CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 541

_id ijac20053305
id ijac20053305
authors de Almeida, Clarissa Ribeiro Pereira; Pratschke, Anja; La Rocca, Renata
year 2005
title In-between and Through:Architecture and Complexity
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 3, 335-354
summary This paper draws on current research on complexity and design process in architecture and offers a proposal for how architects might bring complex thought to bear on the understanding of design process as a complex system, to understand architecture as a way of organizing events, and of organizing interaction. Our intention is to explore the hypothesis that the basic characteristics of complex systems – emergence, nonlinearity, self-organization, hologramaticity, and so forth – can function as effective tools for conceptualization that can usefully extend the understanding of the way architects think and act throughout the design process. To illustrate the discussions, we show how architects might bring complex thought inside a transdisciplinary design process by using models such as software engineering diagrams, and three-dimensional modeling network environments such as media to integrate, connect and 'trans–act'.
series journal
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/search/expand?pub=infobike://mscp/ijac/2005/00000003/00000003/art00006
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 6b43
id 6b43
authors Heylighen A, Casaer M, Neuckermans H
year 2005
title SHARING-IN-ACTION. HOW DESIGNERS CAN SHARE INSIGHTS WITHOUT KNOWING
source P. Kommers & P. Isaías (eds), Web Based Communities 2005, Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference on Web-Based Communities 2005, Algarve (Portugal), Feb 2005, pp.238-245 (ISBN 972-99353-7-8)
summary In architecture, design ideas are developed as much through interaction as by individuals in isolation. This awareness inspired the development of a Dynamic Architectural Memory On-line, an interactive platform to share ideas, knowledge and insights in the form of concrete building projects among designers in different contexts and at different levels of expertise. Interaction with various user groups revealed this platform to suffer from at least two thresholds. First of all, making projects available to other platform users takes time, effort, and specific skills. Secondly, designers tend to sense a psychological threshold to share their ideas and insights with others. In trying to tackle both thresholds, this paper proposes to conceive the platform as an associative network of projects, and develops ideas about how the relationships in this network can be determined and updated by exploiting the insights implicitly available in the project documentation and user (inter)actions. In the long run, this should allow the platform to learn from all designers using the platform, including those who do not release information on their own projects, and to apply the lessons learned to continuously enhance its performance.
keywords web-based communities, self-organization, data mining, design experience
series other
type normal paper
email ann.heylighen@asro.kuleuven.ac.be
last changed 2005/04/01 11:25

_id 2005_083
id 2005_083
authors Agostinho, Francisco Santos
year 2005
title Architecture as Drawing, Perception and Cognition
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 83-90
summary This work is about realizing that human perception is inherent to architecture. It is an asset and a trait subject to training and development in an empirical way, involving physical and manual action. It cannot be taught literally through convention and logic reasoning. It is a human achievement of great significance built on intellectual and scientific knowledge. It is something, being physical and empirical, that is supported on instrumental procedure. The computer, as a machine and an instrument, does not shorten the empirical experience of manipulation; on the contrary, it enhances J.J. Gibson’s findings about the perception of space in relation to eye and body movement. Being a cybernetic machine the computer may, and shall, evolve, and become perceptive. In order for that to happen, it is important to keep in mind the mechanism of human perception. Through producing a computerized model of a major architectural work, we develop natural knowledge about its physical features and the thought that lies underneath. To be able to use the computer as an instrument provides a user with explicit knowledge about its ways and mechanism that has to be made available. It involves training, which is to a great extent self-explanatory, and also explicit knowledge about the conventions that are being used, such as programming, reasoning and trigonometry.
keywords Visualization; Environmental Simulation; Knowledge Modelling (KM); 3D Modeling
series eCAADe
email franc@fa.utl.pt
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id acadia05_012
id acadia05_012
authors Anshuman, Sachin
year 2005
title Responsiveness and Social Expression; Seeking Human Embodiment in Intelligent Façades
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 12-23
summary This paper is based on a comparative analysis of some twenty-six intelligent building facades and sixteen large media-facades from a socio-psychological perspective. It is not difficult to observe how deployment of computational technologies have engendered new possibilities for architectural production to which surface-centeredness lies at that heart of spatial production during design, fabrication and envelope automation processes. While surfaces play a critical role in contemporary social production (information display, communication and interaction), it is important to understand how the relationships between augmented building surfaces and its subjects unfold. We target double-skin automated facades as a distinct field within building-services and automation industry, and discuss how the developments within this area are over-occupied with seamless climate control and energy efficiency themes, resulting into socially inert mechanical membranes. Our thesis is that at the core of the development of automated façade lies the industrial automation attitude that renders the eventual product socially less engaging and machinic. We illustrate examples of interactive media-façades to demonstrate how architects and interaction designers have used similar technology to turn building surfaces into socially engaging architectural elements. We seek opportunities to extend performative aspects of otherwise function driven double-skin façades for public expression, informal social engagement and context embodiment. Towards the end of the paper, we propose a conceptual model as a possible method to address the emergent issues. Through this paper we intend to bring forth emergent concerns to designing building membrane where technology and performance are addressed through a broader cultural position, establishing a continual dialogue between the surface, function and its larger human context.
series ACADIA
email sanshuman@hotmail.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id acadia05_170
id acadia05_170
authors Barker, Daniel and Dong, Andy
year 2005
title A Representation Language for a Prototype CAD Tool for Intelligent Rooms
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 170-183
summary Intelligent rooms are a type of intelligent environment which enhance ordinary activities within the confines of a room by responding to human interaction using pervasive and ubiquitous computing. In the design of intelligent rooms, the specification of how the intelligent room enacts intelligent behavior through computational means is as integral as the geometric description. The self-aware and context-aware capabilities of intelligent rooms extend the requirements for computer-aided design tools beyond 3D modeling of objects. This article presents a Hardware as Agents Description Language for Intelligent Rooms (HADLIR) to model hardware in an intelligent room as “hardware agents” having sensor and/or effector modalities with rules and goals. End-users describe intelligent room hardware as agents based on the HADLIR representation and write agent rules and goals in Jess for each hardware component. This HADLIR agent description and the requisite software sensors/effectors constitute “hardware agents” which are instantiated into a multi-agent society software environment. The society is then bridged to either a virtual environment to prototype the intelligent room or to microelectronic controllers to implement a physical intelligent room. The integration illustrates how the HADLIR representation assists in the design, simulation and implementation of an intelligent room and provides a foundation technology for CAD tools for the creation of intelligent rooms.
series ACADIA
email adon3656@mail.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id ascaad2006_paper29
id ascaad2006_paper29
authors Bennadji, A. and A. Bellakha
year 2006
title Evaluation of a Higher Education Self-learning Interface
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper is a follow-up to a previous paper published in ASCAAD 2004 (A. Bennadji et al 2005). The latter reported on CASD (Computer Aided Sustainable Design) a self-learning educational interface which assists the various building’s actors in their design with a particular attention to the aspect of energy saving. This paper focuses on the importance of software evaluation and how the testing is done to achieve a better human-machine interaction. The paper will go through the summative evaluation of CASD, presents the output of this evaluation and addresses the challenge facing software developers: how to make an interface accessible to all users and specifically students in higher education.
series ASCAAD
email a.bennadji@rgu.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id cf2005_1_83_123
id cf2005_1_83_123
authors BRUNNER Klaus A. and MAHDAVI Ardeshir
year 2005
title A Software Architecture for Self-updating Life-cycle Building Models
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 423-432
summary This paper describes a computational infrastructure for the realization of a self-updating building information model conceived in the design phase and carried over to the operation phase of a building. As such, it illustrates how computational representations of buildings, which typically serve design support, documentation, and communication functions, can be transported into the post-construction phase. Toward this end, we formulate a number of requirements for the conception and maintenance of life-cycle building information models. Moreover, we describe the architecture and the prototypical implementation of such a model.
keywords building models, sensors, simulation-based control, life-cycle
series CAAD Futures
email klaus.brunner@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id acadia05_156
id acadia05_156
authors Cabrinha, Mark
year 2005
title From Bézier to NURBS: Integrating Material and Digital Techniques through a Plywood Shell
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 156-169
summary The development of digital fabrication has reintroduced material processes with digital processes. There has been much discussion about the tool and the objects of the tool, but little discussion of the implication of the material process on the digital process. A brief historical review on the development of computer numerical control and the origins of the Bézier curve reveals an instrumental fact: computer numerical controlled tools necessitated advancements in computational surfaces which eventually led to NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) surfaces. In other words, the origins of NURBS surfaces resides in its relation to material processes, rather than many current approaches that develop free form surfaces and then force the tool onto the material without regard to the material properties. From this historical and mathematical review, this project develops toward more intelligent construction methods based on the integration of NURBS differential geometry paired with material qualities and processes. Specifically, a digital technique of developing conceptual NURBS geometry into piecewise surface patches are then flattened based on the material thickness and density. From these flattened patches, a material technique is developed to intelligently remove material to allow the rigid flat material to re-develop into physical surface patches. The goal of this research is to develop digital and material techniques toward intelligent construction based on the correspondence between digitally driven surface and digitally driven material processes. The application of this technique as a rational and flexible system is to support the dynamic response of form and material toward such performative aspects as structure, daylight, ventilation, and thermal properties.
series ACADIA
email cabrinharch@yahoo.com
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id 2005_647
id 2005_647
authors Caldas, Luisa G.
year 2005
title Three-Dimensional Shape Generation of Low-Energy Architectural Solutions using Pareto Genetic Algorithms
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 647-654
summary This paper extends on a previous work on the application of a Generative Design System [GDS] to the evolution, in a computational environment, of three-dimensional architectural solutions that are energy-efficient and adapted to the climatic environment where they are located. The GDS combines a well-known building energy simulation software [DOE2.1E] with search procedures based on Genetic Algorithms and on Pareto optimization techniques, successfully allowing to tackle complex multi-objective problems. In the experiments described, architectural solutions based on a simplified layout were generated in response to two often-conflicting requirements: improving the use of daylighting in the space, while controlling the amount of energy loss through the building fabric. The choice of a cold climate like Chicago provided an adequate framework for studying the role of these opposing forces in architectural form generation. Analysis of results shows that building characteristics that originate successful solutions extend further than the building envelope. Issues of massing, aspect ratio, surface-to-volume ratio, orientation, and others, emerge from the analysis of solutions generated by the GDS, playing a significant role in dictating whether a given architectural form will prove adapted to its climatic and energy requirements. Results suggest that the questions raised by the exploration of form generation driven by environmental concerns are complex, deserving the pursuit of further experiments, in order to better understand the interaction of variables that the evolutionary process congregates.
keywords Generative Design System, Genetic Algorithms, Evolutionary Architecture, Artificial Intelligence in Design, Building Energy Simulation, Bioclimatic Architecture, Environmental Design.
series eCAADe
email luisa@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id acadia05_058
id acadia05_058
authors Daveiga, José and Ferreira, Paulo
year 2005
title Smart and Nano Materials in Architecture
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 58-67
summary We describe and analyze the fields of Smart and Nano Materials and their potential impact on architectural design and building fabrication. Distinguishing Smart and Nano materials, Smart Materials perform both sensing and actuating operations, whereas many Nano materials are capable of self-assembly. In general, Smart and Nano materials can perform like living systems, simulating human skin, the body’s muscles, a leaf’s chlorophyll and self-regeneration. Recognizing that the traditional partition between Materials Science and Architecture is obsolete, our intent is to show how these two fields are intrinsically connected, while growing evermore symbiotic as we progress into the futureKeeping the designer in mind, our paper begins with the question: “What Nano and Smart materials can be used in future architectural designs?” Outlining what such materials might mean for architectural fabrication and design, we claim that Smart and Nano Materials can imitate living organisms. Effective implementation of these materials will therefore allow designed spaces to operate as active organs within a larger dynamic organism, synthesizing both expressive intent and pragmatic considerations. This paper is a collaboration between an architect and a materials scientist on the future of materials and their influence in architecture. By giving examples of work already underway we intend to illustrate and suggest directions ranging from the functional to the expressive, from tectonics to morphology. We conclude with a reflection on the importance of future research between our two areas of knowledge.
series ACADIA
email jfernand@ucla.edu
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

_id 2005_107
id 2005_107
authors Fricker, Pia, Ochsendorf, Mathias and Strehlke, Kai
year 2005
title GENERATIVE INTERFACES AND SCENARIOS - INTERACTION IN INTELLIGENT ARCHITECTURE
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 107-113
summary New media and modern building automation have a strong impact on contemporary architecture. So far one could regard built architecture as static. These new technologies introduce a dynamic impulse to architecture. The objective of our research and teaching work is to demonstrate the impact of innovative systems on architecture in daily usage while providing building automation, multimedia integration and facility management services in intelligent networked buildings. These technologies, as described in this paper are integrated in our second year course for students of Architecture. By designing an interactive graphical interface for the lab they were asked to create a spatial scenario as a self running Flash animation. Thus real space is merged with virtual reality.
keywords CAAD Curriculum, Human-Computer Interaction, Web-Based Design, Building Automation, Generative Graphical Interfaces
series eCAADe
type normal paper
email ochsendorf@hbt.arch.ethz.ch, fricker@hbt.arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id caadria2005_a_2c_a
id caadria2005_a_2c_a
authors Ivan Redi, Andrea Redi
year 2005
title A.N.D.I. - A new Digital Instrument for networked creative collaboration in architecture and net.art
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 1, pp. 209-215
summary A.N.D.I. (A New Digital Instrument), an open source software project, has objective to develop a run-time environment with the focus on the applications for the networked international and cross-disciplinary production in the creative sphere of architecture, urban planning, design and net.art. It is a digital environment which opens the possibilities to generate advanced projects in a networked society. This new working tools will increase the creativity, productivity and competitiveness of the involved actors by drawing upon and developing technologies for virtual, augmented and mixed realities. A.N.D.I. has two basic aspects. On the one hand it is a database driven collaborative environment and on the other hand it will enable the development of future software and tools for networked creative collaboration.
series CAADRIA
email office@ortlos.com
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id caadria2005_b_6a_a
id caadria2005_b_6a_a
authors José R. Kós, Tereza C. Malveira Araujo, José S. Cabral Filho, Eduardo Mascarenhas Santos, Marcelo Tramontano
year 2005
title Low-tech remote collaborative design studios
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 415-425
summary This paper aims to analyze Virtual Design Studios in big countries such as India, China and Brazil with great disparities between the schools of architecture and cultural diversity within their territories. Two VDS experiences with Brazilian institutions based the paper’s arguments. Limitation of equipment, bandwidth or available tools should not impede the organization of collaborative experiences. Instead, they should ground the strategies for the implementation of those experiences. Several free tools that are available on the Internet and which the students were used to, where chosen for the communication between the participants. Limited resources were not an obstacle to gain what we have considered the most important benefit of our experience: the exchange between students and faculty towards the recognition of the other participants’ different cultures, traditions and knowledge, allowing a better understanding of their own context.
series CAADRIA
email josekos@ufrj.br
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id 2005_629
id 2005_629
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 2005
title A Biased History of CAAD
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 629-637
summary The democratization and popularization of the computer has brought on fundamental changes to many areas related to computer science, including CAAD. Such areas have been facing the necessity to reposition and reorient themselves in rapidly evolving academic and professional frameworks. A factor that complicates the processes of repositioning and reorientation is that most areas have a short but varied and frequently incoherent history that may be poorly understood. The paper is an attempt to trace the history of CAAD by means of publications. This refers to both key publications and the thematic structure of the overall CAAD production. The underlying hypothesis is that CAAD derives from two distinct ambitions, the technology-driven, bottom-up development of architectural computer graphics and the more domain theory-minded, top-down automation of designing. A third, less popular ambition is the computerization of analysis and evaluation, which can be treated as a subcategory of the previous two. The results of the bibliographic analysis are summarized in a timeline that indicates a convergence of ambitions and approaches in the 1980s, the period when CAAD became a recognizable area. In the 1990s the democratization and popularization of the computer caused diversification of CAAD activities over a wide spectrum, ranging from support to end-use of computer systems to computational theory and including the development of advanced, specific applications in cooperation with other architecture, building or design specializations.
keywords History; Bibliography; Drawing; Design; Computerization
series eCAADe
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_2_36_65
id cf2005_2_36_65
authors LIAO Kai and HAN Chia Y.
year 2005
title Collective Pavilions: A Generative Architectural Modelling for Traditional Chinese Pagoda
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 129-138
summary This paper investigates generative architectural modelling for traditional Chinese architecture and aims to explore and extend the potential of adaptive computing for architectural design methods. The design manners analysis of traditional pagodas architectures is made in a holistic view and under historical perspective. We propose a descriptive model and generative system for the design of traditional Chinese pagodas, by which each pagoda is defined as a collection of style-matched and form-coordinated pavilions and described by both topological graphs and variant geometrical units. Our approach models both of the building geometry and space organization/spatial patterns of pagodas separately. The generative mechanism consists of a framework of grammar-based design and parametric, recursive shape computation. Accordingly, the generative algorithm is also made of two levels, the topology of spatial patterns and the shape geometrical parameters that characterize pavilion variations. The algorithm for computing the former is based on GP (Genetic Programming) and the latter GA (Genetic Algorithms). To explore the collective behaviour of a group of pavilions, multi-agent modelling approach is incorporated in composition patterns search. A prototype system, 'glPagoda', using the OpenGL graphics library for rendering and visualization, has been developed and implemented on PC windows platform.
keywords pagoda, grammar-based design, multi-agent modelling, generative design system
series CAAD Futures
email liao_kai@yahoo.com, liaok@email.uc.edu
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

_id ddss2006-hb-187
id DDSS2006-HB-187
authors Lidia Diappi and Paola Bolchi
year 2006
title Gentrification Waves in the Inner-City of Milan - A multi agent / cellular automata model based on Smith's Rent Gap theory
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 187-201
summary The aim of this paper is to investigate the gentrification process by applying an urban spatial model of gentrification, based on Smith's (1979; 1987; 1996) Rent Gap theory. The rich sociological literature on the topic mainly assumes gentrification to be a cultural phenomenon, namely the result of a demand pressure of the suburban middle and upper class, willing to return to the city (Ley, 1980; Lipton, 1977, May, 1996). Little attempt has been made to investigate and build a sound economic explanation on the causes of the process. The Rent Gap theory (RGT) of Neil Smith still represents an important contribution in this direction. At the heart of Smith's argument there is the assumption that gentrification takes place because capitals return to the inner city, creating opportunities for residential relocation and profit. This paper illustrates a dynamic model of Smith's theory through a multi-agent/ cellular automata system approach (Batty, 2005) developed on a Netlogo platform. A set of behavioural rules for each agent involved (homeowner, landlord, tenant and developer, and the passive 'dwelling' agent with their rent and level of decay) are formalised. The simulations show the surge of neighbouring degradation or renovation and population turn over, starting with different initial states of decay and estate rent values. Consistent with a Self Organized Criticality approach, the model shows that non linear interactions at local level may produce different configurations of the system at macro level. This paper represents a further development of a previous version of the model (Diappi, Bolchi, 2005). The model proposed here includes some more realistic factors inspired by the features of housing market dynamics in the city of Milan. It includes the shape of the potential rent according to city form and functions, the subdivision in areal submarkets according to the current rents, and their maintenance levels. The model has a more realistic visualisation of the city and its form, and is able to show the different dynamics of the emergent neighbourhoods in the last ten years in Milan.
keywords Multi agent systems, Housing market, Gentrification, Emergent systems
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id sigradi2005_315
id sigradi2005_315
authors Pratschke, Anja
year 2005
title From participation to collaboration: structuring digital knowledge environments
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 315-320
summary This paper discusses ways to structure digital knowledge environments as process environments, tracing a parallel between participatory design processes, developed in the disciplinary area of architecture, and collaborative contemporary processes. These processes are supported by new information and communication technologies. At this context the key-words are interaction and auto-organization. The discussion draws on relations between the auto-organization model and the use of mnemonic techniques. These techniques of data organization – related to spatial structures, may constitute the informational organization rules: structuring the flow, storage and access, making auto-organization possible [Full paper in Portuguese]
series SIGRADI
email pratschke@sc.usp.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:58

_id cf2005_1_55_94
id cf2005_1_55_94
authors SCHEURER Fabian
year 2005
title Turning the Design Process Downside-up
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 269-278
summary This paper describes the latest results of an ongoing research project that aims at using the power of self-organization for the design and optimisation of irregular spatial structures in real-world applications. An example is presented, which uses a growing swarm to define the configuration of randomly positioned columns in a large concrete structure. This agent based simulation, developed in cooperation with the building's architects and engineers, was successfully used in the final design stage of a project in the Netherlands to resolve the conflicting structural and functional requirements arising from the initial design.
keywords self-organization, emergent design, spatial structure, dynamic simulation
series CAAD Futures
email scheurer@hbt.arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id 5b89
id 5b89
authors Sevaldson, Birger
year 2005
title Developing Digital Design Techniques Investigations on Creative Design Computing
source Oslo School of Architecture and Design, PHD-Thesis
summary 1.1. The themes in this theses 16 1.1.1. Mind the mind gap 16 1.1.2. Prologue: The World Center for Human Concerns 17 1.1.3. Creative computer use 26 1.1.4. Design strategies and techniques 31 1.2. Overview 33 1.2.1. Main issues 34 1.2.2. The material 36 1.2.3. The framework of this thesis 37 2. CURRENT STATE AND BACKGROUND 39 2.1. New tools, old thoughts. 39 2.1.1. A misuse strategy 44 2.1.2. Emergence in design 47 2.1.3. Programming and design 50 2.1.4. Artificial intelligence 53 2.1.5. Human intelligence and artificial representations 53 2.2. Electronic dreams 54 2.2.1. The dream of intuitive software 55 2.2.2. The dream of the designing machine 60 2.2.3. The dream of self-emerging architecture; genetic algorithms in design 61 2.2.4. A cultural lag 62 2.3. Ideas and ideology 64 2.3.1. A personal perspective on the theories of the 1990s 65 2.3.2. "The suffering of diagrams" 68 2.3.3. Architectural theory and design methodology 69 2.4. Ideas on creativity 72 2.4.1. What is creativity? 73 2.4.2. Creativity, a cultural phenomenon. 75 2.4.3. Creativity in the information age 79 2.4.4. Creativity-enhancing techniques 81 2.4.5. Crucial fiicro-cultures 82 2.4.6. A proposal for a practitioner approach to creativity 83 2.5. Summary and conclusion of part 2 84 3. NEW DESIGN TECHNIQUES 86 3.1. Introduction 86 3.2. New technology - new strategy 87 3.3. Thinking through design practice: the inspirational playful design approach 88 3.4. A Corner stone: emergence 89 3.4.1. The source material 94 3.5. Recoding, translation and interpretation 95 A case: Tidsrom 97 3.6. Reconfiguring schemata 109 3.7. Rules and games 113 3.8. Virtuality and virtual models 118 3.8.1. What is "The Virtual"? 118 3.8.2. Virtual reality 119 Investigating "the virtual" 120 3.8.3. Analysing the virtual 126 3.9. Visual thinking (diagrams and visual thinking) 130 3.9.1. Visual Thinking and Abstraction. 130 3.9.2. A heuristic process 132 3.9.3. Visual thinking, skills and tacit knowledge 132 3.9.4. Media for visual thinking 133 3.10. Diagrammatic thinking 138 3.10.1. Descriptive diagrams 142 3.10.2. Generative diagrams 144 3.10.3. Versioning 149 3.10.4. Finding 153 3.10.5. Translation and interpretation 158 3.10.6. From generative diagram to program 168 3.10.7. Dynamic generative diagrams 171 3.11. The question of selection 175 3.12. Summary and conclusion of part 3 178 4. WAYS OF WORKING: FROM DESIGN PRACTICE TOWARDS THEORY AND DIGITAL DESIGN METHODS 179 4.1. Introduction 179 4.1.1. Practice-based research 180 4.1.2. Visual material is central. 180 4.1.3. Two investigation paths 180 4.1.4. Achievements 180 4.2. Methods 181 4.2.1. Explorative and generative research 182 4.2.2. A first-person approach 183 4.2.3. Analysis 184 4.2.4. The Material 185 4.3. Systematising creative computer use. Ways of working; techniques in creative computer use. 186 4.3.1. Categorization 186 4.3.2. Mapping the field of design computing. 187 4.3.3. Generic techniques 190 4.3.4. Specific techniques 192 4.3.5. Table of techniques 193 4.3.6. Examples of techniques 200 4.3.7. Traces of technology. 213 4.4. The further use of the generated material 219 4.4.1. Realisation strategies 221 4.4.2. Templates and scaffolds 223 4.5. Summary of Part 4 240 PART 5. WAYS OF THINKING: INTENTIONS IN CREATIVE COMPUTER USE. 241 5.1. Intentions 241 5.1.1. Categorising intentions 242 5.2. Intention themes 243 5.2.1. Cases and samples from Group one: Formal, phenomenal, spatial and geometrical themes 244 5.2.2. Intentions of response to the complexity of urban systems 297 5.3. The Hybrid Process 317 5.3.1. Hybridization strategies 319 5.3.2. The hybrid process and its elements. 328 6. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 344 6.1. Principles, concepts and methods for creative design computing 344 6.2. A new type of creativity? 348 6.3. A practice as the field for an investigation 349 6.4. Suggestions for further studies 349
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
last changed 2007/04/08 14:11

_id acadia05_254
id acadia05_254
authors Sheil, Bob and Leung, Chris
year 2005
title ‘Kielder Probes’ – bespoke tools for an indeterminate design process
source Smart Architecture: Integration of Digital and Building Technologies [Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 0-9772832-0-8] Savannah (Georgia) 13-16 October 2005, pp. 254-259
summary Sixteen (makers) are a group of practicing architects, academics, designers and makers who assemble when key questions surrounding design, fabrication, use and adaptability in architecture emerge. Initially, the group was formed out of a motivation to engage as designers with the physical and tactile aspects of production without a dependency upon drawing. Now, in the post digital age, the age of digital fabrication, boundaries between drawing and making, between the designer and the maker, have dissolved. Consequently sixteen*(makers) work is now engaged with questions of knowledge transfer, expertise, and innovation where modes of investigation are equally embedded within in the analogue and the digital world. This article relates to our latest ongoing work which is due for completion in 2005/06. The work has been developed as a specific response to the award of an architectural residency by the Art and Architecture Partnership at Kielder Park, Northumbria, England. From the outset, it has not been a requirement of the residency that an outcome is identified early on. In fact, as I write, the outcome remains open. Presented with an extraordinary site and coinciding with a time of rapid change the work has begun by exploring a design process that is adaptable, indeterminate, and informed by site conditions. In October 2003, sixteen*(makers) were awarded an architecture residency by The Art and Architecture Programme at Kielder (AAPK) of Northumbria, UK. This organization is well known for commissioning works such as the ‘Belvedere’ by Softroom and the ‘Skyspace’ by James Turrell. Coordinated by Peter Sharp, AAPK consists of a number of large public bodies, including The Forestry Commission, Northumbrian Water and Tyndale District Council. Together they manage a land area of 62,000 ha’s centred on the UK’s largest reservoir and surrounded on all sides by one of Europe’s largest managed forests.
series ACADIA
email r.sheil@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/10/25 16:52

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