooperative design. So, in the first part of this article, we propose to view the exchanging data mode and cooperation tools in the building domain. The second part of this article illustrates the existing cooperative design models. Then we justify the interest shown in a new model of cooperative design where the relational organization of the project and the semantic meaning of works are taken into account. Finally, we use this new model for defining a design-aided tool, to deduce advantages and limits of the “Virtual Cooperative Project”.
series CAADRIA
email bouattou@crai.archi.fr
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id caadria2005_b_4b_d
id caadria2005_b_4b_d
authors Martin Tamke
year 2005
title Baking Light: Global Illumination in VR Environments as architectural design tool
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 214-228
summary As proven in the past, immersive Virtual Environments can be helpful in the process of architectural design (Achten et al. 1999). But still years later, these systems are not common in the architectural design process, neither in architectural education nor in professional work. The reasons might be the high price of e.g. CAVEs, the lack of intuitive navigation and design tools in those environments, the absence of useful and easy to handle design workflows, and the quality constraints of real-time display of 3D models. A great potential for VR in the architectural workflow is the review of design decisions: Display quality, comfortable navigation and realistic illumination are crucial ingredients here. Light is one of the principal elements in architectural design, so design reviews must enable the architect to judge the quality of his design in this respect. Realistic light simulations, e.g. via radiosity algorithms, are no longer the domain of high-end graphic workstations. Today's off-the-shelf hardware and 3D-software provide the architect with high-quality tools to simulate physically correct light distributions. But the quality and impression of light is hard to judge from looking at still renderings. In collaboration with the Institute of Computer Graphics at our university we have established a series of regular design reviews in their immersive virtual environment. This paper describes the workflow that has emerged from this collaboration, the tools that were developed and used, and our practical experiences with global-light-simulations. We share results which we think are helpful to others, and we highlight areas where further research is necessary.
series CAADRIA
email m.tamke@tu-bs.de
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id caadria2005_b_5c_b
id caadria2005_b_5c_b
authors Martin Tamke
year 2005
title Crossing The Media
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 364-374
summary An open-ended, diversified and critical approach of architectural design, using different form of ideas representation might offer best chances to gain new spatial solutions. Today’s most forward architects and designer are aware of this and make full use of physical and digital media during the process of design. During the summer term 2004 the experiment ‘Crossing the Media’ took place at the Technical University of Braunschweig. The main goal of this practical oriented seminar has been the exploration of the interface between analogue and digital Media within the design process. Both techniques, analogue and digital, were used in an experimental way and their interaction and adaptability in the field of architecture was analyzed. The work examines the possibility of a consistent integration of digital and physical representation in a design process and the individual benefits of each. In order to achieve this, we made up a stringent line of digital-analogue and analogue-digital (DA-AD) Technologies for our design experiment. During the examination we focused especially on the creative potential of the techniques used, their interaction and adaptability in the field of architecture. Hence one of the goals of the occupation with the digital analogue interfaces was the examination of the emerging shift within the structure during the process, the imprints of technology. This paper describes the workflow and tools that were used, our practical experiences with analogue digital interface and the emerging questions and impulses to architects future work and theory. The discovered limitations and consequences of interfaces between the analogue and digital realm of design and their creative chances will be revealed. We share results which we think are helpful to others, and we highlight areas where further research is necessary.
series CAADRIA
email m.tamke@tu-bs.de
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id caadria2005_b_6c_c
id caadria2005_b_6c_c
authors Mauro Chiarella
year 2005
title Parametric Surfaces And Architecture: Concepts, Design, and Production
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 496-502
summary By incorporating parametric surfaces and spline entities into the shape modeling computer systems, new design and production graphic tools have been created in the conceptual and poetic field of architecture; thus allowing an intuitive approach to the fast production of complex shapes with a minimum amount of data and specific knowledge. The analogous production systems (constrained by the material resources and constructive procedures present in the local existing technologies) are challenged by design and virtual simulation systems, suggesting new relationships between the architectural features and their representation: the creation of a symbolic and dynamic information space where the representation affects the identity of what is being represented. Taking into account this current challenge mentioned above, we have decided to work in the mixture, without reciprocal exclusions or substitutions, proposing some work alternatives to approach the issue under discussion in the Architecture Workshop.
series CAADRIA
email chiarell@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id caadria2007_585
id caadria2007_585
authors Menegotto, José Luis
year 2007
title The Nazca Lines and their Digital Architectural Representation
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary This paper relates to a digital architectural design experience in 2005 for the Nazca Competition. Nazca is an archaeological site situated about 400 kilometers south of Lima, Peru. It is a large desert with gigantic millenary geoglyphs carved on the surface, which can only be seen clearly from above. The Nazca geoglyphs are made up of hundreds of lines, spirals and triangular plazas, as well as zoomorphic figures like birds, fish, spider, etc. The Nazca Competition asked for an observatory-lodge of approximately 1.000m2 with 20 rooms, communal bathrooms, supporting areas and an observatory tower of at least 100 meters. The observatory-lodge was designed using a digital representation technique called "Genetically Constructed Structures". The structure was created using the geometric principle of the affinity of two conic sections: circle and ellipse. The form was produced transforming the circle and the ellipse by performing basic geometric transformations (translation, rotation, reflection and scaling). According to this technique, the sequence of transformations was codified in the form of an alphanumerical string, metaphorically named the "DNA structure". The code was inserted as extended data into the entities which shaped the structure profiles. The algorithms were programmed with AutoLISP language. The "DNA code" allowed the structure to be constructed and deconstructed from any point, generating many different forms, to be studied and compared. One year later, the same 3D model was used to test another digital technology called "musical box" where their geometrical points are captured, read and translated into musical parameters, generating music. In this paper we will present the graphical form of the tower as well as the music associated.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id cf2005_1_91_156
id cf2005_1_91_156
authors PLUME Jim and MITCHELL John
year 2005
title A Multi-Disciplinary Design Studio using a Shared IFC Building Model
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 445-454
summary This paper reports on a multi-disciplinary building design studio where a shared IFC (Industry Foundation Classes) building model was employed to support a collaborative design process in a studio-teaching environment. This project began with the premise that the efforts over the past decade of the International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI) to develop a genuinely operational building model schema has resulted in a mature technology that is now ready to be applied. This design studio experience sought to test that premise. The paper discusses the background to the idea of design collaboration based on a shared building model, placing this current work within that context. We look at both the nature of design decision-making, as well as the process opportunities afforded by close multi-disciplinary collaboration and rapid feedback from design analysis. Although the work was undertaken in a teaching context, the paper does not discuss the pedagogical issue, but rather concentrates on the operational issues that are encountered when working with a shared building model during a design process. The paper concludes with a statement of the lessons learnt and strategies to be adopted in future projects of this nature.
keywords collaborative design, industry foundation classes, shared building model, building information modelling, design studio
series CAAD Futures
email J.Plume@unsw.edu.au
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id sigradi2005_350
id sigradi2005_350
authors San Martín, Patricia; Sergio Bertozzi
year 2005
title “Otra Andria” e-learning environment for the architectural designing workshop
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 350-354
summary This work describes results obtained from a test over an experimental prototype “Otra Andria” (OA1) designed by the investigation team of “Obra Abierta: Over the construction of an investigating and learning system in virtual environments”. OA1 is a basic tool. It show us: three simultaneous screens with editing tool bars, an integrated chat for publication and discussion, images and texts, all this in synchronized time. Tools are simultaneously accessible from all boards by the teacher, the students or between pupils. There is a web log, a personal web, and an activities’ organization space for the professors. This experience was helpful to understand the actual needs for virtual environment applications as well as e-learning problems in such cases where the know-how is not available to every attendant to the course. That means we must begin working on hyper-medial language diffusion among all teachers who want to use the ICT in all its actual potentiality. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email sanmartin@ifir.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id caadria2005_a_1a_c
id caadria2005_a_1a_c
authors Soo-Hoon Park
year 2005
title Interpretation of Implicit Design Knowledge in Architectural Drawings Into Explicit Knowledge
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 23-32
summary This paper concerns a methodology in applying architectural design knowledge to the interpretation of design concepts from architectural drawings. We formalize the design knowledge such that knowledge plays a key role in the design interpretations that map between drawings and their design concepts. We consider this mapping, in general, as those linking between design decision space and design performance space, where design variables in both spaces are examined and categorized from the drawings and concepts. Examinations on drawings are performed based on qualitative shape analysis schemes and we apply feature-based shape analysis techniques to encapsulate those design characteristics in decision space. Interpretations of design concepts through shape characteristics are based on mostly two types of symmetries, namely cyclic and dihedral groups. We use CommonLISP in analyzing shapes in design decision space and CLIPS expert system shell in illustrating simple reasoning based on those design knowledge. We select target drawings from some of Frank Lloyd Wright’s block housing plans. In this experiment we try to illustrate a valid methodology that explicitly handles some of the implicit design knowledge hidden in architectural drawings.
series CAADRIA
email soohoon@hanbat.ac.kr
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id sigradi2005_709
id sigradi2005_709
authors Souza Tenorio, Gabriela de
year 2005
title The 3D visualization of the architecture undergraduate course final thesis: where we went wrong? – or – why students are paying for their 3D models?
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 709-713
summary This paper describes recent research developed at FAU-UnB that asks why students don’t incorporate the 3D digital modeling skills acquired during their course for use in the design process. It speculates that it’s not only the computer graphics courses fault, but the design/studio courses might also be responsible for that. [Full paper in Portuguese]
series SIGRADI
email gabi@unb.br
last changed 2016/03/10 09:00

_id caadria2005_a_1a_b
id caadria2005_a_1a_b
authors B. Senyapili, I. Basa
year 2005
title RECONCILING COMPUTER AND HAND: THE CASE OF AUTHOR IDENTITY IN DESIGN PRESENTATIONS
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 13-22
summary As computers were newly emerging in the field of architectural design, it was claimed that the impact of computers would change the way architects design and present. However, within the course of computer use in design, although the field of architectural practice might have been altered extremely, in architectural education there still seems to be a bond to conventional mind-hand-paper relation. One of the reasons for that bond is the fact that although being r 1000 elated to many technologies, architecture essentially positions itself around an artistic core that is still fed with conventional modes of creation. Architectural education aims at adopting and working on this very core. One of the major contributors in the formation of this core is the presence of author identity. This paper makes a critical approach to computers in terms of expressing author identity in design presentations especially during design education. We believe that the author identity is important in design education in terms of identifying the potential and skills of the student. Especially in design education the final step of design process turns out to be the presentation, unlike architectural practice where the presented design is actually built. Within this conception, two different studies were held in an educational environment with 160 design students and 20 design instructors. The results of both studies pointed at the fact that the digital opportunities that exist for design education should evolve around preserving and underlining the author identity in design presentations.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
email burcu@bilkent.edu.tr, basa@bilkent.edu.tr
last changed 2006/04/17 16:00

_id sigradi2005_575
id sigradi2005_575
authors Murad, Carlos Alberto; Claudia Veloso, Aline Andrade
year 2005
title The poetic of sight: eye-driven landscapes
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 575-579
summary This paper is based on the phenomenological approach of the imagination and poetic image of the philosopher Gaston Bachelard (1957, 1960), through a discussion of the role played by imaginary impulse in the comprehension and representation of urban nature. Our aim is to explore the epistemological potential of a poetic interpretation of eye-driven landscapes by an ontology of sight. We will do so by exploring two topopoetics themes given by Bachelard`s phenomenology, such as a blue sky deepness e o movement of intimate immensity, from which Win Wenders`s cinematic urban spaces will be analyzed. We believe the poetic contemplation of film framing would be a way from where the city and its eye-driven landscapes would meet their full human destiny. [Full paper in Portuguese]
series SIGRADI
email murad@acd.ufrj.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id sigradi2005_755
id sigradi2005_755
authors Mántaras, Guillermo J.
year 2005
title Virtual unreality
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 755-759
summary What will be waiting for the man of a virtual, parallel world, conceived by another man? Inasmuch as a virtual atmosphere does not possess weather, there is no day or nights, simply there is no sky, and if there is neither sky nor ground it does not have an above or below and of course there is no gravity. In such case why would we need walls and windows? Would we need streets to circulate? Why would we walk or fly? Today, digital media bring the necessary tools to shape, to represent and to live impossible experiences within a world where all imaginable phenomena is possible. Our experience aims to explore an approach of the student towards the new processes of design in order to contrive new spaces, taking care of not falling in an exclusively aesthetic objective but reflecting on the characteristics and qualities that a virtual space and its matter must have. In order to be able to conceive them we must use and teach digital media stimulating the students to harness its “non-reality”. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email gcarbo@fadu.unl.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id acadia07_130
id acadia07_130
authors Satpathy, Lalatendu; Mathew, Anijo Punnen
year 2007
title Smart Housing for the Elderly: Understanding Perceptions and Biases of Rural America
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 130-137
summary It is commonly acknowledged that ‘smart’ environments, interactive architecture and ‘smart’ homes will define the next cutting edge in architectural research. Most critics agree that one of the first problems that ‘smart’ homes will help to address is that of spiraling costs of healthcare and aging-in-place. This may be true for urban settings where there is the financial feasibility for such technologies but what about rural America? It has been conclusively proven that rural America suffers from a lack of healthcare (delivery and access). Prior research (Mathew 2005) has also established that a rural home is different from an urban home. Will technologies designed for the urban home work in a rural setting? And do rural people carry the same attitudes and biases towards technology? This paper continues our research in the design of ‘smart’ rural environments. It summarizes findings from focus group studies conducted in rural communities that help us to understand attitudes of people towards ‘smart’ technology. We will use these findings to examine the feasibility of ubiquitous computing and ‘smart’ spaces in rural areas. In conclusion, we will present guidelines to help designers in the creation of technology to augment healthy aging in rural home settings.
series ACADIA
email lsatpathy@cmu.edu
last changed 2007/10/02 06:14

_id cf2009_673
id cf2009_673
authors Tamke, Martin; Thomsen, Mette, Ramsgard
year 2009
title Digital wood craft
source T. Tidafi and T. Dorta (eds) Joining Languages, Cultures and Visions: CAADFutures 2009, PUM, 2009, pp. 673- 686
summary In 1995, Robin Evans points out in his book The Projective Cast how the development of techniques changed architecture and the space inhabited in times of Gothic and early Renaissance. We see a parallel phenomenon today, where the interplay of technology and tool gives shape to new design (Kolarevic 2005). Yet in opposition to the interwoven fields of design and craft of the late Gothic, today’s building sector is enormously diversified, and a growing complexity in the building process and number of used materials can be observed. This gives an opposite point of departure into a more integrated field of design and innovation in architectural design and building industry.
keywords Digital production, CAD/CAM, parametric design, complex form, mass customization
series CAAD Futures
email martin.tamke@karch.dk
last changed 2009/06/08 18:53

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