CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 548

_id ascaad2014_023
id ascaad2014_023
authors Al-Maiyah, Sura and Hisham Elkadi
year 2014
title Assessing the Use of Advanced Daylight Simulation Modelling Tools in Enhancing the Student Learning Experience
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 303-313
summary In architecture schools, where the ‘studio culture’ lies at the heart of students’ learning, taught courses, particularly technology ones, are often seen as secondary or supplementary units. Successful delivery of such courses, where students can act effectively, be motivated and engaged, is a rather demanding task requiring careful planning and the use of various teaching styles. A recent challenge that faces architecture education today, and subsequently influences the way technology courses are being designed, is the growing trend in practice towards environmentally responsive design and the need for graduates with new skills in sustainable construction and urban ecology (HEFCE’s consultation document, 2005). This article presents the role of innovative simulation modelling tools in the enhancement of the student learning experience and professional development. Reference is made to a teaching practice that has recently been applied at Portsmouth School of Architecture in the United Kingdom and piloted at Deakin University in Australia. The work focuses on the structure and delivery of one of the two main technology units in the second year architecture programme that underwent two main phases of revision during the academic years 2009/10 and 2010/11. The article examines the inclusion of advanced daylight simulation modelling tools in the unit programme, and measures the effectiveness of enhancing its delivery as a key component of the curriculum on the student learning experience. A main objective of the work was to explain whether or not the introduction of a simulation modelling component, and the later improvement of its integration with the course programme and assessment, has contributed to a better learning experience and level of engagement. Student feedback and the grade distribution pattern over the last three academic years were collected and analyzed. The analysis of student feedback on the revised modelling component showed a positive influence on the learning experience and level of satisfaction and engagement. An improvement in student performance was also recorded over the last two academic years and following the implementation of new assessment design.
series ASCAAD
email sura.almaiyah@port.ac.uk
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id caadria2005_b_3c_a
id caadria2005_b_3c_a
authors Christopher Lowry
year 2005
title Making Understanding: Research in the application of virtual environments in the teaching of architectural design and technology
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 93-101
summary This paper describes how the application of interactive three dimensional computer modelling enables students of architecture to gain a comprehensive insight into how buildings are made. An intimate exploration of what can be, in the student’s perception, a lacklustre subject area is revitalized through the use of virtual building models and introduces the student to the potentials of this medium in communicating their own design work. In addition the published case studies are navigated as one would a web site which is a familiar and comfortable format for the student. Original working drawings and specification provided by architects are utilised in generating detailed three dimensional virtual models of the complete building along with larger scale detail studies of particular building components. The models are then animated or transferred to VRML format for publication within interactive case studies. The case studies may be accessed via the department server for use by staff during lectures and seminars or informally by the individual student.
series CAADRIA
email c.lowry@dundee.ac.uk
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id cf2011_p051
id cf2011_p051
authors Cote, Pierre; Mohamed-Ahmed Ashraf, Tremblay Sebastien
year 2011
title A Quantitative Method to Compare the Impact of Design Mediums on the Architectural Ideation Process.
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 539-556.
summary If we compare the architectural design process to a black box system, we can assume that we now know quite well both inputs and outputs of the system. Indeed, everything about the early project either feasibility studies, programming, context integration, site analysis (urban, rural or natural), as well as the integration of participants in a collaborative process can all be considered to initiate and sustain the architectural design and ideation process. Similarly, outputs from that process are also, and to some extent, well known and identifiable. We are referring here, among others, to the project representations or even to the concrete building construction and its post-evaluation. But what about the black box itself that produces the ideation. This is the question that attempts to answer the research. Currently, very few research works linger to identify how the human brain accomplishes those tasks; how to identify the cognitive functions that are playing this role; to what extent they operate and complement each other, and among other things, whether there possibly a chain of causality between these functions. Therefore, this study proposes to define a model that reflects the activity of the black box based on the cognitive activity of the human brain. From an extensive literature review, two cognitive functions have been identified and are investigated to account for some of the complex cognitive activity that occurs during a design process, namely the mental workload and mental imagery. These two variables are measured quantitatively in the context of real design task. Essentially, the mental load is measured using a Bakan's test and the mental imagery with eyes tracking. The statistical software G-Power was used to identify the necessary subject number to obtain for significant variance and correlation result analysis. Thus, in the context of an exploratory research, to ensure effective sample of 0.25 and a statistical power of 0.80, 32 participants are needed. All these participants are students from 3rd, 4th or 5th grade in architecture. They are also very familiar with the architectural design process and the design mediums used, i.e., analog model, freehand drawing and CAD software, SketchUp. In three experimental sessions, participants were asked to design three different projects, namely, a bus shelter, a recycling station and a public toilet. These projects were selected and defined for their complexity similarity, taking into account the available time of 22 minutes, using all three mediums of design, and this in a randomly manner to avoid the order effect. To analyze the two cognitive functions (mental load and mental imagery), two instruments are used. Mental imagery is measured using eye movement tracking with monitoring and quantitative analysis of scan paths and the resulting number and duration of participant eye fixations (Johansson et al, 2005). The mental workload is measured using the performance of a modality hearing secondary task inspired by Bakan'sworks (Bakan et al.; 1963). Each of these three experimental sessions, lasting 90 minutes, was composed of two phases: 1. After calibrating the glasses for eye movement, the subject had to exercise freely for 3 minutes while wearing the glasses and headphones (Bakan task) to get use to the wearing hardware. Then, after reading the guidelines and criteria for the design project (± 5 minutes), he had 22 minutes to execute the design task on a drawing table allowing an upright posture. Once the task is completed, the subject had to take the NASA TLX Test, on the assessment of mental load (± 5 minutes) and a written post-experimental questionnaire on his impressions of the experiment (± 10 minutes). 2. After a break of 5-10 minutes, the participant answered a psychometric test, which is different for each session. These tests (± 20 minutes) are administered in the same order to each participant. Thus, in the first experimental session, the subject had to take the psychometric test from Ekstrom et al. (1978), on spatial performance (Factor-Referenced Cognitive Tests Kit). During the second session, the cognitive style is evaluated using Oltman's test (1971). Finally, in the third and final session, participant creativity is evaluated using Delis-Kaplan test (D-KEFS), Delis et al. (2001). Thus, this study will present the first results of quantitative measures to establish and validate the proposed model. Furthermore, the paper will also discuss the relevance of the proposed approach, considering that currently teaching of ideation in ours schools of architecture in North America is essentially done in a holistic manner through the architectural project.
keywords design, ideation process, mental workload, mental imagery, quantitative mesure
series CAAD Futures
email pierre.cote@arc.ulaval.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id cf2011_p135
id cf2011_p135
authors Chen Rui, Irene; Schnabel Marc Aurel
year 2011
title Multi-touch - the future of design interaction
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 557-572.
summary The next major revolution for design is to bring the natural user interaction into design activities. Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) brought a new approach that was more effective compared to their conventional predecessors. In recent years, Natural User Interfaces (NUI) have advanced user experiences and multi-touch and gesture technologies provide new opportunities for a variety of potential uses in design. Much attention has been paid to leverage in the design of interactive interfaces. The mouse input and desktop screen metaphors limit the information sharing for multiple users and also delayed the direct interaction for communication between each other. This paper proposes the innovative method by integrating game engine ‘Unity3D’ with multi-touch tangible interfaces. Unity3D provides a game development tool as part of its application package that has been designed to let users to focus on creating new games. However, it does not limit the usage of area to design additional game scenarios since the benefits of Unity3D is allowing users to build 3D environments with its customizable and easy to use editor, graphical pipelines to openGL (http://unity3d.com/, 2010 ). It creates Virtual Reality (VR) environments which can simulates places in the real world, as well as the virtual environments helping architects and designers to vividly represent their design concepts through 3D visualizations, and interactive media installations in a detailed multi-sensory experience. Stereoscopic displays advanced their spatial ability while solving issues to design e.g. urban spaces. The paper presents how a multi-touch tabletop can be used for these design collaboration and communication tasks. By using natural gestures, designers can now communicate and share their ideas by manipulating the same reference simultaneously using their own input simultaneously. Further studies showed that 3Dl forms are perceived and understood more readily through haptic and proprioceptive perception of tangible representations than through visual representation alone (Gillet et al, 2005). Based on the authors’ framework presented at the last CAADFutures, the benefits of integrating 3D visualization and tactile sensory can be illustrated in this platform (Chen and Wang, 2009), For instance, more than one designer can manipulate the 3D geometry objects on tabletop directly and can communicate successfully their ideas freely without having to waiting for the next person response. It made the work more effective which increases the overall efficiency. Designers can also collect the real-time data by any change they make instantly. The possibilities of Uniy3D make designing very flexible and fun, it is deeply engaging and expressive. Furthermore, the unity3D is revolutionizing the game development industry, its breakthrough development platform for creating highly interactive 3D content on the web (http://unity3d.com/ , 2010) or similar to the interface of modern multimedia devices such as the iPhone, therefore it allows the designers to work remotely in a collaborative way to integrate the design process by using the individual mobile devices while interacting design in a common platform. In design activities, people create an external representation of a domain, often of their own ideas and understanding. This platform helps learners to make their ideas concrete and explicit, and once externalized, subsequently they reflect upon their work how well it sits the real situation. The paper demonstrates how this tabletop innovatively replaces the typical desktop metaphor. In summary, the paper addresses two major issues through samples of collaborative design: firstly presenting aspects of learners’ interactions with physical objects, whereby tangible interfaces enables them constructing expressive representations passively (Marshall, 2007), while focussing on other tasks; and secondly showing how this novel design tool allows designers to actively create constructions that might not be possible with conventional media.
keywords Multi-touch tabletop, Tangible User Interface
series CAAD Futures
email rui.chen@sydney.edu.au
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ascaad2012_003
id ascaad2012_003
authors Elseragy, Ahmed
year 2012
title Creative Design Between Representation and Simulation
source CAAD | INNOVATION | PRACTICE [6th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2012 / ISBN 978-99958-2-063-3], Manama (Kingdom of Bahrain), 21-23 February 2012, pp. 11-12
summary Milestone figures of architecture all have their different views on what comes first, form or function. They also vary in their definitions of creativity. Apparently, creativity is very strongly related to ideas and how they can be generated. It is also correlated with the process of thinking and developing. Creative products, whether architectural or otherwise, and whether tangible or intangible, are originated from ‘good ideas’ (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). On one hand, not any idea, or any good idea, can be considered creative but, on the other hand, any creative result can be traced back to a good idea that initiated it in the beginning (Goldschmit and Tatsa, 2005). Creativity in literature, music and other forms of art is immeasurable and unbounded by constraints of physical reality. Musicians, painters and sculptors do not create within tight restrictions. They create what becomes their own mind’s intellectual property, and viewers or listeners are free to interpret these creations from whichever angle they choose. However, this is not the case with architects, whose creations and creative products are always bound with different physical constraints that may be related to the building location, social and cultural values related to the context, environmental performance and energy efficiency, and many more (Elnokaly, Elseragy and Alsaadani, 2008). Remarkably, over the last three decades computers have dominated in almost all areas of design, taking over the burden of repetitive tasks so that the designers and students can focus on the act of creation. Computer aided design has been used for a long time as a tool of drafting, however in this last decade this tool of representation is being replaced by simulation in different areas such as simulation of form, function and environment. Thus, the crafting of objects is moving towards the generation of forms and integrated systems through designer-authored computational processes. The emergence and adoption of computational technologies has significantly changed design and design education beyond the replacement of drawing boards with computers or pens and paper with computer-aided design (CAD) computer-aided engineering (CAE) applications. This paper highlights the influence of the evolving transformation from Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) and how this presents a profound shift in creative design thinking and education. Computational-based design and simulation represent new tools that encourage designers and artists to continue progression of novel modes of design thinking and creativity for the 21st century designers. Today computational design calls for new ideas that will transcend conventional boundaries and support creative insights through design and into design. However, it is still believed that in architecture education one should not replace the design process and creative thinking at early stages by software tools that shape both process and final product which may become a limitation for creative designs to adapt to the decisions and metaphors chosen by the simulation tool. This paper explores the development of Computer Aided Design (CAD) to Computational Design (CD) Tools and their impact on contemporary design education and creative design.
series ASCAAD
email ahmed.elseragy@aast.edu
more http://www.ascaad.org/conference/2012/papers/ascaad2012_003.pdf
last changed 2012/05/15 18:46

_id caadria2005_b_6a_a
id caadria2005_b_6a_a
authors José R. Kós, Tereza C. Malveira Araujo, José S. Cabral Filho, Eduardo Mascarenhas Santos, Marcelo Tramontano
year 2005
title Low-tech remote collaborative design studios
source CAADRIA 2005 [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] New Delhi (India) 28-30 April 2005, vol. 2, pp. 415-425
summary This paper aims to analyze Virtual Design Studios in big countries such as India, China and Brazil with great disparities between the schools of architecture and cultural diversity within their territories. Two VDS experiences with Brazilian institutions based the paper’s arguments. Limitation of equipment, bandwidth or available tools should not impede the organization of collaborative experiences. Instead, they should ground the strategies for the implementation of those experiences. Several free tools that are available on the Internet and which the students were used to, where chosen for the communication between the participants. Limited resources were not an obstacle to gain what we have considered the most important benefit of our experience: the exchange between students and faculty towards the recognition of the other participants’ different cultures, traditions and knowledge, allowing a better understanding of their own context.
series CAADRIA
email josekos@ufrj.br
last changed 2005/04/30 01:30

_id cdc2008_243
id cdc2008_243
authors Loukissas, Yanni
year 2008
title Keepers of the Geometry: Architects in a Culture of Simulation
source First International Conference on Critical Digital: What Matters(s)? - 18-19 April 2008, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Cambridge (USA), pp. 243-244
summary “Why do we have to change? We’ve been building buildings for years without CATIA?” Roger Norfleet, a practicing architect in his thirties poses this question to Tim Quix, a generation older and an expert in CATIA, a computer-aided design tool developed by Dassault Systemes in the early 1980’s for use by aerospace engineers. It is 2005 and CATIA has just come into use at Paul Morris Associates, the thirty-person architecture firm where Norfleet works; he is struggling with what it will mean for him, for his firm, for his profession. Computer-aided design is about creativity, but also about jurisdiction, about who controls the design process. In Architecture: The Story of Practice, Architectural theorist Dana Cuff writes that each generation of architects is educated to understand what constitutes a creative act and who in the system of their profession is empowered to use it and at what time. Creativity is socially constructed and Norfleet is coming of age as an architect in a time of technological but also social transition. He must come to terms with the increasingly complex computeraided design tools that have changed both creativity and the rules by which it can operate. In today’s practices, architects use computer-aided design software to produce threedimensional geometric models. Sometimes they use off-the-shelf commercial software like CATIA, sometimes they customize this software through plug-ins and macros, sometimes they work with software that they have themselves programmed. And yet, conforming to Larson’s ideas that they claim the higher ground by identifying with art and not with science, contemporary architects do not often use the term “simulation.” Rather, they have held onto traditional terms such as “modeling” to describe the buzz of new activity with digital technology. But whether or not they use the term, simulation is creating new architectural identities and transforming relationships among a range of design collaborators: masters and apprentices, students and teachers, technical experts and virtuoso programmers. These days, constructing an identity as an architect requires that one define oneself in relation to simulation. Case studies, primarily from two architectural firms, illustrate the transformation of traditional relationships, in particular that of master and apprentice, and the emergence of new roles, including a new professional identity, “keeper of the geometry,” defined by the fusion of person and machine. Like any profession, architecture may be seen as a system in flux. However, with their new roles and relationships, architects are learning that the fight for professional jurisdiction is increasingly for jurisdiction over simulation. Computer-aided design is changing professional patterns of production in architecture, the very way in which professionals compete with each other by making new claims to knowledge. Even today, employees at Paul Morris squabble about the role that simulation software should play in the office. Among other things, they fight about the role it should play in promotion and firm hierarchy. They bicker about the selection of new simulation software, knowing that choosing software implies greater power for those who are expert in it. Architects and their collaborators are in a continual struggle to define the creative roles that can bring them professional acceptance and greater control over design. New technologies for computer-aided design do not change this reality, they become players in it.
email yanni@mit.edu
last changed 2009/01/07 07:05

_id 2005_279
id 2005_279
authors Walz, Steffen P., Schoch, Odilo, Ochsendorf, Mathias and Spindler, Torsten
year 2005
title Serious Fun: Pervasive game design as a CAAD teaching and research method
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 279-286
summary Today and in the future, architectural students must be prepared for designing both physical and adaptive, computer-integrated spaces. The question is: How do we easily and effectively convey architecturally relevant theories and practices of pervasive computing in teaching? In this paper, we present a didactic model that has proved to be a possible answer. During a semester long design class, we supervised an interdisciplinary group of architecture and computer science students who teamworked on an early so called serious pervasive game prototype, entitled “ETHGame”. The class culminated in a two week compact phase and a presentation before ETH representatives involved in e-learning projects. The resulting interactive prototype takes advantage of our campus’s extensive wireless local area network infrastructure, allowing for user positioning and location based learning, servicing, and peer-to-peer communication. The game mutates the whole of the ETH Zurich campus into a knowledge space, issuing position dependent and position relevant questions to players. The ETHGame forces participants to engage with a given space in the form of a quiz and rewards them for collaborating both face-to-face and facelessly. The game helps them build a collective academic and space aware identity whilst being immersed in a sentient environment. Thus, in this paper we are introducing serious pervasive game design as a novel design research and teaching paradigm for CAAD, as well as a e-learning design strategy.
keywords Pervasive Computing; Pervasive Game Design; Serious Games; LocationBased Learning; Knowledge Space
series eCAADe
email spindler@hbt.arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2005_1_35_162
id cf2005_1_35_162
authors PALMON Orit, OXMAN Rivka, SHAHAR Meir and WEISS Patrice L.
year 2005
title Virtual Environments in Design and Evaluation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2005 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-3460-1] Vienna (Austria) 20–22 June 2005, pp. 145-154
summary One of the major challenges facing the professionals involved in the home modification process is to succeed in adapting the environments in a way that enables an optimal fit between the individual and the setting in which he or she operates. The challenge originates primarily from the fundamental characteristic of design - one can see and test the final result of home modifications only after they have been completed. The goal of this study was to address this problem by developing and evaluating an interactive living environments model, HabiTest, which will facilitate the planning, design and assessment of optimal home and work settings for people with physical disabilities. This paper describes the HabiTest tool, an interactive model that has been implemented via an immersive virtual reality system which displays three-dimensional renderings of specific environments, and which responds to user-driven manipulations such as navigation within the environment and alteration of its design. Initial results of a usability evaluation of this interactive environment by users are described.
keywords accessibility, environmental-modifications, 3D simulation, barrier-free design
series CAAD Futures
email rivkao@tx.technion.ac.il
last changed 2006/11/07 06:27

_id sigradi2006_e034d
id sigradi2006_e034d
authors Ryan, Rachel and Donn, Michael
year 2006
title A 3D, interactive, multilayered, web-enabled model as a tool for multiple sets of end user groups: A case study and end user analysis
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 392-396
summary This research undertakes a case study involving focus groups of potential end users, to identify how a successful digital tool could be created using new and emerging technologies, to accommodate the multiple needs of these end users. 2005 saw the completion of a research paper, which proposed that a single, 3 dimensional digital model of a city forming a core for many different information systems, is a better approach to the needs of the city than many individual models optimised for each information system. The case for the single 3D model was evaluated through the research, development, delivery and analysis of a prototype 3 Dimensional model of Wellington City, New Zealand, presenting different ‘views’ of information in Wellington: a rendered visualisation in an animated “walkthrough”; the impact of planning constraints on daylight; interactive “plots” of property values. The development and delivery of the prototype model was analysed in regards to how complex, costly and time consuming it may be to exploit one base model for several purposes; and also therefore how beneficial, affordable and potentially successful a single model may be. The prototype model was created to test the idea, and therefore provided conclusions based on a limited feasibility analysis - with four potential information layers modelled and two potential delivery methods tested. The prototype model and user analysis results were presented in a research report that suggested further research and development of a single model could be very beneficial: Positive feedback from potential end users and data providers, and examples of potential data mining opportunities forming the basis of the need for continued research. 2006 sees the research continue as an 18 month research project in conjunction with an industry partner, Terralink International, (http://www.terralink.co.nz/). Terralink International Limited provides GIS and mapping solutions which according to their web site: “enable better business management.” The company maintains a national resource of “imagery, cartography, and spatial databases” and provides consultancy services linking these to company databases through GIS systems. The research investigates the potential for 3 dimensional, interactive, multilayered models to enhance delivery of information to multiple end user groups. The research method uses functional prototypes in end-user focus group workshops. These workshops, consisting of a combination of presentations, hands on interactive examples, group discussions, and individual feedback surveys, aim to establish how a tool might best be developed to communicate to a wide range of end users. The means of delivery whether a stand alone tool or web-based is a key element of the user group workshop assessment process. Note: The submission of the prototype tool (via video or interactive media) would greatly increase the effectiveness of the research presentation. Ability to include such media would be greatly appreciated.
keywords multilayered; 3D; end users; interactive; web-enabled
series SIGRADI
email Rachel.A.Ryan@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id 6547
id 6547
authors Coates P, Derix C, Lau T, Parvin T and Puusepp R
year 2005
title Topological Approximations for Spatial Representations
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2005
summary Marshall McLuhan once said in his book Understanding Media that ‘Environments are invisible. Their ground rules evade easy perception.’ Evasive perception leads to fuzzy representations as shown through Kevin Lynch’s mental maps and the Situationists’ psycho-geographies. Eventually, spatial representations have to be described through abstractions based on some embedded rules of environmental interaction. These rules and methods of abstraction serve to understand cognition of space. The Centre for Evolutionary Computing in Architecture (CECA) at the University of East London has focused for the last 5 years on methods of cognitive spatial descriptions, based largely on either behavioural patterns or topological machines. The former being agent based, the latter neural network based. This year’s selection of student work constitutes a combination of cognitive agents + perceptive networks, and comprises three theses.
keywords spatial cognition, neural networks, spatial perception, agent modelling
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 19:09

_id bc88
id bc88
authors Coates P, Derix C, Lau T, Parvin T and Puusepp R
year 2005
title Topological Approximations for Spatial Representations
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2005
summary Marshall McLuhan once said in his book Understanding Media that ‘Environments are invisible. Their ground rules evade easy perception.’ Evasive perception leads to fuzzy representations as shown through Kevin Lynch’s mental maps and the Situationists’ psycho-geographies. Eventually, spatial representations have to be described through abstractions based on some embedded rules of environmental interaction. These rules and methods of abstraction serve to understand cognition of space. The Centre for Evolutionary Computing in Architecture (CECA) at the University of East London has focused for the last 5 years on methods of cognitive spatial descriptions, based largely on either behavioural patterns or topological machines. The former being agent based, the latter neural network based. This year’s selection of student work constitutes a combination of cognitive agents + perceptive networks, and comprises three theses.
keywords spatial cognition, neural networks, spatial perception, agent modelling
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 16:46

_id 2005_037
id 2005_037
authors Côté, Pierre, Léglise, Michel and Estévez, Daniel
year 2005
title Virtual Architecture as Representation for Creative Design Process - Through a Collaborative eDesign Studio
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 37-45
summary Using Virtual Architecture (VA) as a general scheme for representations to sustain the reflection activities involved in the design process can help students to initiate creative design ideas. Because of its implicit abstract nature, VA can be used, to represent original ideas or processes, or well-known architectural theories to articulate design ideas. Furthermore, VA as a mean of expression, turn out to be a source of inspiration for students who perceive it as medium with very few limits with which to develop, explore and express their design intuitions. A recent collaborative edesign studio experience is reported to illustrate the benefit observed. Using three examples out of ten student projects, we show how designs and design process have been characterized by those virtual representations. In fall semester 2004, the edesign studio took place between the Schools of Architecture of Toulouse and Université Laval in Québec. VA was both an academic and a studio topic at Laval while the other school students had a traditional design task to tackle, namely the rehabilitation of Chapou University Residences for students in Toulouse. Students from both schools composed each edesign team. In addition, three common architectural themes were web-documented and introduced to both classes: room, as defined by Louis Kahn: “a space which knows what it wants to be is a room”; color, as an architectural medium in dialectic with structure; and body-space relationships, as articulated by Gilles Deleuze and its projection to cyberspace. From the edesign studio results, we are arguing that virtual architecture should be looked at not only as new domain to be investigated by architects and taught in academic studios but also as a new medium of design to develop and explore design intuitions through virtual representations.
keywords Virtual Architecture; Virtual Representations; Medium; eDesign; Design by Collaboration
series eCAADe
email pierre.cote@arc.ulaval.ca
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 2005_547
id 2005_547
authors Elger, Dietrich and Russell, Peter
year 2005
title Crisis? What Crisis?
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 547-556
summary The paper describes the current situation concerning career opportunities in the field of architecture in developed western countries. Several aspects that are almost universal mark this situation. Firstly, there are too many architects chasing traditional work in competition with structural (civil) engineers. This is not surprising in consideration of the fact, that the architectural education industry produces far too many new architects for the economy to absorb. In Germany, the number is almost three times too many. Secondly, the needs of the building industry have changed over the past twenty years so that the skills that architects want to offer are not necessarily those that are sought. Lastly, the constant specialisation of work has continued unabated. Architects, as generalists, have idly watched their areas of expertise be usurped from neighbouring fields like civil and structural engineering The reasons for this crisis are manifold. In the schools of architecture, the discussions often deal with form or formal arguments, which, in fact, have little or no relevance to the building industry. This position was tenable so long as the clients were willing to accept formal arguments in order to receive buildings of high quality or current social relevance (i.e. current architectural fashion). With the dual aspects of globalisation and a shift to maintaining building stocks rather than producing new buildings, the tolerance for “architectural” discussions has been reduced even further. Indeed, the monetary pressures overwhelm almost all other aspects, including so-called green issues. What is more, most of the monetary issues are time based. Time represents, perhaps, the largest pressure in any current planning project. The clients expect expedient, accurate and inexpensive solutions. If architects are not able to produce these, the clients will (and do) go elsewhere. The authors argue that there remain serious problems to be solved for architects and the metier in general. Ever cheaper, ever faster and ever encompassing information technologies offer the architectural community a chance to turn recent trends on their head. By using information technologies to their full potential, architects can reassert themselves as the coordinators of building information and processes. Simply put, this means less photorealistic rendering and more databases, which may be unappealing for those architects who have positioned themselves as “designers” and are able to talk long on form, but short on cost or logistics. Nonetheless, the situation is not lost, so long as architects are able to recognise what is desired from the point of view of the client and what is desired from the point of view of the architect. It is not a question of one or the other. Architects must be able to offer innovative design solutions that not only address the fiscal, legal and programmatic constraints, but also push the boundaries at to the position of architecture in the community at large. For educators, it must be made clear that the real potential architects possess is their encompassing knowledge of the building process including their expertise concerning questions of architectural form, function, history and art. Precisely while they are generalists are architects invaluable in a sea of specialists. The biggest hurdle to asserting this in the past has been the control of the vast amounts of information. This is no longer a problem and also no longer an excuse. In the education of architects, it must be made clear that their role dictates sovereignty over architectural information. Architectural Information Management is a necessary skill alongside the more traditional architectural skills. A brief outlook as to how this might come about is detailed in the paper. The authors propose didactic steps to achieve this. Primarily, the education of computer supported planning should not simply end with a series of lectures or seminars, but culminate in integrated Design Studios (which including Design-Build scenarios).
keywords Architectural Information Mangement, Computer Supported Design Studios, CSCW
series eCAADe
email dietrich.elger@ifib.uni-karlsruhe.de
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id cf2011_p027
id cf2011_p027
authors Herssens, Jasmien; Heylighen Ann
year 2011
title A Framework of Haptic Design Parameters for Architects: Sensory Paradox Between Content and Representation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 685-700.
summary Architects—like other designers—tend to think, know and work in a visual way. In design research, this way of knowing and working is highly valued as paramount to design expertise (Cross 1982, 2006). In case of architecture, however, it is not only a particular strength, but may as well be regarded as a serious weakness. The absence of non-visual features in traditional architectural spatial representations indicates how these are disregarded as important elements in conceiving space (Dischinger 2006). This bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses—in the way architecture is conceived, taught and critiqued—results in a disappearance of sensory qualities (Pallasmaa 2005). Nevertheless, if architects design with more attention to non visual senses, they are able to contribute to more inclusive environments. Indeed if an environment offers a range of sensory triggers, people with different sensory capacities are able to navigate and enjoy it. Rather than implementing as many sensory triggers as possible, the intention is to make buildings and spaces accessible and enjoyable for more people, in line with the objective of inclusive design (Clarkson et al. 2007), also called Design for All or Universal Design (Ostroff 2001). Within this overall objective, the aim of our study is to develop haptic design parameters that support architects during design in paying more attention to the role of haptics, i.e. the sense of touch, in the built environment by informing them about the haptic implications of their design decisions. In the context of our study, haptic design parameters are defined as variables that can be decided upon by designers throughout the design process, and the value of which determines the haptic characteristics of the resulting design. These characteristics are based on the expertise of people who are congenitally blind, as they are more attentive to non visual information, and of professional caregivers working with them. The parameters do not intend to be prescriptive, nor to impose a particular method. Instead they seek to facilitate a more inclusive design attitude by informing designers and helping them to think differently. As the insights from the empirical studies with people born blind and caregivers have been reported elsewhere (Authors 2010), this paper starts by outlining the haptic design parameters resulting from them. Following the classification of haptics into active, dynamic and passive touch, the built environment unfolds into surfaces that can act as “movement”, “guiding” and/or “rest” plane. Furthermore design techniques are suggested to check the haptic qualities during the design process. Subsequently, the paper reports on a focus group interview/workshop with professional architects to assess the usability of the haptic design parameters for design practice. The architects were then asked to try out the parameters in the context of a concrete design project. The reactions suggest that the participating architects immediately picked up the underlying idea of the parameters, and recognized their relevance in relation to the design project at stake, but that their representation confronts us with a sensory paradox: although the parameters question the impact of the visual in architectural design, they are meant to be used by designers, who are used to think, know and work in a visual way.
keywords blindness, design parameters, haptics, inclusive design, vision
series CAAD Futures
email jherssens@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id sigradi2005_362
id sigradi2005_362
authors Jemtrud, Michael; Konstantin Privalov
year 2005
title “User Controlled LightPath” Enabled Participatory Design Studio: first steps
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 362-368
summary The technical scheme and creative scenario of a new media-based “User Controlled Lightpath Provisioning” (UCLP) enabled “Participatory Design Studio” will be elaborated. This practical collaborative work environment model represents a technologically robust and sophisticated means of communication and sharing of resources that stands to radically transform design processes. UCLP technology is a fibre based software solution designed to enable end-users to create their own discipline or application-specific IP network whose topology and architecture is optimized for their particular applications needs and requirements. A distinction between “task-based collaboration” found in conventional “Virtual Design Studios” and the heterogeneous nature of the “participatory” work environment will be made. UCLP technology provides a secure, large bandwidth, low latency network that can accommodate up to 10Gbps. This capability creates an environment which is not dependent upon traditional low bandwidth requirements for communication, visualization, and production therefore allowing a greater range of desired tools for creative activity.
series SIGRADI
email michael_jemtrud@carleton.ca
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id b678
id b678
authors Loemker, Thorsten Michael
year 2008
title Designing with machines
source Proceedings of the Dresden International Symposium of Architecture 2005, Technische Universitaet Dresden, P. 225-229
summary In 1845 Edgar Allan Poe wrote the poem “The Raven”. An act full of poetry, love, passion, mourning, melancholia and death. In his essay “The Theory of Composition” which was published in 1846 Poe proved that the poem is based on an accurate mathematical description. Not only in literature are structures present that are based on mathematics. In the work of famous musicians, artists or architects like Bach, Escher or Palladio it is evident that the beauty and clarity of their work as well as its traceability has often been reached through the use of intrinsic mathematic coherences. If suchlike structures could be described within architecture, their mathematical abstraction could supplement “The Theory of Composition” of a building. This research focuses on a basic approach to describe principles in architectural layout planning in the form of mathematical rules that will be executed by the use of a computer. Provided that “design” is in principle a combinatorial problem, i.e. a constraint-based search for an overall optimal solution of a design problem, an exemplary method will be described to solve those problems. Mathematical and syntactical difficulties that arise from the attempt to extract rules that relate to the process of building design will be pointed out. As a consequence for teachings it will be demonstrated which competences are needed in order to aid designing with machines.
series other
type normal paper
email thorsten.loemker@tu-dresden.de
last changed 2008/10/13 12:20

_id 2005_723
id 2005_723
authors Norman, Richard
year 2005
title Digital Color as a Paradigm for 3D Modeling
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 723-728
summary Johannes Itten wrote in the 1920’s that seven distinct possibilities exist for the contrast of color: “Each (is) unique in character and artistic value, in visual, expressive and symbolic effect...together these constitute the fundamental resource of color design” Itten (1973). In either the digital world or in the world of painting, there has never been a more profound statement about color arrangement. Of Itten’s seven contrasts, the contrast of hue, value, and saturation, taken together have become a standard description of digital color today. As most projects reach the final stage of presentation, color selection becomes a possible paradigm for their development. It is customary to leave the selection of color to the end of a project — if time permits, then the colors are changed to make the project “appear better”, otherwise the selection of color is put in a pile of “good intentions” — overlooked. Proposed here is an alternative, a method of selecting color “up front”. Student projects are used to illustrate just how a building, or even a group of buildings may be better illustrated if one bases a presentation on a successful and understood work of art. The use of a painting as a source of color is proposed as a specific way of working. Most libraries contain an abundance of examples. The web, too, has many paintings; painters generally have more experience at putting colors together than architects and usually do not mind if their color ideas are borrowed, Done right, the result can be a happy merger of idea, emotion, and color, providing another paradigm for studying digital modeling.
keywords Color ; Painting ; Itten ; Design
series eCAADe
email normafs@auburn.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2005_453
id sigradi2005_453
authors Ribeiro, Fabíola M.; Rejane Spitz
year 2005
title Archigram: an analogical way of looking at the digital
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 453-458
summary In this article we investigate how the Archigram Group used computer logics and concepts as inspiration for architectural projects without ever actually using computers. By developing principles as varied and as pop as expendable architecture, customization, individualism, consumerism and mutation, the architects managed to work with concepts like software architecture, space of flux and dematerialization. When compared to the writings of contemporary theorists and designers of computer-mediated architecture, we see that the Archigram Group has been able to forecast much of the current concerns of the architecture that deal with digital and virtual spaces. Without literally digitalizing their projects or spaces, they have been able to achieve information-based architectural design. [Full paper in Portuguese]
series SIGRADI
email xxfabixx@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:58

_id sigradi2005_350
id sigradi2005_350
authors San Martín, Patricia; Sergio Bertozzi
year 2005
title “Otra Andria” e-learning environment for the architectural designing workshop
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 350-354
summary This work describes results obtained from a test over an experimental prototype “Otra Andria” (OA1) designed by the investigation team of “Obra Abierta: Over the construction of an investigating and learning system in virtual environments”. OA1 is a basic tool. It show us: three simultaneous screens with editing tool bars, an integrated chat for publication and discussion, images and texts, all this in synchronized time. Tools are simultaneously accessible from all boards by the teacher, the students or between pupils. There is a web log, a personal web, and an activities’ organization space for the professors. This experience was helpful to understand the actual needs for virtual environment applications as well as e-learning problems in such cases where the know-how is not available to every attendant to the course. That means we must begin working on hyper-medial language diffusion among all teachers who want to use the ICT in all its actual potentiality. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email sanmartin@ifir.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

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